suffrage

In the run-up to the Californian Antiquarian Book Fair in Pasadena in February, an innovative social media campaign celebrating the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage has been launched. Since its debut on October 30 with nineteenth-century activist Lucretia Mott, the CA Book Fair has been posting brief, daily profiles of women who made history (#

A man may work from sun to sun, but a woman’s work is never done, as the old adage goes. Pity, then, the collector of women’s work, whose subject is virtually uncontainable, not to mention largely obscured. But Lisa Unger Baskin has persisted and prevailed at it over the past 45 years, ultimately placing her massive collection at Duke University’s Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History

Handwritten letters, speeches, photographs and scrapbooks, created by American suffragists who persisted for more than 70 years to win voting rights for women, will be featured in a new exhibition at the Library of Congress. “Shall Not Be Denied: Women Fight for the Vote,” opening June 4, will tell