early printed books

Amsterdam — The first book was printed in Italy in 1465, only ten years after the Gutenberg Bible. It is natural then, that there are many fine, early volumes available from Italy. As Fine Books & Collections readers will be aware, an Incunabula is a book, broadside or pamphlet printed before 1501. For many collectors, these are the pinnacle of their collections, being the

Amsterdam — Nearly every book collector loves an early text.  This early French text, which explains the meaning and symbolism of the clothing a priest wears, is particularly fascinating to all those interested in the medieval church or the symbolism of garments. It is hard to find this document as a complete text, particularly in such good condition. The Latin can still be easily read today

Christophe Plantin, born 500 years ago this May, was one of the most important printer-publishers of his time. To honor the occasion, Antwerp’s Plantin-Moretus Museum, a UNESCO World Heritage Site, has planned a series of festive projects and exhibitions to run through 2020.

Designers and makers of every stripe will be interested in the

New York — Swann Galleries’ Thursday, October 24 sale of Early Printed, Medical, Scientific & Travel Books saw a full auction room and active bidding on the internet and phones with particular interest in works

Rolling off the same printing press as Johannes Gutenberg’s celebrated production of 1455, this 1462 two-volume Biblia latina, published in Mainz by Gutenberg’s direct successors (and former associates), Johannes Fust and Peter Schöffer, is headed to auction in Hamburg later this month, where

New York — Early Printed, Travel, Scientific & Medical Books comes to Swann Galleries on Thursday, October 24, featuring notable works on science, a standout selection of incunabula, and an extensive offering of

London — While autumn is the time to go back to school, Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books returns to Frieze Masters this autumn (October 3-6 2019) with an exquisite selection of museum quality, medieval and Renaissance illuminated manuscripts, miniatures, and early printed books. This year’s special

Los Angeles – The cosmos—full of shining stars and orbiting planets—inspired works of art and literature throughout the Middle Ages (about 500-1500). Awe-inspiring cosmic phenomena were thought to inform every aspect of a person’s physical, mental, and spiritual well-being, provoking students of medicine, philosophy, and religion carefully to track the progress of the twelve signs of the