book theft

Well, the verdict is in: antiquarian bookseller John Schulman of Caliban Book Shop and former Carnegie Library archivist Gregory Priore were given light sentences for stealing about 300 rare books from Pittsburgh’s Carnegie

For many of us, the past three months of lockdown has meant extra time for reading. With no social or cultural events to attend, the books have beckoned. Luckily, a great selection of books about books were in the works for late spring and early summer publication. Here are the ones that I’ve been enjoying.     

Leading our nonfiction list is, of course, longtime FB&C

Floyd-Vinland.JPGMuch like the Voynich Manuscript, the purportedly

In an effort to aid in the recovery of materials missing as a result of the Carnegie Library theft, the ABAA requests the assistance of the public in bringing its attention to the list of items believed stolen. A downloadable pdf of same can be found here:

<https://www.abaa.org/blog/post/carnegie-library-theft>

With all the news about book theft of late (in Pittsburgh; and

It's always an enlightening end-of-year undertaking to dig into the data and ascertain which stories were the most popular with our online readers. News items? Auction previews? Interviews with book world folks? Book reviews? Turns out, it's a little bit of everything. Here's the rundown:

#1

New York—June 17 2015—Herrick, Feinstein LLP's Art Law Group announced today that with its assistance, and working with the United States Government, its client, The Royal Library of Sweden, has recovered two rare books stolen along with dozens of other volumes over ten years ago.  One book, dating from 1638, is a manual for constructing scenes and machines for the theater published by

On June 26, the British Library will host "The Written Heritage of Mankind in Peril: Theft, Retrieval, Sale and Restitution of rare books, maps and manuscripts," a conference focused on the illegal trading of priceless cultural materials. The full-day seminar, open to dealers, librarians, collectors, auction house staff, security experts, and interested others, may be a response in part to the