Rebecca Rego Barry

The British Library announced earlier this week its acquisition of the archive of the UK magazine, Granta. The much-lauded literary journal is marking the 40th anniversary of its relaunch this year.  

Comprised of about three hundred boxes of material, the Granta archive features correspondence from many significant contemporary authors, including Margaret Atwood, Ian McEwan, Kazuo Ishiguro, and Zadie Smith. Deeper in the collection are letters from Raymond Carver, Susan Sontag, and Martha Gellhorn.

Five years ago, Joseph Makkos made a splash with an essay in the Atlantic about how he acquired a sizable collection of vintage New Orleans newspapers for free through a Craigslist ad. He created a company called NOLA DNA, arranged for storage of the collection (kept by the previous owner in 30,000 airtight tubes), and began working on how best to save and showcase its content.

Facebook is hardly good for anything anymore, but one of its finer applications is allowing a global audience of book lovers to share information and images in a handful of terrific rare book-related groups.

Many people will recognize Desmond Morris as the author of The Naked Ape (1967). As a zoologist and the curator of mammals at the London Zoo, Morris popularized evolution for a mid-century audience. Still contentious at the time, his book became one of eleven titles named in a 1982 U.S. Supreme Court case related to book banning and First Amendment rights, alongside Kurt Vonnegut’s Slaughterhouse-Five and Richard Wright’s Black Boy.  

Last month, the University of Iowa (UI) Libraries Special Collections announced that it has become the new home of the renowned Sackner Archive of Visual and Concrete Poetry. Founded by Miami Beach-based collectors, Dr. Marvin Sackner and his wife, the late Ruth Sackner, the Sackner Archive currently holds the largest collection of concrete and visual poetry in the world.