96-PhilipKDick copy.jpgNew York—Swann Galleries’ auction of 19th & 20th Century Literature on Tuesday, November 14 offered a veritable library of scarce first editions and inscriptions by authors from the last two centuries. More than two thirds of the sale was devoted to twentieth-century literature, with myriad genres represented among the highlights.

Topping the sale was the deluxe centenary limited edition set of 18 volumes comprising the works of Ian Fleming, the creator of James Bond. Each tome is ensconced in a custom leather binding reflecting its contents: Casino Royale features playing cards, while Octopussy is adorned with undulating tentacles. The set, celebrating what would have been Fleming’s one-hundredth birthday, includes a selection of the author’s travel writings, previously unpublished stories and a copy of Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang. One of 26 lettered sets published in 2008, the work reached $30,000, tying the previous auction record.

Works by William Faulkner performed well, selling 100% of the lots offered. An association copy of the first edition of his first book, The Marble Faun, 1924, signed and inscribed by Faulkner and his mentor Phil Stone to Dorothy Wilcox, was especially important because its inscription was specifically referenced in Joseph Blotner’s Faulkner: A Biography, 1974 ($22,500).

An auction record was established for Het Achterhuis, known in English as The Diary of Anne Frank. The true first edition of the iconic work, in the exceedingly rare unrestored dust jacket showing the author’s name in yellow rather than blue, sold to a collector for $18,200.

Each of the four works by Philip K. Dick offered found buyers, with three of those surpassing their previous auction records. The cover lot for the sale, a signed first edition of World of Chance, 1956, reached $7,250, a record for the work, above a high estimate of $4,000. The stand-out lot was the first edition of The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch, 1965, inscribed by Dick: it far exceeded its high estimate of $3,000, finally selling for $16,250, a record for the work.

The auction debut of The Intelligent Investor, by Benjamin Graham, was well-received: financiers competed for the first printing of the first edition, in the original dust jacket, achieving $8,750, over a high estimate of $6,000.

John D. Larson, Specialist of 19th & 20th Century Literature at Swann Galleries, said of the sale: “The high sell-through rate and the high prices achieved once again demonstrate that the top-quality material will find enthused bidders. As always, condition is paramount, especially for books published after 1800.”

The next auction of 19th & 20th Century Literature at Swann Galleries will be held May 15, 2018. The house is currently accepting quality consignments.

Image: Lot 96: Philip K. Dick, The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch, first edition, inscribed, Garden City, 1965. Sold November 14, 2017 for $16,250, a record for the work. (Pre-sale estimate: $2,000 to $3,000).

Quincy Adams copy.jpgDallas, Texas--A rare and unusual photo of one of the first U.S. presidents is expected to sell for $50,000 or more when an image of President John Quincy Adams taken in 1846  crosses the block in Heritage Auctions’ Dec. 2 Americana & Political Auction in Dallas, Texas.

“Quincy Adams was the first American president to be photographed,” Heritage Director of Americana Auctions Tom Slater said, “and this newly-discovered example is one of the earliest known presidential photographs.

The sixth-plate daguerreotype was taken at the Washington, D.C. Studio of John Plumbe Feb. 14, 1846, according to Adams’ diary entry. The location of this image was unknown until it was recently discovered in an antiques market in Paris.

Plumbe was one of the most prominent photographers of the day, and apparently had complete approval from Adams, who sat for him on four different occasions.

This image is housed in a case stamped on the brass mat with Plumbe’s name and lined with paper reading “Manufactured at the Plumbe National Daguerrian Depot/New York.” The image is accompanied by a detailed letter of authentication by William F. Stapp, who served as the Curator of Photographs at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Portrait Gallery from 1976-91.

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, London, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

Codez Quet.jpgThe Codex Qutzalecatzin represents one of the most important indigenous manuscripts from the earliest history of America to become available in the last century.

The Library of Congress has acquired the Codex Quetzalecatzin, one of the very few Mesoamerican manuscripts to survive from the 16th century. After being in private collections for more than 100 years, the codex has been digitally preserved and made available online for the first time to the general public at loc.gov/resource/g4701g.ct009133/.

The codex, also known as the Mapa de Ecatepec-Huitziltepec, represents one of the most important indigenous manuscripts from the earliest history of America to become available in the last century. Only few examples of manuscripts of this kind have endured the ravages of time.

While digitizing the codex at the Library, the Librarian stated: “The acquisition of the map, because of its relevance to the early history of the European contact with the indigenous people of America, makes an important addition to the early American treasures at the Library of Congress, including the Oztoticpac Lands Map and the Huexotzinco Codex. It’s a rare document of world history and American history in general.”

The manuscript dates from 1593, a time when many cartographic histories were being produced as part of a Spanish royal investigation into the human and community resources in the American colonies. The Codex Quetzalecatzin serves as an example of these maps that were largely made by indigenous painters and scribes.

As with many Nahua, indigenous group, manuscript maps of the period, the Codex Quetzalecatzin depicts the local community at an important point in its history and the iconography that makes up the map reflects some Spanish influence.

“The codex shows graphically the kinds of cultural interactions taking place at an important moment in American history,” said John Hessler, curator of the Jay I. Kislak Collection for the archaeology of the early Americas of the Library of Congress. “In a sense, we see the birth of what would be the start of what we would come to know as the Americas.”

Hessler added: “The codex relates to the extent of land ownership and properties of the family line known as “de Leon,” most of the members of which are portrayed on the manuscript. With Aztec stylized graphics, the map illustrates the family’s genealogy and its descent from Quetzalecatzin, who in 1480 was the major political leader of the region. It also shows churches, some Spanish place names and images suggesting a community adapting to Spanish law and rule.”

In the codex, certain features that point to indigenous authorship include pre-Hispanic stylistics, such as symbols for rivers, roads and pathways, and hieroglyphic writing. The marginal notations with alphabetic writing utilizing the Latin alphabet and the names of some of the indigenous elites, such as “don Alonso” and “don Matheo,” are clues to its colonial era composition. This is evidence that some indigenous people enjoyed the Spanish title “don” and had been baptized with Christian names.

The codex has a great provenance. The Library acquired the manuscript from the collections of Charles Ratton and Guy Ladriere in France. From previous owners like William Randolph Hearst, who also owned the Jefferson Bible, to the first Viscount Cowdray, the codex can be traced all the way into the 19th century.

The manuscript belongs to a larger group of interrelated pictographic documents, called “Pinome Group,” from northern Oaxaca and Southern Puebla in Mexico. The codices include the Tecamachalco Canvas, Cuevas Codices and Fragmented Codex, which together show the extent, the people and history of the region.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States - and extensive materials from around the world - both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office.  Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

Dracula Poster.jpgDallas, Texas - One of just two surviving movie posters for the 1931 horror classic Dracula set a world record for the most valuable movie poster ever sold at auction when it brought $525,800 Saturday, Nov. 18, in a public auction held live and online by Heritage Auctions.

The poster surpassed the previous auction record of $478,000 which was also set (twice) by Heritage Auctions. Heritage had just sold the only known surviving Italian issue movie poster from 1946 for Casablanca in July 2017, which matched their own previous world record from November 2014 for an only-known 1927 copy of the poster for London After Midnight.

This particular poster style from Dracula depicts the menacing visage of actor Bela Lugosi, who transformed the character into the now-famous Universal Monster. Recently discovered in the San Diego, California, collection of a noted film historian, collectors and experts consider it one of the most desirable horror movie posters ever produced.

The family of its longtime owner, Lt. Col. George J. Mitchell, Jr., an Associate Member of the American Society of Cinematographers, placed the poster up for auction. Mitchell had owned the poster since the 1950s.

“The reason my dad purchased the poster is because he loved horror films. He was drawn to the Bela Lugosi poster because it brought back childhood memories of seeing the film when it was first released,” Mitchell’s son, Arthur Mitchell said. “He remembered going to the theater … and remembered that there was an ambulance stationed in the lobby, in case anyone was so scared they needed medical attention.”

The elder Mitchell was a longtime cinematographer and photographer, who after World War II and a 20-year career in the U.S. Army, started a small film production company in San Diego, and did video work for AFL and NFL Films, the San Diego Zoo and training films for assorted branches of the military.

“It is a matter of opinion, but this poster probably is the most beautiful of all of the styles,” Heritage Auctions Vintage Posters Director Grey Smith said, “and one of only two styles that pictures Bela Lugosi in realistic terms or a faithful rendering - the other is a photographic image.”

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, London, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

LOBEL.jpgAmherst, MA--The Caldecott Medal, an annual award bestowed upon "the most distinguished American picture book for children," is one of the most prestigious prizes in children's literature. Next month, The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art will celebrate the 80th anniversary of the distinguished award in the exhibition Eighty Years of Caldecott Books, on view December 12, 2017 through May 13, 2018.

First conferred in 1938, the Caldecott Medal is named in honor of nineteenth-century British illustrator Randolph Caldecott, acknowledged as the father of the modern picture book for his lively drawing style and sense of humor. Each year the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC)--a division of the American Library Association--selects the fifteen members that form the Caldecott committee. This group reads, critiques, and discusses hundreds of picture books before voting on a winner.

Eighty Years of Caldecott Books presents a chronological look at the winning titles from 1938 to the present. It also represents The Carle's first book-focused exhibition. "While we always have books available for visitors to read in our galleries, the books in this exhibition are the art objects themselves. As first editions, they are valuable historical artifacts," says Ellen Keiter, the Museum's chief curator. Keiter organized the exhibition with Barbara Elleman, former editor-in-chief of Book Links, published by the American Library Association and, Distinguished Scholar of Children's Literature at Marquette University. While these rare books cannot be handled, guests will be able to read copies available in the Museum's Reading Library.

The exhibition will change on February 12, 2018 when the ALSC announces the winner of the 2018 Caldecott Medal and a new book is added to the display. In the interim, guests can cast their votes in the gallery for the book they believe should win the coveted honor. Online visitors to the Museum's website can vote too. 

"Eighty Years of Caldecott Books is a celebration of artistic achievement," says Keiter. "We have included original illustrations from several winning titles, many drawn from The Carle's permanent collection." On view are three artworks by Marcia Brown, one from each of her three Caldecott Medal books: Cinderella, or The Little Glass Slipper (1955), Once a Mouse (1962) and Shadow (1983). [Brown won an unprecedented three Caldecott Medals, a feat matched only by David Wiesner.] The other artists and artworks on display are: Ed Emberley, Drummer Hoff (1968), Uri Shulevitz, The Fool of the World and the Flying Ship (1969), Arnold Lobel, Fables (1981), Chris Van Allsburg, The Polar Express (1986), David Macaulay, Black and White (1991), Emily Arnold McCully, Mirette on the High Wire (1993), Paul O. Zelinsky, Rapunzel (1998), Simms Taback, Joseph Had a Little Overcoat (2000), Mordicai Gerstein, The Man Who Walked Between the Towers (2004), and Javaka Steptoe, Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat (2017). 

PROGRAMMING:

The Best of the Best in 2017 

December 16, 11:00am 

Free with Museum Admission 

In anticipation of the 2018 American Library Association Book & Media Awards, including the Newbery and Caldecott Medals and the Coretta Scott King Book Awards, join Susan Bloom and Cathryn M. Mercier from the Center for the Study of Children's Literature at Simmons College as they share their favorite books of the past year.

Meet Javaka Steptoe 

December 16, 1:00pm 

Free with Museum Admission

Artist and author Javaka Steptoe won the 2017 Caldecott Medal for his book, Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat. Hear Steptoe discuss his research and art for Radiant Child, and what his year has been like following a Caldecott win.

Book signing to follow program. Can't make it to the event? You may reserve signed books online or contact The Carle Bookshop at shop@carlemuseum.org.

Randolph Caldecott: The Man Who Could Not Stop Drawing

with children's book historian, author, and critic Leonard S. Marcus              

April 7, 2018, 1:00pm 

Free with Museum Admission

This illustrated talk introduces the sly, fun-loving Victorian whose kinetic drawing style and keen feeling for life culminated in the invention of an art form the world has come to embrace: the children's picture book. Celebrate this true original as the American Library Association marks the 80th anniversary of the coveted prize named for him: the Randolph Caldecott Medal.

The 8th Annual Barbara Elleman Research Library (BERL) Lecture 

Celebrating the Caldecott: The stories behind some of the great Caldecott Medal and Honor Books with editor, author, and scholar Anita Silvey

Saturday, April 28, 2:00 pm 

Free with Museum Admission

The Barbara Elleman Research Library (BERL) Lecture is an annual event featuring the country's preeminent scholars, book collectors, researchers, editors, authors, and illustrators in the field of children's literature.

About The Carle

The mission of The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, a non-profit organization in Amherst, MA, is to inspire a love of art and reading through picture books. A leading advocate in its field, The Carle collects, preserves, presents, and celebrates picture books and picture-book illustrations from around the world. In addition to underscoring the cultural, historical, and artistic significance of picture books and their art form, The Carle offers educational programs that provide a foundation for arts integration and literacy.

Eric Carle and his wife, the late Barbara Carle, co-founded the Museum in November 2002. Carle is the renowned author and illustrator of more than 70 books, including the 1969 classic The Very Hungry Caterpillar. Since opening, the 43,000-square foot facility has served more than 750,000 visitors, including 50,000 schoolchildren. The Carle houses more than 11,000 objects, including 7,300 permanent collection illustrations. The Carle has three art galleries, an art studio, a theater, picture book and scholarly libraries, and educational programs for families, scholars, educators, and schoolchildren. Educational offerings include professional training for educators around the country and Master's degree programs in children's literature with Simmons College. Museum hours are Tuesday through Friday 10 am to 4 pm, Saturday 10 am to 5 pm, and Sunday 12 pm to 5 pm. Open Mondays in July and August and during MA school vacation weeks. Admission is $9 for adults, $6 for children under 18, and $22.50 for a family of four. For further information and directions, call (413) 559-6300 or visit the Museum's website at

www.carlemuseum.org

Image: Arnold Lobel, Illustration for Fables [Harper & Row, 1980]. Gift of Adrianne and Adam Lobel (The Estate of Arnold Lobel). © 1980 Arnold Lobel.

Oxford, England—The origins of early English graphic design are explored in a new exhibition opening at the Bodleian Libraries’ Weston Library. Designing English: Graphics on the Medieval Page, open from 1 December 2017, brings together a stunning selection of manuscripts and other objects to uncover the craft and artistry of Anglo-Saxon and medieval scribes, painters and engravers.

Designing English looks at the skills and innovations of these very early specialists who worked to preserve, clarify, adorn, authorize and interpret writing in English. For almost a thousand years most texts had been written in Latin, the common European language. Beyond the traditions established for Latin, books in English were often improvisatory, even homespun, but they were just as inventive and creative. In an age when each book was made uniquely by hand, each book was an opportunity for redesigning. The introduction of the English text posed questions: How did scribes choose to arrange the words and images on the page in each manuscript? How did they preserve, clarify and illustrate writing in English? What visual guides were given to early readers of English in how to understand or use their books?

The exhibition explores all elements of design, from the materials used, such as the size and shape of animal skins used to create parchment, to the design of texts for different uses, such as for performing songs, plays or music. Medical texts and practical manuals feature alongside ornate religious texts, including rare examples of unfinished illustrations that reveal the practical processes of making pages and artefacts. The use of English is traced from illicit additions made to Latin texts, to its more general, every day use, and spread to more ephemeral formats.

The exhibition features incredible early manuscripts held in the Bodleian collections, one of the largest medieval collections in the UK, alongside loan items from the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford and the British Museum.

Highlights of Designing English include:

-          The Macregol Gospels, one of the treasures of the Bodleian Libraries, dating from Ireland in around 800 CE, with English translations added to the original Latin text.

-          English translations of hymns composed by Caedmon (657-680), an illiterate cowherd who lived at Whitby Abbey and is the first named English poet.

The Alfred Jewel, an ornate enamel and gold jewel on loan from the Ashmolean Museum that contains the inscription ‘Alfred ordered me to be made’. The jewel is widely believed to have been commissioned by King Alfred the Great (849-899 BCE), who championed the use of English.

-          Gravestones and other medieval objects engraved with English text, including an Anglo-Saxon sword and a gold ring found at Godstow Abbey, Oxford.

-          Medical texts such as revolving ‘volvelle’ diagrams, magical charms and colourful drawings and diagrams for doctors. 

-          Some of the earliest known works in the English language, including Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales and early drama and songs

-          Examples of intricate texts with colour coded instructions on how to read them, such as an English translation of the Bible which may have belonged to Henry VI.

Designing English is curated by Daniel Wakelin, Jeremy Griffiths Professor of Medieval English Palaeography at the University of Oxford, one of the few posts in the world dedicated to the study of medieval English manuscripts.

Professor Wakelin said: ‘Medieval writers had to be graphic designers every time they wrote or carved their words. Tracing the earliest uses of English, from illicit annotations on Latin texts, to more everyday jottings in ephemeral formats, this exhibition celebrates the imagination and skill of these early writers. Their craft and inventiveness resonates today when digital media allow users to experiment with design through word processing, social media and customized products.”

Richard Ovenden, Bodley’s Librarian said: ‘The Bodleian Libraries holds one of the most important collections of medieval manuscripts in the world, and this exhibition celebrates all aspects of the ingenuity and craftsmanship that went into some of the most beautiful, and everyday items that still survive today. The exhibition provides an intriguing and surprising history of English literature in one room.”

To show the likeness of these medieval documents to modern craft, Designing English will, until 11 March 2018, be exhibited alongside Redesigning the Medieval Book: a display of contemporary book arts inspired by the exhibition. The exhibited contemporary artworks include calligraphy, prints, embroidery, pop-up books, videos, games and jewellery.

The exhibition will be opened by award-winning designer Jay Osgerby, who with Edward Barber, designed the new Bodleian Chair. The exhibition runs until 22 April 2018 and is accompanied by two new titles from Bodleian Library Publishing. A beautifully illustrated exhibition catalogue, Designing English: Early Literature on the Page, written by exhibition curator Daniel Wakelin is available in hardback for £30. A second title, Revolting Remedies from the Middle Ages, brings together weird and wonderful medical tips for everyday use in medieval England, some of which are displayed in the exhibition. Both titles are available to preorder from www.bodleianshop.co.uk.

An exciting programme of talks and events, including family-friendly activities, will be held over the course of the Designing English exhibition, starting with a special opening weekend celebration at the Bodleian’s Weston Library on 2 December. For more information visit www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/whatson.

The Weston Library is one of the newest cultural destinations in Oxford and has welcomed more than 2 million visitors since opening to the public in March 2015. The Library has also won numerous architectural awards and was shortlisted for the RIBA Stirling Prize 2016.

 

The Folio Society is delighted to announce that their Limited Edition of Robert Hooke’s Micrographia won the Scholarly, Academic and Reference Book category at The British Book Design & Production Awards 2017, presented in London last week. 

The British Book Design & Production Awards is one of the most prestigious and popular literary events of the year, the awards recognise and promote excellence in the British book industry by celebrating the best editions of the year. 

The judges said: ‘Micrographia is a delightful book traditionally typeset with stunning illustrations of insects and plants including throw-outs for the larger illustrations. The book is beautifully quarter-bound in leather, with silver foiled sides and a silver gilt top, and presented in a cloth-bound slipcase. It may be a large format book but you will fnd it very hard to put down!’ 

Kate Grimwade, Production Director at The Folio Society said: ‘Folio are delighted to have won the Scholarly, Academic and Reference Books category with Micrographia. The images in the book were painstakingly reproduced and restored to their original glory from copies held at the Bodleian and the Museum of the History of Science in Oxford. With five throw-outs, gilded tops, a leather quarter-binding and a stunning blocked design, Micrographia encompasses the very best of Folio’s design and production values. 

 

Thames Bonhams.jpgDesigns for the Thames Tunnel, signed by Marc Isambard Brunel and his son Isambard Kingdom Brunel, sold for £200,000 at Bonhams Fine Books, Atlases, Manuscripts and Photographs Sale in London on Wednesday 15 November. The archive, which came with the signed Brunel family album in which the drawings were originally kept, had been estimated at £50,000-100,000.

Built between 1825 and 1837, the Thames Tunnel - which connects Rotherhithe and Limehouse in East London - was the first ever successful underwater tunnel. The techniques pioneered by the Brunels revolutionised tunnelling and had a significant impact on the development of the London Underground - indeed they were still influential in the construction of the Channel Tunnel in the late 1980s. The Thames Tunnel remains in daily use, 180 years after its completion, as part of the London Overground rail network.    

Bonhams Head of Books and Manuscripts, Matthew Haley, said: “This was a very important archive of what was described at the time as ‘The Eighth Wonder of the World’, and is still regarded as one of the greatest engineering feats of the 19th century. The high price paid reflects its huge significance.”

The sale made a total of £1,716,175 with premium.

Sale:          Fine Books, Atlases, Manuscripts and Photographs

Location:    Bonhams Knightsbridge

Date:          Wednesday 15 November at 1.00 pm

Specialist:   Matthew Haley, Head of Books and Manuscripts

 

Potter Bonhams.jpgA first edition of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by J K Rowling set a new world record at auction of £106,250 at Bonhams Fine Books and Manuscripts Sale in London on 15 November. It had been estimated at £30,000-40,000.

The book was inscribed to a friend and her family: ‘For Meera, Donnie, Nastassia and Kai, with lots of love from Jo (also known as J.K. Rowling)".  The inscription is dated one month and a day after the book was published on 26 June 1997, this being one of the first copies supplied to Rowling by the publisher.

Bonhams Head of Books and Manuscripts Matthew Haley said, “There is always a great deal of interest when first editions of Harry Potter books come to auction, especially, of course, in the very first one in the series. This particular example was not only in excellent condition, but it had the added attraction of a very personal inscription from the author herself.”

Among the other sale highlights were:

  • Designs for the Thames Tunnel, signed by Marc Isambard Brunel and his son Isambard Kingdom Brunel, which sold for £200,000.  The archive, which came with the signed Brunel family album in which the drawings were originally kept, had been estimated at £50,000-100,000.
  • An archive of manuscripts and letters from the estate of the famous 18th century actor David Garrick, sold for £112,500 (estimate £10,000-15,000)
  • A first edition of Christopher Saxon’s Atlas of England and Wales from 1859 made £106,000 (estimate £50,000-70,000)
  • A letter from Alan Turing to his former maths teacher was bought for £75,000 (estimate £20,000-30,000).

The sale made a total of £1,716,175 with premium.

New York—Christie’s is pleased to present Russian America and Polar Exploration: Highlights from the Martin Greene Library, a choice selection of important books chronicling the exploration of our planet’s extremes. The auction will take place on Thursday, December 7 at Christie’s Rockefeller Plaza. Spanning a period of 400 years, from the 16th to the 20th centuries, Martin Greene’s library includes myriad stories of adventure, scientific discovery, cultural encounters and geopolitical ambition. 

Martin Greene, a Seattle - based doctor and mountaineer, has spent decades collecting books relate d to his passion of travel and exploration. The selection offered in this sale contains rarities from first hand accounts to cartography — with a range including Pacific Voyages, the search for the Northwest and Northeast Passages, the search for Sir John Franklin’s lost expedition, and the race to the North and South Poles. Moreover, Greene has acquired the most important collection of books relating to Alaska when it was a Russian possession which has ever appeared at auction. 

Among the top lots is an extremely rare and beautiful account and atlas of Ivan Kruzenshtern’s voyage of 1802 - 1806, the first Russian circumnavigation of the globe (estimate: $350,000 - 450,000). Not only is it among the most splendid works of 19th century Russian printing it also contains important views of the Northwest Coast of America. Russia’s great rival Britain launched the greatest number of Arctic expeditions; dozens of which centered on the search for the missing explorer, Sir John Franklin, and his crew. Another highlight is an 1854 first edition of S.G. Cresswell’s illustrations of the Franklin Search expedition led by Robert McClure (estimate: $30,000 - 50,000), inscribed by the artist. McClure and his men were the first to traverse the Northwest Passage. America, too, entered the game and with great ambition. Charles Wilkes led the first ever American scientific voyage, the United States Exploring Expedition of 1838 - 1842. Another highlight is a rare Congressional issue of Wilkes’s account (estimate: $60,000 - 90,000). The project was plagued by budget overrun and only 100 sets of these official accounts were printed, many of which were destroyed in the 1851 Library of Congress fire. 

PREVIEW 

New York | Friday, December 1 to Wednesday, December 6. 

 

Auction Guide