Front-cover-Game-Faces.jpgA new book, “Game Faces: Early Baseball Cards from the Library of Congress,” offers baseball fans and historians a visual delight that showcases early baseball cards from the 19th and early 20th centuries alongside photos from the early days of the nation’s beloved pastime. Author Peter Devereaux takes readers behind the scenes of the Library of Congress’ Benjamin K. Edwards Collection to see the vibrant world of the early boom of America’s pastime.

“Game Faces” was published in October 2018 by Smithsonian Books in association with the Library of Congress. It is the first book to explore the Library’s extensive collection of early baseball cards, providing both the history and cultural context that reveals baseball cards as documents of their times as well as their teams. The book accompanies the Library’s ongoing exhibition “Baseball Americana,” which is open through June 2019.

In the 1880s, more than half of the population lived in rural areas without major league baseball teams of their own. Since pictures were rare in newspapers, the only way these fans could follow the game was through the box scores and printed recaps of games. The new baseball cards, brightly colored and with precise detail, brought the legends of the game to life for people all across the nation. “Game Faces” not only highlights cards depicting many of the early stars of baseball like Ty Cobb, Cy Young, and Christy Mathewson, but also shines a light on the lesser known figures.

“First created as advertising aids, baseball cards celebrate America’s national pastime as well as its entrepreneurial spirit,” Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden wrote in the preface. “The colorful cards appealed immediately to baseball fans of all ages, and their widespread availability spurred their popularity. Their charm persists today, as the images they bear of players who inspired the first ‘bugs and cranks’ (a term for baseball supporters) bring the history of the game to life.”

“Game Faces” provides engaging insights into the players, the development of the game and American culture at the turn of the 20th century. Learn about the rich, engrossing history of the baseball card and the ways it has influenced and shaped not only baseball culture but American culture as a whole.

About the Author: Peter Devereaux is writer-editor at the Library of Congress and author of “The Card Catalog: Books, Cards, and Literary Treasures.”

“Game Faces: Early Baseball Cards from the Library of Congress,” a 155-page hardcover book with more than 300 images, is available for $19.99 in the Library of Congress Shop, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C., and through retailers. Credit card orders are taken at (888) 682-3557 or online at loc.gov/shop/.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States - and extensive materials from around the world - both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

artobject.jpgNew York - TEFAF New York Fall, which opens to the public this week, on Saturday, October 27, and runs through Wednesday, October 31, 2018 at the historic Park Avenue Armory releases a selection of key works to be exhibited at the much-anticipated third edition of the Fair. 

The Fair, which features 93 of the world’s leading art and antiques dealers, including 10 new exhibitors, showcases top quality, strictly-vetted works from a variety of collecting areas including fine and decorative art from antiquity to 1920, as well as rare books and manuscripts, jewelry, portrait miniatures, arms and armor, and much more. TEFAF has refreshed the conversation and the climate for historic art in America by highlighting its relevance and providing an innovative platform and collector experience. In a year that saw Salvator Mundi sell for $450 million at a contemporary art auction, Victoria Beckham hosting Old Master Paintings at her store in London, and Beyonce and Jay-Z filming their music video in the Louvre - older art has firmly crossed-over into the pop-culture milieu in a most discernable way. 

For more than three decades, TEFAF has been widely regarded as the world’s preeminent organization devoted to fine art, design and antiquities, celebrated for its dedication to historical importance and unrivalled quality. The specialist dealers at TEFAF are experts in their fields, providing both a wealth of knowledge and an all- encompassing picture of cultural and artistic evolution and development through a range of time periods and mediums in an elegantly curated display at the Armory. 

Returning for this iteration of the Fair are monumental works displayed in the public spaces of the Armory, outside of the exhibitor’s booths and historic rooms. This program utilizes the soaring spaces and unique architectural framework of the Park Avenue Armory to enable dealers to showcase larger scale works which adds to the overall offering at the Fair. The works to be featured in the public spaces of the armory are from the exhibitor Mullany (UK, stand 373), showing a rare Flemish tapestry Feuilles de choux with stag (c. 1550-70), Bernard Goldberg Fine Arts (US, stand 202) displaying William Hunt Diederich’s (1854-1953) Polo Players Weathervane (c.1926), Gregg Baker Asian Art (UK, stand 353) presenting a pair of Ishiyama Taihaku’s (1893-1961) Two-Fold Screens with Egrets Perched on the Branches of a Willow Tree (c. 1934), and Robert Simon Fine Art (US, stand 327) showing The Martyrdom of Saint Peter (c. 1660-65) by Giovanni Battista Beinaschi (1636-88).

TEFAF New York Fall 2018 will include a dynamic range of exceedingly rare, museum-quality, and historically significant pieces, such as a full-length portrait of George Washington by Gilbert Stuart (1755-1828) offered by exhibitor Hirschl & Adler (US, stand 370).

Amongst the stellar decorative works of art being brought to the Fair are Thomas Chippendale’s (1718-79) The Brocket Hall Saloon Chairs (1773) shown by Ronald Phillips (UK, stand 357) which once belonged to Sir Elton John, as well as a gold brooch (c. 1842) a gift from Prince Albert to Queen Victoria to commemorate the birth of their first born child, also called Victoria, brought by Wartski (UK, stand 311). Also notable and new to market, is a singular and rare compilation of five of Ovid’s Heroides (c. 1493) presented to queen consort Anne of Brittany, which is presented by Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books AG (Switzerland, stand 336).

For the complete TEFAF New York Fall 2018 exhibitor list, please click here. A full list of Fair highlights are available in the supporting document.

The exhibitor offering is supported by a comprehensive and informative series of coffee and afternoon talks, A complete list of the cultural programming for TEFAF New York Fall 2018 is available here.

The Fair’s Opening VIP Preview takes place on Friday, October 26, from 1:00 - 8:00 PM, with The Society of Memorial Sloan Kettering hosting its Opening Night Benefit from 5:00 - 8:00 PM. Proceeds of the evening support The Society’s patient care, research, and education programs at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, as well as the acclaimed cultural programs produced by the Park Avenue Armory.

Opening Night tickets are available for purchase at www.giving.mskcc.org/tefaf, or by calling +1 212.639.7972.

Image: Octovien De Saint-Gelais, Epistres D’Ovide, Octovien De Saint-Gelais or Francois Rebertet, Three French Poems. Master Of The Chronique scandaleuse (France, Active circa 1493-1510) Illuminated manuscript on vellum 26.5 x 19 cm (10.4 x 7.5 in.). Paris - Circa 1493. Dr. Jorn Gunther Rare books AG / Stand 336 

Boston Satellite Fair Celebrates 7 Years

BBPEIMG_9125.JPGBoston--When Bernice Bornstein started the Boston Book Print and Ephemera Show twenty years ago, she called it a “shadow show” because it was in a garage across the street and literally in the shadows of the ABAA’s Boston International Book Fair. Bornstein grew the show and moved it to the Radisson Hotel and then to the Park Plaza Castle. When Marvin Getman purchased the show in 2013, he moved it into a much brighter space closer to the Hynes Auditorium and the ABAA Fair. At the same time, he started to promote his fair as the Satellite Fair. “I remember thinking that I was going to lift the show out of the shadows and launch it into orbit. I always felt that my fairs should be able to stand on their own without being dependent on another fair. I think I’ve proven that with my Brooklyn fair which now attracts dealers, curators, and librarians from all over the country. I am pleased that the Boston fair has proven that, by attracting a good quality group of dealers, it stands on its own as a fair that collectors and dealers love to attend.”

This year the fair has attracted several dealers who have not exhibited before, namely, Detroit dealer Evan Bates of Evan bates books and documents, Massachusetts bookbinder Christine Carpenter of Green Dragon bindery, ephemera dealer Al Malpa of Chester, CT, James McBride and Teri Osborn of newly established McBride Rare books based in New Haven, CT, Burton Miller of Books of Yore, Purcellville, VA, Boston dealer Robert Minnocci of RJM Autogtraphs and Antiques, Cincinnati dealer Ted Twyman of The First Edition Rare Books, and Ralph Galo of Eclectibles, Tolland, CT.

These dealers will join 60 others at this one-day fair on Saturday November 17, at the Back Bay Events Center, 180 Berkeley St. just 4 walkable blocks from the ABAA fair. Hours are 8am-4pm. Discounted admissions are available online at bookandpaperfairs.com.

SEFXS0lORy5QTkc=.pngLondon - A brilliant mind whose discoveries have shaped our understanding of the universe, Stephen Hawking, who died on 14 March this year, is one of the most well regarded physicists of all time. Christie’s is honoured to present a remarkable selection of 22 lots from the legendary physicist’s estate during an online sale entitled ‘On the Shoulders of Giants’, taking place between 31 October - 8 November.

The lots featured in Christie’s online sale range from the offprints (the scientist’s own printed copies) of his most important papers, including his seminal ‘Black hole explosions’ of 1974, to a selection of his medals and awards, a copy of his best-selling ‘A Brief History of Time’ (1988) signed with a thumbprint, a bomber jacket, and the script for one of his appearances on The Simpsons. Estimates in this auction start as low as £100.  The last lot of the sale, one of Hawking’s iconic wheelchairs, will be sold to benefit the Stephen Hawking Foundation and the Motor Neurone Disease Association.

Thomas Venning, Head of the Books and Manuscripts department, Christie’s London comments: It has been a huge privilege for Christie’s to work on this selection of objects from the estate of one of the most brilliant minds of the last half-century. The lots selected for sale highlight Professor Hawking’s remarkable achievements in science alongside his unique personality and inspirational life story. The sale concludes with Professor Hawking’s wheelchair, in which he both toured the world as a successful scientific communicator, and from which his mind voyaged to the outer reaches of space-time, making it literally and figuratively one of the most-travelled wheelchairs in history. 

Lucy Hawking comments - We are very pleased to have the assistance of Christie's to help us with the important matter of managing our beloved father's archives and his unique and precious collection of personal and professional belongings, chronicling his life and work. We hope to be able to offer our father's archive to the nation through the Acceptance in Lieu* process as we feel it is a huge part of his legacy but also of the history of science in this country. We are also giving admirers of his work the chance to acquire a memento of our father's extraordinary life in the shape of a small selection of evocative and fascinating items. In addition, we will be auctioning one of our father's historic wheelchairs, the proceeds of which will be donated to the Motor Neurone Disease Association and the Stephen Hawking Foundation

A highlight of the group is Hawking’s thesis typescript, an opportunity not to be missed for collectors (estimate: £100,000-150,000). When Professor Stephen Hawking’s PhD thesis was made available online by Cambridge University in October 2017, it proved so popular that it crashed the University’s website. Christie’s is pleased to be offering one of only five original copies of his thesis alongside early editions which celebrate the scientist’s genius. 

When he wrote his thesis in October 1965, Hawking was already suffering with the early symptoms of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (‘ALS’), and it was his wife Jane, whom he had married three months earlier, who typed out the 117 pages of the document, painstakingly adding the mathematical equations by hand. The thesis is signed in Hawking’s distinctively shaky handwriting, with the statement ‘This dissertation is my original work. S.W. Hawking’. Of the 22 lots featured in the sale, 12 are offprints of Hawking’s most important papers, including ‘Origin of Structure in the Universe’, ‘Spectrum of Wormholes’ and ‘Fundamental Breakdown of Physics in Gravitational Collapse’, illustrated below. The online sale ‘On the Shoulders of Giants’ will present these offprints alongside rare and important autograph letters and manuscripts by leading scientific forebears including Isaac Newton, Charles Darwin and Albert Einstein. News regarding this auction will be announced in the coming days. 

chfjkadmolbkbcko.jpgNew York-An auction of Old Master Through Modern Prints on Thursday, November 1 at Swann Galleries offers a grand selection of prints by Pablo Picasso. Rare and museum-quality prints from the fifteenth-to-twentieth centuries act as an overview of the evolution of Western printmaking and chronicle the dramatic changes of the second half of the millennium.

European works from the early twentieth century are led by a powerful selection of works by Pablo Picasso. Hailing from the artist’s Blue Period, Le Repas Frugal, 1904, presents an allegorical scene constructed from glimpses into the lives of those living in poverty (Estimate: $100,000-150,000). Flûtiste et Trois Femmes nues, 1932, is one of 100 Neoclassical-style subjects Picasso etched for Suite Vollard, valued at $8,000 to $12,000. Late color linoleum cuts include La Femme au Chapeau, 1962, which spotlights the artist’s second wife Jacqueline Roque, and Le Vieux Roi, 1963 ($80,000-120,000 and $15,000-20,000, respectively).

Additional works from the twentieth century include Les Chevaux Daliniens, 1972, a complete set of 25 color lithographs with embossing by Salvador Dalí ($15,000-20,000); René Margritte’s Trois Pommes, circa 1968 ($1,200-1,800); and Alberto Giacometti’s scarce, early etching, Sans titre, 1935 ($10,000-15,000).

Exemplary works from old masters feature Rembrandt van Rijn’s The Windmill, 1641, at $70,000 to $100,000, and Albrecht Dürer’s Melencolia I, 1514 ($60,000-90,000). Other notable lots include The Drunken Silenus, 1597-1600, by Annibale Carracci, estimated at $2,500 to $3,500, and a run of prints by Francisco José de Goya, including Las Proverbios: Additional Plates, 1824, which features the complete set of four aquatints ($5,000-8,000).

Mary Cassatt is represented in the sale with Baby’s Back, a scarce print from 1890 ($10,000-15,000); Baby’s Lullaby, circa 1887 ($6,000-9,000); and Marjorie Wearing a Dress with Puffed Sleeves, circa 1895 ($7,000-10,000). Also, from the nineteenth century come a slew of works by James Jacques Tissot. The assortment is led by Octobre, 1878, an etching based on the painting of the same name from 1877, and depicts Mrs. Kathleen Newton, the artist’s frequent model and companion, also featured in L’Été, 1878 ($15,000-20,000 and $2,000-3,000, respectively).

Latin American material includes Rufino Tamayo’s Galaxia, 1977, at $5,000 to $8,000, and an array of works by David A. Siqueiros.

A strong selection of works by American printmakers is led by East Side Interior, 1922, one of Edward Hopper’s most celebrated etchings, which displays the artist’s use of heavy chiaroscuro and strong, dark hatching ($50,000 to $80,000). George Bellows’s lithograph, Introducing the Champion, 1916, is estimated at $4,000 to $6,000. A substantial amount of prints by Thomas Hart Benton include Wreck of the Ol’ 97, 1944, which pictures the famous Southern Railway locomotive as it derails at Stillhouse Trestle near Danville, Virginia in September of 1903 ($10,000-15,000).

The complete catalogue and bidding information is available at www.swanngalleries.com

Additional highlights can be found here.

Image: Lot 332: Pablo Picasso, Le Repas Frugal, etching and drypoint, 1904. Estimate $100,000 to $150,000.

 

Austin, TX — A detailed look at the history of the Arts and Crafts movement is the focus of a new exhibition at The University of Texas at Austin.

Displayed at the Harry Ransom Center from Feb. 9 through July 14, 2019, “The Rise of Everyday Design: The Arts and Crafts Movement in Britain and America” examines how the ideas of Arts and Crafts reformers, influential to this day, transformed the homes and lives of ordinary people in the 19th and 20th centuries.

With more than 250 books, drawings, furniture pieces, decorative arts objects, photographs and advertising ephemera, the exhibition appeals to anyone with an interest in architecture and design, including professionals, enthusiasts and those interested in the antecedents of lifestyle branding and today’s maker movement.

It is organized into three main sections. “The Birth of the Arts and Crafts Idea” considers the founding ideals of designers and theorists in Britain, “The Arts and Crafts in America” shows how the principles of the movement crossed the Atlantic Ocean, and “The Postwar Legacy” explores the persistence of the American Arts and Crafts movement beyond World War II. This narrative highlights the contributions of Alice and Elbert Hubbard and The Roycrofters, William Morris and The Kelmscott Press, John Ruskin, Gustav Stickley, Frank Lloyd Wright, bungalow culture and a burgeoning do-it-yourself craft movement.

Visitors will learn how the movement’s theorists and makers spread their ideas through books, retail showrooms and world's fairs. Concerned with the daily realities of the Industrial Age, they used design to envision and promote a new and improved way of living.

The movement was transformed as its tenets of simple design, honest use of materials and social value of handmade goods were widely adopted and commodified by large companies. The exhibition explores how these objects, originally handmade and costly, came to be manufactured and sold to the everyday consumer.

Christopher Long, professor of history and theory in UT’s School of Architecture, and Monica Penick, associate professor in the Department of Design in the School of Design and Creative Technologies, curated the exhibition.

“The exhibition's distinction is its emphasis on the Arts and Crafts' transformation from a movement that made handcrafted objects for the well-to-do to a popular phenomenon of mass- manufactured, inexpensive pieces sold through retail outlets like Sears, Roebuck & Co.," Penick said. "The Arts and Crafts idea persisted long after it is usually said to have expired, well into the 1950s and 1960s. The Ransom Center, with its wide-ranging collections of both British and American art, architecture and design, is ideally suited to tell this story.”

Items from the Center's collections include hand-drawn designs and sketches by Ruskin and Morris, books and marketing materials of the Kelmscott and Roycroft presses, stained glass designs by Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Edward Burne-Jones and plates from Wright's Wasmuth portfolio. These are complemented by photographs, furniture and decorative arts objects from the university's Alexander Architectural Archives; the Dallas Museum of Art; the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; and private collections.

“Viewers will see many objects that are seldom shown, including unique documents and rare sales catalogs and brochures,” Long said.

The exhibition “The Rise of Everyday Design: The Arts and Crafts Movement in Britain and America” is accompanied by a catalog of the same title. Published by Yale University Press in association with the Ransom Center and edited by Penick and Long, it features essays such as “The Kelmscott Press and the Modern Popular Book,” “The Arts and Crafts Knock-Off and U.S. Intellectual Property Law” and “The Sears Modern Home.”

Visitors can view the free exhibition on Mondays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with extended Thursday hours until 7 p.m. On Saturdays and Sundays the galleries are open from noon to 5 p.m. Free docent-led tours are offered daily at noon, Thursdays at 6 p.m. and Saturdays and Sundays at 2 p.m.

 

New York —The Morgan Library & Museum announced today the appointment of Maria L. Fredericks as the Sherman Fairchild Head of the Thaw Conservation Center. Founded in 2002 with the support of Eugene Thaw, a longtime Morgan Trustee, the Thaw Conservation Center is a world-renowned  laboratory facility for the study and conservation of works on paper and parchment, including drawings, illuminated manuscripts, rare books, fine bindings, prints, photographs, and literary, historical, and music manuscripts. Ms. Fredericks’s new role is the first full-time leadership position for the center and was made possible by an endowment from the Sherman Fairchild Foundation.

In her new role, Fredericks will lead the staff of the Thaw Center, oversee the long-term conservation of the collection, and broaden the Morgan’s conservation-related programs. She succeeds Peggy Ellis, who was Director of the center from its inception in 2002 through 2016. Prior to this appointment, Fredericks was the Drue Heinz Book Conservator at the Morgan, a position she held for thirteen years during which she oversaw the preservation of rare manuscripts and books, enabling the Morgan to present these works to the public under the right conditions and in the best light. She has mentored numerous graduate interns and post-graduate fellows, while also carrying out technical research and conservation treatment on treasures of the Morgan’s collection, such as the Hours of Catherine of Cleves, the Golden Gospels of Henry VIII,and an illuminated Pontifical made for Pope Leo X.

“The Sherman Fairchild Foundation has been very generous in endowing this leadership position in the Thaw Conservation Center,” said Colin B. Bailey, Director of the Morgan. “The TCC helps preserve irreplaceable works of art and works on paper, in addition to training talented conservators, many of whom go on to lead conservation efforts at other institutions both nationally and internationally. Ms. Fredericks has contributed greatly to the Center, and we are delighted to continue supporting her work at the Morgan.” 

Before coming to the Morgan in 2005, Fredericks was Head of Conservation at Columbia University Libraries, where she managed the conservation program for twenty campus libraries including Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, the C.V. Starr East Asian Library and the Rare Book and Manuscript Library. She has also held positions at the Library of Congress, the Newberry Library in Chicago, the Huntington Library in San Marino, California, and the Winterthur Museum in Winterthur, Delaware. At the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Coptic Museum Archives in Cairo, she contributed to conservation and preservation efforts on rare manuscripts.

A graduate of Swarthmore College with a B.A. in art history, Ms. Fredericks has lectured, taught and published extensively on book conservation and historical bindings.Since 2010, she has been a Visiting Lecturer at the NYU Institute of Fine Arts Conservation Center, where she has taught graduate students specializing in rare book conservation and participated in curriculum development for a Mellon-funded initiative in Library and Archives Conservation Education (LACE).

“The Thaw Conservation Center, with its stellar staff of conservators and preparators has a well-established track record of maintaining the highest professional standards in teaching, conservation treatment and collections care,” said Fredericks. “I am excited and honored to be continuing this work in the company of such wonderful colleagues.”

Frank Trujillo has been promoted to replace Ms. Fredericks as the Drue Heinz Book Conservator. Mr. Trujillo has been at the Morgan since 2006, most recently as Associate Book Conservator. He will continue to evaluate, treat, and research the bound collections from all curatorial departments at the Morgan. His previously published research has focused on technical aspects of the Hours of Catherine of Cleves, the Hours of Claude de France, French Romanesque bindings, and the Coptic Binding Collection at the Morgan Library & Museum.

Teddy-Roosevelt-Laughing-1910-e1539722671345.jpgThe largest collection of the papers of President Theodore Roosevelt, documenting his extraordinary career in the White House and as vice president, governor of New York, and as a naturalist, writer and reformer, has been digitized and is now available online from the Library of Congress.

The digitization of the massive collection comes just before the 160th anniversary of Roosevelt’s birthday. The nation’s 26th president was born Oct. 27, 1858, and died nearly 100 years ago on Jan. 6, 1919.

The Roosevelt collection is online at: loc.gov/collections/theodore-roosevelt-papers/about-this-collection/.

The Roosevelt papers are one of the largest presidential collections held by the Library, consisting of about 276,000 documents and comprising about 461,000 images. It includes letters, speeches, executive orders, scrapbooks, diaries, White House reception records and press releases of his administration, as well as family records.

The collection provides a closer look at Roosevelt as an individual and as a powerful president from 1901 to 1909 who established a tradition of using his position as a “bully pulpit” by appealing to the broader public through the media. Roosevelt strengthened the presidency by seeking to centralize power after a time when Congress and the Supreme Court had dominated government, and he survived an attempted assassination during his unsuccessful run for the presidency in 1912.

Roosevelt was a prolific writer, offering readers a glimpse at the power of his personality and family life. In public service, he was known for confronting such major issues as the regulation of corporations, conservation of natural resources, construction of the Panama Canal and mediation during the Russo-Japanese War (for which he won the Nobel Peace Prize). Beyond the presidency, he was also an influential naturalist. Animal specimens he brought back from a safari in Africa remain part of the collection at the Smithsonian Institution. Roosevelt also nearly died while exploring an uncharted river in Brazil. The river was later named in his honor.

The papers also document his service as vice president before the assassination of President William McKinley, his time as governor of New York, as police commissioner of New York City, as a cavalry officer in the Spanish-American War, his founding of the Progressive Party and his unsuccessful run for president in 1912.

Highlights of the Roosevelt papers include:

  • A personal diary from Feb. 14, 1884, where Roosevelt records his reaction to the death of his first wife and mother on the same day. “The light has gone out of my life,” he wrote;
  • An 1897 letter signaling Roosevelt’s support for annexing Hawaii and building a canal in Central America while he was assistant secretary of the Navy;
  • A listing of “Rough Rider” officers serving with Roosevelt in the Spanish-American War;
  • Roosevelt’s letter from 1900 with his first documented use of the phrase “speak softly and carry a big stick;”
  • A 1905 letter on the conservation of Yosemite Valley as a national park;
  • Roosevelt’s 1912 campaign speech in Connecticut while seeking another term as president on the Progressive Party ticket;
  • A 1915 letter criticizing President Woodrow Wilson’s policy toward World War I.

The Roosevelt papers have been at the Library of Congress since Roosevelt sent the first shipment of his papers from his Oyster Bay, New York, home to the Library for safekeeping in 1917. His deposits were made a permanent gift in 1919. Additional contributions to the collection were made by Roosevelt’s family members and his literary executor.

The Harvard University Library also holds a major archival collection documenting Roosevelt’s life and career. The Theodore Roosevelt Center at Dickinson State University in North Dakota is building a digital library of Roosevelt materials in partnership with the Library of Congress and other organizations.

Previously, much of the Library’s Roosevelt collection was available on microfilm, which helped facilitate the digitization process. More recent additions to the collection were scanned and digitized for the first time during this project.

The Roosevelt project reflects advancement toward a goal in the Library’s new user-centered strategic plan to expand access, making unique collections, experts and services available when, where and how users need them. Learn more about the Library’s five-year plan at loc.gov/strategic-plan/.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States - and extensive materials from around the world - both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

Image: President Theodore Roosevelt is shown in 1910 after he had left the White House. (Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division)

BIABF_Anonyme regla y constitutiones de la cofradia_Courtesy Rare Books Le Feu Follet.jpgBoston - The annual fall gathering for booklovers, the Boston International Antiquarian Book Fair returns to the Hynes Convention Center in Boston’s beautiful Back Bay for its 42nd year, November 16-18, 2018.  Featuring the collections and rare treasures of 130 booksellers from the U.S., England, Canada, Netherlands, France, Germany, Russia, Denmark, and Argentina, the Boston Book Fair gives visitors the opportunity to see, learn about, and purchase the finest in rare and valuable books, illuminated manuscripts, autographs, graphics, maps, atlases, photographs, fine and decorative prints, and much more.

Special events at this year’s Fair include Documentary Filmmaker Frederick Wiseman on the making of Ex Libris: The New York Public Library; political guru Michael Goldman on 1968: The Year of the Century; Aji Yamazaki from the Kyoto Book Artists Society in discussion with Charles Vilnis on Japanese art books; Editor Peter K. Steinberg on Sylvia Plath; and the 17th annual Ticknor Society Roundtable panel discussion on starting a collection. Visit www.bostonbookfair.com for complete event listings.

One of the oldest and most respected antiquarian book shows in the country, the event offers a top selection of items available on the international literary market. Attendees have the unique chance to get a close look at rare and historic museum-quality items, offered by some of the most prestigious participants in the trade.  Whether just browsing or buying, the Fair offers something for every taste and budget—books on art, politics, travel, gastronomy, and science to sport, natural history, literature, music, and children’s books—all appealing to a range of bibliophiles and browsers.

Among the highlighted items for sale at this year’s fair will be: the legendary Blue Map of China from the 19th century Qing Empire-one of the rarest, largest, and most aesthetically magnificent maps ever made!; Sylvia Plath’s own proof copy of The Bell Jar; America's National Game by A.J. Spalding, published in 1911-a classic in baseball collecting; an original handwritten manuscript by Martin Luther King Jr. for his first book, Stride Toward Freedom; a newly discovered and never published fourteenth century commentary on The New Testament, published in Paris around 1350; the original unpublished 1980 typescript of Luis Buñuel's last screenplay, Agón o El Canto del Cisne [Struggle or Swan Song]; a rare collection of documents evoking the climax and the dawn of decay of the mighty Medici dynasty, the most influential family of the Italian Renaissance; a rare copy of the first printed Sea Chart to correctly locate Boston, 1647; an elaborately illustrated 16th century gilded vellum folio from Spain of Regla y constitutiones de la cofradia del Sanctissimo sacramento de la yglesia de San Christoval de Granada; autographed letters and memorabilia from the 1960s of Ethel Kennedy and Richard Nixon; a wondrous work of fin de siècle art and occultism-Austin de Croze’s unpublished illustrated poetic collection La Lumière Magique, created in 1920s Paris; and rare and first editions of works by Margaret Atwood, James Baldwin, William Blake, Charlotte Bronte, Albert Camus, Albert Einstein, Charles Dickens, Fyodor Dostoevsky, Betty Friedan, Beatrix Potter, Marcel Proust, Ayn Rand, Sir Walter Scott, Kurt Vonnegut, and Edith Wharton.

The Fair gives visitors the opportunity to see, learn about, and purchase the finest in rare and valuable books and ephemera. For attendees wanting to start a collection without breaking the bank, there will be dealers offering “Discovery” items priced at $100 or less, including a selection of children's books and decorative cloth bindings. The Fair is an opportunity to learn tips on how to start a collection and talk to dealers who are experts in their specialties.

On Sunday from 1:00-3:00pm, attendees are invited to bring in their own books for FREE APPRAISALS!

Tickets are $20 for Friday night’s exclusive Opening Night event, an opportunity for the public to get a first look at items for sale at the Fair; admission is free on Saturday and Sunday.

Friday, November 16              5:00-9:00pm             Tickets: $20.00 - Opening Night (valid all weekend)   

Saturday, November 17          12:00-7:00pm          Free Admission 

Sunday, November 18             12:00-5:00pm         Free Admission

Hynes Convention Center
900 Boylston Street
Boston, MA
www.mccahome.com

The Boston International Antiquarian Book Fair is sponsored by the New England Chapter of the Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association of America. A portion of the ticket sales will benefit the Boston Public Library and the American Antiquarian Society. Tickets are for sale at www.bostonbookfair.com and at the show’s box office during Friday evening show hours. For more information, please visit www.bostonbookfair.com or call 617-266-6540.

The Boston International Antiquarian Book Fair is produced by CommPromo, Inc. www.commpromo.com 

EVENTS AT THE FAIR

Kyoto Book Artists Society-Aji Yamazaki & Charles Vilnis

Saturday, November 17, 1:00 pm

Learn about the world of Japanese art books with Aji Yamazaki, one of Kyoto’s top dealers, in discussion with Boston Book Company Principal Charles Vilnis, an expert in the field of Japanese printing. 

Ticknor Society Roundtable: Starting a Collection

Ken Gloss, Luke Kennedy Kelly, Alexander M. Koch

Saturday, November 17, 2:30 pm

This year’s Ticknor Society’s Collectors Roundtable will discuss the best ways for new and young collectors to begin a book collection. The panel will feature Ken Gloss, proprietor of Boston’s iconic Brattle Book Shop; Luke Kelly, Harvard University student and award-winning book collector; and Alexander Koch, book collector and Maine Conservation Task Force member.  Ticknor Society Board Member and former president, Chris Morgan will moderate.

Ex Libris: The New York Public Library with Director Frederick Wiseman

Saturday, November 17, 4:00 pm

In Ex Libris, famed director Frederick Wiseman, goes behind the scenes of one of the greatest institutions in the world, The New York Public Library, revealing it to be a place of cultural exchange, learning and community. With 92 locations through Manhattan and the boroughs, The New York Public Library affirms the deeply-held American belief that individuals have a right to know and be informed. Wiseman, arguably one of the greatest living documentary filmmakers, will discuss the making of Ex Libris and will be available for questions on this and other highlights of his brilliant career.  The film will be shown at the BPL Copley Branch prior to Wiseman’s talk, details TBA.

1968: The Year of the Century-Michael Goldman

Sunday, November 18, 1:30 pm Exhibit Hall Theater

Political and cultural historian Michael Goldman has been collecting books on 1968 for decades, to the point where the local monthly publication The Improper Bostonian once opined that the two best places to relive the spirit of the late 1960s were Harvard Square and the book cases in Michael Goldman’s basement! For this presentation, Goldman will explain what it is about the year 1968 that continues to fascinate and frustrate those who remember it, as well as those who missed it, and also why many of its events, music, books, and films remains the focal point of so many in our culture right into 2018.

Sylvia Plath’s Letters & Traces-Peter K. Steinberg

Sunday, November 18, 3:00 pm

Join Peter K. Steinberg for a discussion on the editorial role he served in the recently published two-volume Letters of Sylvia Plath (Faber, 2017; HarperCollins, 2018). He will discuss finding, transcribing, and annotating the more than 1,400 letters in the books. The talk will conclude with the discovery of two lost Plath poems on a piece of carbon typing paper. Steinberg maintains the oldest, continuously updated websites about Plath: (www.sylviaplath.info) and the Sylvia Plath Info Blog (http://sylviaplathinfo.blogspot.com). 

FREE Expert Appraisals!

Sunday, November 12, 1:00-3:00pm

Bring in your own books, maps, and ephemera and discover what they’re worth. Get free expert appraisals from the best in the industry. Learn about details that determine the value of your item and whether or not it would interest collectors and dealers. You might find you have a valuable treasure!

Image: Anonyme regla y constitutiones de la cofradia. Courtesy Rare Books Le Feu Follet.

Bob Dylan lyrics.jpgWestport, CT - A rare, 1785 hand-colored portrait engraving of George Washington, printed for and sold by the London publisher Carington Bowles (British, 1724-1793), will be a featured lot in University Archives’ next online-only auction, slated for Wednesday, October 31st. Live bidding for the 283-lot auction is scheduled to start promptly at 10:30 am Eastern time. 

As with all University Archives auctions, this one is loaded with rare and highly collectible autographed documents, manuscripts, books, photos and relics. The full catalog can be viewed now, at www.UniversityArchives.com. Online bidding is being provided by the major platforms, Invaluable.com and LiveAuctioneers.com. Telephone and absentee bids will also be accepted.

Major categories in the sale include JFK and many other U.S. presidents, and scientific items (to include Darwin, Freud and Marie Curie). Additional highlight lots will include Bob Dylan’s handwritten and signed lyrics to The Times They Are A-Changin’; John F. Kennedy’s personally owned rosary beads; and a letter written by then-Gen. George Washington, dated Feb. 26th, 1780.

“We’re always strong in Americana, with the presidents and the Rev and Civil Wars, but this sale also has strong foreign consignments, too,” said John Reznikoff, the president and owner of University Archives. “We have many British Monarch items that are tastefully framed and were originally purchased from notable autograph dealer Kenneth Rendell. On top of that I note a very unusual WWII period huge Hirohito document which includes a decorative award that is quite a piece of art. Also, a rare Czarina Catherine (the Great) signed document and a handful of others.”

The Washington portrait engraving - an exquisite framed mezzotint measuring 12 ¾ inches by 9 ¾ inches - has an international pedigree. It was engraved from a painting by Jean-Baptiste Le Paon (French, 1738-1785), with elements of Charles Wilson Peale (American, 1741-1827) and Noel Le Mire (French, 1724-1793). And of course, it’s of a U.S. president, shown in a full-length portrait, with a slave or servant tending his horse, plus historic documents (est. $3,000-$4,000).

With a pre-sale estimate of $50,000-$60,000, Dylan’s handwritten signed lyrics to the iconic The Times They Are A-Changin’, penned on an 8 inch by 10 inch sheet, could end up as the sale’s top lot. The lyrics and signature were authenticated by Dylan’s manager. The bi-fold letter written and signed by George Washington in 1780 is addressed to Nathaniel Greene, the noted Rev-War general. In it he addresses ongoing concerns about supplies for the troops (est. $15,000-$17,000).

JFK’s personally owned rosary beads had been previously gifted, via donation, by Kennedy’s mother, Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy, in 1974, to Sister Fabiola Parent of the Sinsinawa (Wisc.) Sisterhood and curator and founder of the Sinsinawa Rosary Museum (est. $20,000-$24,000). Also, a copy of the special edition of LIFE magazine from 1961, for the inauguration of JFK, one of only three known copies that were signed by Kennedy, carries an estimate of $4,000-$5,000.

A two-page letter handwritten and signed by the evolutionary theorist Charles Darwin (British, 1809-1882), dated “Jan 31”, should gavel for $6,000-$7,000. The letter is to Darwin’s lawyer, Thomas Salt, and regards the family home in Shrewsbury. Also, items pertaining to aviation pioneer Orville Wright - a check dated Aug. 11, 1917 and signed by him, an original part from his plane and a print of the Wright Brothers’ first flight - is expected to soar to $3,000-$4,000.

A large, Japanese World War II-era document, in which Emperor Hirohito of Japan confers the Imperial Order of Meiji upon Eiichi Yamamoto, with the Star of the Order of the Sacred Treasure, signed in Japanese and dated April 18, 1940, should bring $4,000-$4,500; while an outstanding studio portrait of Wild West showman “Buffalo Bill” Cody in full Western costume, with a hat and rifle, signed by him and with a charming inscription, should garner $3,500-$3,750.

With the baseball post-season in full swing, what fan wouldn’t appreciate a mini Adirondack bat signed by some of the game’s all-time greats? These include DiMaggio, Mantle, Mays, Torre, Banks, Aaron, Bench, Williams, Ford, Perez, Gibson, Clemente, Musial and Rose (est. $3,000-$4,000). Also, a Bicentennial (1776-1976) Executive Service Badge (the short-lived precursor agency of the Secret Service), brass and painted red, white and blue, should make $600-$700.

A document dated 1774, probably a military appointment, signed by Russian Empress Catherine (the Great) II (1729-1796), as “Ekaterina” in the lower right corner, printed in Russian Cyrillic lettering on parchment, is estimated at $3,000-$3,500. Also, a one-page letter written in French and signed by Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821), as “Napol”, in which he outlines a grueling marching schedule, penned at Finckenstein Palace in May 1807, should rise to $1,500-$1,600.

A letter written by Union officer David Farragut on July 16, 1862, from his flagship Hartford during the bombardment of Vicksburg, Miss., during the Civil War, on the day Farragut was promoted to Rear Admiral (unbeknownst to him) carries an estimate of $1,500-$1,700; while a newspaper account of the Boston Massacre and the resulting political tensions in its aftermath, as described in the Boston Gazette and Country Journal, July 16, 1770, should fetch $1,000-$1,200. 

As with all University Archives online auctions, this one is packed with important, scarce and collectible signed documents and other items relating to some of the most famous names in all of history. The firm has become world-renowned as a go-to source for rare material of this nature.

University Archives was founded in 1979, as a division of University Stamp Company, by John Reznikoff, who started collecting stamps and coins in 1968, while in the third grade. Industry-wide, Reznikoff is considered the leading authenticity expert for manuscripts and documents. He consults with law enforcement, dealers, auction houses and both major authentication companies. 

For more information about University Archives and the Wednesday, October 31st internet-only auction, please visit www.universityarchives.com.

Image: Bob Dylan’s handwritten and signed lyrics to the iconic song The Times They Are A-Changin’, penned on an 8 inch by 10 inch sheet, authenticated by Dylan’s manager (est. $50,000-$60,000).

Auction Guide