PR_Expired_Book_02.jpgExpired (October 2017) is an exquisite new monograph by American photographic artist Kerry Mansfield that pays homage to the beauty and grace found in the collective and shared experience of time worn and well-read library books. The book's title is drawn from an official designation bestowed by a librarian upon a library book that is considered too damaged to be borrowed and read any longer. Some of these "expired" books are sent to be pulped and recycled, while others languish in storage or turn up in garage sales and on eBay.

This is where Mansfield steps in. For her, the discarded library book is a relic to be cherished and revered. Over the course of several years, she embarked on a mission to locate expired library books across the country and bring them back to life through her photography. With meticulous composition and artful lighting, Mansfield lovingly illuminates every damaged detail elevating these aging books into permanent works of art.

In her artist statement, Kerry Mansfield writes: "The volumes documented in 'Expired' serve as specimens akin to post-mortem photography in the Victorian Era, when family members only received the honor of documentation upon their demise. Each picture serves as an homage, calling out palpable echoes etched into the pages by a margin-scrawled note, a yellowed coffee splatter or sticky peanut butter and jelly fingerprints. It's easy to feel a sense of abuse and loss, but they say much more. They show the evidence of everyone that has touched them, because they were well read, and often well loved. They were not left on shelves, untouched."

In Expired, we witness beauty and poignancy in the tattered edges, torn covers, broken spines, water logged pages, and other defects brought on by time and neglect. Mansfield also photographs the ephemera of the library going experience: the little paper check-out cards where alongside the stamped due date the borrower's signature signifies a sacred promise to return the book on time or face a fine, or, worse, a scolding from the librarian.

The titles Mansfield captures range from the classics we love such as Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird," Dr. Seuss's "Hop on Pop," and "The Hardy Boys" series to more obscure books such as Evelyn Sibley Lampman's "The Shy Stegosaurus of Cricket Creek" and "The Flutes of Shanghai."

The Process

After culling through thousands of books, Mansfield chose each title based on specific characteristics that she felt best displayed the love poured into library books over their years on the stacks. Currently, over 180 ex-library books have been individually photographed by Mansfield. Every book was carefully assessed, documented and alphabetically archived. The series is comprised of 175 photographs. The book presents 73 of these images. Mansfield still has over 75 books left to shoot and is planning Expired (Volume II).

Book Design

Expired is elegantly designed to have the look and feel of a novel. The book features a red ribbon page marker, a tipped in image on the back cover, and mounted on the inside of the back cover is a physical library check-out card that is signed by the artist on the author line and inserted into a pocket stamped "Expired."

"We must take time to celebrate the swiftly disappearing communal experience offered by library books as they are being replaced by downloads, finger swipes, and plastic newness. If you listen carefully, you can hear the aching poetry -- the burden of the years that calls from their tattered pages," says Mansfield.

Expired will appeal to art and photo book collectors, writers, avid readers, librarians, sociologists, and anyone who cherishes the fading emblems of our collective reading history. 

About the Artist:

Kerry Mansfield is a San Francisco based photographer whose work explores time and how it effects our perceptions of what we see. Born in New Jersey in 1974, Kerry graduated with a Bachelor's Degree in Photography from UC Berkeley and did further studies at CCA (California College of the Arts) to refine her sense of space and architecture. Her work has been exhibited globally and garnered numerous honors including LensCulture's Single Image Award, multiple World Photography Organization and IPA Awards, and as a Critical Mass Finalist for three straight years. A host of press and publications, ranging from the PDN Photo Annual to The New York Times, have featured several of her bodies of work, including the most recent Expired series. For more information, go to: www.kerrymansfield.com

Book Specifications:

The Trade Edition

12"x12" 120 Smyth sewn pages 

Case bound linen cover

Leather wrap spine

Library check-out card in envelope

Red page marker ribbon

Blind embossed title

Tipped-in back cover image

$65 US

The Limited-Edition Box Set

SIGNED Limited Edition PRINT

Only 50 numbered copies

Linen clamshell case

Blind embossed title

Hand signed

Linen covered clamshell case

Includes all Trade Edition details

$350 US 

Both editions can be purchased by going to: www.kerrymansfield.com

 

Milton in Translation (Cover) copy.jpgThe works of John Milton have been translated more than 300 times and into 57 different languages - including onto sheets of toilet paper by a Yugoslavian political prisoner - extensive new research has revealed. 

A new book titled ‘Milton in Translation’ has been put together by Milton scholars and translators from across the globe to explore how wide reaching the impact of the 17th Century poet is and mark the 350th anniversary of his masterpiece ‘Paradise Lost’ (1667).  

It represents the world’s first detailed research into how Milton has been translated and read across the globe, and reveals previously unknown stories of the writer’s significance.

It has been produced by Prof Angelica Duran, Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Purdue University (USA), Dr Islam Issa, Lecturer in English Literature at Birmingham City University (UK), and Dr Jonathan R Olson, newly appointed Assistant Professor of English at Grand Canyon University (USA).

They recruited a global array of contributors who researched the number of translations, the languages and the significance of Milton across dozens of countries and hundreds of texts.  

Among stories uncovered, they found that in the 1960s, imprisoned Yugoslav communist party official turned dissident, Milovan Djilas, translated Milton onto rolls of toilet paper using a three-inch pencil hidden inside an orange and smuggled it out of prison. 

They also discovered a wide range of previously unknown facts. For instance, that translations were produced to replace lost manuscripts during China’s Cultural Revolution and that Josef Jungmann, the poet and linguist considered to be largely responsible for creating modern Czech language, took delight in translating Milton’s work. 

Dr Islam Issa, Lecturer in English Literature at Birmingham City University, who came up with idea, said:

“The inspiration for this book came in 2012 after the 10th International Milton Symposium in Tokyo, the first time the gathering had been held outside Europe or North America. It hit us how international Milton had become. It became particularly exciting finding how many languages Milton's work had been translated into since he was famously a multilingual himself.

"This book shows the real reach of literature, even if it's from 350 years ago. It also confirms that Milton's works, particularly ‘Paradise Lost’, have themes that are both universal and adaptable to different contexts.”

Among other findings, the book explores the relationship between Milton and politics across the world, reflecting the anti-establishment character of the author who played a role in ordering the execution of King Charles I. 

Translations were often found to mirror periods of rebellious ideology or nationalism such as in Soviet Estonia where the translation was an act of national resistance, during the Winter War of Finland when the country was gaining independence from Russia, and in the Middle East during the recent Arab Spring uprisings.

The book finds that translations of Milton’s work have been closely linked to religion in Iran and Israel, and specifically with Christianity in Italy, Poland, Portugal and Spain, where the Catholic Inquisition played a part in limiting and delaying some translations. 

Dr Issa added:

"The book isn't just about Milton. For me, the most fascinating thing was seeing how all around the world, religion and politics have been so closely linked with what people choose to translate and how they go about it.

“There were many common trends. So readers going through independence took real interest in Milton's revolutionary ideas. Or interestingly, translators in Egypt, Estonia and Spain from completely different times self-censored the exact same sexual scenes". 

Discoveries also include that Milton's works have been translated into more languages in the last 30 years than in the previous three centuries combined, emphasising the global political liberation and changing landscape of the 21st Century. 

‘Milton in Translation’ has been published by the Oxford University Press. 

 

1007.jpgThe July 15, 2017 sale at National Book Auctions (NBA) featured a broad range of rare and collectible books and ephemera.

Figuring prominently were titles relating to the opening of the American West as well as emblem books dating back to the early 17th century. Another standout offering was an early edition of Alexander von Humboldt's magnum opus "Voyage aux Regions Equinoxiales du Nouveau Continent." This highly decorative set with calf-backed, marbled, and gilt-stamped boards fetched $1,125 against a high estimate of $400. This pleasing result reflects the recent resurgence of interest in von Humboldt thanks to Andrea Wulf's 2016 bestseller "The Invention of Nature," which credits the German geographer with "forever chang[ing] the way we see the natural world."

Noteworthy ephemera lots included a very early issue of Detective Comics featuring Batman and Robin, which was discovered among personal papers during a complete estate clean-out conducted by NBA's full-service sister company Worth Auctions. Also showcased were an envelope franked by James A. Garfield; an original drawing by Rube Goldberg inscribed to the famous conservationist Horace Marden Albright; and a suite of vintage gravure prints by such iconic early 20th century photographers as Imogen Cunningham and Charles Sheeler.

Further complementary material will be featured in NBA's upcoming sale on July 29, 2017. NBA's cataloged live sales take place in the Galleries at Worth Asset Brokerage in Freeville, New York (just six miles north of Cornell University) and are simulcast to a global bidding audience via Invaluable. For more information about bidding or consigning, mail@nationalbookauctions.com or call 607-269-0101.

Image: Voyage aux Regions Equinoxiales du Nouveau Continent.

Altered States 5 copy.jpgCambridge, MA (July 2017) -- The search for something beyond the limits of ordinary experience—for transcendence—has preoccupied humankind for millennia. Religion, the occult, philosophy, music, endorphins, sex, Ecstasy: various paths have been taken in the hope of achieving it. In Altered States: Sex, Drugs, and Transcendence in the Ludlow-Santo Domingo Library, on view at Houghton Library 5 September-16 December, one collector’s quest to document the history of this search through rare books, manuscripts, photographs, posters, prints, comics, and ephemera is celebrated. 

Investment advisor Julio Mario Santo Domingo, Jr. (1957-2009) assembled the world’s largest private collection documenting psychoactive drugs and their physical and social effects. His interest was broad, from cultivation and synthesis to the many cultural and counter-cultural products such altered states of mind have inspired and influenced. Rich in scientific, medical, legal, and literary works, the Ludlow-Santo Domingo (LSD) Library documents in depth both the benefits of controlled use and the horrors of addiction. 

The exhibition, curated by Leslie A. Morris, Curator of Modern Books and Manuscripts at Houghton Library with the assistance of colleagues throughout the Harvard Library system, focuses on eight major topics represented in the LSD Library: opium, cocaine, hallucinogens, marijuana, sex, social protest, underground comix, and ephemera. “The incredible variety of material in the LSD Library has transformed our collection,” said Morris. “The Library can now support innovative new research on 20th-century culture and counterculture. And it’s very cool stuff!” 

Highlights include illustrations of poppies in a 16th-century doctor’s manual; an album of delicate 19th-century Chinese paintings showing stages of opium production; a binding with mirror and Amex card for cutting cocaine by artist Damien Hirst; self-portraits drawn under the influence of LSD; and posters from the Black Panthers and the May 1968 student protests in Paris. A selection of classic literature, including work by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Thomas De Quincy, Charles Baudelaire, William S. Burroughs, and Allen Ginsberg; and association copies such as Adolf Hitler’s annotated Kokain by Pitigrilli and Timothy Leary’s notes on Aleister Crowley’s Diary of a Drug Fiend, rub shoulders with pulp fiction such as Marijuana Girl, and underground comix illustrated by R. Crumb and Trina Robbins. Medical works on therapeutic drug use, and true-life tales of crime and addiction, provide a sobering reminder of the danger of excess. 

Sex, another path towards transcendence, is explored through poet Pierre Louÿs’s sex diary; erotica by Rachilde, Guy de Maupassant, and Pauline Réage; the first X-rated comic, Barbarella; and Jeffrey magazine. Works on birth control, AIDS prevention, and the Illustrated Presidential Report of the Commission on Obscenity and Pornography, and a female condom, show the individual and social consequences such exploration may provoke. 

The LSD Library came to Harvard in 2012. The collection is shared between various libraries at the University; this exhibition includes material from the Botany Library, Countway Medical Library, Fine Arts Library, Harvard Film Archive, Houghton Library, Law Library, Schlesinger Library, and Widener Library. “Since its arrival at Harvard in 2012, the Ludlow-Santo Domingo Library has been one of our most heavily used collections for research and for teaching,” said Thomas Hyry, Florence Fearrington Librarian of Houghton Library. “With this exhibition, we now look forward to presenting selections from this remarkable collection and to welcoming a broad audience of visitors who can engage with and learn from it.” 

Programs 

Complementary events include:
o Lectures by Don Lattin, author of the Harvard Psychedelic Club, and Laurence Bergreen, author of Casanova: The World of a Seductive Genius
o A film series at the Harvard Film Archive
o Social protest inspired poetry readings and other events hosted by Houghton 

Library’s Woodberry Poetry Room
o Altered Gazes: Sex, Drugs, and Rock & Roll at Schlesinger Library, an exhibition at Harvard University’s Schlesinger Library 

Houghton Library 

Houghton Library is Harvard University’s principal repository for rare books and manuscripts, literary and performing arts archives, and more. The library’s holdings of primary source material are managed by an expert staff and shared with scholars, students and the public in the reading room, and through exhibitions, lectures, seminars, publications and courses. 

Houghton Library is located in Harvard Yard, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. It is open Monday, Friday and Saturday 9am-5pm, and Tuesday through Thursday 9am-7pm. Houghton Library is closed on Sundays. Exhibitions are free and open to the public. 

Image: Ronald Jamer. Hippie Sex Communes. Los Angeles: Echelon Book Publishers, 1970. SD Library Pulp Fiction Collection, Houghton Library, Harvard University.

Cambridge, MA (July 2017) - Houghton Library, Harvard College’s primary rare books and manuscripts library, recently announced the capstone event of its 75th anniversary year, a symposium that asks bluntly, “Houghton Library: Who Cares?” The event, scheduled for this October 5th-6th, will examine the library’s legacy, mission, and path forward through the lens of that central question and provocation. 

Florence Fearrington Librarian of Houghton, Tom Hyry looks forward to “an engaging symposium that will address, from a variety of perspectives, many of the most pressing challenges and promising opportunities faced by Houghton Library and the special collections and archives profession. We hope and expect,” he continues, “that the symposium will result in a renewal of mission and the development of new directions for the library.” 

Fourteen speakers and panelists who connect to Houghton’s collections in a range of ways - as creators and collectors, readers and interpreters, colleagues in cultural heritage from around the world - will join the audience to grapple with questions around care and concern for the collections, as well as the scholarship, art, and inquiry that come out of engagement with libraries like Houghton. Organizers of the event hope to face boldly questions and concerns, cultivating an informed optimism about the future of special collections and archives that is tempered with an understanding of the problems they face in our current cultural climate. 

“Anniversaries tend toward the celebratory and self-congratulatory; our organizing committee hoped instead to use this opportunity to self-challenge and really do the work of building a case for care with this dynamic group of speakers and thinkers,” says Emilie Hardman, Houghton’s Research, Instruction, and Digital Initiatives Librarian, chair of the organizing committee. 

Each day of the symposium will feature a keynote lecture, the first delivered by Jamaica Kincaid, the world-renowned novelist and essayist. Kincaid will be followed by Johanna Drucker, internationally known for her work in the history of graphic design, typography, experimental poetry, fine art, and digital humanities. Symposium attendees will also hear opening remarks from Henry Louis “Skip” Gates, Director of the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University, and Drew Gilpin Faust, president of Harvard. For a full schedule, presenter profiles, registration for the waitlist, and other information, please visit: houghton75symposium.org. 

Want to know more? houghtonlibrary_events@harvard.edu or +1 617-998-5210 

Houghton Library 

Houghton Library is the principal repository for Harvard University's collections of rare books, manuscripts, and archives. The library’s holdings of primary source material are managed by an expert staff and shared with scholars and the public in the reading room, and through exhibitions, lectures, seminars, publications and courses. 

Houghton Library is located in Harvard Yard, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. It is open Monday, Friday and Saturday 9am-5pm, and Tuesday through Thursday 9am-7pm. Houghton Library is closed on Sundays. Exhibitions are free and open to the public. 

 

old ny photo 1.jpgThere’s even more to experience, more to enjoy and - best of all -- more to buy, when the Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair returns to the Brooklyn Expo Center in Greenpoint, September 8-10, 2017. One of New York City’s most eagerly awaited fall events, the 100-exhibitor fair, produced by the Impact Events Group, is among the largest regional antiquarian book fairs in the country.  

This year show goers will be introduced to a whole new world of collectible treasures with the debut of a “Works on Paper” gallery. Sunlight from the exhibition hall’s large windows will flood into individual gallery spaces where exhibitors have brought together outstanding collections of prints, drawings, etchings, engravings, lithographs and photography to add to the fair’s abundance of rare and vintage books from top dealers from across the U.S., Canada and Europe. Whether you’re looking for a book under $50, a rare edition, or a fine print to cherish for years to come, you’ll find it at this fair. With the addition of the Works on Paper gallery, the Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair’s expanded offerings make it feel like two great shows in one!

To celebrate the debut of the Works on Paper gallery, the Fair will mount an exhibition and sale of works by the late Maurice Sendak, beloved children’s author and illustrator. The first gallery-style showing and sale to be held in the artist’s native Brooklyn, this special event will feature original drawings, watercolors, vintage posters, signed prints and etchings, most of which have never been offered for public sale. 

These have been collected over a period of fifty years and were largely acquired directly from the artist himself. This is an unprecedented opportunity to own a fine art print, actually produced by the artist in 1971 from some of his favorite book images, for as little as $25.  For the serious collector, an exceptional signed first edition of the artist’s most famous children’s book, “Where the Wild Things Are,” is being offered by Enchanted Books for $22,500.  

If the work of Matthew Carter looks familiar, it’s because you might use it yourself - on your computer. The Center Street Studio is bringing a dramatic exhibit of a print portfolio by the renowned digital type designer, who has seven of his designs in the collection at the Museum of Modern Art. This portfolio consists of the 26 letters of the alphabet in his favorite typefaces of his own creation, which will be displayed on a 24-foot wall.  Some of the fonts include his best known, such as Verdana and Georgia, as well as some from type designs still in progress. 

Pop-up Mania is a series of events devoted to books filled with characters that pop right up out of its pages. Ellen Rubin, known as the Pop-Up Lady, is an expert on the history of moveable paper and will give an informative talk, “A History of Pop-up Books: 900 Years of Paper Engineering” on Saturday. She will also present an amazing exhibit from her massive collection of rare pop-up books from around the world.  On Sunday, parents and children alike will enjoy joining her for a 20-minute dramatic reading of the pop-up book, The Three Little Pigs. Fun for the entire family!

Joining her on Sunday is Matthew Reinhart, a world-renowned children's book author, illustrator and paper engineer. He will share the secrets of how to transform paper into magical, moving, three-dimensional structures that defy imagination in his demonstration, “Cut, Fold And Repeat.” Matthew is known best for designing the impossible in his acclaimed pop-up books, among them the New York Times bestselling “Star Wars: A Pop-Up Guide To The Galaxy, Cinderella: A Pop-Up Fairy Tale, Dc Super Heroes: The Ultimate Pop-Up Book and Mommy ?, produced with the legendary Maurice Sendak.. 

For people new to collecting rare books or prints, two talented professionals will present informative talks on Saturday. The History Channel’s “Pawn Stars” personality and rare book specialist, Rebecca Romney, will talk on “The ABC’s of Starting a Rare Book Collection,” and sign copies of her newly published book, “Printer’s Error:  Irreverent Stories from Book History.”  Art appraiser and renowned print specialist Jeannot R. Barr will share the fine points of getting started on a print collection in his presentation, “Starting a Print Collection on Any Budget. It’s a unique opportunity for collectors at all levels to learn directly from experts.

One of the signatures of this show is its depth of variety. Visitors could spend hours combing the aisles for personal favorites:  nostalgic snapshots of early New York from the vast collection of Stacy Waldman, owner of the House of Mirth; Brooklyn-based bookseller Lizzy Young’s vintage cookbooks and ephemera, including menus from the ocean liner RMS Lusitania. A collection of beautifully bound books from Austin Abbey Rare Books, has gilt-embossed covers that turn into glowing miniature works of art under direct light; and a huge collection of vintage luggage labels from Sheryl Jaeger of Eclectibles is sure to induce romantic visions of faraway places. World War II history buffs will be drawn to two important and very rare propaganda postcard collections that demonstrate how history unfolds on paper. Exhibitor Kurt Sanftleben’s Black Album, a collection of ten propaganda postcards, is the earliest depiction of Nazi atrocities against Poland’s Jewish citizens. Emil Allakhverdov’s Anti-Nazi, Anti-Soviet postcards, were reconfigured illustrations from a Ukrainian children’s book, published after the defeat of Nazi Germany in 1945. 

A Friday evening preview benefiting Rare Book School, is a must for those wanting to get first pick from the fair’s thousands of rare items before doors open on Saturday.  

LOCATION:

Brooklyn Expo Center

79 Franklin Street

Greenpoint, Brooklyn

HOURS:

Friday Preview - 5:00-9:00 pm (benefit for Rare Book School)

Saturday, September 9 -11:00 am to 7:00 pm

Sunday, September 10 - 11:00 am to 5:00 pm.

ADMISSION PRICES:

Friday Night Preview Benefit -- $25.00

General Admission Weekend Pass for $15 or $10 on Sunday 

Visit: www.brooklynbookfair.com for more information and discount admission tickets.

9781783301874.jpgFacet Publishing have announced the release of Freda Matassa’s new book Valuing Your Collection: A practical guide for museums, libraries and archives 

Assigning a financial value to a cultural object is always difficult, as there is no right answer. It is one of the many tasks of the curator, whether they work in a gallery, museum, archive or library, yet it is a role for which few have had any training and that many approach with a lack of confidence. Even if there is a profound knowledge of the subject matter, there may be insufficient experience in the market for cultural objects. However, although it may not be easy, it has to be done.

In Valuing Your Collection, collections management expert Freda Matassa examines the issues around valuing objects in cultural collections, describing current practice in museums, libraries and archives, and giving practical advice on how to assign values. Matassa looks at the difference between value and worth and at how cultural value can be translated into monetary terms. She outlines the arguments over whether financial values should be assigned at all and provides guidance on how to approach a valuation by making comparisons and using a step-by-step process for which templates for a wide range of collections are provided.

Matassa said, “Valuation is fraught with difficulties for cultural collections. Finance is not their core business. Curators have little or no training and are reluctant to mention money as it may detract from significance. My book is designed to give the non-specialist confidence in their decision making.”

Valuing Your Collection: A practical guide for museums, libraries and archives | Jul 2017 | 240pp | paperback: 9781783301874 | £59.95 | hardback: 9781783301881 | £119.95 | eBook: 9781783302147

Freda Matassa FRSA MA (Hons) DipAL DipEd is a well-known UK expert on collections management who advises, teaches and lectures internationally. Currently Director of Matassa Toffolo, a museum-standard art consultancy, former Head of Collections Management at Tate Galleries and co-founder of the European Registrars Conference, she is expert adviser on several European projects for museum standards and to the Minister of Culture on Immunity from Seizure. She was named one of the Top 50 Women to Watch in the arts and is the author of Museum Collections Management (Facet, 2011) and Organizing Exhibitions (Facet, 2014).

The book is published by Facet Publishing and is available from Bookpoint Ltd | Tel: +44 (0)1235 827702 | Fax: +44 (0)1235 827703 | Email: facet@bookpoint.co.uk | Web: www.facetpublishing.co.uk. | Mailing Address: Mail Order Dept, 39 Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 4TD. It is available in North America from the American Library Association.

Gigli copy.jpgDALLAS, Texas — Some of the most recognizable cultural figures and historical events are represented in the prints offered in Heritage Auctions’ Photographs Online Auction. Bids have been registered for a number of pieces with the end of bidding arriving July 19.

Highlighting the auction is long time LIFE magazine photographer Ormond Gigli’s Girls in the Windows, New York City, 1960 (est. $35,000-45,000), an impressive-sized (46 by 46 inches) print that is widely regarded as one of the most famous fashion shots of the 1960s.

“This auction is a testament to the evolving fine-art photography market and our over one million registered bidder-members that we are able to offer such high-value and iconic photographs in an internet-only format,” said Nigel Russell, Heritage Auctions Director of Photography.

Photographer and environmentalist Ansel Adams is represented with his Aspens, Northern New Mexico, 1958 (est. $15,000-25,000). This photo came to auction from the current owner who received it directly form Adams in 1977.

One of the most memorable photos ever published by LIFE magazine V.J. Day , Times Square, New York City, 1945 also referred to as “The Kiss” by Alfred Eisenstaedt (est. $8,000-12,000), numbered 175/250, captures the celebration of V-J Day in New York City. The Germany-born photographer recorded some of the most influential and iconic images of the 20th century.

Additionally, American photographer Herb Greene built his career around his portraits of the infamous band The Grateful Dead. This shot of the band with rock legend Bob Dylan aptly titled Bob Dylan and the Grateful Dead, 1987 (est. $1,500-2,500), is classic Greene and is one of many pop culture-themed photos available.

Other top lots include but are not limited to:

Hiroshi Sugimoto’s Saint Benedict Chapel from the series Architecture of Time, 2000: est. $10,000-15,000

Josef Hoflehner’s Jet Airliner #43, 2011: est. $6,500-7,500

Yousuf Karsh’s Winston Churchill, 1941: est. $3,000-5,000

Nicholas Nixon’s The Brown Sisters, Cambridge, 1986: est. $6,000-8,000

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

nielsen copy.jpgDALLAS, Texas - A record-breaking $1.4 million worth of rare animation art, concept drawings and poster art changed hands in Heritage Auctions’ Animation Art Auction July 1-2 in Dallas. The event featured a grand selection of original Fantasia artwork, and the leader of the famed Disney musical feature was Kay Nielsen’s depiction of the demon Chernabog in the Night on Bald Mountain Concept Painting, which sold for an astounding $59,750.

“This was our sixth consecutive Animation auction to top the $1 million mark,” said Jim Lentz, Director of Animation Art for Heritage. “Our formula has been to auction primarily fresh material that never had been offered for sale before, with almost no reserves, and to cross-promote it to a new generation of bidders as well as seasoned animation collectors. We plan to continue in this vein and also to continue emphasizing the whole range of animation from 1928-2000."

A beautiful Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs Old Hag and Snow White Production Cel exceeded expectations by closing $33,460, solidifying the fact that the cel was “no ordinary apple.” Also, a museum-worthy storyboard sequence from Song of the South appeared and its 23 pages of concept art from the “Tar Baby” scene by illustrator Ken Anderson sold for $15,535. Concept art from the classic by Mary Blair featuring Br'er Bear and Br'er Fox Concept Art (Walt Disney, 1946) sold for $10,157.

A lavish selection of Lady and the Tramp original artwork was offered, and some of the highlights included an alluring Production Cel Setup and Master Background that realized $14,340, a Production Cel Setup from the memorable “Bella Notte” scene received $11,950 and a Concept Art/Background Color Key by Eyvind Earle was auctioned for $6,572.50.

Additional animation and collectibles highlights included, but were not limited to:

·         Mary Blair’s The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad Concept Painting: realized $14,937

·         Mary Blair’s It’s a Small World Concept Painting: realized $14,340

·         Robin Hood Daffy Original Painting by Chuck Jones: realized $14,340

·         A bound Mickey Mouse Magazine Giveaway V1 #1: realized $13,145

Classics and Saturday Morning Cartoons

A gem from the Saturday morning cartoon arsenal of artwork Filmation’s The Adventures of Batman Publicity Cel and Painted Coconut came out on top, realizing $6,572. This cel was special because it was actually displayed in Filmation Studios’ offices for many years.

A rare, Rocky and His Friends Production Cel and Key Master Background realized $16,730.

An extraordinarily rare Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas Production Cel Setup and Master Background (MGM, 1966) - depicting the dastardly Grinch speeding away from Whoville on a sled packed with presents - sold for nearly three times its estimate to end at $6,572.

One of the first depictions of Mighty Mouse as “Super Mouse”- desired for being the first time art from the early cartoon was ever offered at auction - sold for $5,019. Also bringing $5,019 was a Production Cel and Master Painted Background Setup from the famous Tom and Jerry short “A Mouse in the House.”

Rare Disneyland Poster Art

Fans of Disneyland were treated to The Haunted House/Haunted Mansion Disneyland Notes and Plans group that are straight from the hands of Walt Disney and Ken Anderson, a longtime writer and art director at Walt Disney Animation Studios. These binder-bound notes went for $13,145 after a fierce battle among 13 bidders.

The “Haunted Mansion" Disneyland Entrance Poster Signed by Marc Davis (Walt Disney, 1969) sold for $4,899. The "Matterhorn Bobsled" Disneyland Park Attraction Poster (Walt Disney, 1959) sold for $3,585 as did the "Autopia" Disneyland Park Attraction Poster (Walt Disney, 1955).

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

casa.jpgDALLAS, Texas - A truly special piece from a film widely regarded as one of the greatest ever made, the 1946 Casablanca Italian 4 Fogli with Luigi Martinati Artwork is expected to sell for as much as $180,000 July 29-30 in Dallas. This 55.5-by-78.25-inch work of art is the first of its kind to surface in recent history; the poster, and many more, will hit the block on July 29-30 at Heritage Auctions’ Movie Posters Signature Auction.

“This Casablanca rarity is one of the finest in the entire hobby,” said Grey Smith, Director of Vintage Posters at Heritage Auctions. “To own this poster is on par with owning the pinnacle of poster art.”

Also on offer is a Frankenstein (Universal, 1931) One Sheet (est. $80,000), which is one out of six copies known to exist. The sequel to Frankenstein also makes an appearance at auction. A French Grande (46.5-by-62-inch) of The Bride of Frankenstein from 1935 is expected to bring in $40,000.

Other momentous Horror posters consist of a Supernatural One Sheet from 1933 (est. $45,000) and a never-before-offered Italian 4 Fogli from Horror of Dracula, a Universal production (est. $10,000).

From the depths of imagination came Metropolis, and with it came the revolutionary genre of science fiction. Two Australian pre-war daybills will cross the block and each is the only known copy of its kind. The two styles being presented are the Robotrix Style Daybill (est. $30,000) and the Flood Style Daybill (est. $20,000) which are genre-defining classics and must-haves for any serious collector. 

The Day the Earth Stood Still (est. $10,000) by 20th Century Fox in 1951 is arguably one of the best science fiction movies ever made, and Heritage is offering a classic Standee with retro imagery similar to the artwork found on the half sheets and title cards.

Additional highlights include, but are not limited to:

·         Casablanca Half Sheet (Warner Brothers, 1942): est. $50,000

·         Cavalcade One Sheet (Fox, 1933): est. $25,000

·         Morocco Double Grande (Paramount, 1931): est. $20,000

·         Spitfire One Sheet (RKO, 1934): est. $15,000

·         Moon Over Miami One Sheet (20th Century Fox, 1941): est. $12,000

Heritage Auctions’ Signature Movie Poster Auction takes place July 29-30 in Dallas and online at HA.com.

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

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