In an effort to aid in the recovery of materials missing as a result of the Carnegie Library theft, the ABAA requests the assistance of the public in bringing its attention to the list of items believed stolen. A downloadable pdf of same can be found here:

<https://www.abaa.org/blog/post/carnegie-library-theft>

Should any member of the public identify having purchased or otherwise having knowledge of the disposition or current location of any items from the Carnegie Library—whether on this list or not—please contact one of the following detectives from Allegheny County District Attorney’s Office:

· Det. Fran Laquatra 

  (412) 388-5305 

  flaquatra@alleghenycountyda.us

· Det. Perann Tansmore                   

  (412) 388-5307                           

  ptansmore@alleghenycountyda.us         `

· Det. Lyle Graber                           

  (412) 388-5316                           

  lgraber@alleghenycountyda.us

Please note, the detectives do not have reason to believe that anyone who may have purchased any of these items was necessarily aware that the material had been reported stolen.

The ABAA appreciates your attention and assistance with respect to this grave matter. Please check our post from March for further details, including additional information on collection markings: https://www.abaa.org/blog/post/pittsburgh-area-thefts.

Sincerely,

Vic Zoschak

President, ABAA

Brad Johnson

Chair, ABAA Security Committee

Susan Benne

Executive Director, ABAA

 

The Phantom in Skanor by De Geer.jpgIt’s the largest known collection of artwork and photography produced by the leading Swedish and Scandinavian artists of the 1960s and 70s counterculture. The Swedish Underground Exhibition, one of the finest examples of the shift in post-war art in Sweden, is coming to the Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair, Sept. 8 & 9 at the Brooklyn Expo Center in Greenpoint. The exhibition will be on view both days of the Fair during show hours in the Center’s exhibit room.   

Organized and curated by Johan Kugelberg, founder of Boo-Hooray, the organization he formed to formalize his archival collections of hip hop, punk and counter culture art,  the exhibition features major artistic voices of the time. At the center of the movement is Carl Johan De Geer, the Swedish artist and photographer, who began taking photographs in the 1960s that captured the grit of everyday Swedish life. De Geer’s photographs serve as a visual record of the era’s societal and cultural upheaval in otherwise conservative Sweden.

Like many artists of the time, De Geer became associated with Galleri Karlsson, considered the epicenter of the countercultural movement. The gallery exhibited artists such as De Geer and his wife, Mari-Louise De Geer, an accomplished artist in her own right;  Lars Hillersberg, Lena Svedberg, and Oyvind Fahlstrom - all of whom are represented in the upcoming exhibition.

In the late 60’s, De Geer, along with Svedberg, Hillersberg, and two other Swedish artists were associated with the leading Swedish underground publication of the Time, Puss magazine, contributing to its satire-driven, progressive content. The work of Lars Hillersberg, often employed humor and caricature in his political cartoons. Oyvind Fahlstrome served as New York correspondent, covering the city’s underground art scene.

Lena Svedberg (1946-1972) is cited as the greatest political artist associated with Puss. A compulsive draftsman, she avoided gallery shows, making her work difficult to sell.  De Geer’s documentary, “ I Remember Lena Svedberg is a masterful tribute to the artist, who committed suicide at age 16. The Swedish Underground Exhibit contains several original Svedberg artworks, as well as reproductions in prints and publications such as Puss.

Johan Kugelberg, who teaches and hosts symposiums at Yale and Cornell Universities, as well as Rare Book School at the University of Virginia, will conduct a tour of the exhibit and give a talk, humorously titled, “Why is The Swedish Underground Important:  I Don’t Speak Swedish,” on Sunday September 9th at  2pm. The tour and talk is free with pre-registration on the Fair’s website - www.brooklynbookfair.com.  

Show hours are: Saturday noon-7pm; Sunday 11am-4pm.   Admission:  Weekend pass $15 for adults; Sunday admission $10. An opening “Bagels & Books,” preview is scheduled for Saturday, 10am on.  The preview benefits scholarships at the University of Virginia’s Rare Book School. Tickets are $30 and available online at a discounted price at brooklynbookfair.com

Image: Like many artists of the time, De Geer, a talented painter, photographer, illustrator and filmmaker, became associated with Galleri Karlsson, considered the epicenter of the countercultural movement. The Swedish Underground Exhibition opens Sept. 8 & 9 at the Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair. It is largest known collection of counterculture artwork and photography produced by  leading Swedish and Scandinavian artists of the 1960s and 70s. The 100-exhibitor Fair is held at the Brooklyn Expo Center in Greenpoint.

BIABF-cloth bindings_Courtesy Brattle Book Shop copy.jpgBoston - The annual fall gathering for booklovers, the Boston International Antiquarian Book Fair returns to the Hynes Convention Center in Boston’s beautiful Back Bay for its 42nd year, November 16-18, 2018. Featuring the collections and rare treasures of 130 booksellers from the U.S., England, Canada, Netherlands, France, Germany, Russia, Denmark, and Argentina, the Boston Book Fair gives visitors the opportunity to see, learn about, and purchase the finest in rare and valuable books, illuminated manuscripts, autographs, graphics, maps, atlases, photographs, fine and decorative prints, and much more.

One of the oldest and most respected antiquarian book shows in the country, the event offers a top selection of items available on the international literary market. Attendees have the unique chance to get a close look at rare and historic museum-quality items, offered by some of the most prestigious participants in the trade.  Whether just browsing or buying, the Fair offers something for every taste and budget—books on art, politics, travel, gastronomy, and science to sport, natural history, literature, music, and children’s books—all appealing to a range of bibliophiles and browsers.

“We’re seeing a marked increase in dealers participating in this year’s event, including many dealers who are participating for the first time, “ said show producer Betty Fulton. “We’re very excited to see the array of items they will be bringing with them to Boston.”

For attendees wanting to start a collection without breaking the bank, there will be dealers offering “Discovery” items priced at $100 or less, including a selection of children's books and decorative cloth bindings.  The Fair is an opportunity to learn tips on how to start a collection, and talk to dealers who are experts in their specialties.

Special events at the Fair will include The Ticknor Society’s annual Collectors’ Roundtable, free appraisals, and other talks and demonstrations to be announced early this fall.  Visit www.bostonbookfair for updated event listings.

Tickets are $20 for Friday night’s exclusive Opening Night preview event, an opportunity for the public to get a first look at items for sale at the Fair; admission is free on Saturday and Sunday.

Friday, November 16              5:00-9:00pm             Tickets: $20.00 - Opening Night (valid all weekend)   

Saturday, November 17          12:00-7:00pm          Free Admission 

Sunday, November 18             12:00-5:00pm         Free Admission

Hynes Convention Center
900 Boylston Street
Boston, MA
www.mccahome.com

The Boston International Antiquarian Book Fair is sponsored by the New England Chapter of the Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association of America. A portion of the ticket sales will benefit the Boston Public Library and the American Antiquarian Society. Tickets are for sale at www.bostonbookfair.com and at the show’s box office during Friday evening show hours. For more information, please visit www.bostonbookfair.com or call 617-266-6540.

TUFSR0FSRVQtQk9VUktF4oCTV0hJVEUtKDE5MDTigJMxOTcxKS0tRm9ydC1QZWNrLURhbSwtTW9udGFuYSwtMTkzNi5qcGc=.jpegNew York -  Christie's announces the sale of An American Journey: The Diann G and Thomas A Mann Collection of Photographic Masterworks. On public view in Los Angeles, San Francisco and New York - the sale will take place at Christie’s Rockefeller Center the evening of October 4, followed by a morning session on October 5. The collection includes rare examples of works by major figures of the Photo-Secession—Edward Steichen, Gertrude Kasebier, Clarence White, and the quintessential patron and practitioner of American art photography, Alfred Stieglitz—along with numerous masterworks in early American Modernism by Edward Weston and Paul Strand.

Alfred Stieglitz was immensely influential in establishing and tirelessly promoting photography as an art form in the United States. He edited and published magazines, promoted photographers through exhibitions at his galleries, and produced his own rich body of creative photographic work. The photogravure printing process was his well-known favored method, and he promoted the technique as an original means of photographic printmaking. The Mann Collection contains his three most iconic works from the Photo-Secessionist period, printed as oversized photogravures; each example is signed and mounted including: The Terminal, New York, 1892; The Hand of Man, 1902; The Steerage, 1907.

The Mann collection also features works by socially conscious photographers associated with the Farm Security Administration which documented America during the Great Depression era, including Dorothea Lange, Margaret Bourke-White, Arthur Rothstein and Walker Evans. Additionally, of particular note are two outstanding 19th century works, including El Capitan, Yosemite, 1878-1881 by Carleton Watkins, and a superb example of White House Ruins in Canyon de Chelley by Timothy O'Sullivan, from 1873. 

An American Journey forms a comprehensive visual record of a rich period of production before World War I, through the explosive and radical period between the two great wars, and into the heady post-War period. Assembled by an assiduous couple who were moved by the power of photography, and recognized how severely photographic masterworks were undervalued. The Manns were true connoisseurs before photography collecting took off and had been fully accepted as a legitimate art form.

Image: Margaret Bourke-White (1904-1971), Fort Peck Dam, Montana, 1936. Gelatin silver print. Estimate: $100,000-150,000

Dayton, Ohio - Recognizing the power of literature to promote peace and reconciliation, the Dayton Literary Peace Prize Foundation today announced the finalists for the 2018 Dayton Literary Peace Prize in fiction and nonfiction.

Inspired by the 1995 Dayton Peace Accords that ended the war in Bosnia, The Dayton Literary Peace Prize is the only international literary peace prize awarded in the United States. The Prize celebrates the power of literature to promote peace, justice, and global understanding. This year's winners will be honored at a gala ceremony in Dayton on October 28th.

Writer John Irving, whose novels champion outsiders and often explore the bigotry, intolerance, and hatred directed at sexual minorities, will receive the 2018 The Ambassador Richard C. Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award, named in honor of the noted U.S. diplomat who helped negotiate the Dayton Peace Accords.

The full list of finalists can be found below and at www.daytonliterarypeaceprize.org.

"Many of this year's finalists explore the concept of 'home' at a time when more and more people find themselves forced to leave theirs, whether because of war, poverty, political turmoil, or dreams of new opportunities," said Sharon Rab, Chair of the Dayton Literary Peace Prize Foundation. "These books help the reader cultivate their ability to understand and empathize with people from very different backgrounds than their own - an ability that is becoming increasingly vital in today's turbulent world." 

The 2018 Dayton Literary Peace Prize fiction finalists are

  • Exit West by Mohsin Hamid (Riverhead): An astonishingly timely love story that brilliantly imagines the forces that transform ordinary people into refugees and the impossible choices that follow.
  • Go, Went, Gone by Jenny Erpenbeck (New Directions): A scathing indictment of Western policy toward the European refugee crisis, but also a touching portrait of a Berlin man who finds he has more in common with his city’s African refugees than he realizes.
  • Pachinko by Min Jin Lee (Grand Central): Exiled from a homeland they never knew, four generations of a poor Korean immigrant family fight to control their destinies. 
  • Salt Houses by Hala Alyan (Houghton, Mifflin, Harcourt): A heartbreaking story that follows three generations of a Palestinian family and asks us to confront that most devastating of all truths: you can’t go home again.
  • Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward (Scribner): A family makes the trip from their Gulf Coast town to the Mississippi State Penitentiary, testing the strength of their emotional bonds and the pull of a collective history.
  • Spaceman of Bohemia by Jaroslav Kalfař (Little, Brown): Raised in the Czech countryside by his doting grandparents, Jakub Procházka has risen from small-time scientist to become the country's first astronaut. A dangerous solo mission to Venus offers him the chance at heroism he's always dreamed of -- and a way to atone for his father's sins as a Communist informer.   

The 2018 Dayton Literary Peace Prize nonfiction finalists are

  • Enduring Vietnam by James Wright (St. Martin’s Press): A recounting of the experiences of the young Americans who fought in Vietnam and of the families who mourned those who did not return.
  • Ghost of the Innocent Man by Benjamin Rachlin (Little, Brown): This gripping account of one man's long road to freedom provides a picture of wrongful conviction and of the opportunity for meaningful reform, forever altering how we understand our criminal justice system.
  • Lolas’ House by M. Erdina Galang (Northwestern U. Press): The stories of sixteen Filipino “comfort women” are told in unprecedented detail in what is not only testimony and documentation, but a book of witness, of survival, and of the female body. 
  • Reading with Patrick by Michelle Kuo (Random House): In this stirring memoir, Kuo, the child of Taiwanese immigrants, shares the story of her complicated but rewarding mentorship of Patrick Browning, a teenaged student from one of the poorest counties in the U.S., and his remarkable literary and personal awakening.
  • The Newcomers by Helen Thorpe (Scribner): Helen Thorpe’s intensive, year-long reporting puts a human face on the U.S. refugee population through an intimate look at the lives of 22 teenagers enrolled in a beginner-level English Language Acquisition class at South High School in Denver, Colorado. 
  • We Were Eight Years in Power by Ta-Nehisi Coates (One World PRH): “Biting cultural and political analysis... reflects on race, Barack Obama’s presidency and its jarring aftermath, and [Coates’s] own evolution as a writer in eight stunningly incisive essays.” Kirkus Reviews (starred review) 

A winner and runner-up in fiction and nonfiction will be announced on September 18. Winners receive a $10,000 honorarium and runners-up receive $2,500. Finalists will be reviewed by a judging panel of prominent writers including Lesley Nneka Arimah (What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky), Robin Hemley (Reply All: Stories, Nola: A Memoir of Faith, Art, and Madness, Invented Eden: The Elusive, Disputed History of the Tasaday), Susan Southard (Nagasaki: Life After Nuclear War), and Alan Taylor (William Cooper’s Town, The Internal Enemy).

To be eligible for the 2018 awards, English-language books had to be published or translated into English in 2017 and address the theme of peace on a variety of levels, such as between individuals, among families and communities, or between nations, religions, or ethnic groups.

 

Pathe.jpgNew York - Poster Auctions International, Inc., has unveiled its all-new Poster Price Guide, an expanded and revamped version of its poster-dedicated database, consolidating a full pricing history of over 40,000 of the rarest vintage posters sold in 75 proprietary auctions over the past 33 years. It’s a must-have reference tool for poster collectors and dealers worldwide.

The new Poster Price Guide includes a new, mobile-responsive database, larger images and links to auction listings, with all relevant details (to include references, sizes and printer and historical details). Poster Auctions International, Inc., has also redone the user interface, allowing for easier browsing and searching. Even the technologically challenged will find it very simple to navigate.

Access is competitively priced, at just $4.99 per week, $14.99 per month or $149.99 for a year. “It’s an essential tool for collectors, auctioneers, and scholars,” company president Jack Rennert said. “Since you have a full history - every poster, estimated price and final sale - you can learn about sales trends for individual posters, artists or the artistic movements, such as Art Nouveau.”

Since the late 1980s, Poster Auctions International, Inc., has held 3-4 auctions a year. Poster aficionados, enthusiasts, collectors, galleries, and leading art museums around the world value it as one of their most trusted venues for successful consignments, unique buying opportunities, an unequaled experience in the field, and an impeccable source for top quality in original poster art.

Poster Auctions International, Inc.’s gallery, located at 26 West 17th Street in New York City, hosts rotating exhibitions of original poster art. Additionally, it offers for sale a wide catalogue of “Contemporary Classics” poster originals from the 1960s to the 1980s, with specialties in local New York topics, plus late 20th-century Polish, Japanese, and Israeli designers and more.

The gallery is also a veritable bookstore of research and coffee-table volumes on poster art, as well as an extensive research archive, open to the public by appointment. Poster Auctions International, Inc., regrets that it can sell, and accept for consignment, only poster originals.

Jack Rennert is regarded as one of the world’s foremost authorities on rare vintage posters. He’s authored (either solo or in collaboration,) two dozen books on poster art, including catalogue raisonnés for Leonetto Cappiello and Alphonse Mucha; studies on bicycle and circus posters; and Buffalo Bill’s Wild West. His book Posters of the Belle Epoque has sold over 30,000 copies.

Rennert is currently at work on the definitive catalogue of Edward Penfield’s graphic art. He was a consultant at Time-Life Books for the poster section of the Collectibles Encyclopedia and has organized poster exhibitions around the country, including the Lincoln Center Museum for the Performing Arts, Radio City Music Hall, the French Embassy and banks and corporate buildings. 

To learn more about Poster Auctions International, Inc., visit www.posterauctions.com. To schedule a gallery appointment, call (212) 787-4000, or e-mail to info@postersplease.com.

Image: Pathe (1932), a vinyl-record poster by the French illustrator A.M. Cassandre (Alphonse Mouron, 1901-1968), sold for $96,000 at Poster Auctions International, Inc., on March 12, 2017.

MoserNoFatherMLM71811_73495v_0002-hpr(1).jpg“It’s alive, It’s alive! cried the crazed scientist, Dr. Frankenstein, looking up from his operating table and exulting at the success of his scientific experiment.  And, in fact, the hated and lonely, yet fabulous creation of the mad scientist is alive and thriving in 2018 - two hundred years later!

Mary Godwin Shelley’s iconic novel, Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus,” written when she was just 21 years old -  a remarkable literary feat for a young woman just finding her way in the world-- is 200 years old this year.   It’s an anniversary that is soon to be the subject of a major exhibition this Fall at the Morgan Library & Museum in New York City, appropriately titled, “It’s Alive:  Frankenstein at 200.”

A special preview of this exhibition, will be featured at the upcoming Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair, September 8 & 9 at the Brooklyn Expo Center in Greenpoint - a not-to-be-missed event for all those who continue to be fascinated  and drawn to this world classic novel.  The exhibition’s curators,  the Morgan Library’s John Bidwell, and New York Public Library’s Elizabeth Denlinger, are scheduled to present a talk on Sat. Sept 8th at 5pm that previews the Morgan exhibition and looks at the enduring legacy of Mary Shelley’s novel.  It is a wonderful opportunity to sample some of the excitement of the upcoming exhibition a month before its actual opening at the Morgan Library.

Mary’s own life echoed some of the estrangement of the monster she created.  The wife of Percy Bysshe Shelley, one of England’s most renowned 19th century poets, Mary was the daughter of philosopher and political writer, William Godwin, and early feminist writer, Mary Wollstonecraft, who died shortly after Mary’s birth in 1797.  Mary was raised  in London by her father and stepmother.  It was a difficult childhood, not much enlightened by love nor formal education.  Mary escaped her challenging home life by reading and daydreaming.

At age 17, she entered into a relationship with Shelley, a devoted student of  Mary’s father.  Although still married to his first wife, he and the teenaged Mary fled England to travel throughout Europe for the next two years.   Perpetually poor, they ended up in Switzerland with a group of similarly poor friends, including Lord Byron, who had rented a house at Lake Geneva.  The friends entertained themselves one rainy summer day by reading a book of ghost stories.

“Let’s write our own ghost story,” Byron suggested.  This was the impetus for Mary to begin work on what would become her most famous novel, the incomparable “Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus.” Thus,  the legend of this frightening, yet very human monster was born.  The book, published anonymously in 1818,  proved to be a huge success  and is read world-wide to this day. 

The struggle between a monster and its creator has been reincarnated in the theatre, other books, comic books and especially in film (the iconic Boris Karloff movie of 1931; Gene Wilder’s spoof, Young Frankenstein;” Kenneth Branagh’s film adaptation in 1994; and the modern thriller, “I, Frankenstein” in 2015).

Aside from the classic story that appeals to both children and adults, the enduring relevance of Frankenstein lies in its basic human emotions.  Immediately recognizable as part of the human condition, is the monster’s need to be loved.   “You made me,” says the monster reasonably.  “All I ever wanted was your love.  Or at least acceptance.  But I am so ugly that everyone flees in disgust.  I’m lonely, an outcast, hated.  So I take my revenge.  I have learned, in the absence of love, to hate.”  Perhaps Frankenstein’s ultimate message today remains exactly what it was 200 years ago:  give love, not unkindness.

Hours for the Brooklyn Antiquarian Fair are:   Sat., September 8th, noon-7pm; Sun. September 9th, 11am-4pm; Admission:  Weekend pass:  $15 for adults; Sunday admission $10.   The Frankenstein talk is free with  online registration and tickets to the fair at www.brooklynbookfair.com.  

Image: Barry Moser, “No Father Has Watched My Infant Days” illustration in Mary Woolstonecraft Shelley, Frankenstein, West Hatfield, Mass.:  Pennyroyal Press, 1983. Morgan Library & Museum.  Photography by Janny Chiu 2017 @ 1984 Pennyroyal Press. 

Frazetta venus.jpgDallas, TX - Frenetic bidding drove the final price for Frank Frazetta’s Escape on Venus Painting Original Art (1972) to $660,000 to claim top-lot honors in Heritage Auctions' Comics & Comic Art Auction Aug. 2-4 in Dallas, Texas, which brought in a total of $6,670,739.

The price realized by Escape on Venus was the third-highest ever through Heritage Auctions for a Frazetta painting. Death Dealer 6 Painting Original Art (1990) brought a record $1,792,500 in May 2018, and Frank Frazetta At The Earth's Core Paperback Cover Painting Original Art (1974), sold for $1,075,500 in August 2016.

Used as the cover image for the 1974 re-issue of the Edgar Rice Burroughs novel of the same name, Escape on Venus was created in 1972 and released as a print later in the decade.

“The result for this painting continues a trend of Frazetta paintings that have enjoyed enormous success in our auctions,” Heritage Auctions Senior Vice President Ed Jaster said. “Frank Frazetta was known for painting strong, sensuous women in fantastic environments. Escape on Venus is a prime example of his ability to paint in a way that directs the focus of those viewing his paintings to a specific place. In this painting, the trees and plants around the borders of the painting are done in subtle, muted tones, sending the focus back to the tiger and the woman in the center of the image.”

The Incredible Hulk #1 (Marvel, 1962) CGC VF/NM 9.0 Off-white to white pages also drew bids from nearly 30 collectors, before ultimately selling for $264,000. Ranked second on Overstreet’s list of the Top 50 Silver Age Comics, this issue is the only one in which the Hulk appears grey, and carries a grade higher than all but two copies ever offered by Heritage Auctions.

The cover of Gene Colan and Bill Everett Iron Man and Sub-Mariner #1 Cover Original Art (Marvel, 1968) proclaims it to be a “Special Once-In-A-Lifetime” issue, and the $240,000 - a figure nearly 2-1/2 times the pre-auction estimate - showed evidence that the statement was more than mere hyperbolic hype designed to sell the issue. The title characters teamed up in this issue after each had paired up with others: Namor the Sub-Mariner with the Hulk in Tales to Astonish, and Iron Man with Captain America in Tales of Suspense.

John Romita Sr. Amazing Spider-Man #55 Cover Doctor Octopus Original Art (Marvel, 1967) was another extremely popular lot, drawing bids from 18 collectors before realizing $105,000. This stunning cover shows an extreme close-up image of supervillain Doctor Octopus, who is engaged in a battle with Spider-Man, who can be seen in the reflection of Doc Ock’s glasses over a banner trumpeting “DOC OCK WINS!”

Jack Kirby and Chic Stone Tales of Suspense #60 Splash Page 1 Captain America Original Art (Marvel, 1964) was among the most coveted items in the auction, inspiring bids from 31 collectors before closing at $96,000, nearly double the pre-auction estimate. Just the second solo Captain America story since the 1950s, the issue features an extraordinary image of Captain America beneath a starburst balloon announcing “THE ARMY OF ASSASSINS STRIKES!” The issue is written by Stan Lee, with art by Jack Kirby, and is inked by Chic Stone and lettered by Art Simek.

The 1958 cult-classic film The Blob! was inspired by scenes like the one on the cover of Wally Wood Weird Science #22 Cover Original Art (EC, 1953), which yielded $90,000. Promising “Incredible Science-Fiction Stories,” the original art by Wally Wood features Wood’s “Old English” font signature in the lower left corner. The image, measuring 13-1/2 by 19-1/2 inches, is done in ink over graphite on EC Bristol board.

Other top lots included, but were not limited to:

·         Jack Kirby and Paul Reinman X-Men #1 Story Page 5 Original Art (Marvel, 1963): $72,000

·         Detective Comics #35 Larson Pedigree (DC, 1940) CGC Conserved NM- 9.2 White pages: $66,000

·         Bernie Wrightson Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley's Frankenstein Unused Illustration Original Art (c. 1975): $60,000

·         Barry Smith Conan the Barbarian #5 Cover Original Art (Marvel, 1971): $60,000

The auction also featured a collection of 23 Star Wars action figures, which sold for a total of $201,180. The collection included, but was not limited to:

·         Bib Fortuna (Red Cape) Loose Action Figure /TW Prototype (Kenner, 1983) Condition: AFA 85 NM+: $31,200

·         Luke Skywalker 12 Back-C w/Yellow Hair Action Figure (Kenner, 1978) AFA 95 MT: $28,800

·         Ben (Obi-Wan) Kenobi First Shot Prototype Action Figure with Yellow Saber (Kenner, 1977) AFA 70 EX+: $20,400

·         Princess Leia Organa 12 Back-B Action Figure (Kenner, 1978) AFA 95 MT: $19,200

·         Luke Skywalker w/Telescoping Lightsaber 12 Back-C Action Figure (Kenner, 1978) AFA 85 NM+: $15,600

16 Kajioka.pngThe Center for Book Arts is pleased to announce its Fall Exhibitions. The Main Exhibition, titled Inside/ Out: Self, Family, Memory, Loss, Displacement, Catastrophe, is organized by Carole Naggar, poet, artist, curator, educator, and photography historian. 

Self-published photobooks first made their appearance in Europe right after World War II. At that time photographers mainly published in magazines, and the form of the photobook was still somewhat exotic, used infrequently by photographers. Today, self-published photobooks are also well represented in collections such as the New York MoMA’s library, The Indie Photo Library at the Beinecke (Yale), which inspired the creation of other independent photobook archives, like The Asia-Pacific Photobook Archive, as well as private collections.

This exhibition features thirty-four self-published photobooks, varying in sizes and aspect, usually printed in small editions. Their form varies from the classic, traditionally printed book to the zine, the folio, the leporello book, the panoramic shape, the I-phone… Also including selected photographs, Inside/Out shows a range of media from gelatin prints to C-prints, collotype, inkjet and Xerox.

The photographers and artists in this exhibition see the self-published photobook as a place of independence, a place where they can experiment freely with form, but, more importantly, as a testing ground for reflection, self-examination, meditation and ideas that the main market does little to accommodate. The quick turnaround from concept to creation also allows them to react to national and international news, making the books not only an aesthetic endeavor but also a political one.

The chosen books illustrate very personal subjects such as family, memory, loss and identity as well as larger topics such as immigration, displacement and exile and catastrophic events such as World War II, the AIDS epidemic, September 11 and Fukushima. A few are historical and most contemporary. They originate from twenty countries: Argentina, Azerbadjian, Denmark, Estonia, France, Germany, Great Britain, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Great Britain, Mexico, The Netherlands,The Philippines, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United States and Vietnam.

It had been predicted that the rise of the Internet would mean the end of the book on paper. However, it had an opposite effect, creating “digital fatigue” because ephemeral images are everywhere. Readers still crave a hands-on experience and the concrete sensations associated with reading and looking.

While some deplore the rise of self-publishing because it tramples the gates and gatekeepers who once decided what should be published, the trend gave artists new freedom. Self-published photobooks provide the experience of looking at work the way the artist envisioned it. Most self-published photobooks are issued in limited editions, hand-numbered or signed, which makes them works of arts themselves. They become places for debating ideas, articulating insights and experience, and testing out new forms. And many are objects of beauty.

Artists include: Olivia Arthur, Barbara Bash, Doug Beube, Julia Borissova, Machiel Botman, Chien Chi Chang, Cristina De Middel, Giovanni del Brenna, Michel Delsol, Eamonn Doyle, Carolyn Drake, Tina Enghoff, Veronica Fieiras, Claire Fouquet and Patty Smith, Lee Friedlander, Ralph Gibson, Hiroshi Hamaya, Simone Hoang, Ilkin Huseynov, Fumiko Imano, Miho Kajioka, Kent Klich, Anouk Kruithof, Susan Meiselas, Editha Mesina, Kazuma Obara, Pablo Ortiz Monasterio, Sophie Ristelhueber, Alec Soth, Jordan Sullivan, Peter Van Agtmael, Todd Walker, Mo Yi, and Ksenia Yurkova

Roundtable Discussion: Friday, October 19, 2018, 6:30 pm

The roundtable will include Barbara Bash, Michel Delsol, Editha Mesina and Patty Smith. and will be moderated by Carole Naggar.

For inquiries please contact the Center at eahern@centerforbookarts.org.

When: October 5 - December 15, 2018

Where: 28 W 27th St., 3rd Floor, NY, NY

Subway: N/R to 28th St, or F to 23rd St

Exhibition URL: https://centerforbookarts.org/events/category/exhibitions/upcoming-exhibitions/

Gallery Hours: M-F, 11a-6p; Sat, 10a-5p

Admission: Free

ALSO ON VIEW: FALL 2018 FEATURED ARTIST PROJECTS

 In addition to Inside/Out, The Center presents Cultivating Book and Land by Sally Alatolo and Celestial Bodies by Monica Ong, both organized by Alexander Campos, Executive Director & Curator for The Center for Book Arts. All three shows are on view through December 15.

Cultivating Book and Land by Master Faculty Fellow Sally Alatolo is a project that originated in the rehabilitation of an orchard and woodlands in rural SW Michigan. Alatolo is eager to bridge her interests in language and its dissemination with the discourses of rural economies.

Monica Ong is a visual artist and poet whose hybrid image-poems juxtapose diagram and diary, bearing witness to silenced histories of the body. Her Featured Artist Project is presented as a series of art installations. The poems are as much visual journeys as they are lyrical haunts of medicine and memory.                                                               

Visit our website for up-to-date details on all events and programs:  www.centerforbookarts.org

Image: Miho Kajioka, And Where Did the Peacocks Go?, 2018, Courtesy of the Artist

l2017146_119v_low.jpgLos Angeles - The J. Paul Getty Museum recently announced the acquisition of the Rothschild Pentateuch, a manuscript of the first five books of the Hebrew Bible, known as the Torah. Its acquisition, coupled with works already in the Museum’s manuscripts collection, allows the Getty to represent the medieval art of illumination in sacred texts from the three Abrahamic religions—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Art of Three Faiths: A Torah, a Bible, and a Qur’an, on view August 7, 2018 through February 3, 2019, showcases three spectacular examples of each of these three: a Christian Bible and a Qur’an will be shown alongside the newly acquired Torah.  

“This landmark acquisition fulfills one of the Museum’s longstanding goals of adding to our collection a Hebrew manuscript that can stand comparison in quality and importance to our finest illuminated manuscripts of other languages and faiths,” explains Timothy Potts, director of the J. Paul Getty Museum. “It has taken 35 years, but the Rothschild Pentateuch fills this gap more brilliantly than we could ever have imagined. An amazingly rare and beautiful object, richly illuminated with all manner of real and imaginary animals, it also broadens greatly the narratives we are able to tell about life, culture and religion in the Middle Ages. The acquisition will be a highlight of an upcoming exhibition that brings together - for the first time at the Getty - the sacred texts of the three Abrahamic religions, something that I am sure will deepen the experience of these works for many of our visitors, and be a rich subject of study for scholars.”

Judaism, Christianity, and Islam trace their belief in the singular God to a common patriarch, the figure of Abraham. The practitioners of all three religions have been called “people of the book” for their shared belief in the importance of the divine word, rendered in medieval manuscripts in glowing gold and luminous colors on parchment. 

The Torah is the central sacred text of Judaism. In the strictest sense, the word refers to the Pentateuch, which contains the books of Moses: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. Illuminated copies of the Hebrew Bible in codex form, rather than Torah scrolls, began to appear in the mid-thirteenth century. In northern Europe, these manuscripts served the needs of members of the Ashkenazi Jewish community who had settled in the area along the Rhine River. Lavishly illustrated Hebrew manuscripts are exceedingly rare, since Jewish artisans were forbidden by law to join painting guilds. Hebrew manuscripts were often written by itinerant Jewish scribes and illuminated by local, sometimes Christian, artists. Illumination of the Hebrew Bible centers on the calligraphic forms of the letters, such as initials, word panels, or decorative frames around blocks of text.

“The three objects on display are exceptionally beautiful artworks that we hope will spark meaningful dialogue among various audiences,” said Elizabeth Morrison, senior curator of Manuscripts at the Getty Museum. “Museums offer more than simply an aesthetic experience. Through exhibitions such as this one, they foster a deeper understanding of history that helps us to reflect on our own shared experiences.”

Among the earliest bound and illuminated codices from the Mediterranean world are copies of the Christian Bible written in Greek, Latin, Syriac, Ge’ez, Armenian, and other languages. The first part of the Christian Bible consists of texts from the Hebrew Bible, referred to since the second century by Christian writers as the Old Testament. Medieval Christians understood it not only as a historical document but also as a body of prophecy that specifically foretold the coming of Christ. The New Testament comprises accounts of Christ’s life, the Gospels, letters to churches or individuals from his disciples, such as apostles Peter and Paul, and a text about the end of time known as Apocalypse or Revelation. Illuminated Bibles—handwritten and printed alike—are among the most enduring forms of Christian book art produced during the Middle Ages.

The words that the angel Jibril (Gabriel) recited to the prophet Muhammad ibn Abdullah, about 560-632, formed the sacred text of the Qur’an. The opening line, “In the name of Allah, most gracious, most merciful,” a central tenet of Islam that expresses submission to the will of Allah, is repeated in almost every surah or chapter. Muslims transmitted scripture through oral tradition for the first few centuries, and later recorded it through beautiful and ornate calligraphy. Artists incorporated Quranic verses into books, textiles, coins, ceramics, and architecture, demonstrating reverence for the written word. Throughout the Middle Ages, the Islamic word spanned a vast territory, from the Iberian Peninsula to northern and coastal Africa, across the Mediterranean basin, and as far as Central and Eastern Asia.

Art of Three Faiths: A Torah, a Bible, and a Qur’an is curated by Kristen Collins, Bryan Keene, and Elizabeth Morrison, of the department of Manuscripts at the J. Paul Getty Museum. The exhibition will be on view August 7, 2018 through February 3, 2019. 

Image: Decorated Text Page (Book of Exodus) from the Rothschild Pentateuch, France and/or Germany, 1296. Leaf: 10 7/8 x 8 1/4 in. (27.5 x 21 cm). Ms. 116 (2018.43), fol. 119v

 

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