Federalist PBA.jpgPBA Galleries is pleased to offer an exceptional, complete copy of the 1788 first edition of The Federalist in our May 31st Americana auction. The Federalist is the single most important book published in North America with this copy being an exceptionally clean copy, a rare example printed on thick superfine royal writing paper.

The first edition of the seminal work on American political theory and a cornerstone of American constitutional governance, called by Wright Howes “the most famous and influential American political work.” Only 500 copies of the first edition were printed, and the present copy is one of the exceptionally rare examples printed on thick superfine royal writing paper. These copies were advertised by the publisher M’Lean in contemporary periodicals as the more deluxe version of this seminal document: “A few Copies will be printed on superfine royal writing paper, price ten shillings.” The importance of the Federalist to the early development of the great political experiment that was the United States cannot be overstated. The work comprised 85 political essays, all but the last 8 of which were first published in newspapers in New York, in an effort to convince New York to approve the Federalist Constitution. Alexander Hamilton wrote 51 of the essays, James Madison 14, and John Jay 5; the authorship of 15 of the essays is in dispute between Hamilton and Madison. They were all published under the pseudonym “Publius.” The first thirty-six numbers of The Federalist were here published in book form in March 1788, with the remaining forty-nine, together with the text of the Constitution, in May of that year. Upon its publication George Washington noted to Alexander Hamilton that the work “will merit the Notice of Posterity; because in it are candidly and ably discussed the principles of freedom and the topics of government, which will always be interesting to mankind” (George Washington, letter to Hamilton, Aug. 28, 1788). The present copy has an early and bold ink ownership signature at the top of p.[1] of each volume, “Lawr. Stuart” or possibly “James Stuart”; the very top of each of the signatures was slightly shaved when the volumes were bound, likely prior to 1820 or so. Church 1230; Evans 21127; Grolier, 100 American, 19; Howes H114; Printing and the Mind of Man 234; Sabin 23979; Streeter 1049. Provenance: Helen A. [Doolittle] and George R. Sanders.

With some rubbing to covers and spines, corners a bit worn, joints scuffed and tender; only a few instances of minor foxing within, overall very clean and fine internally, the stitching quite tight. It has been in the same private collection for at least the last fifty years. The estimate is set at $80,000-$120,000.

You can view the complete entry and multiple images online at http://www.pbagalleries.com/content/2018/04/12/first-complete-edition-of-the-federalist-papers-in-book-form/

PBA Galleries holds sales of fine, rare and collectible books every two weeks.  For more information regarding upcoming sales, consignments, or auction results, please contact PBA Galleries at (415) 989-2665 or pba@pbagalleries.com

a-view-endeavour-watering-place-alexander-buchan copy.jpgMarking 250 years since James Cook’s ship Endeavour set sail from Plymouth, James Cook: The Voyages (27 April to 28 August 2018) explores Cook’s three world-changing voyages through stunning artworks, original maps and handwritten journals.

From iconic depictions of people and landscapes by expedition artists Sydney Parkinson, John Webber and William Hodges to an evocative collection of drawings by Polynesian high priest and navigator Tupaia, which are going on display together for the first time, James Cook: The Voyages will take visitors on a journey of discovery, from the Pacific Ocean to the Antarctic.

The exhibition will chart Cook’s three voyages, from the Endeavour setting sail from Plymouth in 1768 to the Resolution and Discovery returning to Britain in 1780 after Cook’s death in Hawaii. It will explore different perspectives on the voyages, from those on board the ships to those who saw them arrive on their shores, and will consider their legacy and relevance today.

Exhibition highlights include:

  • Paintings depicting Tahiti, New Zealand and Australia by the Polynesian high priest and navigator Tupaia, which are going on display as a group for the first time
  • The first chart of New Zealand by James Cook
  • The first artworks depicting the Antarctic by William Hodges on loan from the State Library of New South Wales, which will be reunited with James Cook’s handwritten journal entry describing the first crossing of the Antarctic Circle, for the first time in 100 years
  • Specimens from the first voyage, including the mouth parts of a squid, on loan from the Royal College of Surgeons
  • Expedition artist John Webber’s watercolour landscapes, including the first European illustrations of Hawai’i
  • Jewellery and musical instruments, including a necklace from Tierra del Fuego, ceremonial rattle from Nootka Sound (Vancouver Island) and bamboo flute from Tahiti, on loan from Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology, Cambridge 
  • Natural history drawings, including the first European depiction of a kangaroo by Sydney Parkinson on loan from the Natural History Museum

The British Library holds pre-eminent collections from the voyages, including many original maps, artwork and journals produced on board ship, which will be displayed alongside films exploring contemporary views on Cook’s legacy in Australia, New Zealand and other places visited by the expeditions. Contemporary perspectives on the voyages, including people from the Pacific communities Cook visited, will also be explored through the Library’s accompanying web space (www.bl.uk/the-voyages-of-captain-james-cook) and public events programme.  

William Frame, co-curator of James Cook: The Voyages at the British Library, said:

‘The British Library holds many iconic artworks, charts and handwritten journals from James Cook’s voyages and the exhibition displays the most famous of these together, alongside key loans, for the first time in a generation. Through the exhibition and accompanying public programme visitors will be able to consider different perspectives on the voyages and to reflect on their meaning today.’ 

Laura Walker, co-curator of James Cook: The Voyages at the British Library, said:

‘In the exhibition, visitors will be able to follow the course of each voyage through eyewitness accounts, hand-drawn charts and stunning artwork created on board ship. Alongside these sources, recently commissioned films allow visitors to consider contemporary perspectives on the voyages and to examine their legacy, much of which remains highly contested today.’

The accompanying web space, which will be added to throughout the exhibition run, hosts a range of newly digitised collection items, audio-visual content and articles by academics, artists, journalists and community historians who present their views and responses to the Library’s exhibition and collections.

The British Library will also be hosting a series of photographs by Crystal Te Moananui-Squares, which present a contemporary encounter with Pacific communities in the United Kingdom as a creative response to the exhibition. The free display, entitled Tūhuratanga - Voyages of Discovery, will be located in the Library’s Second Floor Gallery from 6 July to 23 September 2018.

There will be a full programme of events, including talks, discussions and film screenings, inspired by the exhibition. April to June events can be found on the British Library’s What’s On pages, with a full programme of events available on request. Highlights include:

James Cook: The Voyages is supported by PONANT Yacht Cruises & Expeditions and the UK Antarctic Heritage Trust.

Image: 'A View of the Endeavour’s Watering Place in the Bay of Good Success’ by Alexander Buchan, 1769 (c) British Library Board.

 

d31c94afe21a5e639252b78f_1100x734.jpgNew York, NY — Known for exhibiting book designs by artists ranging from the Master of Catherine of Cleves to Andy Warhol, the Morgan Library & Museum will now showcase extraordinary works by New York City public school students. The month-long exhibition Inspiring and Illuminating the Classroom, on view in the lobby of the Morgan's Gilbert Court, is the culmination of the Morgan Book Project, a unique collaboration between the Morgan and NYC Department of Education. Now in its ninth year, this free and innovative program guides third to twelfth grade students as they write, illustrate, and bind their own illuminated manuscripts throughout the school year. 

On May 11, 2018, the museum will host the Morgan Book Project Awards Ceremony, honoring the 64 students whose exemplary works have been selected by jury of book professionals, artists, and school librarians. During the award ceremony in Gilder Lehrman Hall, students have the opportunity to display and celebrate their work in the presence of their teachers, principals, and families. 

By sparking interest in the book arts, NYC public school teachers and Morgan educators hope to inspire the next generation of artists, illustrators, and writers from diverse backgrounds. From October through March, students learn to apply traditional book art techniques and language arts skills to their own creative work. Throughout the process of book making, students draw upon the Morgan’s rich collection of illuminated manuscripts and learn about world history for inspiration. They also have the opportunity to make their own paint with traditional pigment sources such as malachite, saffron, insects, to adorn their work with a 22 karat gold leaf, and to use professional grade watercolor and Italian marble paper.

This year’s ceremony marks many important milestones for the program. In 2017, the Morgan became one of the first institutions to gain the status of official Continuing Teacher and Leader Education (CTLE) sponsor. In the past year, it expanded its high school curriculum to reach ninth, tenth, twelfth grade students as well, increasing participation in the 17-18 school year. After modifying its resources and schedule to assist teachers of students with special needs, the Morgan Book Project has also seen the highest participation by students with diverse needs and abilities in the project’s history. More recently, the Morgan tailored the learning experiences to the vast numbers of New York City pupils of non-Western backgrounds and installed multilingual educators in Title 1 participating schools.

“The Morgan Book Project is in many ways a pillar of our arts education initiatives,” said Colin B. Bailey, Director of the Morgan Library & Museum. “Students have the opportunity to not only see great works of art and literature up close, but also experience the creative process firsthand and develop their own gifts. It is wonderful to see such inspired engagement and enthusiasm for the book arts among school children, and we are proud to celebrate their accomplishments at the museum.” 

The Morgan Book Project is made possible by a generous grant from Marina Kellen French and the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation.

Image: Installation of student works at the Awards Ceremony. Photography by Emily Korn.

Amherst, MA — Together, Leo and Diane Dillon created illustrations of extraordinary beauty and cultural resonance, illuminating global stories of diverse subjects--from the Caldecott Medal-winning picture book Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears to the paperback covers of classic children's literature. The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art is pleased to present A Marriage of Artistry: Leo and Diane Dillon, on view from May 26, 2018 through November 25, 2018 in the Central Gallery.

Born 11 days apart on opposite sides of the country, Leo Dillon (1933-2012) and Diane Sorber (b. 1933) met as students at the Parsons School of Design in New York, where they became instant rivals and steadfast partners in life and art. They worked in concert for 50 years, demonstrating remarkable versatility and a mastery of media. No single style defines their art; they skillfully adopted different modes of expression to best illustrate each narrative. 

The Dillons are the only artists ever to win the Caldecott Medal in back-to-back years, and the exhibition features original art from those two distinguished books: Why Mosquitoes Buzz in People's Ears (1976) and Ashanti to Zulu: African Traditions (1977). They produced art together in their Brooklyn brownstone, collaborating on every piece until Leo's passing in 2012. In a 2015 interview, Diane said, "We came to the concept of the 'third artist,' which was the combination of the two of us doing something that neither one of us could do separately. We would look at a piece after we finished it, and it'd be impossible for us to figure out who did what." The family collaboration extended to their son Lee, who sculpted several customized frames for his parents work, including the 50th edition cover art for C. S. Lewis's The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe. In the exhibition, a drawing activity emphasizes the art of collaboration by inviting visitors to work together on a shared picture.

Twenty-three titles are represented in A Marriage of Artistry: Leo and Diane Dillon, three of which Leo and Diane authored. Diane's first solo effort, I Can Be Anything! Don't Tell Me I Can't (2018), is also featured. The Dillon's extraordinary amalgamation of imagery illustrates African, Japanese, Inuit, and West Indian folklore, mythologies, and Biblical stories. Many of their books address African and African-American history. They dedicated themselves to portraying children of color so young readers could see themselves reflected in stories. As Leo noted in a 2002 interview, "We're an interracial couple, and we decided early in our career that we wanted to represent all races and show people that were rarely seen in children's books at the time." They illustrated the words of dozens of authors, including notable Newbery Medalist Virginia Hamilton, and fastidiously researched the cultures they portrayed.

"There is an astonishing range of emotions and artistic styles presented in the exhibition," says Ellen Keiter, the Museum's chief curator. "Some stories, like Jazz on a Saturday Night (2007), provide a joyful dance through history while others, such as The People Could Fly (2004) and Never Forgotten (2011), depict the haunting horrors of slavery." The Dillon's used acrylic, oil, watercolor, collage, pastel, gold leaf, and other media to create their imagery. Whatever the format or varied subject matter, their illustration is proof of their ability to master visual storytelling.

Gallery Talk:

A Marriage of Artistry: Leo and Diane Dillon

Thursday, May 31, 4:00 - 6:00 pm

Join Chief Curator Ellen Keiter for a guided gallery talk. A book signing with Diane Dillon and a light reception in the Great Hall will follow.  Free with Museum Admission, reservations suggested; call 413-559-6336.

About The Carle:

The mission of The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, a non-profit organization in Amherst, MA, is to inspire a love of art and reading through picture books. A leading advocate in its field, The Carle collects, preserves, presents, and celebrates picture books and picture-book illustrations from around the world. In addition to underscoring the cultural, historical, and artistic significance of picture books and their art form, The Carle offers educational programs that provide a foundation for arts integration and literacy.

Eric Carle and his wife, the late Barbara Carle, co-founded the Museum in November 2002. Carle is the renowned author and illustrator of more than 70 books, including the 1969 classic The Very Hungry Caterpillar. Since opening, the 43,000-square foot facility has served more than 750,000 visitors, including 50,000 schoolchildren. The Carle houses more than 11,000 objects, including 7,300 permanent collection illustrations. The Carle has three art galleries, an art studio, a theater, picture book and scholarly libraries, and educational programs for families, scholars, educators, and schoolchildren. Educational offerings include professional training for educators around the country and Master's degree programs in children's literature with Simmons College. Museum hours are Tuesday through Friday 10 am to 4 pm, Saturday 10 am to 5 pm, and Sunday 12 pm to 5 pm. Open Mondays in July and August and during MA school vacation weeks. Admission is $9 for adults, $6 for children under 18, and $22.50 for a family of four. For further information and directions, call (413) 559-6300 or visit the Museum's website at www.carlemuseum.org.

MS5BdWR1Ym9uLldpbnRlckhhd2suSlBH.jpegNew York - On June 14, 2018, collectors will have a rare chance to own one of the most sought-after books of natural history ever created: a full-size, complete first edition of John James Audubon’s The Birds of America (1827-1838).  Christie’s New York will offer in a special sale the exceptional “Duke of Portland” set of these 435 lushly hand-colored engravings (estimate: $8,000,000-12,000,000), among the most superlative copies in private hands of the finest color-plate book ever produced. Prior to the dedicated sale, the book will tour to Christie’s Los Angeles (April 26-28) and to Christie’s London (May 19-24), where it will be presented for public exhibition. Proceeds from this sale will benefit the Knobloch Family Foundation and its mission to preserve plants, animals and natural habitats through the protection and conservation of land and ecosystems, and to support the advancement of methods for valuing shared natural resources.

Audubon’s greatest triumph, The Birds of America, is considered one of the world’s most preeminent natural history documents and visually arresting works of art. Issued in 87 fascicles of five sheets each, the double-elephant-folio edition contains 435 hand-colored prints featuring 1,037 life-size birds, representing 500 species reflecting his determination to depict all the known species found in North America. This luxurious edition is the most spectacular color folio print series ever produced and is acknowledged as the finest work of colored engraving with aquatint in existence. The towering format of this work, a four-volume set of double-elephant folios over 3 feet in height, was dictated by Audubon’s insistence on life-size illustrations—from the flamingo down to the hummingbird—even if the former had to curve its neck in an elegant arabesque (pictured above right). His adherence to scale and lifelike depictions was grounded in his profound connection with the natural world which was inseparable from his work.

The set was acquired by William Henry Cavendish Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck, the fourth Duke of Portland (1768-1854), at some point after 1838, and has been maintained in excellent condition, with fresh, vibrant colors. Bibliographers calculate that the entire first edition numbered just 200 completed copies produced over an eleven-year period, of which 161 copies were created for paid subscribers.  At present, only 120 complete sets are known to exist in the world, 107 in institutions and 13 in private hands.

Carl W. Knobloch, Jr. purchased this volume at Christie’s New York in 2012. He has spent a lifetime preserving nature founding the Knobloch Family Foundation to continue that mission. When building his collection, Carl turned for advice to Gudmund Vigtel who for many years was the distinguished Director of the High Museum of Art in Atlanta. It is fitting that this remarkable book is now being sold to benefit conservation of the natural environment - a precious resource so dear to both Audubon and Carl.

A Masterpiece of Ornithological Art 

John James Audubon was born on April 26, 1785 on a sugar plantation in Haiti, as the illegitimate son of Jean Audubon, a French sea captain and agent for a Nantes mercantile firm, and his mistress Jeanne Rabine, a twenty-seven-year-old chambermaid who died within months of giving birth. John James and his half-sister spent their early years with their father in France. It was here, during long countryside rambles that the young Audubon collected bird specimens to be stuffed and drawn, and began his lifelong fascination with birds. Before the age of 12, Audubon escaped a slave revolt in Haiti, and survived France Reign of Terror, spending months in a dungeon with his family. At age 18 his father sent him to America to avoid conscription into Napoleon’s imperial army. John James settled in Philadelphia, where he met Lucy Bakewell, the daughter of a prosperous neighbor. They married in 1808 and moved to Kentucky. 

The largely unspoiled wilderness of Kentucky provided Audubon with access to a broader range of birds to hunt and draw. Without any artistic training to speak of, Audubon developed a new method of mounting dead birds on wires as an aid to delineation. In 1810, Audubon briefly met Alexander Wilson, the distinguished ornithologist, who had published the first two volumes of the artist-author’s pioneering work American Ornithology. Although the idea of publication first entered his mind on this occasion, it was not until 1820, that Audubon came into his full powers as a brilliant painter of birds and master of design. 

In the spring of 1824, Audubon tried to find a publisher for his work in New York, and Philadelphia, the nation's intellectual and publishing epicenter at the time, yet there he was met with closed doors and animosity. In May 1826 he landed in England, where he quickly found the support and appreciation that was so lacking back home. It was in London where Audubon established a reputation and secured his entry into the scientific community among its leading scholars of the time including von Humboldt, Walter Scott, John Murray, Thomas Lawrence, Humphry Davy, and a young Charles Darwin. Before the American Civil War, Audubon was one of only two Americans ever elected to the Royal Society of London, the leading scientific institution of its time - the other was Benjamin Franklin. To create the greatest illustrated book on birds, Audubon worked with William Home Lizars, known at the time as “the best engraver in the city," Robert Havell of London, a senior member of the well-known family of artists, and his son Robert Jr., an accomplished engraver in his own right who at the time worked for Colnaghi. 

In 1830, no longer a provincial curiosity, Audubon was received at the White House by President Andrew Jackson, and the House of Representatives subscribed to The Birds of America. That Audubon could complete his monumental project by subscription, with no institutional backing or noble benefactor, was a staggering achievement. To this day, The Birds of America is considered the most spectacular color folio print series ever produced and one of the world's preeminent natural history documents. 

The Portland Family 

The Portland family descended from Hans Willem Bentinck (1649-1709), one of William of Orange’s closest allies during and after his ascent to the English throne in 1688. In recognition of his friendship and support, Bentinck was created the 1st Earl of Portland; his eldest son Henry succeeded him as Earl and was created 1st Duke of Portland in 1716. Bentinck’s grandson married Lady Margaret Cavendish Holles Harley, the greatest heiress of her day, in 1734, herself a collector of natural curiosities and an eminent scientist. Their son, William Bentinck, the 3rd Duke, was twice Prime Minister in 1783 and 1807-09. William John Cavendish-Scott-Bentick, 5th Duke of Portland (1800-1879), was a notable eccentric who preferred his own company and excavated an extensive network of tunnels and rooms under the estate, including an underground library and ballroom. William John Cavendish-Bentick, 6th Duke of Portland (1857-1943), inherited the estate from his cousin in 1879. The 6th Duke was rather more sociable than his reclusive predecessor: he carried the imperial state crown during the coronation ceremony of King George VI. Earlier, in 1913, he hosted Archduke Franz Ferdinand during his visit to England, and took him shooting on the estate. During that visit, Portland records in his memoirs that “Franz could have been killed (a year before Sarajevo) when someone in the party dropped a gun and both barrels discharged.” 

TOURING EXHIBITIONS 

  • Los Angeles | April 26-28 | Christie’s Los Angeles Gallery | 336 North Camden Drive, Beverly Hills, CA 90210 
  • London | May 19-24 | Christie’s London | 8 King Street, London WC2E 8HN, UK 

PUBLIC EXHIBITION | 20 Rockefeller Center | New York 

    • June 9, 11-13, 10am - 5pm 
    • June 10, 10am - 2pm 

BOOKS & MANUSCRIPTS AUCTIONS | 20 Rockefeller Center | New York 

  • June 14, 2pm | The Portland Audubon 
  • June 14, immediately following | Fine Printed Books & Manuscripts 

Image: AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851). The Birds of America; from Original Drawings. London: Published by the Author, 1827-1838. The exceptional Duke of Portland set of Audubon's masterpiece - among the finest copies in private hands of the finest color-plate book ever produced.  Featured above: The Winter Hawk (plate 71). Estimate: $8,000,000-12,000,000

The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress today announced the appointment of Stephen Houston, an anthropologist, archaeologist and epigrapher, as the inaugural Jay I. Kislak chair for the study of the history and cultures of the early Americas. He will begin his tenure in September 2018. While at the Library, Houston will work on a project titled “Classic Choreography: The Meaning of Ancient Maya Movement.”

By encouraging broad interdisciplinary inquiry, the Kislak chair will help nourish a wide conversation ranging from the technical aspects of archaeological discovery to issues of interest in the current cultural conversation in view of generating broad public engagement with themes related to the early history of the Americas. 

The Kislak chair is funded by the Kislak Family Foundation to support annually a distinguished individual to undertake research using the Kislak Collections and related materials at the Library of Congress. 

Houston, the Dupee Family professor of social science and a professor in the Department of Anthropology at Brown University, has worked on the excavations of several major Mayan cities, most recently the ancient city of El Zotz in Guatemala and on collaborative advances in mapping with lidar technology. 

His interpretations of stylized representations of the human body reveal the concepts that underlie ancient Maya existence and his research on writing around the world reconstructs how early scripts begin, flourish and die. 

A major participant in the decipherment of Maya script, Houston draws on inscriptions and figural art to reconstruct the political and social structure of Mayan civilization, including the dynamics of royal court life and the role of religion. 

The Kislak Collection encompasses more than 3,000 rare books, maps, manuscripts, historic documents, artifacts and works of art related to early American history and the cultures of Florida, the Caribbean and Mesoamerica. It is considered among the finest collections of its kind in the world, one that brings together material that is of equal interest to scholars and the general public.

The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress exists to help address the challenges facing democracies in the 21st century by bridging the gap between scholarship and policymakers. It does this by hosting top thinkers from around the world to conduct research in the Library’s vast collections and engage with national leaders. For more information about the Kluge Center, visit loc.gov/kluge/.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

BF HA copy.jpgDallas, TX - A painting by one of the most popular American artists of all time, and formerly owned by a famous Hollywood actress is expected to be the top lot at Heritage Auctions’ American Art Auction May 4 in Dallas, Texas.

Once in the private collection of late actress Debbie Reynolds, Norman Rockwell Ben Franklin's Sesquicentennial, The Saturday Evening Post cover, May 29, 1926 (est. $800,000-1,200,000) was commissioned in celebration of the 150th anniversary of the signing of the Declaration of Independence and is Rockwell’s only cover illustration featuring a Founding Father.

“Norman Rockwell is one of the most beloved American artists who ever lived,” said Aviva Lehmann, Director of American Art. “Collectors of American art are drawn in great number to his works, as they immediately increase the strength and impact of any collection. The offerings in this auction span decades and many aspects of Rockwell’s career, allowing collectors at all levels to get involved.”

Another Rockwell expected to spark significant interest is Norman Rockwell The Census Taker, The Saturday Evening Post cover study, 1940 (est. $250,000-350,000). While amusing, The Census Taker also documented a serious and important event in American History, the 1940 U.S. Census, which occurred April 1, only weeks before the April 27 debut of this Post cover. 

Norman Rockwell Stealing Socks, Interwoven Stocking advertisement, 1928 (est. $200,000-300,000) serves as a primary example of Rockwell's skillful ability to present an enduring and heartwarming image that continues to resonate with the public even decades after its creation. Stealing Socks served as an advertisement for Interwoven Stocking that first appeared in The Saturday Evening Post on Feb. 11, 1928.

Rockwell’s Before the Shot, The Saturday Evening Post cover study, 1958 (est. $150,000-250,000) is a preparatory study for an illustration that graced the March 15, 1958 cover of The Saturday Evening Post. The scene takes place in the interior of Stockbridge (Massachusetts) physician Dr. Donald Campbell's office. Dr. Campbell was the model for the doctor, but while the little boy (Terry Locke) posed, Rockwell's favored model Louis Lamone served as the doctor's stand-in. One of the artist's most iconic and most popular images, the present study was exhibited alongside the final painting at the Norman Rockwell Museum in Stockbridge.

Rockwell rarely expressed his own political opinions, but Norman Rockwell The Day I Painted Ike (All through that grind of turning on different moods, he never lost patience. At the end-by golly, it was time to go fishing.), The Saturday Evening Post interior illustration, 1952 (est. $120,000-180,000) depicts the 34th president of the United States, of whom Rockwell was an unabashed fan; he even referred to himself as an “Eisenhower worshipper.” So intense was Rockwell’s admiration for Eisenhower that Ben Hibbs, then editor of the Saturday Evening Post, wrote to Rockwell saying, "If Ike is elected, as I think he will be, no small share of the credit should go to Norman Rockwell."

Golden Age Illustration is extremely well represented in the auction, including six works by Joseph Christian Leyendecker. Living Mannequin, The Saturday Evening Post cover, March 5, 1932 (est. $120,000-180,000), comes from the Estate of Harry Glass, of Long Island, New York. The painting originally sold at the 1943 U.S. War Bond at the United States Treasury-Saturday Evening Post War Bond Show, in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.

The auction also includes two important works by artists of the Hudson River School:

John S. Jameson Grazing Sheep at Headwaters of a Stream, 1862 (est. $40,000-60,000) casts a spotlight on Jameson’s enormous talent, and also raises the question of what he could have accomplished had he not lost his life at the age of 22 after being captured while fighting in the Civil War. The influence of the Hudson River School on the young prodigy is evident in the expansive landscape and exploration into theatrical light and weather effects. Depicting lush green fields with a rocky stream in the foreground, Jameson populates his scenery with cattle, a figure in red that creates a focal point to draw the eye in, and provides the viewer with a glimpse of the mountainous view beyond.

Joseph Rusling Meeker Lake Pontchartrain, Louisiana, 1880 (est. $20,000-30,000) was discovered recently in Concord, Massachusetts and is inscribed by the artist “Lake Pontchartrain, La.” Above his monogram signature. The large scale and specified location suggest it might have been executed as an exhibition entry, perhaps at the New Orleans World’s Industrial and Cotton Centennial Exhibition in 1884.

Other lots expected to generate multiple bids from collectors include:

·         Milton Avery Young Artist, circa 1938 (est. $80,000-120,000)

·         Newell Convers Wyeth He Sat There until the Sun Went Down, The Little Shepherd of Kingdom Come interior illustration, 1931 (est. $60,000-80,000)

·         Frederick Cark Frieseke Girl with a Basket of Ribbons, painted by 1915 ($60,000-80,000)

·         Walter Launt Palmer Oaks in Winter (Snow in November), 1906 (est. $50,000-70,000)

·         Theodore Earl Butler Lilly Butler (Artist's Daughter, Step-Granddaughter of Claude Monet), 1896 (est. $30,000-50,000)

·         Theodore Earl Butler Bethesda Fountain, Central Park, New York, 1915 (est. $15,000-25,000)

·         From the personal collection of actor Bruce Willis: Daniel Ralph Celentano Hanging Out The Wash (est. $10,000-15,000)

A Distinguished Southern California Collection includes 53 lots of American Modernism, including:

·         Marguerite Thompson Zorach Mother and Child, 1919 (est. $60,000-80,000)

·         Marguerite Thompson Zorach Dancers and Mother & Child (double-sided work) (est. $15,000-25,000)

·         Peter Hurd Corrienda a California, circa 1960 (est. $12,000-18,000)

·         Henry Schnakenberg Summer in the Park (Central Park, Bethesda Fountain) (est. $12,000-18,000)

Stephen Hawking Signed Book 54977_lg.jpegLos Angeles - A book signed by Stephen Hawking in 1973 will be auctioned by Nate D. Sanders Auctions on April 26, 2018. 

The late physicist signed the book, ''The Archaeology of the Industrial Revolution'' in 1973 shortly before he was unable to write his name due to ALS. The book was signed by several members of the Theoretical Astronomy at Cambridge University to commemorate an employee leaving his job as a computer operator.

Hawking was a researcher at the Institute of Theoretical Astronomy at Cambridge from 1968-1973. It was at the Institute in 1973, he published his first important book, ''The Large Scale Structure of Space-Time.''

Hawking died on March 14, 2018.

Bidding for the book begins at $28,000.

Additional information on the pen can be found at 
http://natedsanders.com/Stephen_Hawking_Signed_Book_From_1973____One_of_th-LOT48985.aspx

 

Dallas, TX - Nude with Blue Hair - a monumental work combining the talent of artist Roy Lichtenstein and the printmaking expertise of John Hutcheson - sold for $540,400 in Heritage Auctions’ Modern & Contemporary Art - Prints & Multiples Auction April 17 in Dallas. The sale was 97 percent sold by value and achieved $2,406,000, well above the overall presale estimate.

“The Lichtenstein was a printer’s proof from the collection of John Hutcheson, a Master Printer who worked with hundreds of well-known artists such as Frank Stella, David Hockney, and Helen Frankethaler,” Holly Sherratt, Heritage Auctions' Director of Modern & Contemporary Art, San Francisco, said. “The sale price is one of the highest prices ever for the work.”  

The 154 lots on offer featured a group of 11 artworks by Andy Warhol, which claimed four of the auction’s top 10 lots. Grevy's Zebra, from Endangered Species, 1983, brought $75,000 and Liz, 1964, a portrait of Elizabeth Taylor from an edition of approximately 300, sold for $55,000 - more than twice its estimate. Warhol’s Untitled, from Flowers Portfolio, 1970, sold for $52,500 and $1, 1982, signed, numbered and published by the artist, realized $42,500.

Marquee lots included artist David Hockney’s Amaryllis in Vase, from Moving Focus, 1984, which sold for $75,000 and Lichtenstein’s Forms in Space, 1985, the artist’s iconic interpretation of the American flag created especially to benefit the Institute of Contemporary Art, which ended at $53,750.

Cheese Mold Standard with Olive, 1969, by Ed Ruscha, reached $50,000. Two additional prints from Hutcheson’s private collection came from his personal relationships with artists Frank Stella and Joan Mitchell. Stella’s Pumpkin Moonshine, from Polar Coordinates II (variant), 1979, sold for $50,000 and Mitchell’s Sunflowers I (diptych), 1992, realized $42,500.

A ceramic vase titled Vase deux anses hautes, created by Pablo Picasso in 1952 from an edition of 400, sold for $40,000. 

Additional highlights include:

·         Warhol’s Turtle, 1985, published to coincide with the 1985 film Turtle Diary written by Harold Pinter, brought $37,500

·         Figure au visage coupé assise dans un intérieur, 1929, an etching by Henri Matisse, sold for three times its estimate to end at $37,500 

·         Target with Four Faces, 1979, by Jasper Johns, sold for $33,500

·         The Witch, from Warhol’s celebrated Myths series executed in 1981, sold for $32,500

 

Screen Shot 2018-04-23 at 9.20.12 AM.pngNew York—This June Sotheby’s will present a handwritten working manuscript of “Born to Run,” the Bruce Springsteen smash that became an essential American anthem. The 1975 hit catapulted ‘The Boss’ to mega-stardom and remains a beloved classic, having been ranked as the singer’s greatest song by Rolling Stone Magazine in 2013, used by the artist as the title of his 2016 autobiography, and featured as the finale to the current sell-out show ‘Springsteen on Broadway.’ Written entirely in Springsteen’s hand, this early version charts the beginnings of the breakout hit. It is estimated to fetch $200/300,000 and will be offered in the Books and Manuscripts Online auction with bidding open from 18 - 28 June and public viewing available.

After his first two albums ‘Greetings from Asbury Park, N.J.’ and ‘The Wild, the Innocent & the E Street Shuffle’received critical acclaim but modest commercial success, the 26-year old Bruce Springsteen found his career hinging on the success of his next single. Aiming for musical perfection and Spector-level grandeur, Springsteen spent six months writing and finalizing “Born to Run”, which clocks in at four and a half minutes long. “Born to Run” was a breakout smash, and became Springsteen’s first worldwide release.

The majority of the lines in this version of the song are apparently unpublished and unrecorded but the present manuscript does include a nearly perfected chorus. Captured here, perhaps for the first time, is the most powerful of any Springsteen lyric:

“This town’ll rip the (out your) bones from your back / it’s a suicide trap (rap) (it’s a trap to catch the young) your dead unless / you get out (we got to) while your young so (come on! / with) take my hand cause tramps / like us baby we were born to run.” 

Thirty eight years later, “Born To Run” remains a beloved classic. In 2013, after nearly four decades of performing the career-defining hit, Rolling Stone Magazine ranked “Born to Run” Springsteen's greatest song, and Springsteen himself as number 1 on their 2013 list of the “50 Greatest Live Acts Right Now”. 

The one-man show ‘Springsteen On Broadway’ was initially planned as a eight week residency at the Walter Kerr Theater in New York. However, after opening in October 2017 exceptional demand meant Springsteen On Broadway has been extended twice, most recently through December 2018. Fittingly, the news was reported by the Guardian with the headline: ‘Bruce Springsteen on Broadway: born to run ... and run.’ 

 

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