pnin_pjs2410_300dpi.jpgAUSTIN, Texas — The Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin has acquired books from Gabriel García Márquez’s library. The collection will reside alongside the author’s literary archive, which the Ransom Center acquired in 2014. The selection of more than 180 books includes those that are inscribed, signed and sometimes annotated. 

This selection from the Gabriel García Márquez library reveals expected and unexpected friendships and varied connections between the Nobel laureate and others. The collection includes books inscribed to García Márquez and to his wife, Mercedes, by friends and prominent political and cultural figures such as Isabel Allende, Richard Avedon, Fidel Castro, Bill Clinton, J. M. Coetzee, Carlos Fuentes, Pablo Neruda, Toni Morrison and Mario Vargas Llosa, among others. Also within the library are a number of García Márquez’s own works with annotations by the author.

“I was García Márquez’s official biographer and knew him for 20 years, until his death,” said Gerald Martin, the Andrew Mellon Professor Emeritus of Modern Languages at the University of Pittsburgh. “Few have had access to his library. I am thrilled by this extraordinary acquisition. … I would like nothing better than to take a flight from London tomorrow and spend a year (or more) among the riches of the Harry Ransom Center — my current American dream!”

One of the oldest presentation books is an inscribed first edition of Augusto Monterroso’s “Obras Completas (y otros cuentos)” (“Complete works (and other stories)”). García Márquez once said of one of Monterroso’s works, “This book should be read with your hands in the air: Its danger is based on its sly wisdom and the deadly beauty of its lack of seriousness.” The most recent books are Fidel Castro’s “La contraofensiva estratégica” and “La Victoria estratégica,” published in 2010. In a 1983 interview in Playboy, García Márquez said of Castro, “Ours is an intellectual friendship.”

With 15 books, Colombian poet and author Álvaro Mutis has the largest representation in the library. Authors in the collection come from more than 15 countries including Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Guatemala, Mexico, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela.

Many authors associated with the Latin American Boom are represented in the collection with inscribed editions including Julio Cortázar’s “Rayuela” (“Hopscotch”), José Donoso’s “El obsceno pájaro de la noche” (“The Obscene Night Bird”), and works by Carlos Fuentes, Mario Vargas Llosa and Juan Rulfo.

While processing and cataloging the collection, Amy F. Brown, the Ransom Center’s cataloging librarian, noted that “The García Márquez library is unique in its depth and variety. These books took me through a veritable Latin American ‘republic of letters.’”

Some of the books from the García Márquez library and their inscriptions can be seen online. The collection is open and accessible for research at the Ransom Center.

Image: Pablo Neruda's "Nueva odas elementales" (1963). Photo by Pete Smith.

BEVERLY HILLS — Items from the estate of creative comedy and advertising genius Stan Freberg (1926 - 2015) will be available to his fans in a public auction of animation cels and related memorabilia conducted by Heritage Auctions in Beverly Hills, California, and online Dec. 10 and 11, 2016.

Personally selected by his widow, Hunter Freberg, the items include the first draft script for his acclaimed 1961 comedy album, “Stan Freberg Presents The United States of America Volume One: The Early Years;” the 1953 Gold Record award for the satirical “St. George and the Dragonet:” the script for his award-winning 1958 recording “Green Chri$tma$;” animation cels from his prodigious voice-over work and important items from his memorable TV commercials. Other highlights offered in “The Treasures of Stan Freberg Collection” are his 1960 Hollywood Walk of Fame plaque and the Inkpot Award he received at the 2009 San Diego Comic-Con. 

“Stan Freberg was a genius who rose to the height of achievement and stardom in so many different fields. Advertising Age called him the father of the funny commercial,” said Jim Lentz, Director of Animation Art at Heritage Auctions. 

“He was an animation voice-over actor for over 70 years, from age 18 to 88. He achieved fame as a puppeteer with the television program, “Time for Beany,” and with his space alien puppet, Orville. He was the leading comedy album recording artist for Capitol Records, a prominent television personality and a Radio Hall of Fame star,” explained Lentz.

Many of the awards and animation cels were kept at home “so we could see them all the time,” said Hunter Freberg. “He was the son of a Baptist minister and always said God had given him the blessings for all the creativity he had. No words can describe living with THE Stan Freberg. We laughed so hard, and never had a boring moment together!,” she recalled.

Highlights from the Stan Freberg Collection include:

·         Freberg’s personal, typed with handwritten notations first draft script for his acclaimed 1961 comedy record album, “Stan Freberg Presents The United States of America Volume One: The Early Years.” The manuscript is accompanied by a second version of the script for nine sections of the album and a copy of the actual vinyl record that sold more than one million copies (est. $5,000).

·         A typed manuscript for the 1953 recording of “St. George and the Dragonet” that starred Freberg, June Foray, Daws Butler and Hy Averback as a parody of the popular radio and television crime series, “Dragnet.” The record quickly rose to number one on both the Billboard and Cash Box record charts. The script is accompanied by a vinyl record, “The Best of Stan Freberg,” that includes “St. George and the Dragonet.” (est. $1,000).

·         The Capitol Records gold record award Freberg received for “St. George and the Dragonet.” (est. $1,000).

·         An original script and sheet music for Freberg’s acclaimed holiday season satire record, “Green Chri$tma$” (est. $5,000), and the 1958 Best Comedy Performance nomination certificate he received for that record from the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences.

·         The Hollywood Walk of Fame award presented to Freberg on February 9, 1960 when his star was formally unveiled at 6145 Hollywood Blvd. in Los Angeles, and a second award presented to him on November 3, 2010 to mark the 50th anniversary of the famous Hollywood Walk of Fame (est. $2,000).

·         Animation cells including an artist’s proof (#19 of 50) of Bugs Bunny and Pete Puma (voiced by Freberg) from the 1997 Warner Brothers cartoon, “Rabbits Kin,” signed by Freberg (est. $750); a hand-painted production cel of Pete Puma from the 1990 season of “Tiny Toons” (est. $1,000); Freberg’s personal favorite cel depicting The Three Bears (est. $750) (Freberg voiced “Junyer Bear”) hand-signed by legendary cartoon artist and director Chuck Jones; and a one-of-a-kind cel created and inscribed by “The Simpsons” animator Phil Ortiz that depicts Homer Simpson and Freberg and voice-over actress June Foray as Simpson characters (est. $750).

·         The Inkpot Award he received at the 2009 San Diego Comic-Con convention for Achievement in Animation (est. $1,000); the 1992 “Annie’s” Winsor McCay Award (est. $1,000) from the International Animated Film Society for Freberg’s “distinguished lifetime contribution to the art of animation;” and his 1995 Radio Hall of Fame Award (est. $1,000).

·         Examples of materials created by Freberg to produce award-winning comedic advertising and marketing campaigns for Chung King Chow Mein (est. $1,000) and Kaiser brand aluminum foil (est. $1,000).

Heritage Auctions is the largest auction house founded in the United States and the world’s third largest, with annual sales of more than $800 million, and over one million online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and receive access to a complete record of prices realized, with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com. 

Want to get the up-to-the-minute updates and breaking news stories about Heritage Auctions? Follow us on HA.com/Facebook and HA.com/Twitter. To view an archive of Heritage press releases go to: HA.com/PR. To link to this release on your blog or Website: HA.com/PR-.

Screen Shot 2016-12-01 at 9.37.45 AM.pngDreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions is delighted to be offering the books and photogravure prints from Edward Sheriff Curtis' anthropological masterpiece, The North American Indian as part of their Books, Photographs and Other Works on Paper sale on 15th of December 2016 (1:30pm).

This ethnographical survey by photographer and chronicler, Edward Sheriff Curtis (1868-1952) remains one of the most significant and powerful insights into the world of the indigenous peoples of North America. The sale this December, which will take place at Bloomsbury House, 24 Maddox Street, London, will include volumes one to thirteen of the twenty volume series alongside a large number of the original accompanying portfolio plates. Many of the portfolio plates, which carry attractive estimates ranging from £300 to £1,800, will be offered as separate lots, appealing to a broad selection of budgets and collectors.

The North American Indian documents over eighty distinct native peoples from the culture areas of the trans-Mississippi west. The volumes contain a huge repository of ethnographic information including the outlines of social organisation, biographies of key leaders, myths and more. The sale catalogue features an introduction by Mick Gidley, Emeritus Professor of American Literature & Culture at the University of Leeds and author of several works on Curtis, including Edward S. Curtis and the North American Indian, Incorporated (Cambridge University Press, 1998; paperback, 2000).

The books and portfolios were originally issued to subscribers between 1907 and 1930, each volume and set of plates supposedly one of 500 copies (most likely a smaller run). These volumes therefore only entered the major libraries and homes of the super-rich. The set featuring in the auction was subscribed to by Sir William Northrup McMillan (1872-1925), an American industrialist and friend of Theodore Roosevelt, the latter who also provided the foreword to The North American Indian. Russell Mount, cataloguer of the Curtis lots at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions notes, ‘a set with an intriguing connection to Roosevelt, the President being first a portrait subject of Curtis, then soon his friend, supporter, and confidant. Roosevelt's encouragement to persevere with the project of The North American Indian was of inestimable importance to Curtis’.

The volumes (Lot 200, Est: £60,000-80,000, pictured) incorporate 983 plates with photogravures taken by Curtis himself. Curtis’ ‘documentary pictures’ cover portraiture, tribal arts & crafts, shamanisitic rituals, maps and plans. Lots 201-518 are comprised of the larger-format photogravure plates issued in the portfolios and include many of the more famous photographic images such as Mósa - Mohave (pictured below) which sees the subject powerfully returning the viewer’s gaze (Lot 251, Est £1,500 - £2,000).

Appealing to collectors of both photography and Americana alike, the striking photographic portraits of tribal Chiefs, men, women and children are documented alongside landscapes images. Lot 288, On The Little Bighorn - Apsaroke, 1908 (Est £1,000 - £1,500) and Lot 354 Sun Dance Encampment - Piegan (Est £1,000-£1,500) show the people’s ease with the natural world. Elsewhere, scenes of village life are depicted in Story Telling- Apache, (Lot 210 Est: £1,200 - £1,800) and The Blanket Weaver - Navaho (Lot 232, Est £1,000 - £1,500). Although these scenes may have been reconstructed for the camera, they not only capture the dignity and pride of the native peoples, but also document the craftsmanship inherent within the native cultures.

NEW YORK——The Estate of Maureen O'Hara sale at Bonhams New York today (29 November) sold over 95% of her private documents, clothing, and memorabilia, reaching a total over $445,000. "The Irish style icon's personal effects were volleyed between phone, internet and a healthy crowd of in-room bidders from Ireland, Europe, South America, and Asia," explains Catherine Williamson, Director of the Fine Books and Manuscripts and Entertainment Memorabilia at Bonhams Los Angeles.

The infamous cache of love letters from Quiet Man Director John Ford sold for $75,000. Written during the run-up to filming Ford's 1952 film The Quiet Man, almost all of them are in their original envelopes. After meeting on the set of How Green Was My Valley (1941) O'Hara and Ford began a long and often turbulent friendship colored by Ford's obsessive – and sometimes violent – fascination with the red-haired siren, who he called his 'Rosebud'. O'Hara later said of the director," for years I wondered why John Ford grew to hate me so much. I realize now that he didn't hate me at all. He loved me very much and even thought that he was in love with me." Read more about the two's famous relationship in Neil Lyndon's Bonhams Magazine essay.

O'Hara is perhaps best known for her iconic portrayal of Mary Kate Danaher in The Quiet Man, opposite John Wayne. There was competitive bidding on items associated with the classic film, including O'Hara's personal, heavily annotated The Quiet Man script (originally given to John Ford, with his name on the cover), which sold for $50,000. O'Hara's clothes and jewelry also proved exceedingly popular. A tweed jacket she wore in The Quiet Man (estimated $5,000-7,000), sold for $16,250. Another highlight was O'Hara's pair of Meissen porcelain floral encrusted covered vases, which sold for $31,250 against an estimate of $3,000-5,000.

Bonhams Director of Entertainment Memorabilia, Catherine Williamson, said, "It's clear that O'Hara's appeal is evergreen—she speaks just as much to young movie goers to those who saw her when her films first premiered. She had a fantastic sense of style and her clothing and accessories proved particularly popular, often selling for as many as 10 times their low estimates."

Maureen O'Hara (1920-2015) grew up on the outskirts of Dublin. She joined Dublin's Abbey Theatre in 1934 and spent three years training with the company. At 17, O'Hara was discovered by British actor Charles Laughton, who signed her to a contract with his Mayflower Pictures. Her first major film was the Alfred Hitchcock-directed Jamaica Inn (1939), co-starring Laughton. This was swiftly followed by her first Hollywood movie, The Hunchback of Notre (1939), which cemented her movie star status. Known as "The Queen of Technicolor" for her fiery red hair and emerald green eyes, O'Hara appeared in more than 60 movies and was awarded an honorary Oscar in 2014 for her contributions to the film industry.

Sotheby's London to Offer The Bute Hours

Screen Shot 2016-11-30 at 4.31.28 PM.pngLondon, 30 November 2016--The Bute Hours, one of the most extraordinary Medieval English Book of Hours in existence, is to be auctioned at Sotheby’s London on 6 December 2016, with an estimate of £1.5 to 2.5 million, making it one of the most valuable English books to appear at auction. This lavish work includes more than 50 large miniatures and was probably made for a nobleman of the royal household who is depicted with his wife and children throughout the book.

English Books of Hours are extremely rare on the market, and this particular manuscript remains mostly unstudied. Lavishly adorned with elaborate miniatures, historiated borders and initials, this unique manuscript was produced by several different artists working in a homogeneous style, with an evident fondness for contemporary Netherlandish manuscript illumination, while also borrowing from German engravings. The richness of illustration in this Book of Hours is unparalleled in English illuminated manuscripts of the time, and is thus a reflection of the significant social status of its patron, who is depicted throughout the book.

The manuscript takes its modern name from the Marquesses of Bute, whose ancestral home is on the Isle of Bute, off the west coast of Scotland. The family traces its ancestry back to the 12th century, and is descended from kings of both Scotland and the United Kingdom. The manuscript was acquired for the Bute library by John Crichton-Stuart, 5th Marquess of Bute, who died in 1956; it passed with the title and properties (including six castles and an important art collection) to his eldest son John Crichton-Stuart (1933-93), who was born just 15 minutes before his twin brother, and thus became the 6th Marquess of Bute. In 1983, he sold a number of illuminated manuscripts at Sotheby's, including the Bute Hours.

The Berger Collection Educational Trust, Sold to Benefit Future Philanthropy

The Bute Hours comes to sale from the Berger Collection Educational Trust, sold to benefit future philanthropy. Both natives of Denver, William M. B. Berger and Bernadette Berger began their collecting activities in the 1990s with a passion that has rarely been matched. Over the course of just a few years, they amassed one of the most important collections of British Art in America, spanning over 600 years, as well as excellent examples of French, Italian and American paintings and drawings. The Bergers were dedicated to using art as a vehicle for education: “We have always believed that art, as well as music, poetry, and literature, refreshes and enriches our lives”, they said. In order to further their mission, they founded the Berger Collection Educational Trust.

The Trust’s mission focuses on British Art, culture and history, and uses the collection that the Bergers created to further its goals. It has sponsored numerous exhibitions throughout the United States devoted to British painting, as well as being a major supporter of the British Art Journal. The Trust administers, together with the Journal, the highly prestigious William M. B. Berger Prize for British Art History, awarded for excellence in the field.

In addition to the Bute Hours, a number of properties from The Berger Collection Educational Trust, will be sold at Sotheby’s New York & London in 2016 and 2017 to benefit future philanthropy.

Dr. John Wilson, Trustee, The Berger Collection Educational Trust, commented: “Bill and Bernadette Berger established the Berger Collection Educational Trust to demonstrate the role of British culture in influencing the Western Cultural Tradition in general, and American culture in particular. Their wide-ranging tastes and interests created a collection that allowed visitors to come face-to-face not only with significant paintings and works on paper, but also manuscripts, royal seals and important early books. Since its inception, the Trust has driven and supported educational activities promoting the history of British art, including programs at the Denver Art Museum and the Portland Museum of Art, and raised funds to further the mission of the Collection. The works on offer at Sotheby’s, many of which fall outside the British sphere, will be sold to further this mission.”

1eec3654ab321bf30e35f38be4969c9a374a06fa.jpegBOSTON, MA -  RR Auction is proud to present The Stanley Wiater archive of Modern Horror literature that comprehensively documents the history of the world’s most terrifying genre in its December monthly offering.

A three-time winner of the illustrious Bram Stoker Award, Wiater has earned distinction as a writer, editor, anthologist, journalist, and collector over the course of four decades, with his contributions adding significantly to the growth and visibility of the genre.

The enormous archive consists of over one hundred boxes of material from throughout Wiater’s remarkable career, broken down as follows: 79 banker’s boxes; 14 smaller boxes; four typewriter paper boxes; two bins of assorted posters and artwork; three 100-slot trays of audio tapes; and 27 books contributed to or edited by Wiater.

After several years of collecting pulp, horror, and adventure novels, Wiater found himself well positioned when modern horror emerged in the late 1960s and early 1970s with the release of classic films like Rosemary’s Baby and The Exorcist, and then with the unprecedented rise of Stephen King as a mainstream horror scribe. A 1974 interview with Ray Bradbury, Wiater’s first as a budding journalist, paved the way for his career as a writer of oral history, in addition to his initial Bram Stoker Award for Dark Dreamers: Conversations with the Masters of Horror, a series of insightful interviews with twenty-six of the genre’s most influential writers.

Wiater’s massive collection of audio and videotape, offering over 200 hours of unedited recordings and transcripts, the vast bulk of which have never been published, serve the archive as a uniquely educational keystone and resource. A portion of the interview content includes talks with writers like Stephen King, Ray Bradbury, Clive Barker, Richard Matheson, Robert Bloch, Harlan Ellison, Ira Levin, and David Morrell; and with filmmakers such as Martin Scorsese, George Romero, Roger Corman, David Cronenberg, and Sidney Pollack.  Ten of the audio tapes are available for listening online. 

In 2000, Wiater developed a television series fittingly called Dark Dreamers, which, inspired by his book of the same name, featured one-on-one interviews with writers Barker and Matheson, directors John Landis and Wes Craven, special effects wizard Stan Winston, and many more. The result is a collection of over 150 raw, unedited videotapes of never-before-seen footage. In addition to Dark Dreamers, Wiater has edited two anthologies of original fiction by nearly two dozen writers, as well as books on Stephen King, Brian Lumley, and Richard Matheson’s classic Twilight Zone television scripts. He edited Comic Book Rebels, a definitive treatment on the growth of the underground comix movement of the 1960s, and has penned numerous other manuscripts, both published and unpublished, including his first story, which won a contest judged by Stephen King.

The archive also features a large number of manuscripts—Wiater’s own and those of writers he anthologized or edited; a substantial amount of business and literary correspondence from a wide array of mainstream and underground writers; the paper archives of the Horror Writers Association; original unreleased material by fantasy surrealist photographer J. K. Potter; and a section of material related to Wiater’s employment with Mirage Studios.

“The Stanley Wiater archive documents the lore and history of literature’s most terrifying genre with amazing depth and unmatched appreciation,” said Robert Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction.

The Autographs, Artifacts & Animation auction from RR Auction began on November 17 and will conclude on December 7. For information, visit the RR Auction web site at www.rrauction.com

DALLAS — A pair of posters from the iconic 1942 film Casablanca headlined Heritage Auctions’ Vintage Movie Posters Auction Nov. 19-20 in Dallas, which realized a total of $1,918,571. Both posters more than quadrupled their pre-auction estimates: A Casablanca (Warner Brothers, R-1953) Italian 2-Fogli poster went on the block with an estimated price of $50,000, to sell for $203,150, while a Casablanca (Warner Brothers, 1942) Half Sheet Style B, which went into the auction with an estimated return of $40,000, sold for $167,300.

“This was an exceptional auction that brought together some of the most coveted movie images from Hollywood,” Heritage director of vintage posters Grey Smith said. “The collection included some lots that had been in high demand for some time to our most avid collectors.”

A poster from The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (PEA, 1966), an Italian premier 24 Sheet, with artwork by Franco Fiorenzi and Michelangelo Pappuza, (similar to the two and four fogli with its reflective silver background) sold for $77,675. 

Collectors seeking a poster from the 1932 box office bomb and exploitation film Freaks (MGM, 1932) got their wish in the auction, when a rare Pre-War Belgian Poster for the film sold for $28,680.

Considered one of the defining classics in film noir, a poster from Jacques Tourneur’s Out of the Past (RKO, 1947) sold for $22,705.

A poster of The Maltese Falcon (Warner Brothers, 1941) One Sheet realized more than twice its pre-auction estimate of $8,000 when it brought in $21,510, and a depiction of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s most famous novel, a poster of The Hound of the Baskervilles (20th Century Fox, 1939) One Sheet realized a sale price of $19,120.

A lobby card measuring 11 inches by 14 inches from Dracula (Universal, 1931), one of the most famous horror films of all time, nearly quadrupled its pre-auction estimate of $4,000 when it sold for $15,535.

Collectors searching for an exceedingly rare poster from Captain Blood (Warner Brothers, 1935) One Sheet got their chance in this auction; the lot was another that exceeded its pre-auction estimate when it sold for $14,340.

A surprise lot that crashed the sale’s top 10 lots was a ceramic Dracula/Lugosi Statuette (circa Late 1940s, which also drew $14,340. It is believed that the figure, which stands eight inches tall, actually may have been sculpted by actor Bela Lugosi and given as a gift to friends. Rumors suggest that only about 25 were made, and only a fraction of those remain in existence.

WB16 image1.jpgMinnesota Center for Book Art’s twenty-sixth Winter Book features poetry and prose by Heid E. Erdrich exploring the complex conversations between artists and viewers. every-blest-thing-seeing-eye imagines the varied experiences of viewing art in a gallery. Curation is meant to direct viewers, but every viewer comes to each artwork in a distinct manner—from myriad intellectual, emotional, and spiritual starting points. When an Ojibwe poet acts as curator, her statements on the work of indigenous artists become part of a larger, non-linear narrative in which characters and emblems, just like the artists who create them, cannot be fully fathomed. And yet, we must look. We must see every blest thing. 

every-blest-thing-seeing-eye was designed by Jeff Rathermel and Todd Thyberg, with Thyberg serving as Master Printer. Printing of the deluxe edition portfolio of prints was directed by Tom Spence. every-blest-thing-seeing-eye features poetry and prose by Heid E. Erdrich, a poet, writer, and faculty mentor at Augsburg College. The twenty-sixth Winter Book was produced in two editions, with illustrations by Jim Denomie, Aza Erdrich, Eric Gansworth, Dyani Whitehawk, Louise Erdrich, Adrea Carlson, and Jonathan Thunder.

The Standard Edition (100 numbered copies; $40) contains letterpress printed text and images on Arches Platine papers. The accordion structure features die cuts, a Cave Paper banded closure, and ochre accents throughout. 

The Deluxe Edition (26 lettered copies; $295 / $235 before December 31) is also letterpress printed on Arches Plantine paper, is accompanied by a portfolio of seven prints and various physical artifacts referenced in the text, all housed in a custom glass top case.

Minnesota Center for Book Arts wishes to thank Wet Paint Inc., Smart Set, and Angel Bomb Design + Letterpress for their generous support. Special thanks to the many Winter Book volunteers for their gifts of time and talent. 

Join MCBA in celebrating the handmade book at our annual Winter Book publication celebration! 

Saturday, December 10, 2016

7pm: Reading by Heid E. Erdrich

Followed by a book signing and public reception with light refreshments in MCBA’s Studios and Gallery.

Free and open to the public.

For more information, visit mnbookarts.org/winterbook



super copy.jpgDALLAS — Original Underground Comix Art and key books from the Golden Age and Silver Age helped push the total value of Heritage Auctions’ Comics & Comic Art Auction Nov. 17-19 in Dallas to nearly $10 million, the second-highest total ever for a comic auction. The #1 Comics auction record ($10,389,821) was set by Heritage in July 2012.

“This auction was very gratifying to us at Heritage Auctions, because so many of the lots surpassed our pre-auction estimates,” Heritage Director of Operations for Comics and Comic Art Barry Sandoval said. “For example, we certainly thought the Pep Comics run would sell for multiples of the Price Guide value, but we weren’t expecting some to sell for as much as 12 times the Guide value!”

The top lot was a rare unrestored copy of Superman #1 (DC, 1939) CGC VG+ 4.5 CGC which sold for $358,500. Although an estimated 1,000,000 copies were printed in 1939, very few are known to have survived in this grade or better; this issue is ranked third on Overstreet’s Top 100 Golden Age Comics list.

One of the auction’s highlights was a 9.6 CGC NM+ issue of The Amazing Spider-Man #1 Curator Pedigree (Marvel, 1963), which is one of the top Silver Age comics Heritage has sold in 15 years of auctions. The book sold for $262,900. 

An FN- 5.5 CGC copy of Batman #1 (DC, 1940) was another exceptionally popular Golden Age lot that sold for $239,000. The issue, which features the debut appearances of two characters who would end up being long-time Batman nemeses: Catwoman and the Joker, who are two of the reasons for the issue’s appearance on Overstreet’s list of Top 100 Golden Age Comics. This issue features a retelling of Batman’s origin and a classic cover by Bob Kane and Jerry Robinson, and is one of the top 20 CGC-graded copies.

Steve Ditko’s Amazing Spider-Man #27 Splash Page 1 Original Art (Marvel, 1965) hauled in $239,000. The page features Spider-Man and his greatest villain: The Green Goblin.

Headlining the Underground Comix lots was Robert Crumb’s Thrilling Murder Comics #1 “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” Complete Four-Page Story Original Art (San Francisco Comic Book Co., 1971), which sold for $143,400, setting a new world record for the artist. Considered one of Crumb’s most violent and taboo-breaking stories, this art combines the title of the 1969 Rolling Stones song with the events that led to the notorious Tate-LaBianca murders by Charles Manson’s “family” members.

Another top Underground lot was the Robert Crumb Mondo Snarfo “Grim Grids” Complete Three-Page Story Original Art (Kitchen Sink, 1978). The book sold for $131,450!

A Flash Comics #1 (DC, 1940) FN+ 6.5 CGC pulled in $107,550. Considered one of the nicest copies of this Golden Age collection, fewer than a dozen copies nicer than FN/VF 5.0 or better are known to exist.

More Fun Comics #73 (DC, 1941) VF 8.0 CGC, another coveted issue, went for $104,562.50. In particularly high demand because it includes the origin and first appearance of Aquaman and Green Arrow, its NM- value jumped 43 percent from 2015 to 2016 - the largest jump of any book on Overstreet’s Top 100 Golden Age Comics list. 

Other top results include, but are not limited to:

·         An Alex Raymond Flash Gordon Sunday Comic Strip Original Art dated 8-14-38 (King Features Syndicate): $95,600

·         A Robert Crumb Le Monde Selon Crumb [The World According To Crumb] Promotion Poster Original Art (C.N.B.D.I., 1991): $77,675

·         A Bill Watterson Calvin and Hobbes Daily Comic Strip Original Art dated 4-21-86 (Universal Press Syndicate, 1986): $77,675

·         A Marvel Comics #1 (Timely, 1939) GD/VG 3.0 CGC: $77,675

·         A Jack Davis MAD #6 Complete Six-Page Story “Casey at the Bat!” Original Art (EC, 1953): $77,675

Heritage Auctions is the largest auction house founded in the United States and the world’s third largest, with annual sales of more than $800 million, and over one million online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and receive access to a complete record of prices realized, with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com.

Want to get the up-to-the-minute updates and breaking news stories about Heritage Auctions? Follow us on HA.com/Facebook and HA.com/Twitter. To view an archive of Heritage press releases go to: HA.com/PR. To link to this release on your blog or Website: HA.com/PR-3065.

Screen Shot 2016-11-29 at 9.39.11 AM.pngDreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions is delighted to announce the return of Islamic and Near Eastern manuscripts and miniatures to its regular Western manuscripts sales this December, reuniting these two categories in the auction world after a gap of fifty years. The dedicated section will be offered alongside Western Manuscripts and is curated by Roxana Kashani, Bloomsbury Auctions’ Head of Islamic Manuscripts and Miniatures. The whole sale comprises 123 lots spanning nearly a millennia of human history.

Western and Oriental Manuscripts and Miniatures will be auctioned on Wednesday 7th December 2016 (10:30am) at Bloomsbury House, 24 Maddox Street.

A highlight from the western manuscripts on offer is Bede’s Homilies on the Gospels in Latin (Lot 2, Est: £5,000 - 7,000). This remarkable fragment dates back to the second or third quarter of the ninth century. No copies of the text survive from England before the twelfth century, with this fragment having origins from Germany, most likely Fulda. In a letter written in 747-751, St. Boniface requested from one of Bede’s students and followers, Archbishop Egbert of York, “some of the works which Bede has composed” including “his book of homilies for the year, because it would be a very handy and useful manual for us in our preaching”. This may be a cutting from an immediate descendent of the manuscript sent. Another leaf sold at auction in 2010, and is now in Durham University Library.

Another star lot is a finely illuminated humanist manuscript of Trionfi (Lot 73, Est £10,000-15,000) by the Italian poet and scholar, Francesco Petrarch (1304-1374). Petrarch, credited as being the father of the Renaissance, was the first poet laureate of Italy since the Roman Empire. His verse would inspire hundreds of writers throughout Europe to compose in the same style and little more than a century after his death, Pietro Bembo would use Petrarch’s vernacular works (including those here) to create the standard of modern Italian. The manuscript, likely from Florence and dated circa 1480-90, is written in a strikingly elegant hand by a known scribe who worked for a number of the greatest ducal and royal courts during the Renaissance. It is likely that the manuscript was originally commissioned as a luxury, pocket-copy of the Trionfi for a wealthy client with an interest in Italian literature.

A manuscript document in Latin circa 1280 recording a grant of land in Derbyshire includes a rare clause excluding the future sale of the land to “the religious or the Jews” (Lot 64, Est: £600 - 800). The specification that the lands here could not be sold to religious communities was most probably to avoid their being alienated into Church ownership permanently. However, the extension of this clause to the Jews can be seen as an early record of anti-Semitism in the terrible climate of growing fear and uncertainty which lead up to Edward I’s edict of expulsion in 1290.

A beautiful Book of Hours in its original binding dated circa 1500 from the Netherlands, also features in the sale (pictured, Lot 91: Est: £18,000-25,000). The three large and nine small portrait miniature paintings in the manuscripts have been firmly attributed to the important artist, the Master of James IV, now known as Gerard de Horenbout (circa 1465 - circa 1540). Quirky additions to the border decorations include a series of apes, ‘aping’ human activities. Examples include an ape in an apron nursing a baby, another playing a harp and one with a missing limb on crutches receiving alms from a wealthy ape. Gerard de Horenbout worked for a wealthy, international clientele and contributed to some of the most celebrated illuminated manuscripts produced in his lifetime, including the fabulously opulent Rothschild Prayerbook (last sold in 2014 for £13,605,000).

Oriental Manuscripts

From the Oriental section of the sale, a miniature leaf-shaped Qur'an, copied by Mohammad Saleh Taom Zadeh, in Arabic is another key highlight (Lot 112, Est: £4,000-6,000). Striking for its remarkable design and measuring just 72mm x 40mm, this copy of the Qur’an is dated 1284 AH (1867/68 AD) and unusually illuminated in silver, rather than gold. The text is elegantly laid out mimicking the veins of a real leaf, and the miniature is stored in a bespoke box. The breath- taking design details point to the quality of this manuscript and the wealth of the patron who commissioned it. Only two comparable Qur’ans have appeared on the open market in recent decades.

From Persia, Kolliyat by Muhsin al-Din Sa'adi Shirazi, "Sa'di" (Lot 121, Est: £10,000-15,000, dated 1243 AH [1827-28 AD]) serves as another standout illuminated manuscript from the Oriental section. Sa’di is one of the most revered poetic and prose writers in Persian history, and here the text is surrounded with gold detailing creating a cloud-like effect on the page. Most interestingly, this has provenance from the library of Shahzadeh Khanlar Mirza, the 17th son of Crown Prince Abbas Mirza of the Qajar dynasty. Shahzadeh Khanlar became one of the most prominent princes of his generation. Notably, he became Nasser al-Din Shah’s chief commander in the Anglo- Persian war of 1856. Inside the lacquered outer boards are two fascinating and detailed depictions of an old and young man set against idyllic pastoral backgrounds.

Another captivating lot is a miniature Qajar Qur'an from Persia in the mid-nineteenth century (Lot 110, Est £4,000- 6,000). This intricately decorated, pocket-sized prayer book was probably commissioned by an aristocrat for the purposes of Hajj. It is stored in an accompanying leather carrying pouch of contemporary design with silk-lining and leather strap (detached on one side) which would have made it easily transportable during pilgrimage.

Auction Guide