ITHACA, NY--Worth Auctions, located in Dryden, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog.    

This catalog features the second session of rare and desirable arms and militaria from the estate of a prominent Civil War collector. Central to the Civil War collection is a veritable arsenal of over 150 antique firearms and swords, over 60 of which are offered in this sale. Noteworthy weapons include a rare Confederate Fayetteville musket; an Clauberg presentation sword ornately embellished with garnets, silver, and gold; and a Colt First Model dragoon revolver showing original color.          

Numerous presidentially-signed items will also be showcased, such as a passport signed by James Monroe; a land grant signed by John Quincy Adams; and a mounted riflemen commission signed by James K. Polk. Other interesting documents include a vellum indenture sworn before King George III; a decorative "Squirrel Hunter's Discharge" presented to a member of the volunteer militia that defended Cincinnati from Confederate invasion; and an early American Colonial deed relating to a tract in New York City.                  

Fine art offerings in this session include a masterful oil on canvas portrait of an Erie County gentleman attributed to Moses Billings; a cameo on bone by D.J. Watkins; and a scarce hand-colored woodcut print of the Naval battle at Memphis. Other remarkable items from this state are a French bronze medallion of Abraham Lincoln; an early H.L. Leonard raised pillar fishing reel made of German silver and ebonite; and an eighteen-karat gold Elgin pocket watch. Also of note are a Tiffany Studios trinket box; a field surgical kit; and two McClellan saddles.      

Worth Auctions is a public auction service specializing in estate work and collections.  The company conducts fully cataloged auctions with global bidding activity over three platforms. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of items, from pencils to airplanes. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-330-0358 or email mail@worthauctions.com.

 

Designed to educate, amuse, or advertise, pictorial maps were a clever and colorful component of print culture in the mid-20th century, often overlooked in studies of cartography. A new book published by the Library of Congress in association with the University of Chicago Press, “Picturing America: The Golden Age of Pictorial Maps,” by Stephen J. Hornsby, celebrates these vibrant maps, tracing their development and proliferation from the 1920s to the 1970s.

Cartographers have long incorporated illustrations into their maps, drawing mountains, cities, and even sea monsters on maps, looking back at some medieval examples. Hornsby demonstrates how 20th-century artists adapted this tradition, encouraged by improvements in print technology and inspired by trends in advertising, graphic design and popular culture.

More than 150 maps, most drawn from the Library of Congress’s Geography and Maps Division, are illustrated in six thematic chapters. “Maps to Amuse” includes satirical works like “A New Yorker’s Idea of the United States of America” (1935), while “Maps to Instruct” shows such maps as “A Pictorial Chart of American Literature” (1932), marking the residences of famous American authors. Regional tourism ads, World War II posters, and maps of colonial America are just a few of the many types of maps encountered in this volume.

The New York Times calls the book “beautifully illustrated” and notes that it documents the golden age of pictorial maps, from the 1920s to the 1970s. It includes the playful (distorted views of the country from the perspective of New Yorkers, Texans and Californians); the obscure (a map of volunteer fire departments in Philadelphia, circa 1792, commissioned and drawn in 1938); and more of the obscure (a map of Michigan bakeries).

“Picturing America” shows how mid-century mapmakers paired vivid illustrations with educational information, entrepreneurial spirit, and humor to create lively pictorial maps that are as entertaining to today’s readers as they were to their original audiences.

Stephen J. Hornsby is director of the Canadian-American Center and professor of geography and Canadian Studies at the University of Maine. He is the author and co-editor of several books, including the prize-winning “Historical Atlas of Maine.”

“Picturing America” is a 304-page hardcover book including more than 150 color illustrations. It is available for $45 in the Library of Congress Shop, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C., 20540-4985. Credit-card orders are taken at (888) 682-3557 or loc.gov/shop/.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov, and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

Img2766 copy.jpgBOSTON, MA -  As we near the 100th anniversary of John F. Kennedy's birth, Boston-based RR Auction is proud to announce the manuscript: Prelude to Leadership - JFK's Summer Diary of 1945 will be featured in an upcoming live auction on April 26, 2017. 

This 61-page diary, written as a Hearst newspaper war correspondent, captures a moment in time perhaps never before fully appreciated, and only now, 71 years later, officially being offered at auction.

The diary is compromised of 61 loose-leaf pages, bound in a premium black leather cowhide binder. Twelve of the pages were handwritten by Kennedy and he typed forty-nine pages on his personal typewriter.

The diary was consigned by Deirdre Henderson, who began working for Senator Kennedy in 1959 as his research assistant in his run for the Presidency.  She worked closely with him and his academic advisory group on position papers for his campaign, and the President-elect asked her to stay on during the transition period. Deirdre was on the White House staff before moving on to the State Department. 

“It was a privilege to work as research assistant to Senator John F. Kennedy in his run for the Presidency. He gave me his 1945 diary so I could better understand his views,” said Deirdre Henderson. 

He was not yet thirty, and—unbeknownst to himself and the world—the courageous PT-109 veteran was forging his path to greatness. Germany had just surrendered, and over a brief two months during the summer of 1945, he served as a witness to history, traveling World War II-torn Europe: England, Ireland, France, finally Germany. There, shoulder to shoulder with presidents, prime ministers, and generals, he experienced firsthand the end of WWII and the ominous creeping of the iron curtain.

In the wake of his elder brother’s valiant death soaring over the British Channel, the Harvard graduate left his twenty-something scholarly dreams behind, and picked up the mantle of his storied family dynasty.

Within the detailed personal diary, a 28-year-old JFK reveals surprising views on liberalism versus conservatism and espouses his unedited beliefs regarding Roosevelt’s effect on capitalism; he witnesses and harshly critiques the formation of the United Nations; he muses on iconic leaders Chamberlain, Churchill, DeGaulle, FDR, and Eisenhower. Before the trip is over, young Jack experiences in real-time a desolated Berlin and along with Stalin, Truman, and Eisenhower, attends Potsdam, Germany’s summit. 

This historic event included an unlikely gathering of a current president, Truman, and two future presidents, Ike and JFK. Potsdam was where Truman officially decided to drop the bomb on Japan and revealed the presence of the world-changing weapon to Stalin. 

Throughout the diary, JFK chronicles his own chilling premonitions of power-hungry Russia and the conflict that would be synonymous with his presidency: the cold war. Kennedy even visits the ravaged bunker where Hitler died and attests to a long-rumored conspiracy that the Fuhrer’s body was never found; lacking hindsight and knowledge of Nazi horrors now known, he ends the European portion of the diary with the startling assessment that Hitler possessed “the stuff that legends were made of.”

By Summer’s end, Jack officially decided to run for congress, the first step on his sixteen-year journey to the White House. The final pages of this memoir record, in the future president’s own hand, his reservations on running, coupled with his renewed vigor to serve.

JFK’s assignment as an observer-reporter provided him the final push needed to embrace the next steps of his career and excel as a public servant.

“This exceptional diary sheds light on a side of John F. Kennedy seldom explored and confirms America’s enduring sense that he was one of the most qualified, intelligent, and insightful commanders-in-chief in American history,” said Bobby Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction.

The live auction will take place at RR Auction’s Boston Gallery on April 26, 2017 at 1PM Eastern. More details can be found online at www.rrauction.com.

Image: Courtesy of RR Auctions.

Jane+Austen+Volume+the+First_cover copy.jpgOXFORD—To mark 200 years since the death of Jane Austen, a major new exhibition at Oxford University’s Bodleian Libraries will challenge the current public perception of one of England’s greatest literary heroes. 

Which Jane Austen? presents Austen as an ambitious and risk-taking businesswoman and a wartime writer who was informed and inspired by the surprising international adventures of her family and relations. Through a spectacular selection of Austen materials displayed together for the first time, the Bodleian Libraries delve into the myriad influences on this great writer’s work. 

Britain was at war with Revolutionary and Napoleonic France during most of Austen’s adult life and three of her brothers served in the military. This exhibition examines Austen as England’s novelist of the home front and war as the context for the quiet domestic lives of her characters. Novels like Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park and Persuasion are interpreted in the exhibition as wartime texts and set alongside other war writings including military treatises (of which Austen was an appreciative reader) and political cartoons.

The global journeys of Austen’s well-travelled family to India, Scandinavia, Africa, China, Canada and the West Indies provided her with a rich international outlook. Austen also read many books that dealt with the far corners of the British Empire. This exhibition illustrates the influence of these international links on Austen’s writing, through diaries, letters, naval logbooks and artefacts.  

Also explored is Austen’s success as a professional writer. The exhibition charts her frequent visits to London to oversee the publication process of her books and to relish the cultural and commercial life of the capital. It traces in rich detail her relationship with John Murray II, the most glamorous publisher in London. Lord Byron and Walter Scott, the best-selling authors of the day, were on Murray’s list. 

The Bodleian Libraries have extraordinarily rich Austen holdings and house one of the world’s three most significant collections of Austen materials. The exhibition will also feature items on loan from Oxford college collections, King’s College, Cambridge, Chawton House Library, Jane Austen’s House Museum, the British Library, the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, and the John Murray Archive, National Library of Scotland. 

Professor Kathryn Sutherland, curator of the exhibition and world-leading Austen expert at Oxford University, said: ‘Contrary to popular belief, Jane Austen was no retiring country mouse. And while it is assumed that, as an 18th century female, her context was local and her outlook parochial, Austen was always very much a writer of the world. 

‘To mark the bicentenary of the death of one of our greatest literary heroes, this exhibition presents a 200-year journey ranging from Hampshire to the distant fringes of the British Empire, providing us with glimpses into the many lives of Jane Austen.’

Highlights of the exhibition will include:

  • The Watsons, the earliest surviving manuscript of a novel by Jane Austen in process of development
  • A copy of Volume the First, a collection of short stories, mini-plays, verses and moral fragments that Austen wrote between the ages of 12 and 18.
  • Sanditon, the manuscript-novel left unfinished in the final months of her life, on loan from King’s College, Cambridge
  • The logbook kept by Frank Austen as Post-Captain of HMS Canopus, open at his entry describing the Battle of Trafalgar and the death of Admiral Nelson 
  • A ticket of admission to the trial of Warren Hastings, impeached in 1787 on charges of corruption
  • First-edition copies of Austen novels Pride and Prejudice, Mansfield Park and Persuasion open at passages relating to war
  • Evidence of her professional dealings with her famous publisher, including a royalty cheque made out to ‘Miss Jane Austin’, which she counter-signed with the same spelling, showing how important her writing income was to her
  • The household recipe book used in Chawton Cottage by the Austen women
  • Austen’s writing desk and her hand-copied music books
  • A wealth of family and professional letters that reveal Jane Austen in her own words 
  • A series of edited clips from the earliest to the most recent film and TV adaptations of the novels (presented in collaboration with the BBC)

A range of other national events will take place throughout 2017 to mark the 200th anniversary of the death of Jane Austen (18 July), including ‘The Mysterious Miss Austen’, an exhibition at the Discovery Centre, Winchester (13 May-24 July), and events at Jane Austen’s House Museum, Chawton, Hampshire. 

Which Jane Austen? 

The Weston Library, Bodleian Libraries, Oxford

22 June - 29 October 2017

Free admission, no booking required

Image: Front cover of the unique manuscript Volume the First, a collection of short stories, mini-plays, verses and moral fragments that Austen wrote between the ages of 12 and 18. In this volume, Austen transcribed some of her earliest fiction. She used a ready-made bound blank stationer’s notebook and, according to a final inscription, completed the transcription on 3 June 1793. Credit: Bodleian Libraries, University of Oxford 

 

63dee8bb-7876-441b-a3b5-3f13774379ed.jpgNew York, NY: Bidsquare's inaugural themed auction Passport to the World features a curated collaboration of travel-inspired art, antiques and collectibles from the finest New York dealers. The themed auction is open for bidding, live on Bidsquare until March 30. Featured New York galleries include Barbara Israel Garden Antiques, Elizabeth Street GalleryCombray Gallery and Burden among others.

Take a trip while you browse the auction, all from the convenience of your device. First, decide where you're headed by spinning this vintage globe or consulting engraved or hand colored fabric maps from Rare Paper.

Next, pack up your suitcase! Travel in style, or back in time with vintage Louis Vuitton suitcases and trunks from A Second Chance. The boutique has been supplying the Upper East Side with divine, luxury goods from their Lexington Avenue location since 1993.

Choose your mode of transportation: planes, trains or automobile? Or maybe by boat? Hop on your flight and you're headed there. A Conceptual Aircraft, French, c. 1900 is a uniquely hand-crafted model airplane, extremely impressive in scale measuring 9 feet long. It may have been built by early aviation pioneer Louis Bleriot, or by his collaborator Gabriel Voisin, with whom he created many variations of experimental airplanes and flying machines, from 1903-06.

You've arrived. Take in the scenery and check out the sights, gardens, canals and architecture. Admire the terra-cotta jars and sculptures from Barbara Israel Garden Antiques and take in the views around you. Barbara Israel Garden Antiques works closely with landscape architects, designers, and private clients to find the ideal object for individual gardens.

Bid now on the curated collaboration of travel-inspired art, antiques and collectibles. For purchases made for themed auctions, there is no buyer’s premium. Additional information and the full digital catalog for the sale is online now at www.bidsquare.com.

For Dealers and Galleries

If you are a dealer or gallery and are interested in participating in the next themed auction, please contact Bidsquare here.

About Bidsquare

Bidsquare is a curated platform where collectors can discover, bid and buy authenticated fine art and antiques from over 130 trusted and vetted auction houses and galleries. Bidsquare is the destination for individuals and collectors seeking exceptional, one-of-a-kind pieces, with new, unique property added every day. Visit http://www.bidsquare.com to view sales. 

Image: 1789 Engraved Map of Ukraine with the Black Sea port of Ochakov from Rare Paper, asking bid $50

76-Corcos copy.jpgNew York—On Tuesday, March 21, Swann Galleries held their spring auction of Illustration art to a packed room. The biannual sale offers original works of art intended for publication; it finished with an 82% sell-through rate, and many works exceeded their high estimates.

The top lot of the sale was the original watercolor for the cover of the first French edition of the third Babar book, Le Roi Babar, 1933, by Jean de Brunhoff. It was purchased by a collector for $40,000*. A watercolor by de Brunhoff’s son Laurent, who carried on the Babar series after his father’s death, was also sold; Babar dans l’Île aux Oiseau, 1969, reached $7,000.

Skeletons and Hiding Figures, circa early 1980s, achieved the highest hammer price for a work by Edward Gorey in the last 12 years; with the buyer’s premium, it sold for $18,750. With 12 original works, the auction offered the largest selection of works by Edward Gorey in a single sale. Further highlights included a watercolor, pen and ink drawing of Mr. Earbrass, 1970s, purchased by a collector for $11,875.

The sale featured five works by Charles Addams that came from the Charles & Tee Addams Foundation and had never previously appeared at auction. The run was led by a 1957 gouache and watercolor cover for The New Yorker, titled Scuba Galleon, and a cartoon for the same publication titled Z Line Subway, into which Addams had snuck three characters from his popular show, The Addams Family (each $16,250). Another highlight from the selection was Addams Family Barge, a 1984 advertisement for Mobil Oil that featured the entire freaky family, including the Pugsley’s pet octopus Artistotle and Thing, as Addams had originally conceived him ($14,300).

Two original Peanuts comic strips by Charles Schulz each surpassed their high estimates. A rare early depiction of Snoopy in Here comes the big Polar Bear stalking across the snow!, 1957, was purchased by an institution for $12,500. Snoopy in his more familiar form also starred in the 1974 pen and ink strip Mister Sensitive, which reached $11,875.

A mesmerizing undated egg tempera painting by Lucille Corcos titled Weekend Chores broke the artist’s previous auction record to sell for $10,000. Another record went to John C. Damron for his 1946 oil painting Pet Store, which flew past its high estimate of $1,200 to sell for $5,460.

As is customary for Illustration Art sales at Swann Galleries, there was a robust section of covers and cartoons for The New Yorker. All but one of the 25 offered lots found buyers, surpassing the high estimate for the section by over $10,000. Available works spanned the lifetime of the publication, the earliest being Summer and Winter Activities, a gouache cover by Theodore Haupt published in 1933, which broke its previous auction record to sell for $1,300.

Christine von der Linn, Director of Illustration Art, said of the sale, "Our commitment to offering fresh-to-market material paid off in a sale that was heavily attended and flooded with phone and Internet bidding throughout. Kids, creatures, and cartoons shone as the clear fan favorites in the sale. Perhaps in a time of unusually high political discontent, the pure joy of illustration art also serves as a comfort and panacea."

The next sale of Illustration Art at Swann Galleries will be held in Fall 2017. For more information, contact Christine von der Linn at cv@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 76 Lucille Corcos, Weekend Chores, egg tempera on masonite. Sold March 21, 2017 for $10,000, a record for the artist. (Pre-sale estimate $5,000 to $7,000.)

The international auction house Bonhams has appointed Laura Paterson as Head of Photographs in New York.

A graduate in History of Art from Edinburgh University, Laura joins Bonhams with more than 20 years’ experience as a photographs specialist at Christie’s New York, where she was Senior Specialist. She has also worked as the US Cultural and Print Sales Director at Magnum Photos New York, and as Photography Department Co-Head and Senior Specialist for online auctioneers Paddle 8. 

Bonhams Global CEO, Matthew Girling, said, “Photographs are an important part of Bonhams Fine Arts stable, and so we are delighted that someone as highly respected as Laura Paterson has arrived to lead the department. Laura will build on our strong track record of achievement in this area.”  

Laura Paterson commented, “I am excited at the prospect of joining a company with such a strong commitment to the world of photographs. I look forward to contributing my enthusiasm and experience to its future success.”  

Bullitt full.jpegDALLAS, Texas (March 21, 2017) -  The personally-owned collection of movie star Steve McQueen brought $280,618 across 30 lots in Heritage Auctions’ spring Entertainment & Music Memorabilia auction March 18 in Dallas. The $1 million sale offered private collections by Bruce Willis and Farah Fawcett, as well as a stellar collection of never-before-seen concert posters. 

“Strong bidding across the spectrum drove this auction past expectations,” said Margaret Barrett, Director of Entertainment Memorabilia at Heritage Auctions.

The auction offered 18 annotated shooting scripts from some of McQueen’s greatest movies. His leather-bound, annotated script for the 1968 film Bullitt and his script for Le Mans each sold for $55,000. The script for the 1963 classic The Great Escape - which detailed McQueen’s own requests for the classic motorcycle jump scene - sold for $50,000.

The auction offered a special selection of personal rarities from Marilyn Monroe, including an original marker from Marilyn Monroe’s grave, which sold for $35,000; a circa 1953 Marilyn Monroe signed black and white photograph, which ended at $13,750; and a circa 1954 dollar bill autographed by both Monroe and Joe DiMaggio, which brought $5,750.

A one-owner collection of rarely-seen music concert posters sold for a combined $255,843 led by a poster for a 1964 performance by Roy Orbison. The window card, showing a classic image of Orbison wearing horn-rimmed glasses, saw interest from five bidders who pushed the sale price to $16,250. A Batman/Young Rascals concert poster from 1966 sold for $13,750 and a colorful, 1956 poster advertising performances by Little Richard, Big Joe Turner and Etta James closed at $12,500.

Two rare pieces of memorabilia relating to Otis Redding surpassed estimates as a RIAA Gold Record sales award for his smash hit (Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay sold for $12,500 and a scarce, 1965 record promotional poster sold for $11,250.

Additional highlights include, but are not limited to:

The mauve silk chiffon dress worn by Elizabeth Taylor in the film Cleopatra sold for $10,000.

Hollywood memorabilia personally-consigned by stage and screen actor Bruce Willis featured his French movie poster from Forbidden Planet, which sold for $7,500, and his Hollywood Walk of Fame Award from 2006, sold for $5,000.

Memorabilia from The Beatles saw four signatures from a 1963 autograph album sell for $10,625 and a signed copy of the group’s LP Help! saw $7,500.  

Items from the collection of David Gest Memorabilia Archive includes a Michael Jackson signed color photograph from 1998 and busts of Louis Armstrong and W.C. Handy, which both sold for $4,750.

Lot-293-Steinlen copy.jpgNew York—On Thursday, March 16, Swann Galleries offered Vintage Posters, featuring dynamic selections of graphic art from the end of the nineteenth century through the middle of the twentieth century. The sale represented the myriad functions of the poster as a means of communication and advertising, with sections devoted to Soviet propaganda and beachside vacations alike.

The top lot of the sale was the iconic Tournée du Chat Noir by Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen. The 1896 large-format poster was purchased after a neck-and-neck race by two phone bidders for $30,000*, a record for the work. Art Nouveau pieces performed well overall, most notably a run of works by Alphonse Mucha led by the rare complete 1902 portfolio Documents Décoratifs, purchased by a collector for $22,500. Further highlights by the master included a four-panel folding screen featuring women as the allegories of Times of the Day, 1899, and the deluxe edition of Salon des Cent, 1896 ($13,750 and $16,900, respectively). Nicholas D. Lowry, director of Vintage Posters,  noted “a refreshing resurgence of interest in works by Jules Chéret,” with highlights being Musée Grévin / Théâtre Les Fantoches de John Hewelt, 1900, with and without text ($3,750 and $1,188, respectively).

The sale featured an enormous run of ski and winter posters, with nearly three quarters of the 91 offered lots finding buyers. The breathtaking St. Moritz, 1924, by Carl Moos, topped the section with $11,250, followed by the action-packed Chamonix Mt. Blanc, 1930, by Roger Broders at $9,100. Four of the top ten ski posters advertised American resorts with sweeping scenes showing a single skier. Dwight Clark Shepler’s Sun Valley / Ketchum, Idaho, circa 1940, reached $8,750, while his 1940 Sun Valley / “Round House” on Baldy Mountain sold for $5,500. All but one of the posters featuring the Idaho resort town found buyers: Mr. Lowry was pleased, saying, “As usual, ski posters performed very well, and there was in particular a renewed enthusiasm for Sun Valley.”

In addition to directing the Vintage Posters department at Swann Galleries, Mr. Lowry is also house’s President and Principal Auctioneer, as well as the third generation of his family to run the company since its inception 75 years ago. Swann Galleries is the oldest continually operating specialist auction house in New York, and the world’s largest auctioneer of Works on Paper. This month, the house celebrates the diamond anniversary of its first sale, an auction of books and literary properties, held March 27, 1942.

The next sale of Vintage Posters at Swann Galleries will be Graphic Design on May 25, 2017. For more information, or to consign works to future auctions, contact Nicholas D. Lowry at posters@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 293 Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen, Tournée du Chat Noir, 1896. Sold March 16, 2017 for $30,000.

The Library of Congress today announced the acquisition of the archives of Bob Adelman, one of the best-known photographers of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. The collection, containing 575,000 high-quality images, was given to the Library as a gift from an anonymous donor.

The materials, which represent a wide range of images covering the latter half of the 20th century, will be housed in the Library’s Prints and Photographs Division. Of the 575,000 images, 50,000 are prints and the rest, negatives and slides.

Adelman (1930-2016) photographed many of the important leaders and events of the Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King and the March on Washington. He also photographed people, events and other social issues of the day (1960-2000), including pop artists Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein and short-story writer and poet Raymond Carver.

Adelman said, “My life’s work, in addition to being about race relations, is about the many and diverse social concerns in the great tradition of American documentary photography:  poverty, mental illness, alcoholism, inadequate housing, the immigrant experience, prostitution, delinquency, illiteracy and on and on.”

Born in New York City in 1930, Adelman grew up on Long Island.  He earned a bachelor’s degree from Rutgers University and a master’s in philosophy from Columbia University and studied law at Harvard.

Adelman studied photography under Alexey Brodovitch, the famed art director of Harper’s Bazaar magazine.  As a working photographer and producer of photographic books, Adelman pursued an avid interest in social and political events.  This interest began with coverage of events related to civil rights, such as sit-ins by students across the American South and demonstrations by the Congress of Racial Equality (C.O.R.E.) in the early 1960s.  His engagement with issues of social justice continued until his death.

His mentor, Ralph Ellison, once said, “Adelman has moved beyond the familiar clichés of most documentary photography into that rare sphere wherein technical ability and social vision combine to create a work of art.”

Adelman, in an interview several years ago, said, “When I photographed, I was intent on telling the truth as best I saw it and then to help in doing something about it.  It was a constant effort not only to document in as honest a way as I could, and to make what I was seeing vivid, but to figure out how to change things.”

Adelman received many honors in recognition of his work, including a Guggenheim fellowship, Art Directors Club awards (New York, Washington and San Francisco), American Institute of Graphic Arts 50 Books awards and the University of Missouri’s School of Journalism Award.  He has taught at the International Center for Photography, the New School, the School of Visual Arts, Columbia University, Stanford University, Union College, the University of Minnesota, Ohio State University, the Museum of Fine Arts (Boston) and the Steamboat Falls Workshop.

The Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division preserves and provides access to nearly 16 million photographs, drawings and prints from the 15th century to the present day.  International in scope, these visual collections represent a uniquely rich array of human experience, knowledge, creativity and achievement, touching on almost every realm of endeavor: science, art, invention, government and political struggle, and the recording of history. For more information, visit loc.gov/rr/print/.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov, and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

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