Rebecca Rego Barry

Opening this Friday at the British Library is an exhibition exploring the roots, philosophy, and relevance of Buddhism—and that means a display of rare books and manuscripts encompassing Buddhist scriptures, literary works, and historical narratives. From sacred scriptures written on tree bark or palm leaves to twentieth-century “folding books,”

The Library of Congress announced yesterday the winner of its first annual Library of Congress Lavine/Ken Burns Prize for Film is Flannery, a film about National Book Award-winner Flannery O’Connor. Directed by Loyola University professor Elizabeth Coffman and Jesuit priest Mark Bosco, the documentary chronicles the life of the Georgia author known for her provocative, Southern Gothic

Any book signed by presidential assassin John Wilkes Booth would be intriguing, but one titled Rifles and Rifle Practice (1859) is positively spine-chilling. The book, featuring a gilt-stamped image of a solider on the front cover and containing diagrams, illustrations, and charts related to the art of shooting, clearly signals the impeding war. Indeed, Booth’s inscription, “John

The American Library Association (ALA) released the longlist for its 2020 Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Non-Fiction. The list includes 49 titles (24 fiction, 25 nonfiction), and we’re pleased to report that one of our contributors, Holly George-Warren, is among the honored authors.

A revealing, four-page letter written by Jane Austen to her sister Cassandra will go to auction in New York on October 23. Cassandra was the author's most frequent correspondent, and this letter, written on September 16, 1813, covers a range of intimate, familial subjects, from china patterns to health issues. “The letter throughout

By now many of you will have heard the exciting news that scholars Jason Scott-Warren and Claire M.S. Bourne have identified John Milton as the annotator of the Free Library of Philadelphia’s copy of the First Folio.

Last week, the J. Paul Getty Trust in Los Angeles announced a bold initiative to raise awareness of the world’s cultural heritage through education, research, and conservation. Titled Ancient Worlds Now: A Future for the Past, the $100-million endeavor will be shared among various projects, exhibitions, seminars around the

Here we are back to the books. Earlier this week, I posted part 1 of this Autumn 2019 books about books roundup. Now, without further ado, part 2:

Leah Price’s What We

This year’s winner of the Alice Award has been announced: Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South. Southbound contains fifty-six photographers’ visions of the South over the first decades of the twenty-first century.  It was published to accompany an exhibition at

It’s September, that time of year that tends to bring us all back to the books, so to speak. The ‘books about books’ market is no different, but there seems to be a more-than-usual amount to share with you—a baker’s dozen in all, unevenly split with eight non-fiction titles, three fiction, and one adorable gift book. Let’s dive in! (Part II will appear on Thursday.)

First up is