Rebecca Rego Barry

It is perhaps inevitable that our quarterly roundup of books about books is heavy on heavy books, i.e. oversized, coffee-table tomes, the kind you might give or wish to receive as a holiday gift. Nevertheless, all are useful and beautiful additions to a book lover’s shelves.

Closing out Walt Whitman’s boisterous bicentennial year — there were exhibitions aplenty, featured here and in our summer print edition — New York’s Center for Book Arts is taking a different approach in its celebration of the Good Gray Poet. In its current

Were we to read into the jacket art of the first edition of Barbara Taylor Bradford’s first novel, we’d note the focus on jewelry—in this case, emerald and gold earrings and a pearl necklace. And perhaps we ought to read into it, after all, fine jewels have been very important to the bestselling British-American author. Over the course of her 55-year marriage to Hollywood movie producer Bob

Yesterday, an appropriately snowy day in New York City, Doyle sold a group of four Chuck Jones storyboards from the 1966 classic, How the Grinch Stole Christmas! In the run-up to the holiday season, the bidding bypassed the $3,000-5,000 estimate and landed at $

Looking ahead to the Boston book fairs this weekend, we’d like to share a short list of items that show the breadth of material on offer at the Boston International Antiquarian Book Fair.  

In the booth of Justin Croft Antiquarian Books, for example, you may encounter the rare first

Rolling off the same printing press as Johannes Gutenberg’s celebrated production of 1455, this 1462 two-volume Biblia latina, published in Mainz by Gutenberg’s direct successors (and former associates), Johannes Fust and Peter Schöffer, is headed to auction in Hamburg later this month, where

In 1898, Isabella Stewart Gardner brought the first Raphael to America, a portrait of Pope Julius II’s librarian, Tommaso Inghirami. Today it goes on exhibit at her namesake museum in Boston in commemoration of the 500th anniversary of Raphael’s death.

So who is this man in the red cap,

Every November, Indianapolis hosts VonnegutFest in honor of its native son, the brilliant author Kurt Vonnegut (1922-2007). But this year’s event will be quite special, as it coincides with the grand opening of the new Kurt Vonnegut Museum and Library (KVML). Called “a pilgrimage

Next month the Brontë Parsonage Museum, the former home of the Brontë family, will get a second chance to secure one of Charlotte Brontë’s ‘little books.’ The tiny manuscript, written in 1830 when she was just fourteen years old, contains three handwritten stories that evoke the rich imaginary world she and her siblings created. It came to light in 2011, having been in private ownership since

Opening this Friday at the British Library is an exhibition exploring the roots, philosophy, and relevance of Buddhism—and that means a display of rare books and manuscripts encompassing Buddhist scriptures, literary works, and historical narratives. From sacred scriptures written on tree bark or palm leaves to twentieth-century “folding books,”