Rebecca Rego Barry

As the antiquarian book world readies for the first of its big gatherings of 2020, we thought we’d provide a quick, chronological rundown of the major events. Stay tuned for more information and highlights as we get closer to kickoff.

January 31-February 1: The 2020 San Francisco Antiquarian Book, Print

Last week, UK Arts Minister Helen Whately announced a temporary export ban on “The Myrowr of Recluses,” an illuminated Middle English manuscript meant to guide those who were retreating from society and devoting their lives to prayer, often referred to as anchorites. The leather-

Last week, the Center for Book Arts (CBA) in New York City debuted an exhibition that truly takes poetry off the page. Artist Warren Lehrer is well known for playing with forms, combining book art with contemporary art in ways few have imagined. Warren Lehrer: Books, Animation,

We were saddened to learn of the death of Joseph Rubinfine (1938-2019), a highly respected dealer in historical manuscripts. Richard Austin, senior vice president and head of books & manuscripts at Sotheby’s, described Rubinfine as “truly one of the

In the run-up to the Californian Antiquarian Book Fair in Pasadena in February, an innovative social media campaign celebrating the 100th anniversary of women’s suffrage has been launched. Since its debut on October 30 with nineteenth-century activist Lucretia Mott, the CA Book Fair has been posting brief, daily profiles of women who made history (#

ICYMI: Our top ten most popular posts of 2019. Number one takes a page from our winter issue’s cover feature, pictured above. What can we say? Bob Dylan rules.

1. Collecting Bob Dylan
Music icon Bob Dylan offers collectors several

A man may work from sun to sun, but a woman’s work is never done, as the old adage goes. Pity, then, the collector of women’s work, whose subject is virtually uncontainable, not to mention largely obscured. But Lisa Unger Baskin has persisted and prevailed at it over the past 45 years, ultimately placing her massive collection at Duke University’s Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History

In our current issue, Lilly Library director and curator of early books and manuscripts Joel Silver focuses his column on biographies, memoirs, and reference works that introduce us to the book collectors who have preceded us. “Many collecting fields have a sizable body of guidebooks and reference literature,” he writes, “but book

Music icon Bob Dylan offers collectors several directions: books, manuscripts, photographs, letters, albums, concert tickets and posters, and song lyrics. The winner of the 2016 Nobel Prize in Literature, Dylan is nothing if not prolific -- and very collectible. Our subscribers may already be familiar with the topic, since our current

Hat tip to Aaron T. Pratt, Pforzheimer Curator of early books & manuscripts at the Ransom Center, who brought this incredible but easily overlooked painting to our attention. Known only as “Still life of an illuminated manuscript,” the sixteenth-century oil on panel sold for £81,312 ($105,658) at Bonhams’ sale of Old Masters in