Barbara Basbanes Richter

San Francisco-based Jack Stauffacher (1920-2017) was a master of types. The self-taught printer, typographer, book designer, and founder of Greenwood Press spent his eight-decade-long career in the service of crafting and assembling beautiful typographic forms sure to stand the test of time. Beloved by many throughout the creative community and considered one of the last of the

Before next weekend’s Boston Antiquarian Book Fair, why not head to Massachusetts a few days early to attend a lecture on the tools the Brontë sisters used to compose their novels. Associate Director and Curator of Collections at Rare Book School Barbara Heritage will discuss her

Last month, the Lake District National Park Authority (LDNPA) issued a statement declaring that off road vehicles would not be banned from the park, a move that has upset some locals who say dirtbikes and cars are ruining the countryside. 

Going rogue takes courage, and what better place to cultivate that feeling than between the hard covers of children's books, where rebellious protagonists like Pippi Longstocking and Oliver Twist have long captivated young readers with their verve and spunk. The British Library is celebrating these brave characters and others in a free exhibition running from November 8, 2019 through March 20

It’s the time of year when organizations start asking for donations, and here’s one that ought to pique the interest of you bibliophiles out there: the nonprofit TYPA studio of Estonia is looking for boosters for its letterpress edition of Antoine de Saint-Exupery’s The Little Prince.

Formerly known as the Estonian Print

The Litquake Literary Festival is taking over San Francisco from October 10th through the 19th, with events taking place all across the city. (The name of the festival comes from a poem written by Lawrence Ferlinghetti, who recited the piece at the 2002 festival after arriving two

Back in August, Alex Johnson filed this report for us about the rise of bookish podcasts in the United Kingdom, leaving us to wonder whether there’s a similar move afoot stateside.

Bibliophilic radio shows have come and gone over the years. Some of you may recall “The Book Guys” radio show

Sally Mann’s black and white photographs represent a 40-year quest to document the American South, the people who call it home, and the unending battle between life, death, and decay. Consider, for example, Hephaestus, Mann’s 2008 portrait of her husband, Larry, who suffers from muscular dystrophy. Larry’s exposed torso is partially eaten by the chemical reactions caused by

Las Vegas is home to more than glitzy casinos and pawn shops: the city can now claim a robust special collections program at nearby University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV), thanks in part to a $5-million endowment recently established by alumna Beverly Rogers.

The endowment will fund the Beverly Rogers Rare

Originally founded in 1694 as a private bank to the British government, today the Bank of England serves as the central bank for the United Kingdom, and much has changed in the past 325 years in the world of monetary policy. To recognize the milestone, the world’s second-oldest central bank recently opened an exhibition at its adjoining