Page Mill Press of San Francisco will be publishing a trade edition of Barry Moser's illustrated Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, the first of three autobiographies written in 1845 by the escaped slave turned orator. Launched in 2019 by former HarperCollins editor Roy M.

The Poster House was the last place I visited before New York enacted its statewide stay-at-home order back in March. I trekked down to SoHo via an eerily empty Metro North and the subway to catch a glimpse of The Sleeping Giant, an exhibition dedicated to exploring China's economic progress through poster

Anything with Jane Austen's imprimatur is destined to generate interest, and independent Paris-based publisher SP Books has just released a limited facsimile edition of Austen’s least known novel, Lady Susan

Though launched in 2000, the staff at London's Chelsea Bindery participate in the tradition of fine leather book binding that goes back centuries. This month the bindery celebrates twenty years in business with a catalogue showcasing 170 pieces highlighting the bespoke techniques and skill involved in creating leather bound works

In March 1994, Neutrogena CEO Lloyd Cotsen's massive trove of children's literature arrived at its new residence at Princeton University's Cotsen Children's Library. Part of the donation agreement included the publication of a printed catalogue. After three 18-wheelers deposited more than 120,000 items at the campus, that massive task began taking

I don’t know about you, dear readers, but it’s been nothing short of a miracle for me to focus on much other than the parade of horribles happening right now. Apparently it’s called

Alcott completists, take note: Though she died in 1888, Little Women author Louisa May Alcott is back with a new story. Entitled "Aunt Nellie's Diary" this incomplete novella was rediscovered among her archives at Harvard's Houghton Library by Strand Magazine editor Andrew Gulli, who published the piece in the latest

The secret to great book design may be akin to an exquisite ballet performance: the experience is nearly perfect when the effort and work put into the creation of the piece is invisible. In

"Where were you during the coronavirus pandemic of 2020," will become a common query of us by generations to come. Some of us will respond with poetry--there's been plenty of time to write, and America's poets have answered Covid-19 with verse. Notably among them is Daniel Mark Epstein, who recently launched a series of sonnets created during the early days of the shelter-in-place order.

Ready or not, parts of the country are beginning to reopen, but opportunities to exercise those mental muscles do exist for those of us still homebound. Even before the pandemic, the National Archives put out a call for volunteer researchers and

Barbara Basbanes Richter