Nicholas Basbanes

College Station, TX -- The Texas A&M University Libraries are pleased to announce an upcoming exhibition: The Eternal Passion: Nicholas A. Basbanes and the Making of A Gentle Madness. The exhibit will open March 19 at Cushing Memorial Library and Archives, and will run until Aug. 14. Nicholas A. Basbanes is an

Collectors focusing on the Golden State often point to first editions of the Zamorano 80 as their collective black tulip--that carefully curated list of books created in 1945 by the Zamorano Club deemed most significant to the history of California. Founded in 1928 and named in honor California’

ICYMI: Our top ten most popular posts of 2019. Number one takes a page from our winter issue’s cover feature, pictured above. What can we say? Bob Dylan rules.

1. Collecting Bob Dylan
Music icon Bob Dylan offers collectors several

We at Fine Books were so saddened to learn that Bob Fleck, founder of Oak Knoll Books & Press, passed away last week.

For so many bibliophiles, including myself, Oak Knoll is a point of entry into the world of books about books. I first visited Fleck and his shop back in 2001, when I wrote

DAYTON, Ohio—Some of the rarest books in the world will be on display at the University of Dayton this fall, from authors like Austen, Chaucer, Copernicus, Marie Curie, Shakespeare and Mark Twain.

"Imprints and Impressions: Milestones in Human Progress" will feature first editions, manuscripts, galley proofs, papyri and illustrations spanning the scholarly spectrum from philosophy to

A Gentle Madness is not only the name of the bestselling and most comprehensive book about the passion of book collecting, it has become a widely recognized term to describe the innocent addiction to, and allure of, acquiring books.  Anyone afflicted with this malady is certifiable and in good company.

No one knows this better than the author of A Gentle Madness, Nicholas Basbanes, to
I've had fun reading year-end lists of the most popular online articles at The Millions, Latham's, and
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Nick Basbanes, our columnist-in-chief, will be talking with
Henry Bemis, the compulsive reader whose tragedy was limned in a short story by Lyn Venable and dramatized for television in a 1959 biopic written by Rod Serling for an episode of The Twilight Zone that made Bemis a champion to reading geeks worldwide, is dead after a gallant, fifty year struggle with the cumulative