J. Paul Getty Museum

The Getty Presents “Blurring the Line: Manuscripts in the Age of Print”

Los Angeles — Throughout the Middle Ages (about 500-1500), texts and images were disseminated primarily through handwritten and hand-drawn materials. In the 15th century, with the invention of new printing technologies, a revolution swept through Europe giving rise to a rich cross-fertilization between mechanical innovation and painterly tradition.

Digest
Fantastic medieval beasts are on display at the Getty
Summer 2019
Bestiaries, allegorical texts with pages of illuminated animals—some real, like the lion, some mythical, like the griffin—were the bestsellers of their day. Until now, there has been no more comprehensive look at this medieval megahit than Book of Beasts: The Bestiary in the Medieval World at the Getty Center in Los Angeles through August 18. This exhibition brings together for the first time twenty-four of a known sixty-five illuminated Latin bestiaries.

This Summer the Getty Museum Presents “Once. Again. Photographs in Series.”

Los Angeles – Artists have long used cameras to record change, documenting transformations in landscapes or intimate portraits of people at different times in their lives. Once. Again. Photographs in Series, on view July 9-November 10, 2019 at the J. Paul Getty Museum, Getty Center, features historical and contemporary artists who have revisited people and places to make extended photographic series, prompting reflection on the impact of the passage of time—on photographers as well as their subjects.

The J. Paul Getty Museum Presents “The Wondrous Cosmos in Medieval Manuscripts”

Los Angeles – The cosmos—full of shining stars and orbiting planets—inspired works of art and literature throughout the Middle Ages (about 500-1500). Awe-inspiring cosmic phenomena were thought to inform every aspect of a person’s physical, mental, and spiritual well-being, provoking students of medicine, philosophy, and religion carefully to track the progress of the twelve signs of the zodiac and the celestial luminaries (the sun and moon) across the sky.

Getty’s Newly Acquired Northern Renaissance Masterpiece Goes on View

LOS ANGELES—The J. Paul Getty Museum will exhibit the Roman de Gillion de Trazegnies, an illuminated manuscript from Flanders by Lieven van Lathem (1430-1493) from September 3, 2013-March 2, 2014. The work is considered one of the finest productions by Van Lathem, the most accomplished and sophisticated painter of secular scenes in the golden era of Flemish manuscript illumination. In July, England granted the export license for the work, which was purchased by the Getty at auction in December 2012.

Collecting and Transforming Medieval Manuscripts at The Getty

LOS ANGELES—For hundreds of years, medieval manuscripts have been bought and sold, gifted and stolen, preserved and rearranged, loved and forgotten, hidden and displayed, cut into pieces, hung on walls, and glued into albums. They have survived wars, fires, floods, religious conflict, political tumult, the invention of printing, and changes in taste.  They have at times been valued for their beauty, for their spiritual significance, or simply for the strength of their parchment pages.