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June 04, 2015 -
November 30, 2017
British Guiana One-Cent Magenta: The World’s Most Famous Stamp
The 1856 British Guiana One-Cent Magenta is displayed in the museum’s William H. Gross Stamp Gallery. This exhibition of the stamp is the longest and most publicly accessible showing ever.

Open daily 10am - 5:30pm
(except December 25)

Free admission

Smithsonian's National Postal Museum
2 Massachusetts Avenue NE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 10, 2016 -
May 14, 2017
Now and Forever: The Art of Medieval Time
What time is it? The question seems simple, and with a watch on your wrist or a cell phone in your hand, the answer is easy. In the Middle Ages, however, the concept of time could be approached in many different ways, with vastly different tools.

Drawing upon the rich holdings of the Morgan’s collection of medieval and Renaissance illuminated manuscripts, Now and Forever explores how people told time in the Middle Ages and what they thought about it. The manuscripts range in date from the eleventh to the sixteenth centuries and come from all the major countries of Europe.

The exhibition begins with the quirks of the medieval calendar, exploring sacred feasts, the mysteries of Golden Numbers, the utility of Dominical Letters, and how the Middle Ages inherited the Roman Calendar of Julius Caesar. Visitors will engage with the complexities of time as defined by liturgical celebrations and their two overlapping systems of temporale (feasts of time) and sanctorale (feasts of saints), systems that still influence the way we tell time today. Now and Forever also explores how time beyond the grave preoccupied medieval people for whom life on earth was a mere dress rehearsal for the main event—the afterlife.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 17, 2016 -
June 04, 2017
Double Take: Daguerreian Portrait Pairs
Highlighting the depth of the National Portrait Gallery’s early photography collection, this exhibition will showcase fourteen daguerreotypes—two portraits each—of seven subjects: George Bancroft, Jenny Lind, Zachary Taylor, Frederick Douglass, Jefferson Davis, Daniel Webster, and John Quincy Adams. Only one loan—a daguerreotype of John Quincy Adams from the National Museum of American History—will supplement the Gallery’s collection.

By featuring two portraits of each famous sitter, the exhibition will encourage visitors to consider the ways in which various daguerreotypists approached the same subject and how different the results could be. In addition to discussing the early history of portrait photography, the accompanying text will compare images made for public consumption with those produced as personal keepsakes. Ann Shumard, senior curator of photographs, curates this installation.

11:30am - 7pm daily

Free admission

1st Floor
National Portrait Gallery
8th and F Streets NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 20, 2016 -
July 31, 2017
Truman Capote’s Brooklyn: The Lost Photographs of David Attie
In the spring of 1958 a young photographer named David Attie was led through the streets of Brooklyn Heights and to the Brooklyn waterfront by an unexpected guide—33-year-old Truman Capote. The images Attie took that day were to illustrate Capote’s essay for Holiday magazine about his life in Brooklyn. Decades later, these largely unseen photographs are being exhibited for the first time.

Wed - Sun 12pm - 5pm

Suggested Admission
BHS Member: Free
Adults: $10
Seniors 62 and over: $6
Teachers: $6
Students (with I.D.): Free
Children under 12: Free

The Museum and Library are closed Thanksgiving Day, the day after Thanksgiving, Christmas Day, New Year's Day, Easter Sunday, and Independence Day.

Please note: the Othmer Library will be CLOSED to the public Monday, August 1 - Wednesday, August 31. We will reopen on Thursday, September 1.

Brooklyn Historical Society
128 Pierrepont Street
Brooklyn, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 01, 2016 -
July 01, 2017
Guerra Civil @ 80
Marking the 80th anniversary of the beginning of the Spanish Civil War, the exhibition Guerra Civil @ 80 features selections from The Bancroft Library's Veterans of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, Bay Area Post records and photographic collections, along with posters, books, pamphlets, and other ephemera. A visual and textual display of the struggle to defend the Second Spanish Republic, the exhibition documents the role of both the Republicans, who were defending the democratically elected government, and the Nationalists, the right-wing rebel forces led by General Francisco Franco. The exhibition also addresses how the war, which unfolded from 1936 to 1939, affected the lives of the people of Spain and American volunteers fighting on the front lines or assisting in the war effort, as well as how the conflict precipitated an intense creative response from within and outside Spain.

Mon - Fri 9am - 5pm

2nd floor corridor (between The Bancroft Library & Doe Library)
University of California
Berkeley, CA
Exhibit West
September 01, 2016 -
December 09, 2017
Making the English Book: The Takamiya Deposit
The most impressive collection of medieval English manuscripts in private hands will be on exhibition for the first time in the United States at the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library in 2017. Four unique Chaucer manuscripts, numerous devotional rolls, and works as varied as Boethius’ Consolation of Philosophy, Langland’s Piers the Plowman and a Middle English medical manuscript—all from the collection of Toshiyuki Takamiya—will be shown in the context of the Beinecke’s own rich holdings of English and Continental manuscripts.

With a rare combination of scholarly and antiquarian expertise, Professor Emeritus Takamiya of Keio University in Tokyo assembled an unrivaled collection of medieval manuscripts over four decades. Held privately in Japan, the collection has been relatively unstudied in the West, and Professor Takamiya’s generous deposit of these manuscripts at the Beinecke makes a significant contribution to medieval scholarship at Yale University and internationally.

Mon 10am - 7pm
Tue - Thu 9am - 7pm
Fri 9am - 5pm
Sat (Exhibitions only) 12pm - 5pm

Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library
121 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
September 01, 2016 -
July 01, 2017
Guerra Civil @ 80
Marking the 80th anniversary of the beginning of the Spanish Civil War, the exhibition Guerra Civil @ 80 features selections from The Bancroft Library's Veterans of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, Bay Area Post records and photographic collections, along with posters, books, pamphlets, and other ephemera. A visual and textual display of the struggle to defend the Second Spanish Republic, the exhibition documents the role of both the Republicans, who were defending the democratically elected government, and the Nationalists, the right-wing rebel forces led by General Francisco Franco. The exhibition also addresses how the war, which unfolded from 1936 to 1939, affected the lives of the people of Spain and American volunteers fighting on the front lines or assisting in the war effort, as well as how the conflict precipitated an intense creative response from within and outside Spain.

9am - 5pm, Monday - Friday

2nd floor corridor between The Bancroft Library and Doe Library
University of California
University Drive
Berkeley, CA
Exhibit West
September 10, 2016 -
June 18, 2017
Janet Taylor Pickett: The Matisse Series
Janet Taylor Pickett: The Matisse Series explores the dialogue between Taylor Pickett’s artwork and that of renowned French artist Henri Matisse. Held in the Museum’s Roberts and Rotunda galleries, the exhibition features 76 collages, as well as 4 hand-made books.

An additional highlight of the exhibition will be the installation of Sixty Six Dresses: An Odyssey, 2014-15. Referring to the artist’s age at the time of its ongoing creation, this work will be augmented by two additional collaged dresses to match her current age when the exhibition opens. The artist has observed that “the dress is the symbol that we address, redress, and dress with meaning. Historically, women are defined by how they dress—our dresses have our DNA in them, our memory.” In many of her dresses, Taylor Pickett juxtaposes images of African sculpture, textiles, and cultural elements, with details from Matisse’s work, typically procured from exhibition catalogue reproductions. This multi-cultural dialogue is at the heart of her complex, archetypal work, which often features portraits of the artist herself. The artist’s interest in light, color, and multiple perspectives is also pervasive in some of her recent works in which she combines elements of Matisse’s work with tripartite spaces evoking medieval altarpieces, unifying past and present times.

This is the second time the artist has been featured in a one-person show at MAM; the first More than One Way Home in 1997 was a 25-year mid-career survey. Furthermore, Janet taught classes in the Museum’s Yard School of Art and served on the Museum’s Board of Trustees, as well as its African American Cultural Committee, which she co-founded. Pickett will also be represented in two concurrent complementary exhibitions, Matisse and American Art and Inspired by Matisse: Selected Works from the Collection, opening February 2017.

Montclair Art Museum
3 South Mountain Avenue
Montclair, NJ
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 16, 2016 -
September 11, 2017
Artists' Books and Africa
African artists are experimenting with the genre of artists’ books, while international artists are exploring African themes in theirs. Artists’ Books and Africa is the first exhibition to focus on African artists books from the Smithsonian Libraries’ Warren M. Robbins Library and the National Museum of African Art.

10am – 5:30pm

Free admission

Sublevel 3 (off the Ripley Center Concourse)
African Art Museum
950 Independence Avenue SW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 22, 2016 -
April 09, 2017
Historic Futures: Artists Reinvent the Book
The lineage of the artist’s book descends from the common impulse to use pictures to tell stories. This connection has held constant from Paleolithic cave paintings onward, through the emergence of the artist’s book as a recognized creative medium in the twentieth century. Historically, artists have used the familiar elements of the book form—paper, printing, binding—as opportunities for expression and reinvention, sometimes challenging our notion of what a book can be. Historic Futures features examples documenting key moments in the evolution of the artist’s book from the late 1700s to today.

During the social and political upheavals of early twentieth-century Europe, avant-garde artists, poets, and designers re-imagined the book radically. This exhibition features Dlia Golosa (For the Voice), the 1923 collaboration by El Lissitzky and Vladimir Vladimirovich Mayakovsky that was groundbreaking in its compositional interpretations of poetry; Filippo Marinetti’s wild typographic transgressions, as exemplified by his Les mots en liberté futuristes (Futurist Words in Freedom, 1919); and LidantYU (1923), an early book by publisher and artist Ilia Zdanevich (Ilazd), with a text composed in Zaum, a Russian Futurist–invented language.

The exhibition continues with contemporary works, including Musashimaro (2013), by German artist Veronika Schaepers, whose treatment of a short story by Japanese author Choukitsu Kurumatani creates an immersive environment for reading. Examples such as this demonstrate how artists continue to approach the book as a medium still offering myriad possibilities for the creative imagination.

$15 Adults $15
$10 Seniors 65+
$6 Students with current ID
Free Members & youth 17 & under
Prices subject to change without notice.

Tues–Sun 9:30am – 5:15pm
Open select Mondays
Dec 26, 2016 9:30am – 5:15pm

Reva & David Logan Gallery of Illustrated Books
Legion of Honor
Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco
Lincoln Park
100 34th Avenue
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
November 11, 2016 -
May 28, 2017
Cover Stories: What bindings say about books
A book cover can tell its own story. During the early history of book production, the manner in which a book was bound was unique. Each hand-crafted binding reveals information about the individuals who owned books, their social status, professions and how they valued the texts within. The type of covering also demonstrates the skill of the binder and the fashion of the times in which it was made.

This exhibition includes examples of the finest luxury coverings through to the purely utilitarian. It features a selection of books from the University of Aberdeen’s Special Collections that were bound for, or belonged to, persons of note: A fine leather volume with lions tooled in gold for Prince Henry Stuart; a mathematical text wrapped in waste manuscript for daily use by the Renaissance scholar Duncan Liddel; a work of fiction bound in an Arts and Crafts chintz designed by William Morris.

The exhibition also presents covers that illustrate the moment in the mid 1800s when the art of bookbinding changed from being the means of customising a text for an individual into a new graphic art of book design aimed at the mass market.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a series of talks and events.

Mon - Wed: 10am - 5pm
Thu 10am - 7pm
Fri - Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 11am - 4pm

Special Collections
Special Collections Centre
The Sir Duncan Rice Library
Bedford Road
Aberdeen, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
November 11, 2016 -
April 21, 2017
Together We Win
The Philadelphia Homefront During The First World War

9am - 4:45pm

Free & open to the public

The Library Company of Philadelphia
1314 Locust Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 16, 2016 -
April 09, 2017
KAHBAHBLOOOM: The Art and Storytelling of Ed Emberley
Opening this fall at the Worcester Art Museum, KAHBAHBLOOOM: The Art and Storytelling of Ed Emberley is the first comprehensive retrospective for artist Ed Emberley, among the most prolific and respected illustrators of children's literature of the last 60 years. The author of classic books such as the Caldecott Honored One Wide River To Cross (1965), the Caldecott Medal-winning Drummer Hoff (1967), and the bestselling Go Away, Big Green Monster (1992), Emberley also developed one of the bestselling series of teaching books for young artists, beginning with Ed Emberley's Drawing Book of Animals (1970).

The exhibition draws on the Massachusetts-based artist's personal archive of original hand-drawn sketches, woodblock prints, final proofs, and first edition books to survey his career and examine his influence on generations of readers and nascent artists. KAHBAHBLOOOM will include interactive areas throughout the exhibition, including a stylized reproduction of the artist's drawing and light table from his home studio—where visitors of all ages can try their hand at his techniques—and a specially designed reading area.

Wed - Fri, Sun 11am - 5pm
Sat 10am - 5pm
3rd Thu of every month 11am - 8pm

CLOSED on Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year's

Members FREE

Adults: $14
Seniors 65 and over: $12
College Students with ID: $12 / Free on the third Thursday of each month
Ages 4-17: $6
Ages 3 and under: FREE

Special Admission for EBT card holders $2 per person cash admission

FREE FIRST Saturday Mornings
The first Saturday of each month: 10am - noon

Worcester Art Museum
55 Salisbury Street
Worcester, MA
Exhibit New England
November 17, 2016 -
August 31, 2017
Broken Beauty: Ruins of the Ancient World
This compelling new exhibition focuses on the Library’s holdings of books devoted to historic sites in the Middle East and beyond. It was the 2015 bombing of the Temple of Baalshamin in the Syrian city of Palmyra that compelled us to examine our collection of books on the historic cities of Paestum, Petra, Persepolis, and Baalbek, among others.

The Library’s collection contains books written by eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and twentieth-century travelers to the Middle East from Cornelis de Bruyn and Sir Austen Henry Layard to Mark Twain and Vita Sackville-West. Les Ruines de Palmyra, Robert Wood’s documentation of Palmyra during his 1751 visit, became an instant classic for future travelers and today is consulted by archaelogists and historians seeking to reconstruct its legendary past. Accounts of ancient ruins were popular among early members, including John Jay and DeWitt Clinton. Two nineteenth-century Library members also ventured beyond Europe’s more comfortable boundaries. John Lloyd Stephens’ Incidents of Travel in Egypt, Arabia Petraea, and the Holy Land was published in 1838, George William Curtis’s The Howadji in Syria in 1852. One of the treasures of the Library is Giovanni Battista Piranesi’s 1778 folio Differentes vues de quelques restes de trois grands edifices qui subsistent encore dans le milieu de l’ancienne ville de Peste.

“Ruin-fever,” as one writer described it, runs like an electrical current through many of these early accounts. The travelers are nearly all struck with awe at what the past, however fractured and senselessly deconstructed, reveals. We believe that mounting an exhibition of this historic dimension will allow visitors to Broken Beauty to experience the beauty of these legendary ruins. In the end, words may outlive what has been lost.

Mon & Fri 9am - 5pm
Tue, Wed & Thu 9am - 8pm
Sat & Sun 11am - 5pm

THE NEW YORK SOCIETY LIBRARY
53 East 79th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
December 13, 2016 -
May 07, 2017
A Friend Among Us: The Art of Brinton Turkle
Step back in time with Brinton Turkle and his tales of American lore. Whether set on the island of Nantucket or in the mountains of Appalachia, his stories and poetic imagery capture both the history and nuances of place. Turkle follows the escapades of a young Quaker boy in his Obadiah series, offers a surprising twist on a favorite fairy tale in Deep in the Forest, and sprinkles magic realism throughout the pages of Sky Dog. All work is from the museum’s permanent collection, generously donated by the artist’s children. A highlight is surely Turkle’s watercolor illustrations from Thy Friend, Obadiah, awarded a 1970 Caldecott Honor.

Tue – Fri 10am – 4pm
Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

$9 Adult
$6 Youth (1-18), Student, Teacher, and Senior
$22.50 Family (2 adults and 2 youth)

The Central Gallery
The Eric Carle Museum
of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
December 16, 2016 -
April 16, 2017
The Edible Monument: The Art of Food for Festivals
The Edible Monument includes about 140 prints, rare books and serving manuals from the Getty Research Institute collection and private collections. The artworks illustrate in lush detail the delectable monuments and sculptures made of food that were an integral part of street festivals as well as court and civic banquets in Europe in the 16th to 19th centuries. The exhibition has been organized by the Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles.

Public celebrations and street parades featured large-scale edible creations made of breads, cheeses and meats. At court festivals, banquet settings and dessert buffets featured elaborate table monuments made of sugar, flowers and fruit. These edible sculptures didn’t last long, but images of towering garden sculptures and lavish table pieces designed for Italian and French courts have survived in illustrated books and prints, many of which are featured in the exhibition.

The exhibition includes a monumental sugar sculpture based on an 18th-century print. “Palace of Circe” by sculptor and culinary historian Ivan Day is set on an 8-foot table and features sugar paste sculpted into a classical temple with sugar statues and sugar-sand gardens. The figures were meant to impart the consequences of gluttony with a story about the ancient Greek hero Ulysses. When he landed on the island of Aeaea, his men were so greedy that the sorceress Circe turned them into pigs.

By the mid-17th century cookbooks and guides to the new skills and professions of carving and pastry-making were published. Copied and plagiarized, they became models that spread throughout European court culture. Examples of such books are included in the exhibition, such as one by Bartolomeo Scappi, the “private cook” to Pope Pius V; Joseph Gilliers, the dessert chef to King Augustus of Poland; and Juan de la Mata, court chef to the Spanish kings Philip V and Ferdinand VI.

Tue - Thu 9am – 4pm
Fri 9am – 10pm
Sat & Sun 10am – 5pm
Mon Closed

Detroit Institute of Arts
5200 Woodward Avenue
Detroit, MI
Exhibit Midwest
December 16, 2016 -
May 20, 2017
The Dance of Death
Reflections on death and its meaning for Christian communities have taken many forms in art and literature. During the Middle Ages a genre called the Dance of Death developed which depicted a personification of death leading a procession of people ranging from kings to paupers, emphasizing the mortality of all persons regardless of social status. The genre included poetry, prose works, and visual art. While individual works sometimes focused exclusively on images or literature, many included both. This exhibition features images popularized in print by Hans Holbein the Younger (1497–1543) and explores the artist’s possible inspirations and his influence on subsequent illustrators.

Southern Methodist University
6425 Boaz Lane
Dallas, TX
Exhibit Southwest
January 06 -
June 02, 2017
From the Desk of Simone de Beauvoir
Consider the influence and intellect of feminist philosopher Simone de Beauvoir in an interpretation of her Paris studio alcove. This installation invites visitors to reflect on Beauvoir’s impact, not only in her time and not only as a feminist, but in our own time and in the areas of literature, philosophy, and popular culture. A zealous writer, speaker, and lover of all sensations life had to offer—what does Beauvoir say to you?

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

4th floor (in front of the Dix Gallery)
National Museum of Women in the Arts
1250 New York Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 10 -
April 01, 2017
The Illustrated Alice: The Imagining of Wonderland An Exhibit
The Marjorie G. and Carl W. Stern Book Arts & Special Collections Center presents The Illustrated Alice, an exhibit of work by various artists featuring their interpretations concerning Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There. Alice has been illustrated by approximately 2,000 different artists since it was originally published in 1865. The exhibit will feature illustrators such as John Tenniel, Salvador Dali, Arthur Rackham, Robert Sabuda, Camille Rose Garcia, Barry Moser, and George Walker and show how each one imagined the story of Alice in their own version of "Wonderland."

Sun 12pm - 5pm
Mon 10am - 6pm
Tue, Wed, & Thu 9am - 8pm
Fri 12pm - 6pm
Sat 10am - 6pm

Skylight Gallery
Main Library
San Francisco Public Library
100 Larkin Street
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
January 12 -
May 13, 2017
India, Empire, Nation: 200 Years of Indian History
“India, Empire, Nation” presents for public viewing a small part of the extensive collection of rare books and manuscripts relating to the Indian subcontinent that the Lilly Library has recently acquired from antiquarian bookseller and collector Glenn Horowitz. This collection is without parallel in the United States, given its sheer range and diversity, as well as the uniqueness of many of its constituent parts. Taken together, these materials tell a compelling story of South Asia over the past two centuries, and they do so from distinctive and often surprising vantage points. This extraordinary collection of Indian materials will, without question, position the Lilly Library as one of the leading research libraries in the world for South Asian studies.

9am - 6pm

Lilly Library
Indiana University
1200 E Seventh Street
Bloomington, IN
Exhibit Midwest
January 13 -
April 17, 2017
Gather Out of Star-Dust: The Harlem Renaissance & The Beinecke Library
A major building-wide exhibition

The Beinecke show features more than 300 artifacts from the library’s James Weldon Johnson Memorial Collection (JWJ) of African American Arts and Letters and is part of the 75th anniversary celebration of the collection’s founding in 1941. The JWJ Collection overall holds over 13,000 volumes, 3,000 pieces of sheet music, countless pages of manuscripts, correspondence, photographs, and ephemera, as well as 11,000 digital images. It is one of the most-consulted collections at Yale.

The show includes material by Langston Hughes, Bessie Smith, Bill “Bojangles” Robinson, Aaron Douglas, Ralph Ellison, Zora Neale Hurston, W.E.B. Du Bois, Countée Cullen, Augusta Savage, Carter Woodson, Alain LeRoy Locke, Gwendolyn Bennett, Jessie Redmon Fauset, Jean Toomer, James Van Der Zee, Gladys Bentley, Arna Bontemps, Laura Wheeler Waring, Wallace Thurman, Ethel Waters, Sterling Brown, and other creators of the era.

“Gather Out of Star-Dust” also features the work of writer and photographer Carl Van Vechten, a patron of the Harlem Renaissance and Johnson’s close friend. Van Vechten established the JWJ Collection at Yale in association with Grace Nail Johnson as a memorial to her husband after his death in 1938. More than 50 of Van Vechten’s portraits of Harlem Renaissance and related cultural leaders are on view in the Beinecke exhibition.

Among the many highlights of the show is the original artwork of E. Simms Campbell’s 1932 map of Harlem nightclubs. Campbell was the first African American illustrator to be syndicated, and his work was featured regularly in national magazines. His map provides a “who’s who” guide of the nightclubs that drove Harlem nightlife during and after Prohibition, including the Savoy Ballroom, the Cotton Club, and Gladys’s Clam Bar.

Interactive touchscreens in the exhibition allow visitors to hear sound recordings of the era and explore the collection further.

Mon 10am - 7pm
Tue - Thu 9am - 7pm
Fri 9am - 5pm
Sat (Exhibitions only) 12pm - 5pm

Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library
121 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
January 17 -
May 31, 2017
Innovation and Abstraction: Women Artists and Atelier 17
Innovation and Abstraction: Women Artists and Atelier 17 examines the formal innovations and burgeoning feminist consciousness of eight artists—Louise Bourgeois, Minna Citron, Worden Day, Dorothy Dehner, Sue Fuller, Alice Trumbull Mason, Louise Nevelson, and Anne Ryan—all of whom worked at the legendary Atelier 17 printmaking studio. Founded in 1927 in Paris by the British artist Stanley William Hayter, Atelier 17 relocated to New York from 1940 to 1955 to escape the political conflicts in Europe. Hayter championed technical experimentation and collaboration among the two hundred artists who worked there, nearly half of whom were women.

Experimental, often unorthodox, prints by the featured artists are displayed alongside their paintings and sculptures to explore how Atelier 17 catalyzed their creativity and inspired these women to reshape American abstraction. The exhibition includes loans from private collections, as well as the Brooklyn Museum, the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Voorhees Gallery
71 Hamilton Street (at George Street)
College Avenue Campus
Rutgers University
New Brunswick, NJ
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 17 -
May 11, 2017
The Lost Generation : World War I Poetry Selected From The Donald Thomas War Poetry Collection
If asked which twentieth-century war had the greatest impact on the world, the average American is likely to respond with World War II—and that conflict had an enormous effect in the staggering number of casualties, the number of nations engaged in the conflict, the introduction of nuclear weapons, and the ushering in of the Cold War. Despite this, for Europeans, and particularly for the British, World War I had an equal, if not greater, impact.

In the years prior to the First World War, Britain experienced the continued aftereffects of Victorian optimism. Some even referred to this Edwardian period as a time of endless summer, when people believed in progress, that everything was moving in a positive direction. Furthermore, in the second half of the nineteenth century war remained a romanticized phenomenon, with patriotism and gallantry as its primary features. World War I, or the Great War, as it came to be known, exploded those notions—quite literally. Because of extensive and entangling alliances, the conflict evolved from relatively insignificant origins (the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand of the Austro-Hungarian empire) to involve a greater portion of the developed world. Beyond the sheer number of nations involved, it was a war unlike any previous one, depending less on troop numbers and movement and more on technological superiority and military prowess. It was the first conflict in which weaponry became especially important, with the introduction of U-boats, aerial dogfights, Zeppelin bombings, gas attacks, trench battles, and tank warfare. The effect was a dehumanized conflict in which the superior machine mattered more than the superior soldier.

Perhaps most significant, however, was the enormous number of young soldiers who were either killed or wounded in the conflict. As Ezra Pound was to write, “There died a myriad / And of the best, among them” (Hugh Selwyn Mauberley), and for poets during and after the conflict the world would no longer be the same. All of the pre-war optimism disappeared, as did confidence in the traditional Western way of looking at the world. In its place was a profound skepticism of meaning in the universe and of the privileged position of the West, as well as an increased feeling that individuals were ultimately isolated from the workings of the universe and even from their fellow humans. What followed has come to be known as the “lost generation”—writers who longed for meaning and order in the universe but were unable to find them in an alienating and fragmented existence.

Because of the pre-war optimism and the romanticized view of warfare, those writers who entered the conflict were entirely unprepared for what they encountered, and the primary power of their writings comes from the profound disillusionment they experienced. Rather than patriotism, glory, and honor, they found instead death, absurdity, and dehumanization. One of the most famous poems of the war, Wilfred Owen’s “Dulce et Decorum Est,” rejects the romantic view that it is sweet and fitting to die for one’s country: the poem’s effect comes partly from Owen’s descriptions of battle but more from the conflict between what he had been taught was war and what he actually found was war. This was the lesson writer after writer learned, and it is reflected in the works of so many who wrote of their experiences.

This exhibit and catalogue explore the work of many such “soldier poets,” whose aesthetically rich and haunting verse often sits uncomfortably alongside popular ballads, songs and toasts that attempt to sustain, or gently mock, the romanticized ideals of heroic self-sacrifice for the nation’s glory. In between these opposed perspectives we find responses to the war, both critical and laudatory, from poets who did not enlist, including women on the home front and those in active service as nurses. To set these perspectives in context, we add sections on visual images of war, particularly photography and poets’ responses to this documentary technology, and retrospective collections that advocate for peace in the aftermath of the Great War and on the eve of WWII.

Fourth Floor, Room 437
Judge Sarah T. Hughes Reading Room
Willis Library
University of North Texas
1506 Highland Street
Denton, TX
Exhibit Southwest
January 20 -
May 21, 2017
I’m Nobody! Who are you? The Life and Poetry of Emily Dickinson
One of the most popular and enigmatic American writers of the nineteenth century, Emily Dickinson wrote more than 1,700 poems. Nevertheless, her work was essentially unknown to contemporary readers since only a handful of poems were printed during her lifetime and the vast trove of her manuscripts was not discovered until after her death in 1886.

Typecast as a reclusive writer who rarely left her Amherst home, Dickinson was, in fact, socially active as a young woman and maintained a broad network of friends and correspondents even as she grew older and retreated into seclusion. Bringing together nearly one hundred rarely seen items, including manuscripts and letters in the poet’s hand, the exhibition will explore a side of the Dickinson’s life that is seldom acknowledged: one filled with rich friendships and long-lasting relationships with mentors and editors.

In addition to her writings, the exhibition will also feature a wide array of visual material, including hand-cut silhouettes, unique photographs and daguerreotypes, contemporary illustrations, and other items that speak to the rich intellectual and cultural environment in which Dickinson lived and worked.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 20 -
May 14, 2017
Delirium: The Art of the Symbolist Book
The Symbolist movement of the nineteenth century grew out of Charles Baudelaire’s visionary poetry, which explored correspondences between the sensory and the spiritual. Baudelaire believed poetry should not describe the external world but suggest the writer’s interior reality, using a vocabulary of delirium, dreams, mysticism, and disordered states of mind. His revolt against the dominant naturalism of the day influenced a younger generation of writers who helped to shape the Symbolist movement in literature. Visual artists who collaborated on Symbolist publications were challenged to create illustrations for works that were deliberately devoid of concrete imagery.

This exhibition, drawing entirely on the Morgan’s collection, explores some of the encounters between Symbolist authors and artists and the creative approaches they took to illustrate the invisible. Works by Stephane Mallarmé, Odilon Redon, Maurice Denis, Paul Verlaine, Fantin-Latour, Arthur Rimbaud, Alfred Jarry, Maurice Maeterlinck, and Fernand Khnopff will be featured.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 20 -
April 01, 2017
Pulp as Portal: Socially Engaged Hand Papermaking

Mon - Fri 11am - 6pm
Sat 10am - 5pm

Main Gallery
The Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 21 -
July 30, 2017
Toutes Les Nouvelles – All the News: Current Events in Nineteenth-Century French Prints
Beginning in the sixteenth century, prints became the primary medium for circulating and preserving images of current events, including public ceremonies and celebrations, battles, and other noteworthy incidents. Industrialization and rapid urbanization during the 1800s created not only the means to quickly print and publish text and images but the market for such news sources as well. Artists relished the opportunity to create original compositions based on recent happenings that would be widely circulated in illustrated weekly and monthly journals and inexpensive books in addition to being issued as independent prints.

The works in this exhibition present images of various Parisian news items from the mid- to late nineteenth century, ranging from mundane political intrigues to serious foreign affairs. Artists took different approaches to presenting such subject matter: the etchers Auguste Lançon and Félix Buhot created highly detailed, documentary scenes, while the caricaturists Cham and Charles Vernier focused on satirizing French government officials. Particularly remarkable are compositions, such as the one by Honoré Daumier, that portray current events in the guise of biblical or mythological subjects that would have been understood by a broad public. In this way, artists presented new ideas within familiar narratives while investing their subjects with historical significance. Near the end of the century, artists became more partisan in their depictions of current events and revealed their personal positions on sensational topics, which included France’s colonial ambitions and the false claim accusing a Jewish army officer of treason now known as the Dreyfus Affair. The works on view were selected from the Zimmerli Art Museum’s rich collection of nineteenth-century French prints and drawings.

Volpe Gallery
71 Hamilton Street (at George Street)
College Avenue Campus
Rutgers University
New Brunswick, NJ
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 21 -
April 30, 2017
diane arbus: in the beginning
diane arbus: in the beginning considers the first seven years of the photographer’s career, from 1956 to 1962. A lifelong New Yorker, Arbus found the city and its citizens an endlessly rich subject for her art. Working in Times Square, the Lower East Side, and Coney Island, she made some of the most powerful portraits of the twentieth century, training her lens on the pedestrians and performers she encountered there. This exhibition highlights her early and enduring interest in the subject matter that would come to define her as an artist. It also reveals the artist’s evolution from a 35mm format to the now instantly recognizable and widely imitated look of the square format she adopted in 1962. Bringing together over 100 photographs from this formative period, many on display for the first time, diane arbus: in the beginning offers fresh insights into the distinctive vision of this iconic American photographer.

Fri – Tue 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 9pm
Wed Closed
Public spaces open at 9:30am

Entry to this exhibition is included with general admission.

Floor 3
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
151 Third Street
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
January 24 -
May 26, 2017
Harper & Brothers to HarperCollins Publishers: A Bicentennial Exhibition
The company that is now HarperCollins began as a small family business in 1817, publishing first as J. & J. Harper and as Harper & Brothers beginning in 1833. The company survived several fires and financial crises to become one of the biggest and most successful publishing companies in the United States by the middle of the nineteenth century. Today HarperCollins Publishers is considered one of the five most influential English-language publishers in the world.

This exhibition charts continuity and change in the publishing industry by dedicating cases to the publishing functions that have remained constant even as practices and technologies have changed: acquisitions, editorial, manufacturing, art, marketing, publicity, rights & permissions, and finance. Harper was quick to adopt emerging printing technologies from its earliest days and the exhibition displays wood engravings, stereotype plates and case bindings from the nineteenth century. The exhibition puts on display the behind-the-scenes work that publishers do to bring together authors and readers, whether the publication in question is print or digital.

Drawing on the archives of Harper & Brothers and Harper & Row held by the Columbia Rare Book & Manuscript Library, this major RBML exhibition shows how the company grows with the nation, its publications not merely reflecting but actively shaping local and national politics. Highlights include the contract for Melville’s Moby Dick, Nast’s political cartoons for Harper’s Weekly Magazine, posters advertising various Harper’s periodicals, correspondence with luminaries including John F. Kennedy and Richard Wright, and profiles of pioneering female editors Virginia Kirkus and Ursula Nordstrom.

Kempner Gallery
Columbia University
Rare Book & Manuscript Library
535 West 114th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 24 -
May 28, 2017
Remembering Antiquity: The Ancient World through Medieval Eyes
In a rare juxtaposition of antiquities from the Getty Villa and manuscripts from the Museum’s collection, this exhibition explores medieval responses to the ancient world. For more than a thousand years following the fall of Rome (476 A.D.), classical culture lived on in European literature and art. Medieval scribes translated and preserved classical texts, while artists adapted and embellished images of ancient rulers and mythical heroes for inclusion in Christian manuscripts. Although the “rediscovery” of Greek and Roman culture is often associated with the Renaissance, antiquity was never forgotten.

Tue – Fri & Sun 10am – 5:30pm
Sat 10am – 9pm
Mon Closed

Admission is free, parking is $15 ($10 after 3pm)

GETTY CENTER
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
January 26 -
April 17, 2017
Post World War II Drawings by Japanese School Children from Hiroshima
Special exhibition will showcase drawings inspired by a cross-cultural exchange program between Japanese and American students in the 1950s.

With the history of Hiroshima and US and Japanese relations at the forefront of international news, an upcoming exhibition at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art (BCMA), will shed important light on the ties between these two nations. Opening in early 2017, the BCMA exhibition will showcase approximately forty drawings created in the mid-1950s by Japanese school children from Hiroshima. The drawings grew out of an art exchange program between children in Santa Fe, N.M., and in Hiroshima that was organized in the early 1950s by the Japanese artist Chuzo Tamotzu. The show, to be on view from January 26 – April 17, 2017, will be researched and curated by Bowdoin College students. The project will focus on the history of the drawings exchange, its long-term significance for the young artists who took part, and its context within the career of Tamotzu.

Born in Japan but living in Santa Fe at that time, Tamotzu recognized the value of strengthening ties between the country of his birth and his new home in the wake of World War II and focused his personal efforts on the expressive capability of young people. Through the program organized by Tamotzu, drawings by students in Hiroshima and by students in Santa Fe were sent to their exchange partners in the other country. The Japanese drawings depict a festival of the arts, local neighborhoods and gardens, and children at play. Efforts are underway to track down the works made by the American students. Originally exhibited in New Mexico in the mid-1950s, the Japanese student drawings are now on loan to the Bowdoin College Museum of Art from a member of Tamotzu’s family. The special exhibition, of these works will be accompanied by a web-based resource, a short publication, a symposium, and other public programming.

Tue - Sat 10am - 5pm
Thu 10am - 8:30pm
Sun 1pm - 5pm

Open to the public free of charge

Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Walker Art Building
9400 College Station
Brunswick, ME
Exhibit New England
January 27 -
June 18, 2017
State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda
A traveling exhibition from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

This powerful exhibition explores how the Nazi propaganda machine used biased information to sway public opinion during World War II. It examines the definition of propaganda, how it operates, why it works, and how important it is to protect ourselves from its dangers. The exhibit asks visitors to actively question and engage with the messages they see, and to learn from this extreme example that democracies, while appearing strong, are fragile without the responsibility and action of their people. Using posters, photos, newsreels, and eight media pieces, this exhibition aims to help society understand propaganda in order to protect against divisive messages and violent agendas.

9am – 5pm

National WWII Museum
945 Magazine Street
New Orleans, LA
Exhibit South
January 31 -
April 30, 2017
Recent Acquisitions from the Bequest of Maurice Sendak
The great author and illustrator Maurice Sendak (1928-2012) was an avid book collector as well as creator, and amassed a remarkable personal library of rare books during his lifetime. A longtime friend and supporter of the Rosenbach, becoming a trustee in 1973 and later serving as honorary president, Sendak bequeathed the museum and library more than 600 rare editions which enhance the Rosenbach collection in many important ways. Through selected objects from this collection, Recent Acquisitions from the Bequest of Maurice Sendak will explore not only the literary and historical significance of these books but also why they were meaningful to their collector.

Tue & Fri — Noon - 5pm
Wed & Thu — Noon - 8pm
Sat & Sun — Noon - 6pm
Mon closed

Rosenbach Museum & Library
2008-2010 Delancey Place
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 01 -
May 31, 2017
Woof, Moo & Grr: A Carnival of Animals in Law Books
A charming exhibit of animals pictured in law books opens February 1, courtesy of the Yale Law Library’s Rare Book Collection. Titled “Woof, Moo & Grr: A Carnival of Animals in Law Books,” the exhibit is narrated from the perspective of the animals themselves and is aimed at animal lovers of all ages.

Twenty books from around the world will be on display, more than half of them printed before the nineteenth century and the earliest published in 1529. They feature illustrations of a wide variety of animals that visitors may be surprised to find in the pages of serious legal literature.

10am - 6pm

Rare Book Exhibition Gallery
Level L2, Lillian Goldman Law Library
Yale Law School
127 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
February 01, 2017 -
January 01, 2018
BRONTË 200 - MANSIONS IN THE SKY
Who was Branwell Brontë? This new exhibition, curated by poet Simon Armitage, invites us inside the mind and world of the notorious Brontë brother in a search for answers to this question. Inspired by an early poem sent to William Wordsworth by the optimistic and precocious twenty-year old, Armitage explores Branwell’s colourful personal history through his writings, drawings and possessions, displayed at the Parsonage alongside newly created installations.

Highlights include a series of new poems by Armitage in response to Branwell’s belongings in the Museum collection, a dramatic recreation of Branwell’s studio designed in collaboration with the production team of the BBC’s To Walk Invisible, and the actual letter and poem posted to Wordsworth, loaned by the Wordsworth Trust especially for the bicentenary. In delving into the life and times of the infamous Branwell, Mansions in the Sky will provoke new insights into the charismatic and complicated brother of Charlotte, Emily and Anne.

10am - 5pm

Exhibition free with admission to the Museum.

Brontë Parsonage Museum
Church Street
Haworth
Keighley
West Yorkshire, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
February 01, 2017 -
January 01, 2018
TO WALK INVISIBLE: FROM PARSONAGE TO PRODUCTION
An exhibition of costumes, props and photography

An exclusive opportunity to see the costumes from To Walk Invisible, Sally Wainwright's acclaimed Brontë drama, in the historic setting of the Parsonage. Designer Tom Pye worked closely with academics and experts to create costumes which are authentic to the period and which evoke the separate personalities of each member of the Brontë family. Also on display in this arresting exhibition are props made especially for the drama and a selection of stills from photographer Michael Prince which give an enticing behind-the-scenes glimpse into the filmmaking process.

10am - 5pm

Exhibition free with admission to the Museum.

Brontë Parsonage Museum
Church Street
Haworth
Keighley
West Yorkshire, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
February 03 -
April 30, 2017
Tattooed New York
For more than 300 years, New York has played a central role in the development of modern tattooing, from its origins in Native American body art to tattoo craft by sailors in colonial New York to the three-decade tattoo ban instituted in 1961 and the subsequent underground tattoo culture. Its diverse history is explored in ​​Tattooed New York, an exciting exhibition where history and pop culture converge to tell the complex story of a controversial art form in America’s cultural nucleus.

Among the 250+ elements on view are the New-York Historical Society’s set of 1710 Four Indian Kings prints and one of the earliest recordings (1706) in Western accounts of a pictograph done by a Seneca warrior representing his tattoos and personal signature. Highlights of the exhibition include Thomas Edison’s electric pen and early 20th-century tattoo machinery; ​dramatic ​sideshow banners and cabinet cards; a large selection of designs by the Bowery pioneers of modern tattooing, including Sam O'Reilly, Lew Alberts, Bob Wicks, Ed Smith, and Bill Jones; rare photography documenting the tattoo ban years and artwork by mainstream visual artists who tattooed during the ban; and works by some of the finest New York tattoo artists of today. Organized by the New-York Historical Society, this exhibition is curated by Research Associate Cristian Petru Panaite.

Tue - Thu & Sat 10am - 6pm
Fri 10am - 8pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

New-York Historical Society Museum & Library
170 Central Park West
at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 04 -
April 30, 2017
TOULOUSE-LAUTREC: Illustrates the Belle Époque
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901) captured the heart of Parisian nightlife in dynamic cabaret and café-concert scenes inspired by the city’s burgeoning entertainment district. A frequent visitor to lively hotspots in Montmartre, like the Chat Noir, Mirliton, and Moulin Rouge, his record of local amusements fashioned a portrait of modern Parisian life. Toulouse-Lautrec’s arrival in the City of Light coincided with a resurgence in printmaking, and his experiments with lithography revolutionized the field.

For the first time in the US, Toulouse-Lautrec Illustrates the Belle Époque presents one of the foremost collections of the artist’s lithographs and posters. Drawn from the artist’s most prolific years (1891–1899), these iconic images and rarely exhibited unique proofs provide insight into his innovative and complex printmaking process. Encompassing nearly 100 examples of incomparable quality and color, these prints celebrate the premier performers of the belle époque—Aristide Bruant, Marcelle Lender, Cha-U-Kao and others—cleverly caricatured through Toulouse-Lautrec’s perceptive skills of observation and transformation. His modern aesthetic and sharp wit immortalized Paris’s celebrity elite, embraced bohemian culture, and fueled the public imagination.

Tue ‒ Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun Noon ‒ 7pm
Thu extended hours 5pm ‒ 8:30 pm*

*On the first Thursday of every month, general museum admittance ends at 5 pm due to Phillips after 5 events. Admission after 5 pm is restricted to members and Phillips after 5 ticket holders. Advance ticket purchase for Phillips after 5 strongly encouraged as this popular event tends to sell out.

$12 for adults
$10 62 & over & for students
Free 18 & under & for members

The Phillips Collection
1600 21st Street NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 04 -
April 30, 2017
500 Years of Treasures from Oxford
Founded 500 years ago in 1517, the library of Corpus Christi College, Oxford, is a repository of extraordinary treasures, few of which have ever been seen by the public. To mark the 500th anniversary, a selection of fifty manuscripts and early printed books, ranging in date from the 10th to the 17th centuries, is being brought to America for the first time.

Focusing on the first hundred years of the College’s existence the exhibition introduces its Founder, Richard Fox, Bishop of Winchester, and its first President, John Claymond, who laid the foundations of the Library’s great collection. From the start it was to follow Renaissance ideals scholarship in three languages: not just Latin, but also Greek and Hebrew, the original languages of the Bible. A series of display-cases present books in each of these languages in turn, as well as a considerable number that are bilingual and trilingual. Most important among them are a group that have been called “The Most Important Collection of Anglo-Jewish Manuscripts in the World”; these include a series of 13th-century volumes apparently commissioned by Christians from Jews, from which to learn Hebrew and study biblical texts in their original language.

In addition to the ancient languages, the origins of English are explored, with a 10th-century Latin and Old English bilingual copy of the Rule of St Benedict, the foundation work of monasticism in the West, and an illuminated copy of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales in Middle English. French is also represented, in a large paraphrase of the Old Testament, wonderfully decorated with full-page pictures, perhaps for a King and Queen of France, and donated to the College by Sir James Oglethorpe, founder of the colony of Georgia.

Representing the development of Science, and the increasing knowledge of the Universe and the natural world, the exhibition finishes with a series of ground-breaking works in the history of science and medicine, including works on astrology and astronomy ranging from the medieval zodiac, to Hooke’s observations of insects using a microscope, Galileo’s first observation of the moon using a telescope, and Sir Isaac Newton’s observations of Halley’s comet.

Folger Shakespeare Library
201 East Capitol Street, SE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 04 -
April 30, 2017
A Feast for the Senses: Art and Experience in Medieval Europe
Organized by The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, in partnership with The Ringling, this major exhibition will feature more than 80 objects, many on loan from prestigious institutions across the US and Europe including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Victoria and Albert Museum and the Louvre.

The exhibition focuses on the late medieval and early Renaissance period in Europe (roughly 1300-1500), a time in which societal changes prompted a new interest in human experience, the enjoyment of nature and the pursuit of pleasure. As a result, the art of this period functioned in a rich sensory world that was integral to its appreciation. These works were not only seen, but also touched, smelled and heard. The exhibition will bring together sacred and secular art—including paintings, tapestries, metalwork, and manuscripts—to reveal the role of the senses in courtly ritual and religious practice.

A Feast for the Senses: Art and Experience in Medieval Europe was organized by The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, in partnership with The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota.

This exhibition received generous support from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor; the Institute of Museum and Library Services; the National Endowment for the Arts; and anonymous donors.

Open Daily 10am - 5pm
Thursdays until 8pm

FREE WITH MUSEUM ADMISSION

The Ringling
5401 Bay Shore Road
Sarasota, FL
Exhibit South
February 04 -
April 30, 2017
Who Shot Sports: A Photographic History, 1843 to the Present
This Exhibition is the first museum exhibitions to put sports photographers in the forefront and is the most comprehensive presentation of sports photography ever organized. It encompasses approximately 230 works—from daguerreotypes and salted paper prints to digital images—that capture the universal appeal of sports, highlighting unforgettable moments of drama and excitement from around the globe.

The photographers represented in Who Shot Sports include Richard Avedon, Al Bello, David Burnett, Rich Clarkson, Georges Demeny, Dr. Harold Edgerton, Rineke Dijkstra, Brian Finke, Toni Frissell, Ken Geiger, LeRoy Grannis, David Guttenfelder, Ernst Haas, Charles “Teenie” Harris, Walter Iooss, Jr., Heinz Kleutmeier, Stanley Kubrick, Jacques Henri Lartigue, Neil Leifer, Étienne-Jules Marey, Bob Martin, Martin Munkacsi, Edward Muybridge, Catherine Opie, Leni Riefenstahl, Robert Riger, Alexander Rodchenko, Howard Schatz, Flip Schulke, George Silk, Barton Silverman, and others.

Mon – Thurs 11am – 7pm
Fri 11am - 10pm
Sat & Sun 11am – 5pm

Please be advised that the Museum will close at 5pm on Friday, February 3, due to exhibition previews.

$15/adults
$7.50/seniors 65+/military/FL educators
Free/college students with ID
$5/students

Tampa Museum of Art
120 W. Gasparilla Plaza
Tampa, FL
Exhibit South
February 06 -
July 16, 2017
Stories to Tell: Selections from the Harry Ransom Center
Many stories can be told from the Ransom Center's extensive cultural collections—stories of inspiration, adaptation, innovation, confrontation, collaboration, and even frustration. By acquiring and preserving collections created by diverse individuals working in literature, art, and other humanities disciplines, the Ransom Center helps to tell these stories, unlocking and illuminating the profoundly human reach of archives.

This exhibition of more than 250 items includes, among many others, manuscripts of David Foster Wallace, Julia Alvarez, and Gabriel García Márquez, Henri Matisse's Jazz, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's spirit photographs, and the hat that accompanied the green curtain dress worn by Vivien Leigh in Gone With The Wind.

This exhibition helps us better understand how the humanities affect our lives, connecting the past to the present in personal and meaningful ways.

Mon, Tue, Wed, & Fri 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 7pm
Sat & Sun Noon – 5pm

Closed: hanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day

Free admission

Harry Ransom Center
The University of Texas at Austin
21st and Guadalupe Streets
Austin, TX
Exhibit Southwest
February 09 -
May 19, 2017
Expanding Earth: Travel, Encounter, and Exchange
Globalization is no recent phenomenon. People, ideas, and objects have always been on the move, encountering and changing one another as a result. This exhibit presents some of the textual and material residues of these encounters and travels, characteristic of past as well as present human activity and curiosity. Focusing on the years 1400 to 1800, the exhibit examines and looks beyond familiar Eurocentric ideas of exploration, conquest, and "discovery." Using manuscripts, printed books, drawings, maps, and artifacts, Expanding Earth highlights the movements of peoples, ideas, and goods across the world in their own words and in material objects.

To the Ends of the Earth
Thursday, March 2, 5:30 PM - Conference Keynote and Exhibition Reception
Friday, March 3-4, 8:30 AM-6:00 PM - Conference
Class of 1978 Orrery Pavilion, Van Pelt-Dietrich Library, sixth floor

Mon - Fri 10am - 5pm
Wed 10am - 8pm

Free & open to the public

Goldstein Family Gallery
Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Van Pelt Dietrich Library Center, sixth floor
3420 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 10 -
May 21, 2017
Volcanoes
From fire-belching mountains to blood-red waves of lava, volcanoes have captured the attention of scientists, artists and members of the public for centuries. In this exhibition, discover a spectacular selection of eye witness accounts, scientific observations and artwork charting how our understanding of volcanoes has evolved over the past two millennia.

Discover the impact of some of the world's most spectacular volcanoes including the 79 AD eruption of Vesuvius, one of the most catastrophic eruptions in European history, and the 19th-century eruptions of Krakatoa and Santorini, two of the first volcanic eruptions to be intensely studied by modern scientists.

Featuring fragments of 'burnt' papyrus scrolls which were buried during the 76 AD eruption of Vesuvius, the earliest known manuscript illustration of a volcano, and lava and rock samples and notes from 19th-century volcanologists and explorers, this spectacular exhibition brings together science and society, art and history.

Mon - Frid 10am - 5pm
Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 11am - 5pm

Free admission

ST Lee Gallery
Weston Library
Bodleian Library
Broad Street
Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
February 14 -
June 04, 2017
It’s Me, Eloise: The Voice of Kay Thompson and the Art of Hilary Knight
More than 60 years after her debut, Eloise remains a six-year-old star. What accounts for her enduring appeal? Perhaps it is her sly face transfigured with successful sin, that endearing potbelly, or the extravagant world in which she lives. Whatever her magic, Eloise’s charm comes down to two things: that audacious voice and those filigree illustrations. The voice was cabaret star Kay Thompson’s, a comic riff with which she amused her friends. The pictures came from the pen of a young artist, Hilary Knight. Their unlikely collaboration was the alchemical formula from which the successful Eloise series was born.

It’s Me, Eloise: The Voice of Kay Thompson and the Art of Hilary Knight includes more than 90 artworks from the Eloise collaborations—as well as art from the rest of Knight’s prodigious career as a children’s book artist, poster artist, magazine illustrator, and painter. Never before-seen artwork from Knight’s archive include his 1954 trial drawings for the first Eloise book, two Eloise In Paris sketchbooks, a Hollywood notebook with a double-page spread of Thompson belting out “Think Pink!” from Funny Face, a magnificent suite of final art from Eloise In Moscow, and the 1993 Eloise watercolor for New York Is Book Country. There’s a kicker, too: for the first time since its infamous disappearance from the Plaza Hotel in 1960, Knight’s original 1956 Eloise portrait will be on public display.

Tues. – Fri. 10am – 4pm
Saturday 10am – 5pm
Sunday 12pm – 5pm

The East Gallery
The Eric Carle Museum
of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
February 14 -
June 03, 2017
The 2017 Mark Samuels Lasner Symposium & Exhibition
EXHIBITION
“Victorian Passions: Stories from the Mark Samuels Lasner Collection”

The Mark Samuels Lasner Collection focuses on British literature and art of the period 1850 to 1900, with an emphasis on the Pre-Raphaelites and writers and illustrators of the 1890s. It boasts more than 9,000 books, letters, manuscripts, and artworks, including many items signed by such figures as Oscar Wilde, George Eliot, Max Beerbohm, William Morris, Christina and Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and Aubrey Beardsley. It provides a tremendous opportunity for students and scholars to enrich their academic pursuits through the historical, cultural and material value of the documents. (Please note that materials in the Mark Samuels Lasner Collection are not listed in DELCAT.)

In 2016, Mark Samuels Lasner generously gifted his collection, worth more than $10 million, to the University of Delaware. It is the largest and most valuable donation in the Library’s history.

Hours
Access is by appointment only.

SYMPOSIUM:
“Celebrating the Mark Samuels Lasner Collection: Rare Books and Manuscripts, Victorian Literature and Art”

March 17 – 18, 2017

Keynote Speaker: Elaine Showalter, Professor Emerita of English at Princeton University

Special Collections reading room
2nd floor, Morris Library

Special Collections Gallery
Morris Library
University of Delaware Library
181 South College Avenue
Newark, NJ
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 17 -
May 15, 2017
A Most Magnificent Sight
One hundred years ago, in towns across the country, circus day began with a parade that filled the everyday streets with hundreds of exotically costumed performers, some elephants, camels and zebras, and powerful teams of horses pulling beautifully carved wagons. The free show was just a taste of the wonders that could be seen under the big top and the whistling sounds of the calliope, which was at the end of the procession, beckoned audiences to come to the circus.

As early as the 1840s, circus impresarios understood the importance of the parade as a way to impress potential audiences. Shows invested in magnificent chariots and bandwagons with delicately carved and brilliantly gilded figures to create a stunning spectacle in the streets. As soon as there were circus parades, there was circus advertising to bill them. Enjoy a selection of posters dating from 1848 to 1920 and imagine the excitement of the “The Most Magnificent Street Spectacle Ever Seen,” the circus parade.

Open Daily 10am - 5pm
Thursdays until 8pm

FREE WITH MUSEUM ADMISSION

The Ringling
5401 Bay Shore Road
Sarasota, FL
Exhibit South
February 17 -
May 28, 2017
A Taste for Chocolate
The Morris-Jumel Mansion (MJM), Manhattan’s oldest house, will present a special exhibition exploring cacao and chocolate as a commodity and emerging breakfast tradition in colonial and post-colonial America. Stephen Jumel’s role as an importer and purveyor will be revealed in archival material from MJM’s collection. The exhibition focuses on how cocoa— typically sold in “cakes” and served as a hot drink flavored with vanilla, honey, and spices—became a popular beverage during Eliza Jumel’s lifetime (1775‒1865).

Known for its effect as a stimulant and easily transported, both British and American soldiers were supplied with cocoa cakes to mix with hot water for breakfast. Benjamin Franklin, who sold chocolate in his Philadelphia print shop, ensured that the Continental Army marching against General Braddock’s forces in 1775 were equipped with chocolate to boost their energy. In 1785, Thomas Jefferson predicted that cocoa would become American’s favorite after the Boston Tea Party and before coffee rose as the popular choice. Abigail Adams wrote to her husband about drinking breakfast chocolate during a trip to London, and Martha Washington made “cocoa tea.” George Washington and his officers used the Mansion as their headquarters in the fall of 1776. Despite its use in the military as a ration, when Stephen Jumel was importing cacao in the early nineteenth century (ca. 1820) it was enjoyed mostly by the upper and upper-middle classes. Eliza Jumel’s generation saw the democratization of chocolate as production techniques improved, the taste and texture became more palatable, and peoples’ taste for chocolate grew. A Taste for Chocolate will feature art objects from a private collection including rare books, antiquarian botanical prints, chocolate services and pots, and other decorative arts. Advertisements for Cadbury’s and Frye’s provide a window onto how cocoa was marketed in Europe and the U.S., and an original printed inventory from Stephen Jumel’s dry goods business lists a cacao shipment from the West Indies.

Adults $10
Seniors/Students $8
Children under 12 Free
Members Free

Mon Closed to general public, visitation by advanced appt. only
Tue - Fri 10am - 4pm
Sat & Sun 10am - 5pm

Morris-Jumel Mansion
65 Jumel Terrace
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 17 -
May 29, 2017
Seurat Circus Sideshow
Taking as its focus one of The Met's most captivating masterpieces, this thematic exhibition will afford a unique context for appreciating the heritage and allure of Circus Sideshow (Parade de cirque), painted in 1887–88 by Georges Seurat (1859–1891). Anchored by a remarkable group of related works by Seurat that will fully illuminate the lineage of the motif in his inimitable conté crayon drawings, the presentation will explore the fascination the sideshow subject held for other artists in the nineteenth century, ranging from the great caricaturist Honoré Daumier at mid-century to the young Pablo Picasso at the fin de siècle.

This rich visual narrative will unfold in a provocative display of more than 100 paintings, drawings, prints, period posters, and illustrated journals, supplemented by musical instruments and an array of documentary material intended to give a vivid sense of the seasonal fairs and traveling circuses of the day. Among the highlights will be Fernand Pelez's epic Grimaces and Misery—The Saltimbanques (Petit Palais, Paris), of exactly the same date as Seurat's magisterial work and, with its lifesize performers aligned in friezelike formation across a 20-foot stage, a match for his ambition.

Galleries 964–965
The Met Fifth Avenue
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 19 -
December 31, 2017
IMAGES OF INTERNMENT: THE INCARCERATION OF JAPANESE AMERICANS DURING WORLD WAR II
On February 19, 2017 -- the 75th anniversary of the signing of Executive Order 9066 -- the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum will open a new photographic exhibition entitled, IMAGES OF INTERNMENT: THE INCARCERATION OF JAPANESE AMERICANS DURING WORLD WAR II, with over 200 photographs including the work of Dorothea Lange and Ansel Adams. Signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Executive Order 9066 led to the incarceration of 120,000 people of Japanese descent -- including approximately 80,000 American citizens -- during World War II.

In the tense weeks after Japan's December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, many Americans -- particularly those on the Pacific Coast -- feared enemy attack and saw danger in every corner. Rumors and sensational media reports heightened the climate of fear. Under pressure from military and political leaders, President Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066 on February 19, 1942. It is widely viewed today as a serious violation of civil liberties.

IMAGES OF INTERNMENT begins with a small document-focused display that briefly introduces the context behind FDR's decision to issue Executive Order 9066. It includes the role of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, who disagreed with FDR's decision. In April 1943, the First Lady visited an internment camp. Shortly after that the Japanese American Citizens League presented her with a painting of the Topaz camp by Chiura Obata (1885-1975), a Japanese American artist who was confined there. Mrs. Roosevelt displayed the painting in her New York City home until her death in 1962. It is included in the exhibition.

Visitors then enter the exhibition's main gallery where they will encounter over 200 photographs (including some reproduced in dramatically large formats) that provide a visual record of the forced removal of Japanese Americans and their lives inside the restricted world of the remote government camps operated by the War Relocation Authority (WRA). Most of these images were shot by skilled photographers hired by the WRA. The WRA visual records (held at the National Archives and Records Administration in College Park, Maryland) include the work of Dorothea Lange, Clem Albers, Francis Stewart, and Hikaru Iwasaki. IMAGES OF INTERNMENT also features photographs taken by Ansel Adams at the Manzanar camp and a selection of photos shot by George and Frank Hirahara, who were held at the Heart Mountain camp in Wyoming.

The exhibit includes a short film that features excerpts from oral history accounts of Japanese Americans in which they describe their experiences. There is also a video presentation of President Ronald Reagan's remarks when he signed the 1988 bill that provided an official government apology and cash payment to each surviving person covered under Executive Order 9066.

9am - 5pm November - March
9am - 6pm April - October

Closed: Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's Day

William J. vanden Heuvel Gallery
FDR Library
4079 Albany Post Road
Hyde Park, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 22 -
April 29, 2017
Images of Value: The Artwork Behind U.S. Security Engraving 1830s-1980s
Paper money has been much in the news as discussions focused on which woman’s portrait should be the face of the $20 bill, with Harriet Tubman being the final choice. However, surprisingly, it should be noted that from 1886 to approximately 1900, the first named woman’s portrait, that of Martha Washington, appeared on two different examples of US federal paper money. The first lady’s engraved image (and its likely source) is included in the first exhibition to take a comprehensive look at the artwork for engravings that appeared on paper bank notes and securities produced by US bank note firms. The exhibition surveys 150 years of images in watercolor drawings, prints, photographs, and oil paintings that were used as engraving subjects by US bank note firms.

America became the world leader in security engraving by the 1860s, a result of the antebellum banking system. Picture engraving was the key defense against counterfeiting. From beautiful genre and Civil War watercolor drawings of the nineteenth century, to large allegorical oil paintings of the twentieth century, to a range of prints and photographs of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the art that graced currency and securities can be seen, paired with the bank notes and securities on which the resulting engravings appeared. Original works by American artists such as F. O. C. Darley, Henry Inman, James D. Smillie, Walter Shirlaw, Alonzo E. Foringer and others are in the exhibition.

The exhibition is curated by and largely from the collection of Grolier member Mark D. Tomasko, a private collector and researcher who documents the engravers, artists, designers, and the bank note firms. He is the author of The Feel of Steel: the Art and History of Bank Note Engraving in the United States.

Mon – Sat 10am - 5pm

Free & open to the public

THE GROLIER CLUB
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 01 -
April 28, 2017
Utopian Explorations & Science Fiction
This exhibition surveys historical utopian and dystopian literature in the Kislak Center and points to its influence on science fiction, highlighting works in the Mark B. Adams Science Fiction Collection. The focus is on the utopian impulse in space and time travel and on the dystopian element in utopian thought, as well as on ecological utopias, or ecotopias.

The Kislak Center is sponsoring a symposium and two conferences during the Spring 2017 semester that examine various aspects of utopias, travel, exploration, and ecotopias.

The Science of Information,1870-1945: The Universalization of Knowledge in a Utopian Age
Thursday, February 23 - Saturday, February 25, 2017

To the Ends of the Earth
Thursday, March 2 - Saturday, March 4, 2017

An Ecotopian Toolkit for the Anthropocene
Thursday, April 13 - Saturday, April 15, 2017

Mon - Fri 9am - 5pm

Free & open to the public

Snyder-Granader Alcove
Van Pelt-Dietrich Library, sixth floor
3420 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 03 -
June 11, 2017
Prints in Paris 1900: From Elite to the Street
The Van Gogh Museum has 1,800 French prints from the fin de siècle (1890–1905), making this one of the world’s leading print collections.

The exhibition takes you to the French capital, where the revolution in printmaking erupted from 1890 onwards. It focuses on the one hand on prints that were raised to the level of high art and could only be seen in private collections, fashionable theatres and exclusive galleries. And on the other, on world-famous posters such as those for Le Chat Noir and Le Moulin Rouge, which filled the public space along the boulevards and in popular cafés.

Daily: 9am - 5pm
Fridays until 10pm

The Van Gogh Museum
Museumplein 6
Amsterdam, NETHERLANDS
Exhibit International
March 07 -
August 26, 2017
Love in Venice
This exhibition is part of Carnegie Hall’s citywide festival La Serenissima: Music and Arts from the Venetian Republic.

A tolerant and secular state, the Venetian Republic originated in the lagoon communities around Venice and existed for half a millennium, from 1297 until 1797. Dominated by a merchant capitalist elite who did business through sea trade, the Republic of Venice enjoyed an autonomy and freedom that was not typical of the rest of Italy, and which for centuries made it a destination for love and pleasure.

Titled “Love in Venice,” the exhibition at The New York Public Library will examine the literary, artistic, musical and cultural aspects of Venice’s seductiveness, including its beautiful courtesans, lavish festivals, lively carnivals and libertine counter-culture. On view will be works as diverse as the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, one of the most iconic works produced in Venice to explore ideas of desire, to flap books showing the undergarments of Venetian prostitutes, etchings by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, letters from Lord Byron’s paramours and examples of wedding poetry celebrating the unions of leading European families.

Sun 1pm – 5pm
Mon & Thu - Sat 10am – 6pm
Tues & Wed 10am – 8pm

Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
New York Public Library
476 Fifth Avenue (42nd St & 5th Ave)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 07 -
May 07, 2017
The Shape of Things: Photographs from Robert B. Menschel
The Shape of Things: Photographs from Robert B. Menschel presents an engaging survey of The Museum of Modern Art’s multifaceted collection of photography. Borrowing its title from the eponymous work by Carrie Mae Weems, the exhibition is drawn entirely from works acquired over the past 40 years with the support of Robert B. Menschel, telling the story of photography from its beginnings.

Covering more than 150 years of photography—from an 1843 view of Paris by William Henry Fox Talbot, the English father of photography, to An-My Lê's depictions of US military exercises in preparation for war in Iraq and Afghanistan—the exhibition underscores an equal attention to the past and the present, and a strong belief that they complement each other; and that each generation reinvents photography. Since Menschel joined the Committee on Photography at MoMA in 1977, over 500 works have entered the collection through his support, including 162 photographs he recently donated from his personal collection.

10:30am – 5:30pm
Open until 8:00 p.m. on Fridays
Members Early Hours begin at 9:30am

Floor 2, Exhibition Galleries
The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 10 -
May 28, 2017
Asemic Writing: Offline & In the Gallery
Asemic writing is a wordless semantic form that often has the appearance of abstract calligraphy. It allows writers to present visual narratives that move beyond language and are open to interpretation, relying on the viewer for context and meaning. Beyond works on paper, asemic writing enjoys a growing presence online and continues to evolve with new performance-based explorations and animated films.

Asemic Writing: Offline & In the Gallery, curated by Michael Jacobson, is the first large-scale exhibition of asemic art in the United States, featuring the work of over 50 international artists who together create an eclectic assemblage of inventing, designing, and dreaming.

Asemic Translations
Sat, March 25th 7 - 9pm
Free and open to the public
Join us for a special reading by various asemic artists and scholars, and music by Ghostband. This event is sponsored by Rain Taxi.

Opening reception Friday, March 10th 6 - 9pm

Mon – Sat 9:30am - 6:30pm
Tue open late: 9:30am - 9pm
Sun noon - 5pm

Gallery admission is always free.

Main Gallery
Minnesota Center for Book Arts
first floor, Open Book building
1011 Washington Avenue S., Suite 100
Minneapolis, MN
Exhibit Midwest
March 11 -
May 21, 2017
Salvador Dali's Fantastical Fairy Tales
Explore the connections between art and literature while marveling at Dalí’s inventiveness and fine craftsmanship.

This beautiful exhibition features 36 colorful prints from The Dalí Museum that will delight visitors of all ages. Prints are a major part of Salvador Dalí’s work, and here we celebrate his fine and varied techniques in illustrations for stories including Alice in Wonderland, Don Quixote, and the tales of Hans Christian Andersen. Salvador Dalí is one of the great modern artists of the 20th century. He believed that dreams were as real as so-called reality and that art created from visions could be as insightful as realism, if not more so. Visitors get a chance to explore the connections between art and literature while marveling at Dalí’s inventiveness and fine craftsmanship.

Sun 12pm - 5pm
Mon CLOSED
Tues - Fri 11am - 5pm
Sat 10am - 5pm

Museum Members FREE
Adults $12
Senior citizens (65 and over) $10
Military $10
Students $5
Children (6 and under) FREE
Does not apply to groups

Free Sunday admission to the second floor collection galleries sponsored by BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina. Does not include featured exhibitions.

Columbia Museum of Art
1515 Main Street
Columbia, SC
Exhibit South
March 12 -
July 16, 2017
East of the Mississippi: Nineteenth-Century American Landscape Photography
The first exhibition to focus exclusively on photographs made in the eastern half of the United States during the 19th century, East of the Mississippi showcases some 175 works—from daguerreotypes and stereographs to albumen prints and cyanotypes—as well as several photographers whose efforts have often gone unheralded. Celebrating natural wonders such as Niagara Falls and the White Mountains, as well as capturing a cultural landscape fundamentally altered by industrialization, the Civil War, and tourism, these photographs not only helped shape America’s national identity but also played a role in the emergence of environmentalism.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 11am – 6pm

Admission is always free and passes are not required

Other venues: New Orleans Museum of Art, New Orleans, October 5, 2017–January 7, 2018

West Building, Ground Floor, Inner Tier
National Gallery of Art
between 3rd & 9th Streets along Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 20 -
July 31, 2017
The Working Library: Clifford Burke and Fine Printing

The Book Club of California
312 Sutter Street, Suite 500
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
March 23 -
May 27, 2017
Vive les Satiristes: Caricature during the Reign of Louis Philippe 1830-1848, From the Collection of Josephine Lea Iselin
A fascinating overview of the Golden Age of social and political satire in 19th-century France, focusing on the role of controversial and wildly popular journals such as La Caricature and Le Charivari, and the great illustrators — Daumier, Grandville, and others — who captured in these pages the foibles of those around them with unmatched humor, skill, and style.

Mon – Sat 10am - 5pm

Free & open to the public

2nd Floor Gallery
THE GROLIER CLUB
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 27 -
June 09, 2017
The Renaissance: Highlights from Special Collections
This exhibition will present highlights from the rare book and manuscript holdings of the Special Collections Research Center exemplifying the history of the Renaissance. The opening of the exhibition will coincide with the annual meeting of the Renaissance Society of America in Chicago, March 30-April 1, 2017.

9am - 5:45pm

Special Collections Research Center
University of Chicago
1100 E. 57th Street
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
April 01 -
May 14, 2017
50 Years, 50 Works, 50 Reasons. Maurice Sendak: The Memorial Exhibition
In words and images, Maurice Sendak gave form to the fierce power of a child's imagination. This commemorative exhibition will include many highlights from his 60-year-long career, including original illustrations from Where the Wild Things Are, Little Bear, In the Night Kitchen, and other books; set design and costume sketches; animation reels; posters; sculpture; and more. The fifty works of art will be accompanied by quotes from fifty celebrities, renowned illustrators, friends of the artist, politicians, and other personalities who will share their thoughts about Maurice Sendak and how he inspired them, influenced their careers, and touched their lives. In the words of former President Bill Clinton, "Perhaps no one has done as much to show the power of the written word on children, not to mention on their parents, as Maurice Sendak."

April 1st - May 9th
Tue – Sun 10am – 4pm
Mon Closed

May 10th - October 10th (Columbus Day)
Daily 10am – 5pm

Adults & Juniors (13-64) $12.00
Seniors (65+) $10.50
Children (12 & under) FREE

Admission is always FREE for members, active military, and retired career military personnel.

The Fenimore Art Museum
5798 State Highway 80
Cooperstown, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 01 -
July 30, 2017
AUDUBON: DRAWN TO NATURE
Soar to the IMA to experience Audubon: Drawn to Nature, an exhibition featuring the lifelike drawings of John James Audubon. From stern owls to playful parakeets these beautiful drawings feature birds of North America carefully studied and documented by Audubon, a leader in ornithology and conservation.

Along with the artwork and accompanying descriptions of the bird’s habitat and characteristics, experience an immersive gallery where Audubon’s birds will come to life, giving the feeling of being outdoors in a forest. Learn about habitat conservation and test your wingspan against some of nature’s biggest birds. See one of the few remaining printing plates made for the original printing of Audubon’s The Birds of America book, lent to the IMA by the Smithsonian Museum of American History.

While visiting our campus, be sure to walk to the Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park where you can see real life birds up close.

Tue, Wed, Fri, & Sat 11am - 5pm
Thu 11am - 9pm
Sun noon - 5pm

IMA Members: FREE
Adults: $18
Ages 5 & under: FREE
Youth ages 6-17: $10
Access Pass $2
Children 15 and under must be accompanied by an adult.

Indianapolis Museum of Art
4000 Michigan Road
Indianapolis, IN
Exhibit Midwest
April 05 -
June 11, 2017
Books of Course
From the teaching collections of Macy Chadwick, Julie Chen, Betsy Davids, Alisa Golden, Michael Henninger, Charles Hobson, Nance O'Banion, Karen Sjoholm, and Kathleen Walkup

Drawing from their collections, nine Bay Area teachers have chosen books, objects, and creative assignments from their libraries to share in one exhibition. Presenting different teaching approaches through their selections, these educators shed light on their philosophies as well as their passions. Individual collections are reflected in different themes, for example: as a historical timeline; top ten student favorites; and books with an emphasis on language and culture. Over forty artists' works are included, each with a unique vision, and including a wide variety of processes and materials. From a book with intentionally bad printing to a book made to resemble a purse, each work serves as a gem to contemplate, with the hope that you, too, will be inspired to make books, of course.

Opening Reception :: Wednesday, April 5, 2017 :: 6pm - 8pm (RSVP required)

Book Talk

Book Talk :: Friday, April 21, 2017 :: 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

The Book Talk will feature a lively informal tour of the exhibition with Macy Chadwick, Julie Chen, Betsy Davids, Michael Henninger, Charles Hobson, and Kathleen Walkup

San Francisco Center for the Book
375 Rhode Island Street
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
April 05 -
30, 2017
Posters and Patriotism Selling WWI in New York
When the United States entered World War I in April 1917, New York City's artists and illustrators were enlisted in the war effort. Many of them worked for the federal government’s new Division of Pictorial Publicity. Posters and Patriotism: Selling World War I in New York examines the outpouring of posters, flyers, magazine art, sheet music covers, and other mass-produced images created by these New Yorkers to stir the American public to wartime loyalty, duty, and sacrifice.

From the outbreak of the European conflict in 1914, however, New York had also been a city at war with itself—a place where debates about ethnic and racial loyalty, pacifism, the right to side with France, Belgium, and England or Germany, and the very meaning of patriotism spawned impassioned art for a mass audience. In rediscovering a wartime dialogue between images of conformity and dissent, Posters and Patriotism showcases over 60 examples from the World War I poster collection donated to the Museum by railroad executive and financier John W. Campbell (1880-1957) in 1943, most being exhibited for the first time, as well as the work of defiant artists in such colorful publications as The Masses, The Fatherland, and Mother Earth.

Open Daily 10am – 6pm

Adults $18
Seniors, students $12 with I.D.
Ages 19 & under Free
Members Free

Museum of the City of New York
1220 Fifth Ave (at 103rd Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 06 -
28, 2017
MADE IN PARIS. SPOTLIGHT ON THE MEDIEVAL BOOK TRADE
Books made in Paris are among the most important expressions of French medieval and Renaissance art. From c. 1200 into the sixteenth century, Paris was the greatest center for the production of illuminated manuscripts and illustrated books in Europe. The royal court, prestigious members of the church, and the learned men of the university of Paris together supported a thriving commercial book trade. Our exhibit brings together manuscripts, miniatures, and printed books copied and illuminated in the French capital from thirteenth-century Bibles, fifteenth-century illuminated Books of Hours, to precious examples of illustrated books by sixteenth-century French printers.

Monday through Friday 11am - 7pm

Les Enluminures
1, rue Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Paris, FRANCE
Exhibit International
April 07 -
June 11, 2017
Big Bird: Looking for Lifesize
At the dawn of ornithology, 16th-century artists aspired to portray birds lifesize, but the largest paper available measured roughly 11 x 16 inches, allowing only smaller species to be depicted lifesize. Three hundred years later, John James Audubon was able to depict, for the first time, larger species thanks to technological innovations that perfected high-quality, large-size watercolor paper with a smooth surface.

Featuring 28 works from two time periods, Big Bird: Looking for Lifesize contrasts a group of exceptional European watercolors from the 1500s—which were recently featured to great acclaim in an exhibition in France—with spectacular examples of the rarest jewel of the New-York Historical Society’s extraordinary Audubon collection: the cache of watercolor models by Audubon in the special folio series The Birds of America, engraved by Robert Havell Jr. In contrast to the 16th-century artists, Audubon portrayed species lifesize on double-elephant-size-paper, around 40 x 26.5 inches.

Audubon’s watercolors display his brilliant contributions to ornithological illustration and his inventive use of the medium, while the 16th-century “portraits” document one of the most complex, early scientific efforts to catalogue natural phenomena taxonomically. This fascinating exhibition is as much an aesthetic journey as it is a demonstration of how technological innovation—of something even as simple as paper—can influence art and our understanding of nature.

The Audubon watercolors were purchased for the New-York Historical Society by public subscription from Mrs. John J. Audubon, and the sixteenth-century avian works were the gift of Nathaniel H. Bishop.

Tue - Thu, & Sat 10am - 6pm
Fri 10am - 8pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

Gallery
New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West (at Richard Gilder Way/77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 08 -
August 07, 2017
Octavia Butler: Telling My Stories
A new exhibition opening this spring examines the life and work of celebrated author Octavia E. Butler (1947-2006), the first science fiction writer to receive a prestigious MacArthur “genius” award and the first African American woman to win widespread recognition writing in that genre. Butler’s literary archive resides at The Huntington.

The exhibition follows a roughly chronological thread and includes approximately 100 items that reveal the writer’s early years and influences. It also highlights specific themes that repeatedly commanded her attention. Butler was born June 22, 1947, to a maid and a shoeshine man. Her father died when she was quite young. An only child, she discovered writing very early because it suited her shy nature. The exhibition will feature samples of her earliest stories.

The exhibition will include examples of journal entries, photographs, and first editions of her books, including Kindred, arguably her best-known work. The book is less science fiction and more fantasy, involving an African American woman who travels back in time to the horrors of plantation life in pre-Civil War Maryland. “I wanted to reach people emotionally in a way that history tends not to,” Butler said about the book. Published in 1979, Kindred continues to command widespread appeal and is regularly taught in high schools and at the university level, and is frequently chosen for community-wide reading programs and book clubs.

Mon 10am - 5pm
Tue Closed
Wed - Sun 10am - 5pm

The last ticketed entry time is 4 p.m. The library and art galleries close at 4:30 p.m

Library West Hall
The Huntington
1151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
April 08 -
September 01, 2017
Clever Criminals and Daring Detectives
Since the beginning of printing, readers have thrilled to true crime tales of highwaymen and murderers and the last words of executed criminals. These narratives provided a mix of lurid details, moral uplift, and reassurance of the workings of justice. While true crime attracted readers through the centuries, fictional crime stories came into their own with the advent of the modern detective novel in the 19th century. Edgar Allan Poe’s “Murders in the Rue Morgue” launched a new genre that blossomed through the century in works ranging from Charles Dickens’s Mystery of Edwin Drood to Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes and even Bram Stokers’ Dracula.

This exhibition chases both criminal and detective characters across a wide historical landscape and offers the chance to test visitors’ own sleuthing skills. Objects on display include the earliest account of an American multiple murderer, the manuscript of “The Adventure of the Empty House” by Arthur Conan Doyle, and Ellery Queen’s thoughts on collecting detective fiction.

Hours

Mon Closed
Tue Noon — 5pm
Wed & Thu Noon — 8pm
Fri Noon — 5pm
Sat & Sun Noon — 6pm
*Closed on National Holidays

Adults: $10.00
Seniors (ages 65 & older): $8.00
Students & Children: $5.00
Children under 5: Free
Rosenbach Members: Free!
Members of AAM,ICOM, & the North American Reciprocal Museum (NARM) Program: Free

The Rosenbach
2008-2010 Delancey Place
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 20 -
30, 2017
A City Seen Todd Webb’s Postwar New York, 1945-1960
A photographer's exploration of New York City in the years following World War II.

A City Seen: Todd Webb’s Postwar New York, 1945-1960 examines New York through the eyes—and lens—of photographer Todd Webb. Featuring more than 100 images, accompanied by entries from Webb’s own journal, the exhibition highlights Todd Webb’s personal exploration of the city that enthralled him while providing an expansive document of New York in the years following World War II.

As a newly discharged Navy veteran, Webb (1905-2000) moved to New York in 1945 to dedicate a year to photographing the city. Armed with a large format camera and tripod, he worked relentlessly and the year turned into several decades. Webb’s images captured the city’s contrasts—from Midtown’s skyscrapers to the Lower East Side’s tenements, from high-powered businessmen in the Financial District to the remnants of old ethnic enclaves in Lower Manhattan. A City Seen includes his investigations of these neighborhoods, as well as Harlem near 125th Street and Third Avenue Elevated, which would be decommissioned in the 1950s. Also featured are portraits by Webb of members of his intimate circle of friends, including Alfred Stieglitz, Harry Callahan, Berenice Abbott, Helen Levitt, and Lisette Model. This is the first major museum exhibition of Webb’s work since the Museum of the City of New York first exhibited his early images in 1946.

Open Daily 10am – 6pm

Adults $18
Seniors, students $12 with I.D.
Ages 19 & under Free
Members Free

Museum of the City of New York
1220 Fifth Ave (at 103rd Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 21 -
28, 2017
W I L L I A M B L A K E I N C O L O R
(The gallery is currently CLOSED until the opening of our new show, BLAKE IN COLOR)

William Blake in Color: For the first time a massive volume of 2500+ rare plates from the Trianon Press Illuminated Book series enters the collector market. Additional proofs and personal archives from legendary Trianon producer, Arnold Fawcus are also made publicly available.

Tue- Sat 11am - 5pm

Opening Reception: Fri, April 21, 4pm - 7pm

The William Blake Gallery
49 Geary Street, Suite 205
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
April 21 -
July 01, 2017
EN MASSE: BOOKS ORCHESTRATED
Books, foremost agents of intellectual and visual stimuli, pose as objects of desire and forms of aesthetic due to their psychical precision that stems from their geometric formations and mysterious potential. When loosely arranged together through a conceptual or aesthetic vision–whether piled or adjoined– books adopt further narratives distinct in their structure, yet still original in their intellectual content. En Masse: Books Orchestrated, organized by Osman Can Yerebakan, contemplates various possibilities on intellectual thinking and collective culture, bringing together various artists that utilize book arrangement in their practice, while suggesting an alternative perspective on analyzing and interpreting materials beyond their physicality and content.

Complex and profound in their pristine forms, books endure as agents of both subjective specification and individualistic expression. Embedded with certain connotations, each book transfers an aura via its outer case. Authors, titles or artwork covering their layers convey the content of a book, while dictating assumptions on its subject matter. The exhibition aims to investigate cultural, historical, and emotional attributions on books as phenomenons while analyzing the dialogue between every individual edition with one another and their audience.

The artists include Louis Zoellar Bickett, Jordan Buschur, Emilio Chapela, Özgür Demirci, Donald Daedalus, Leor Grady, Katarina Jerinic, Nina Katchadourian, j.c. lenochan, Liz Linden, Michael Mandiberg, Phil Shaw, Ward Shelley & Douglas Paulson, Yinka Shonibare MBE, and Julia Weist.

Mon - Fri 11am - 6pm
Sat 10am - 5pm

Main Gallery
The Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 22 -
September 06, 2017
Witness: Reality and Imagination in the Prints of Francisco Goya
Visions of Spanish life from one of the greatest graphic artists of all time

Francisco Goya witnessed decades of political turmoil and social upheaval as court painter to four successive rulers of Spain. Among his greatest achievements were four series of etchings that chronicle the transformation of Spanish society and his own personal visions: Los Caprichos (The Caprices), Los Desastres de la Guerra (The Disasters of War), La Tauromaquia (Bullfighting), and Los Disparates (The Follies). Near the end of his life, Goya also produced a set of four grand lithographs known as the Bulls of Bordeaux. This exhibition highlights prints from each series, exploring the imagery and techniques that make Goya one of the greatest graphic artists of all time.

From the chaos of war to the spectacle of the bullfight, the prints in the exhibition show Goya’s remarkable ability to move between documentary realism and expressive invention. Unlike his commissioned paintings, his graphic works allowed him the freedom to explore provocative subjects such as prostitution, witchcraft, and political corruption. This exhibition also highlights how Goya pushed the limits of printmaking to heighten the expressive effect of his subjects.

Tue – Sun 10am – 5pm
Wed & Fri open until 8:45pm
Closed Monday

Korman Galleries 121–123
first floor, main building
Philadelphia Museum of Art
2600 Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic