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April 04, 2017 -
January 31, 2019
Echoes of the Great War: American Experiences of World War I
Exhibition examines the upheaval of world war as Americans confronted it— both at home and abroad. The exhibition considers the debates and struggles that surrounded U.S. engagement; explores U.S. military and home front mobilization and the immensity of industrialized warfare; and touches on the war’s effects, as an international peace settlement was negotiated, national borders were redrawn, and soldiers returned to reintegrate into American society.

8:30am - 4:30pm

Second Floor
Southwest Gallery
Thomas Jefferson Building
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 17, 2017 -
June 04, 2018
Double Take: Daguerreian Portrait Pairs
Highlighting the depth of the National Portrait Gallery’s early photography collection, this exhibition will showcase fourteen daguerreotypes—two portraits each—of seven subjects: George Bancroft, Jenny Lind, Zachary Taylor, Frederick Douglass, Jefferson Davis, Daniel Webster, and John Quincy Adams. Only one loan—a daguerreotype of John Quincy Adams from the National Museum of American History—will supplement the Gallery’s collection.

By featuring two portraits of each famous sitter, the exhibition will encourage visitors to consider the ways in which various daguerreotypists approached the same subject and how different the results could be. In addition to discussing the early history of portrait photography, the accompanying text will compare images made for public consumption with those produced as personal keepsakes. Ann Shumard, senior curator of photographs, curates this installation.

11:30am - 7pm daily
Closed December 25th

Free admission

First floor
National Portrait Gallery
8th & F Streets NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 15, 2017 -
June 15, 2018
'Easy Vehicles of Kn​owledge for an Enlightened and Free People'
Am​erican Periodicals in the Watkinson, 1750-1950

Guest Curator Leonard Banco, M.D.,
Trustee of the Watkinson and collector of rare Americana

Trinity College
300 Summit Street
Hartford, CT
Exhibit New England
October 24, 2017 -
August 31, 2018
The New York World of Willa Cather
Willa Cather is better known for her elegiac novels about the Great Plains, but New York City exercised a profound influence on her creative life. Of signal importance was the New York Society Library, a valuable hidden resource for Cather. This is the first exhibition to showcase the Pulitzer Prize-winning author’s relationship to the Library and to the city where she lived off and on for most of her adult life.

Treasures displayed from the Library’s collections will include:

*Charging cards listing the books checked out by Cather and her lifelong companion Edith Lewis during their twenty-year membership

*an essay by Truman Capote describing his humorous meeting with Cather at the Library during a 1942 snowstorm

*first editions of My Mortal Enemy (1926); Song of the Lark (1915); and The Troll Garden (1905)

*titles Cather consulted while writing Sapphira and the Slave Girl (1940)

The exhibition catalog contains an introduction by curator Harriet Shapiro, an essay by Andrew Jewell, editor of the Willa Cather Archive, and photographs of Cather from Wyoming to New York City. It describes the landmarks of Cather’s urban world—her Washington Square and Park Avenue homes and the office of muckraking McClure’s Magazine, where Cather was managing editor—and their influence on books from Song of the Lark to My Mortal Enemy.

Mon & Fri 9am - 5pm
Tue, Wed & Thu 9am - 8pm
Sat & Sun 11am - 5pm

CLOSED:
Thu, Nov 23 & Fri, Nov 24 for Thanksgiving.

The Assunta, Ignazio, Ada & Romano Peluso Exhibition Gallery
The New York Society Library
53 East 79th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 27, 2017 -
September 30, 2019
Headlines of History: Historic Newspapers of St. Louis and the World Through the Centuries at the St. Louis Mercantile Library Association
October 27, 2017 Members' Opening and Bixby Book Club Halloween Party

Join us on Friday October 27 from 6-9pm as we celebrate the opening of the special exhibition Headlines of History: Historic Newspapers of St. Louis and the World Through the Centuries at the St. Louis Mercantile Library Association.

University of Missouri–St. Louis
1 University Blvd.
St. Louis, MO
Exhibit Midwest
November 18, 2017 -
October 20, 2018
Drawn to Purpose: American Women Illustrators & Cartoonists
Features the rich collections of the Library of Congress and brings to light remarkable but little-known contributions made by North American women to the art forms of illustration and cartooning. Spanning the late 1800s to the present, the exhibition highlights the gradual broadening in both the private and public spheres of women’s roles and interests, and demonstrates that women once constrained by social conditions and convention, have gained immense new opportunities for self-expression and discovery.

8:30am - 4:30pm

Ground Floor
Graphic Arts Galleries
Thomas Jefferson Building
10 First Street SE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 15 -
July 15, 2018
Ed Emberley: Better You Than Me
Exhibition includes an array of inventive artwork from the artist's personal archive of hand drawn sketches, woodblock prints, mockups, and first edition books. Better You Than Me is comprised of a specially-curated selection from the first retrospective of Emberley's work that was presented by the Worcester Art Museum in 2016 and 2017, along with never-before-exhibited drawings and prints.

Tue – Sun 11am - 5pm
Thu 11am – 9pm
Closed Mondays

Mary S. & David C. Corbin Foundation Gallery
Akron Art Museum
One South High
Akron, OH
Exhibit Midwest
January 17 -
July 15, 2018
Before/On/After: William Wegman and California Conceptualism
This exhibition will survey Conceptual art as it developed in Southern California in the 1970s. It is occasioned by the artist William Wegman's extraordinary recent gift to the Museum of 174 short videos that he made between 1970 and 1999—his entire career in this medium. A 90-minute selection of videos from this gift will be shown, accompanied by photographs and drawings by Wegman as well as drawings, prints, and photographs by his contemporaries in Southern California such as John Baldessari, Vija Celmins, Douglas Huebler, Ed Ruscha, and others.

Wegman took up video while studying painting at the University of Wisconsin. Like many artists using the then-new medium, Wegman appreciated video, like photography, for its lo-fi reproducibility and anti-artistic qualities—and unlike film, where the negative must be developed and processed before viewing, video was like a sketchbook that allowed revision in real time.

It wasn't until he moved to Southern California in 1970 that his video production took off. Although he only lived in Los Angeles for three years, Wegman found his method: short, staged vignettes using everyday items in which expectations are reversed, puns and homonyms are pursued to absurd conclusions. The artist's key early collaborator for most of these short videos was his pet Weimaraner Man Ray, who enthusiastically participates in the goings on. In contrast to other early adopters of video, Wegman eschewed an aesthetic of boredom for humorous improvised scenarios in which he deflated the pretensions of painting and sculpture while also lampooning the pieties and self-seriousness of Conceptual Art—at a time when it was being codified and institutionalized. Beneath the slacker humor, however, are poignant points about failure and the reversal of expectations that chime with work by fellow West Coast Conceptualist friends and fellow travelers also featured in the exhibition.

Sun – Thu 10am – 5:30pm*
Fri & Sat 10am – 9pm*
*Galleries are cleared 15 minutes before closing.

Gallery 851
The Met Fifth Avenue
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 19 -
July 08, 2018
Hung Liu In Print
Hung Liu In Print invites viewers to explore the relationship between the artist’s multi-layered paintings and the palpable, physical qualities of her works on paper. To make her prints, Liu (b. 1948) uses an array of printing and collage techniques, developing highly textured surfaces, veils of color, and screens of drip marks that transform the figures in each composition. Describing printmaking as “poetry,” she emphasizes the spontaneity of the layering process, which allows each image to build organically with each successive layer.

Before immigrating to California in 1984, Liu grew up during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution in China, where she worked alongside fieldworkers and trained as a painter. Adapting figures from historical Chinese photographs, Liu reimagines antique depictions of laborers, refugees, and prostitutes. Her multifaceted oeuvre probes the human condition and confronts issues of culture, identity, and personal and national history.

Best known as a painter, Liu ably translates the “weeping realism” that characterizes her canvases into the medium of prints. This focus exhibition highlights selected prints from the collection of the National Museum of Women in the Arts as well as the artist’s related tapestry designs.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

Adults: $10.00
Visitors 65 & over: $8.00
Students: $8.00
NMWA members: Free
Youth 18 & under: Free

National Museum of Women in the Arts
1250 New York Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 19 -
June 03, 2018
Collecting the Women’s Marches
On January 21, 2017, hundreds of thousands rallied at the Women’s March on Washington for diverse issues including women’s rights, racial equality, and the environment. Counting more than 500 sister marches across the United States, it was the largest single-day protest in the nation’s history. As part of its History Responds program, the New-York Historical Society collected a range of artifacts, including signs, sashes, pussyhats, and colorful props, to document the moment. One year later, Collecting the Women’s Marches highlights some of the political and visual themes that emerged, as well as the efforts of individuals and groups that worked behind the scenes. An adjunct display of protest clothing by Olek (Agata Oleksiak), an artist who works in crochet, and Brick x Brick, a public art performance group, will be on view. Curated by Rebecca Klassen, assistant curator of material culture.

Tue - Thu, & Sat 10am - 6pm
Fri 10am - 8pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West
at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 20 -
June 03, 2018
Patriotic Persuasion: American Posters of the First World War
The exhibition features a selection of works donated to the Bruce Museum by Beverly and John W. Watling III.

The United States involvement in World War I lasted only a brief twenty months, from April 1917 to November 1918, but the nation’s military and propaganda strategies were of enormous consequence.

The variety of approaches which government agencies used to encourage wide-spread participation in the war effort was impressive, from the allure of artist Howard Chandler Christie’s young woman who, in a1917 poster, seductively proclaimed, “I WANT YOU FOR THE NAVY,” to the inquisitional tone of a war loan poster of the next year: “Are you 100% American? Prove it! Buy U.S. Government Bonds.” In the era of radio and film’s infancy, posters remained an essential medium for the public’s dreamlife, capable of nightmarish manipulation: in one of the iconic wartime posters from the Watling donation, artist Joseph Pennell in 1918 powerfully imagined a partially destroyed Statue of Liberty and New York City aflame in the background, with the plea, “That Liberty Shall Not Perish from the Earth/Buy Liberty Bonds/Fourth Liberty Loan.”

Featuring these works, as well as numerous other posters that combine image and text in ingenious, surprising, and sometimes disturbing combination, “Patriotic Persuasion” marks the centennial of American participation in the First World War. It is organized by Kenneth E. Silver, Bruce Museum Adjunct Curator of Art and Elizabeth Smith, Zvi Grunberg Resident Fellow at the Bruce Museum (2017-2018).

Tue - Sun 10am - 5pm
Doors close 1/2 hour before closing,
Last admission 4:30pm

Closed Mondays and major holidays: New Years Day, Easter, Independence Day

Bruce Museum
1 Museum Drive
Greenwich, CT
Exhibit New England
January 22 -
September 01, 2018
You Say You Want a Revolution: Remembering the 60s
Discover the counterculture of the 1960s and 70s in this comprehensive exhibition at the Library’s Stephen A. Schwarzman Building at 42nd Street. Part of a citywide celebration of the 1960s, this exhibition explores the breadth and significance of this pivotal era—from communal living and forays into expanded consciousness to tensions around race, politics, sexuality, and the environment. Items on display, drawn exclusively from the Library’s collections, include Timothy Leary’s notes on acid trips, footage of the Woodstock music festival, and posters used in protest against the Vietnam War.

Sun 1pm – 5pm
Mon, & Thu - Sat 10am – 6pm
Tue & Wed 10am – 8pm

Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
NY Public Library
476 Fifth Avenue (42nd St & Fifth Ave)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 29 -
July 15, 2018
Vaudeville!
For more than a century, vaudeville was the most popular form of American entertainment and one of the country's largest cultural exports. Performances on the vaudeville stage included comic sketches, acrobatics, animal tricks, magic, blackface performance, celebrity appearances, early film, and more. Shows featuring immigrant acts, racial stereotypes, and frequent appeals to nationalism defined a complex and often problematic sense of American identity at the turn of the 19th century.

Explore vaudeville's influences from Roman mimes to the saloons of the American frontier. Learn what life on the road was like for the thousands of entertainers who traveled around the country performing in theatres that were part of a vast network of venues, and witness the mid-century revival of vaudeville's relevance in musical theatre, radio, film, television, and the internet. See artifacts related to some of Vaudeville's best-known performers—Harry Houdini, Mae West, W. C. Fields, Bert Williams, George M. Cohan, Burns & Allen, Tony Pastor, the Nicholas Brothers, Barbette, and more.

The exhibition features the Ransom Center's extensive holdings of Harry Houdini, Tony Pastor, and Florenz Ziegfeld, among others, to show the development of vaudeville's highly organized form and its long-lasting impact on contemporary film, television, and comedy.

Mon, Tue, Wed, & Fri 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 7pm
Sat & Sun Noon – 5pm

Free admission

The Harry Ransom Center
21st and Guadalupe Streets
Austin, TX
Exhibit Southwest
February 01, 2018 -
January 01, 2019
BRONTË 200 - MAKING THUNDER ROAR: EMILY BRONTË
Emily's Bicentenary Exhibition

Emily Brontë is one of the greatest writers in English literature, and yet very little is actually known about her. What we do know survives as fragments of information from the people who knew her best, while years of fascination by her biographers have introduced speculation and myth to fill the gaps in our knowledge. To mark the bicentenary of Emily Brontë’s birth, this exhibition invites a number of well-known Emily admirers to share their own fascination with her life and work. Specially commissioned contributions from Maxine Peake, Lily Cole and Helen Oyeyemi amongst others result in a thoughtprovoking selection of Emily’s possessions, writing and artwork as well as some of the well-loved household objects she used daily. These personal responses to Emily acknowledge the gaps in our understanding about this intriguing writer, but also encourage fresh perspectives on her life and work.

Daily 10am - 5pm

Free with admission to the Museum

Brontë Parsonage Museum
Church Street
Haworth, Keighley
West Yorkshire, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
February 07 -
October 07, 2018
Of Two Minds
Creative Couples in Art and History

Ferdinand and Isabella; Olivier and Leigh: a true marriage of minds admits no impediment. When two extraordinary talents devote their lives not only to one another but to their craft, they bring the world some of its best and brightest creations.

Of Two Minds: Creative Couples in Art and History explores the art and achievements of romantic couples from the powerful royalty of the 16th century to cinema stars of Old Hollywood to local artists creating together today. Whether richer or poorer, in sickness or in health, in traditional marriages or same-sex partnerships, these power couples of the past and present collaborated, supported, or even taught one another their crafts. They include well-known collaborators, such as printmakers William and Catherine Blake, and lesser-known (and less legally recognized) couples such as Charles Ricketts and Charles Haslewood Shannon, who designed artwork for Oscar Wilde’s books and plays, and Violet Oakley and Edith Emerson, award-winning artists and prominent Philadelphia educators. The creations on display include objects of beauty—including illustrated books, etchings, and fine silver—and articles of knowledge, figured in maps, zoological prints, and political documents.

By exploring the processes of invention and influences behind these creations, Of Two Minds not only challenges the notion that creativity and authorship are solo endeavors, but shines light on the many different ways these artists lived, loved, and created together.

Tue & Fri 12pm - 5pm
Wed & Thu 12pm - 8pm
Sat & Sun 12pm - 6pm
Mon CLOSED

The Rosenbach
2008-2010 Delancey Place
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 10 -
June 10, 2018
Gloria Stoll Karn: Pulp Romance
Talented artist Gloria Stoll Karn is recognized for her contributions to the pulp fiction industry during the 1940s, one of very few female illustrators working in the field to create illustrations and covers for popular romance and dime store magazines. This exhibition explore the artist’s short but prolific career, and her unexpected journey in a world previously assigned to male artists. From 1941 to 1949, Stoll Karn’s art appeared on the covers and pages of many Popular Publication magazines, including Black Mask, Dime Mystery, Detective Tales, New Detective, All-Story Love, New Love, Love Book, Love Short Stories, Love Novels, Romance, and Thrilling Love, as well Argosy. The artist, now in her nineties, continues to create art for her own enjoyment, exploring a range of themes and styles.

November – April: open daily:
Weekdays: 10am - 4pm
Weekends & holidays: 10am - 5pm

Members: FREE
Kids 18 and under FREE
Adults $20
Seniors (65+): $18
Veterans: $17
College students with ID: $10

Norman Rockwell Museum
9 Route 183
Stockbridge, MA
Exhibit New England
February 17 -
July 08, 2018
Keith Smith at Home
A life on paper

Friendship, love, desire: Keith Smith’s life is an open book. For five decades, the Rochester-based artist has used surprising combinations of materials to chronicle his experiences. In this exhibition, explore an array of Smith’s mixed-media photographs and prints, and—his specialty—handmade artist’s books, most from his own collection.

In his work, Keith Smith irreverently disregards the supposed dividing lines between “fine art” (photography, etching, watercolor), “craft” (sewing, quilting, bookmaking), and “utilitarian technologies” (transparencies, photocopies). Although his subject matter is rooted in his personal life, he also grapples with universal themes such as self-representation, domesticity, and intimacy.

Smith frequently remarks that he is shy in life but not in his pictures. While he is a prolific artist who has enjoyed a successful teaching career and numerous exhibitions, he makes no secret about his reclusiveness. For him, “home” includes not only the physical confines of his house, but also his meditative introspection, his close-knit circle of friends and family, and his perpetual striving toward feeling “at home” in his own skin.

Tue – Sun 10am – 5pm
Mon Closed

Julien Levy Gallery
Philadelphia Museum of Art
1st floor, Perelman Building
2525 Pennsylvania Avenue
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 23 -
July 08, 2018
The Codex and Crafts in Late Antiquity
The transition from roll to codex as the standard format of the book is one of the most culturally significant innovations of late antiquity, the period between the 3rd and 8th centuries AD.

The Codex and Crafts in Late Antiquity examines the structural, technical, and decorative features of the major types of codices—the wooden tablet codex, the single-gathering codex, and the multigathering codex. Along with surviving artifacts and iconographic evidence, handmade replicas are used to explore the craft processes applied in the making of these early books. The exhibition presents the codex as an innovation, rather than an invention, that evolved using techniques already widely employed by artisans and craftspeople in the creation of everyday items such as socks and shoes, revealing that the codex was a fascinating, yet practical, development.

Tue, Fri – Sun 11am – 5pm
Wed, Thu 11am – 8pm

BARD GRADUATE CENTER GALLERY
18 West 86th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 23 -
June 03, 2018
The Bibliophile as Bookbinder: The Angling Bindings of S.A. Neff, Jr.
The exhibit is about one man’s passion for the natural world, and the world of books. Over five decades ago Mr. Neff began a serious pursuit of trout, and books on the art of angling. His travels have taken him to some of the most picturesque and challenging trout rivers in this country and abroad. His collection of angling books has grown into a proper library of three thousand volumes, dating from 1554, with a focus on fly-fishing for trout and salmon.

In the early 1980’s, Mr. Neff transitioned from a career in graphic design…to fine bookbinding. An autodidact by nature, he began his training with occasional workshops and seminars sponsored by the Guild of Book Workers. Since 1986 his work has been exhibited in this country and abroad. At the turn of this century he had arguably the largest solo binding exhibition ever mounted in this country. This exhibit traveled to six institutions during a two year period. Examples of his work have been published in books and periodicals in the U.S. and Europe.

Neff is cognizant of the traditional structures in bookbinding that have evolved over numerous centuries. He has chosen to embrace rather than negate these traditions. However, he prefers to stretch the boundaries whenever possible. For over two decades he has focused his binding efforts exclusively on work for his angling library. Neff has created sets of bindings with multiple volumes contained in drop-back boxes. Usually working with goatskin, the design on the box serves as an introduction to its contents. Even single volumes are housed in a decorative box. The work ranges from bindings with intricate pictorial panels of Japanese dyed paper …to decorative leather bindings with multiple onlays, and elaborate gold tooling.

In bridging the span of centuries of binding design, Neff has often focused on modern interpretations of 17th and 18th century panel designs. His collection of angling bindings is unique in its genre, and will remain intact in perpetuity.

Mon – Sat 9:30am - 6:30pm
Tue open late 9:30am - 9pm
Sun noon - 4pm

Free & open to the public

OPENING RECEPTION:
Fri, Feb 23rd 6pm - 9pm
Film Screening at 7pm

Main Gallery
Minnesota Center for Book Arts
1011 Washington Avenue S., Suite 100
Minneapolis, MN
Exhibit Midwest
February 24 -
June 03, 2018
Beyond Words: Book Illustration in the Age of Shakespeare
The printed images in early modern books are a visual delight, but many also add key information and a different or unique perspective. Curated by Caroline Duroselle-Melish, the Folger's curator of early modern books and prints, Beyond Words includes more than 80 illustrated books and prints from the Folger collection from the 15th to 18th centuries—many of which have rarely been displayed before. Video and period illustrations show how images were made and printed. Astoundingly, Beyond Words even includes the woodcut and copper plate from which two of the prints were produced.

The richly varied illustrations open a window on the early modern age, from contemporary events and observations of daily life to allegorical figures, guides to dancing and sewing and other how-to books, and much more. Among several insightful portraits is a print of an Ethiopian abbot—a rare image of an African scholar of the time. Another picture shows us sunflowers from Peru, with Aztec-language labels. Still another illustrates the ideas of the real-life French alchemist Nicolas Flamel.

Including printed images in books was costly. Still, the prints helped to sell books, as they do today, and often provided vital information. Frontispieces introduced books to potential buyers, and other images offered useful explanations, sometimes paired with text that was printed on or near the pictures. The use of color could simply be appealing or it could be a key element in understanding the meaning of the image. Many images, of course, presented purely visual information that could not be expressed in words, from observations of animals and plants to detailed maps and diagrams.

Beyond Words includes works by many European artists, among them Wenceslaus Hollar, Marcantonio Raimondi, and Hans Baldung Grien. It also has an especially strong Dutch presence, reflecting the publishing role of Amsterdam and Antwerp. Among the Dutch materials are an illustrated "college catalog" for the University of Leiden; works by the Dutch artists Theodor de Bry, Romeyn de Hooghe, and Crispijn van de Passe; and observations of nature by the Dutch merchant Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, made with the microscope he perfected. Beyond Words also has two works by the Flemish engraver Martin Droeshout, including his portrait of Shakespeare in the 1623 First Folio—one of the best-known book illustrations of the early modern age.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun noon – 5pm

Folger Shakespeare Library
201 East Capitol Street SE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 26 -
June 01, 2018
“Law Books Bright and Beautiful: Examples from the Yale Law Library Collection”
Although law books may not be known for their beauty, two dozen lovely exceptions are on display.

The volumes range from a 13th-century illuminated manuscript to modern fine press books on famous American trials. Other volumes include the mining laws of New Spain (1783), the statutes of Verona (1475), and a stunning book of French customary law (1540) printed on parchment with initials in gold leaf. Three of the books were chosen for their colorful endpapers.

“Law Books Bright and Beautiful” is the latest in a series of exhibitions aimed at promoting the study of law books as objects. It follows two exhibitions dedicated to illustrations in law books. Bindings will be showcased in an upcoming exhibition.

Lillian Goldman Law Library
Rare Book Exhibition Gallery
Yale Law School, Level L2
127 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
March 06, 2018 -
February 03, 2019
Sappho to Suffrage: women who dared
Pirates and poets; suffragettes and explorers - this exhibition celebrates the achievements of women who dared to do the unexpected. Sappho to Suffrage showcases some of the Bodleian's most remarkable and treasured items.

Mon - Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 11am - 5pm

Free admission

Related LECTURE: July 25th 5.00pm — 6.00pm
Speaker: Professor Patricia Fara
Lecture Theatre
Weston Library

Treasury, Weston Library
Bodleian Library
Broad Street
Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
March 09 -
September 02, 2018
Miniature Masterpiece: The Coëtivy Hours
The Coëtivy Hours is a masterpiece of fifteenth-century illumination. It was produced in Paris (1443-1445) for Prigent de Coëtivy, bibliophile and Admiral of France, to mark the occasion of his marriage to Marie de Rais. Made from parchment, the manuscript comprises 364 folios, each illuminated with decorative borders. In addition, it includes 148 three-quarter page miniatures painted in demi-grisaille. Using this technique, the figures are for the most part rendered in a limited palette of white with occasional hints of colours and gold.

Books of Hours are a collection of prayers intended for private use, and many were illuminated. Although described as the medieval ‘best seller’ due to the sheer number of surviving examples, their quality varies drastically. The patron dictated the number of miniatures and the level of decoration, while the style and palette were determined by the abilities of the workshop and availability of materials; no two books were identical.

Edith Beatty acquired the Coëtivy Hours in 1919 as an anniversary gift for her husband. Her inscription on the fly-leaf reads: ‘To A. Chester Beatty, from his loving wife, Edith’. At Beatty’s request, all but four of the miniatures were removed from the manuscript. For Beatty this had one clear purpose: ‘why shouldn’t people who are interested … look at them as closely as they want and study them properly?’

The Coëtivy Hours is a master work on a miniature scale. The exquisite artistry of the Parisian illuminators draws the viewer into each lavishly illuminated page. This exhibition and accompanying catalogue invite the visitor to indulge in the richness of this miniature masterpiece.

Mar - Oct: Mon - Fri 10am - 5pm

Free admission

Chester Beatty Library
Dublin Castle
Dublin, IRELAND
Exhibit International
March 16 -
September 03, 2018
Dead Sea Scrolls
This exhibition is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see authentic Dead Sea Scrolls, ancient manuscripts that include the oldest known biblical documents dating back over 2,000 years. The scrolls will be dramatically presented within a massive exhibit case featuring carefully regulated individual chambers, along with the full English translation.

Ten scrolls will be displayed when the exhibition opens. Due to strict preservation requirements, 10 different scrolls will arrive halfway through the run to replace the 10 initial scrolls. This will make it possible to see a total of 20 scrolls while the exhibition is in Denver. Each rotation includes a scroll that has never before been on public display.

In addition, more than 600 artifacts from the ancient Middle East will immerse guests in historic traditions and beliefs that continue to impact world cultures today. The authentic objects include inscriptions and seals, weapons, stone carvings, terra cotta figurines, remains of religious symbols, coins, shoes, textiles, mosaics, ceramics, jewelry, and a three-ton stone from the Western Wall in Jerusalem that fell in 70 CE. The exhibition is organized by the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA).

The Dead Sea Scrolls represent one of the most significant archaeological discoveries of the 20th century. As the story goes, in 1947, Bedouin goatherders wandered into a cave along the shore of the Dead Sea, near the site of the ancient settlement of Qumran. Concealed within the cave were scrolls that had not been seen for 2,000 years. After extensive excavation, thousands of fragments from more than 900 remarkably preserved scrolls were recovered, leading to decades of extraordinary scrutiny, preservation, debate, and awe.

Mon – Fri 10am - 5pm
Sat & Sun 9am - 5pm

Denver Museum of Nature & Science
2001 Colorado Blvd.
Denver, CO
Exhibit West
March 20 -
June 24, 2018
Joseph Cornell: The Saint-Exupéry Dossier
To mark the seventy-fifth anniversary of the publication of Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s classic story The Little Prince, the Morgan presents five newly discovered drawings by the author as well as intimate memorabilia from his time in New York during the 1940s. The items belonged to the American artist Joseph Cornell (1903–1972), who met Saint-Exupéry at the very moment the French author-aviator was drafting what would become one of the world’s favorite books. Cornell kept a dossier of papers and fragments that served as echoes of their encounters—everything from a marked-up cocktail napkin to an unpublished sketch of the little prince perched at the edge of a rose-covered cliff. Cornell’s Saint-Exupéry dossier was acquired by the Morgan in 2014 and is now shown in its entirety, for the first time, in the Morgan’s lower level lobby gallery.

At the time he met Saint-Exupéry, Cornell had already exhibited his work in some of the earliest exhibitions of Surrealist art in the United States and was creating the shadow boxes for which he is now best known. Saint-Exupéry, a French Air Force pilot and the celebrity author of best-selling books about the poetry of flight, had come to New York during the Second World War, after Germany’s invasion of France, and published The Little Prince just before returning to active duty in 1943; he died the following year while on a reconnaissance mission over southern France. The Saint-Exupéry dossier is one of countless files that Cornell assembled about various friends, historical figures, and themes, forming a dynamic library of everyday ephemera that fueled his imagination and served as source material for his remarkable works of collage and assemblage.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

$20 Adults
$13 Seniors (65 & over)
$13 Students (with current ID)
Free to members & children 12 & under (must be accompanied by an adult)

Admission is free on Fridays from 7pm - 9pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 20 -
July 06, 2018
Drawing the Line: Realism and Abstraction in Expressionist Art
The exhibition is a survey of major works situating Expressionism within the broader context of modernism. The exhibition of paintings, woodcuts, watercolors, drawings, and prints – 69 works in total – examines the principal forces – abstraction and realism – that shaped Expressionism. Artists include Max Beckmann, Otto Dix, Lyonel Feininger, Richard Gerstl, George Grosz, Erich Heckel, Wassily Kandinsky, Paul Klee, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Oskar Kokoschka, Alfred Kubin, August Macke, Franz Marc, Otto Mueller, Emil Nolde, Hermann Max Pechstein, Egon Schiele, and Karl Schmidt-Rottluff.

Tue - Sat 11am - 5pm

The Galerie St. Etienne
24 West 57th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 22 -
July 08, 2018
Manuscripts Meet the World: Handwriting from Around the World
Writing by hand is an activity that all cultures share in common. From Europe to Asia to Africa, from the ancient Egyptians to the present, manuscripts have been a vital part of the chain linking us together as communities. The Hill Museum & Manuscript Library (HMML) works around the world to preserve these handwritten works photographically.

This exhibition at the Minnesota Center for Book Arts presents samples of manuscripts from HMML’s own collections. Included are books from the European Middle Ages, as well as from Ethiopia, the Middle East, and South Asia. Many languages are represented, as are different kinds of books, such as codices, scrolls, and a palm-leaf book, as well as fragments of manuscripts. Visitors are invited to learn about the centrality of handwriting to both human experience and creativity.

Mon – Sat 9:30am - 6:30pm
Tue (open late) 9:30am - 9pm
Sun noon - 4pm

Cowles Literary Commons
Open Book Building, 2nd Floor
Minnesota Center for Book Arts
1011 Washington Avenue S., Suite 100
Minneapolis, MN
Exhibit Midwest
March 24 -
December 09, 2018
The Rabblerouser and the Homebody: Minnesota’s Elizabeth Olds and Wanda Gág
Before and after writing her famous children’s book Millions of Cats (1928), Wanda Gág was a printmaker, creating lithographs as intimate and exuberant as her books. Meanwhile, fellow Minnesotan Elizabeth Olds was writing herself into history by helping to transform screenprinting, traditionally a commercial process, into a medium for fine art. Her efforts, part of Franklin D. Roosevelt’s New Deal program of arts patronage, enabled artists to put low-cost art in the hands of a mass audience.

Olds’s prints used humor, satire, and a socially conscious viewpoint to document American life during the unsettled 1930s. Gág’s work came from a more private place: a spinning wheel, tree, or sleeping cat was enough to ignite her one-in-a-million imagination

This exhibition celebrates these two Minnesota-grown artists with prints, drawings, and preparatory materials for their children’s books.

Mon Closed
Tue, Wed, & Sat 10am – 5pm
Thu & Fri 10am – 9pm
Sun 11am – 5pm

Free admission

Minneapolis Institute of Art
2400 Third Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN
Exhibit Midwest
March 24 -
November 04, 2018
Bohemian Beauty: The Aesthetic Movement and Oscar Wilde’s Newport
The exhibition celebrates the ideas embodied by the artists, poets and thinkers popular during the Aesthetic Movement (1870-1890), an important era of artistic experimentation here and abroad. The exhibition will feature a selection of furniture, ceramics, wallpaper, glass, silver, paintings and costume illuminating the tenets of this “art for art’s sake” movement personified by its most influential impresario Oscar Wilde.

American poet and author Julia Ward Howe invited Oscar Wilde to speak at the Newport Casino Theater on July 15, 1882 as part of his grand North American lecture tour. The tour comprised 140 lectures in 260 days and stretched from New York to San Francisco. His lecture topic in Newport was “The Decorative Arts.”

Wilde’s tour manifested itself across the United States in raised awareness and interest in interior decoration. The style was influential in the Gilded Age, as it merged interests in traditional crafts – a precursor of the Arts & Crafts Movement – as well as the influence of industrial design and new technologies in manufacturing.

Bohemian Beauty draws upon the Preservation Society’s collections as well as significant loans from prominent museums and private collections.

Complimentary admission with Rosecliff ticket.

The Galleries at Rosecliff
548 Bellevue Avenue
Newport, RI
Exhibit New England
March 26 -
December 07, 2018
‘The art of freezing the blood’: Northanger Abbey, Frankenstein, & the Female Gothic
January 2018 marks two hundred years since Mary Shelley’s groundbreaking first novel Frankenstein was published anonymously. Shelley had wanted her work to ‘curdle the blood, and quicken the beatings of the heart’, and her thrilling account of creation, ambition, and monstrosity remains influential to this day. Shortly before, in December 1817, Jane Austen’s mock-Gothic Northanger Abbey appeared posthumously. In writing about the comic effects that reading too many ‘horrid’ novels had on a young and impressionable heroine, Austen turned her satirical eye on the Gothic craze that had swept Europe. Both novels provided fresh perspectives on the genre that had been delighting and horrifying audiences for over fifty years.

Alongside Shelley and Austen, many of the Gothic’s most successful practitioners were women. Most notably, Ann Radcliffe was a pioneer of the genre, who published five immensely popular novels between 1789 and 1797, and whose influence was far-reaching. Other lesser-known women writers such as Clara Reeve, Caroline Lamb, Regina Maria Roche, Eliza Parsons and Eleanor Sleath wrote Gothic works. They are often in conversation with one another or with male writers, and often neglected in the modern day. William Lane’s Minerva Press, established in 1790, published many female Gothic novelists, and these women also benefitted from circulating libraries which made their work widely available, from cheaply produced novellas or bluebooks, and from magazines, in which they published serial fiction in installments.

Our 2018 exhibition will explore this history, setting Shelley and Austen’s iconic novels in their female literary contexts, and placing rare editions of their novels alongside their lesser-known contemporaries.

Chawton House
Chawton
Alton
Hampshire, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
March 27 -
June 30, 2018
Shared Sacred Sites
For more than 100 years, The New York Public Library has collected thousands of religious books and manuscripts in order to preserve and make accessible the rich history of world religions, including the three Abrahamic faiths: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Drawn from divisions across the Library’s research collections, the objects on display represent centuries of creativity that tell the story of these religions and the varied interactions among followers of different belief systems.

Several major figures central to the Torah, the Bible, and the Qur’an have inspired interfaith encounters. While chronicles of the three monotheistic faiths are full of examples of intolerance and conflict, they also tell of coexistence and mutual understanding. Such acts are modeled on the hospitality of Abraham, the motherhood of Mary, and the heroic deeds of other holy figures, including Moses, Elijah, St. George, and Khidr.

Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
476 Fifth Avenue (42nd St & Fifth Ave)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 05 -
August 05, 2018
Red and Black: Revolution in Soviet Propaganda Graphics
In the early years of the Soviet Union, artists and designers joined the project of building a new classless society. Constructivism, one of the key movements to emerge at this time, applied principles of the artistic avant-garde—abstraction and the machine aesthetic, for example—to the practical design of everything from architecture to household objects. An installation of books, periodicals, postcards, and portfolio plates from the collection of The Wolfsonian–FIU Library, Red and Black will be presented concurrently with the major exhibition Constructing Revolution: Soviet Propaganda Posters from Between the World Wars and focus on the contribution of Constructivism to Soviet graphic design.

Mon, Tue, Thu, Sat 10am – 6pm
Wed closed
Fri 10am – 9pm (free 6pm – 9pm)
Sun noon – 6pm

CLOSED: Memorial Day & Independence Day

Members: FREE
Adults: $12
Seniors, students (with ID) & children (6–18): $8
Children under 6: FREE
Students, faculty, & staff of the State University System of Florida: FREE

The Wolfsonian–FIU
1001 Washington Avenue (corner of 10th St & Washington Ave)
Miami Beach, FL
Exhibit South
April 06, 2018 -
January 20, 2019
“PICTURES OF THE YEAR: 75 YEARS OF THE WORLD’S BEST PHOTOGRAPHY”
The exhibition is a groundbreaking photography show featuring seven decades of award-winning images from the archives of Pictures of the Year International (POYi), one of the world’s oldest and most prestigious photojournalism competitions. These images depict the people and events that have defined our times, capturing war and peace, disaster and triumph, and the social and cultural shifts that have shaped the past 75 years. The pictures were selected from POYi’s archive of more than 40,000 photos, tracing the evolution of photojournalism from World War II to today.

This exhibit celebrating the 75th year of POYi is the third collaboration between the Newseum and Pictures of the Year International since the Newseum opened on Pennsylvania Avenue in 2008. “Pictures of the Year: 75 Years of the World’s Best Photography” will include a public program to open the exhibit, a daylong lineup of programs and activities for a Photo Day event, programs and panel discussions with award-winning photographers throughout the run of the exhibit and more.

Mon - Sat 9am - 5pm
Sun 10am - 5pm

Adults, 19 - 64: $24.95 + tax
Seniors, 65 & older: $19.95 + tax
Youth, 7 - 18: $14.95 + tax
Children, 6 &d younger: Free
Prices subject to change without notice.

Discounts for military, college students, and AAA members are available only at our admissions desk with applicable ID (view details).

Newseum
555 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 08 -
July 22, 2018
ROCKWELL KENT: PRINTS FROM THE RALF C. NEMEC COLLECTION & PAINTINGS FROM NORTH COUNTRY COLLECTION
Complementary exhibitions celebrate Rockwell Kent (1882 – 1971), the American painter, printer, and illustrator, who settled in the Adirondacks in 1928. He painted many of his works in his Adirondack studio based on drawings, sketches, and notes taken during extensive travels to Greenland, Alaska, Ireland, and other extreme locations. Curator Caroline Welsh has drawn together paintings from North Country collections, some seldom seen publicly.

Mon CLOSED
Tue - Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

Member Opening: Saturday, April 7, at 2 pm

The Hyde Collection
161 Warren Street
Glens Falls, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 11 -
September 01, 2018
Subscription Campaigns: Contributions in Support of Community
Proponents of the internet believe that crowd-sourcing is a recent, technologically driven innovation. However, throughout the nineteenth-century Bostonians frequently pooled financial resources for various causes in a process popularly called “subscription.” Over the years, this term, an elastic construct, has been applied to a variety of ambitious undertakings and is, in fact, still embraced today. Following precedents set centuries earlier, writers, publishers, and other groups of individuals have achieved lofty goals, unattainable in isolation, that utilize this process of coordinated investment while simultaneously fostering a sense of community through participation in a shared vision.

Founded as a subscription library, the Boston Athenæum is itself the result of one such subscription. Over its history, this institution has continued to prosper thanks to the generosity of its proprietors, members, and staff who have worked together to achieve what, in retrospect, may seem audacious goals. The unique concept of the subscription, in all its fascinating forms, has empowered these individuals to collectively affect a desired outcome that is the result of a commitment of private funds undergirded by a shared emotional belief in the proposed cause. As a result, groups of individuals have acquired works of art and publications on behalf of the Athenæum, significantly advanced its building campaigns, and supported the institution’s operations, all for a common good.

With this subscription concept central to its own remarkable genesis narrative, the Boston Athenæum is uniquely situated to explore this compelling topic through an upcoming exhibition that draws upon the institution’s varied collections, acquired through collective means, from paintings, sculpture, prints, and photographs to architectural drawings, broadsides, and serials. The Athenæum’s archive, rich in primary-level documentation, buttresses this nuanced interdisciplinary investigation that analyzes the process of acquisition through group patronage rather than the genius of the artist, or the act of creation.

Public Hours
Tue 12pm - 8pm
Wed - Sat 10am - 4pm

Member Hours
Mon - Thu 9am - 8pm
Fri & Sat 9am - 5pm

Adults (ages 13 and up) $10
Students & Military $8
Children (ages 12 & under) Free
Boston Athenæum Members Free

Boston Atheneum
0½ Beacon Street
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
April 12 -
December 30, 2018
Murder He Wrote
Edward Gorey and the Art of the Mystery

The Edward Gorey House 2018 exhibit investigates Edward Gorey's life-long fascination for the murder mystery genre. Crime writers — specifically Agatha Christie — but also including Dorothy Sayers, Georgette Heyer, Josephine Tey, Michael Innes, Margery Allingham, Edmund Crispin, and Cecil Street among others, were the passion of a man who some might have considered to be somewhat passionless. As his father, Edward Leo Gorey, was at times a crime reporter for various Chicago papers we might actually say that crime writing literally ran through Gorey's blood.

Maybe as much as he loved cats, or ballet, or rocks, or elephants, or India ink, Edward Gorey loved a good mystery and it proved to be a very formative genre for him. As an illustrator/author, so many of Gorey's visual devices and narrative styles are drawn directly from the murder mystery handbook: distinctly British, vaguely interwar, genteel, understated, and savage (in a genteel, understated way). However, unlike Christie and the whole murderous brood of English crime writers, Gorey is also very funny.

Murder He Wrote reveals Gorey's strange world of suspicious characters, red herrings, and inconclusive revelations. It is a crosshatched black and white world of both rigid social class and brutal anarchy where nothing much happens — until it does. It is, in fact, a world very much like its author: brimming with false clues and mystery.

The artwork in this exhibit features The Awdrey-Gore Legacy (1971) which is, among other things, a dissection of the components of a murder mystery as well as an homage to the genre. Gorey dedicated this book to Agatha Christie who died in 1976. It is not known whether she ever saw, or what she would have made of, The Awdrey-Gore Legacy or additional titles in the exhibit including The Other Statue (1968), The Deadly Blotter (1997) and The Helpless Doorknob (1989) among other works — some pieces never before publicly exhibited. Unknown is the whereabouts of a mysterious letter Agatha Christie sent to Edward possibly in response to a letter he sent her.

The contract, long established between mystery writers and their readers, is this: that disarray will be reassembled, like a puzzle, into a whole again. However, because this exhibit features the work of Gorey as a murder mystery writer, you can be pretty certain that this contract will be broken. Actually, you can count on it. The mystery of the Mystery is that it is a mystery — when drawn by Gorey. While reveling in this stuffy world of righted wrongs, Gorey is also a very contemporary human, leaving us with false clues and broken promises. Gorey constantly tears up the contract between himself and the reader, but in return the rewards can be satisfying and the bond strong. Gorey is always at his most engaging when he lets his reader fill in the blanks and draw conclusions. You his dear Reader are now in cahoots with the Writer and an active part of the landscape that hes drawn you into a strangely beautiful, odd, whimsical yet dangerous place.

In other words, welcome to the modern world.

HOURS:
April 12 to July 1:
Thu/Fri/Sat 11am - 4pm
Sun 12pm - 4pm

July 4 to Oct 7:
Wed/Thu/Fri/Sat 11am - 4pm
Sun 12pm - 4pm

Oct 12 to Dec 30:
Fri/Sat 11am - 4pm
Sun 12pm - 4pm

Edward Gorey House
8 Strawberry Lane
Yarmouth Port, MA
Exhibit New England
April 13 -
August 12, 2018
Constructing Revolution: Soviet Propaganda Posters from Between the World Wars
The 1917 Russian Revolution ushered in a relatively short-lived era of experimentation and idealism in the visual arts. Including some of the most iconic images in the history of graphic design, Constructing Revolution will present more than fifty Soviet propaganda posters, among them works by major figures of the early twentieth-century avant-garde such as Vladimir Mayakovsky and Alexander Rodchenko. These posters, offering a glimpse into a period of political upheaval and cultural ferment, were part of a campaign to provide a new visual language that would convert Communist aspirations into readily accessible, urgent, public art.

Mon, Tue, Thu, Sat 10am – 6pm
Wed closed
Fri 10am – 9pm (free 6pm – 9pm)
Sun noon – 6pm

CLOSED: Memorial Day & Independence Day

Members: FREE
Adults: $12
Seniors, students (with ID) & children (6–18): $8
Children under 6: FREE
Students, faculty, & staff of the State University System of Florida: FREE

The Wolfsonian–FIU
1001 Washington Avenue (corner of 10th St & Washington Ave)
Miami Beach, FL
Exhibit South
April 14 -
October 07, 2018
Paddington™ Comes to America
This coming April, The Carle is proud to be the first American museum to feature the beloved bear in Paddington™ Comes to America. From 32 Windsor Gardens in London, Paddington brings with him stories of humor, compassion, and marmalade. The exhibition commemorates the 60th anniversary of the first book by Michael Bond, A Bear Called Paddington. Fifteen novels, numerous publishing formats, two television series and two successful movies have ensured the loveable bear from Darkest Peru remains as popular as ever. Original art by Paddington’s various illustrators—Peggy Fortnum, Fred Banbery, Ivor Wood, David McKee, Barry Macey, and R.W. Alley—provides comparisons of the iconic bear over time. Guests can “travel” to Paddington’s favorite sites in London posted around the gallery, stamping special London bus passes at each location.

Tue – Fri 10am – 4pm
Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm
Mon CLOSED

The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
April 17 -
August 19, 2018
In Focus: Illuminated Manuscript
Books of hours—custom-made for private devotion in the Christian faith—were a bestseller in medieval Europe. These manuscripts incorporated prayers, hymns, biblical stories, and monthly calendars featuring religious feast days, which were often supplemented by images painted in exquisite detail. Today, books of hours are a testament to the visually rich material culture of the Middle Ages. UMMA was recently gifted a bejeweled double-sided calendar leaf for January. Executed on parchment, the page highlights the material opulence and artistry involved in manuscript illumination. Accompanying the calendar are painted images or miniatures of the labor and characteristic activity of the month, and Aquarius, the zodiac sign for January, embodied by a man collecting water from a stream. The folio’s luminous, gilded surface, accentuated by the use of bright colors, was meant to transport the medieval viewer into a state of spiritual transcendence.

Tue - Sat 11am – 5pm
Sun 12 – 5pm
Closed Mondays

The Connector
The University of Michigan Museum of Art
University of Michigan Museum of Art
525 S. State Street
Ann Arbor, MI
Exhibit Midwest
April 20 -
June 30, 2018
FREUD ON THE COUCH: PSYCHE IN THE BOOK
The science of psychoanalysis has always held a great fascination for artists – both as a medium for reflection and as an instrument for creating meaning. Indeed, Freud’s “cultural work” (per Thomas Mann) remains a popular subject for many contemporary artists. Similar to how images in dreams are visualizations of hidden thoughts, artistic creations probe the depths and meanings of our cultural self-perception, they portray the forces shaping not only the individual but also the collective unconscious. We are surrounded by the issues Freud named and analyzed, and we are also moved by them. The artwork in this exhibition is based directly or indirectly on these concepts and theories or are closely associated to specific themes.

Artists Include: Thorsten Baensch, Sarah Bryant, Ken Campbell, Crystal Cawley, Maureen Cummins, Anne Deguelle, Gerhild Ebel, Stefan Gunnesch, Karen Hanmer, Anna Helm, Susan Johanknecht, Kurt Johannessen, Janosch Kaden, Burgi Kühnemann, M. M. Lum, Jule Claudia Mahn, Patrizia Meinert, Simon & Christine Morris, Didier Mutel, Susanne Nickel, Yasutomo Ota, Waltraud Palme, Marian St. Laurent, Veronika Schäpers, Robbin Ami Silverberg, Herbert Stattler, Ines von Ketelhodt, Carola Willbrand & Mark Met, and Sam Winston.

Mon - Fri 11am - 6pm
Sat 10am - 5pm

Roundtable Discussion: Friday, April 27, 2018, 6:30 pm

This exhibition will be traveling to:

Minnesota Center for Book Arts, July 20, 2018 – September 30, 2018
San Francisco Center for the Book, October 20, 2018 – January 30, 2019

Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 20 -
June 30, 2018
BETHANY COLLINS: OCCASIONAL VERSE
Collins’ Featured Artist Project is centered around America: A Hymnal, an artist book made up of 100 versions of My Country ‘Tis of Thee from the 18th-20th c. Since its debut by the Rev. Samuel E. Smith on July 4, 1831, the lyrics of My Country ’Tis of Thee were re-titled and re-written at least one hundred times. Each re-writing in support of a passionately held cause—from temperance and suffrage to abolition and even the Confederacy—articulates a version of what it means to be American. In its many lyrical variations, America: A Hymnal is a chronological retelling of American history, politics and culture through one song. Additional works included in Collins’ Featured Artist Project are from her Contronym series, altered dictionaries and encyclopedias, each refusing in its own way a singularity of meaning.

Mon - Fri 11am - 6pm
Sat 10am - 5pm

Artist Talk and Reception: June 8, 2018, 6:30 pm

Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 21 -
December 31, 2018
"The Art of War: American Poster Art 1941-1945."

$20.00 joint admission ticket

FDR Presidential Library & Museum
4079 Albany Post Road
Hyde Park, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 21 -
September 09, 2018
NOT AN OSTRICH: AND OTHER IMAGES FROM AMERICA'S LIBRARY
Experience vivid portrayals of America across time

Not an Ostrich: And Other Images from America’s Library is the result of celebrated American photography curator Anne Wilkes Tucker’s excavation of nearly 500 images—out of a collection of over 14 million—permanently housed at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. While visitors to the exhibition might never see an ostrich, they will see the image entitled “Not an Ostrich” and a large selection of rare and handpicked works from the vaults of the world’s largest library, many never widely available to the public.

Free admission

Annenberg Space for Photography
2000 Avenue of the Stars
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
April 21 -
July 15, 2018
Before Audubon: Alexander Wilson's Birds of the United States
In 1808, Scottish-born poet and amateur naturalist Alexander Wilson (1766–1813) began publishing American Ornithology; or The Natural History of the Birds of the United States. Wilson’s impressive achievement inspired John James Audubon to publish his much better-known Birds of America (1827–38). Though Wilson had no background as an artist, he taught himself drawing and illustrated his nine volumes of careful observations of the birds of the northeastern U.S. with 76 hand-colored engraved and etched plates of 314 species—26 of which he was the first to describe.

Fourth in the Toledo Museum of Art’s biennial exhibitions focused on bird-themed art, the exhibition coincides with local birding festival the Biggest Week in American Birding, which brings tens of thousands of birders to the area to observe the spring migration of songbirds. It will be the first time that the Toledo Museum of Art’s first edition of Wilson’s pioneering multi-volume publication has been exhibited.

Tue - Sun 10am - 4pm
Mon Closed

Free admission

Gallery 18
Toledo Museum of Art
2445 Monroe Street
Toledo, OH
Exhibit Midwest
April 27 -
August 28, 2018
James Cook: The Voyages
Explore original maps, artworks and journals from the voyages

To mark 250 years since Captain James Cook’s ship Endeavour set sail from Plymouth, this major exhibition will tell the story of Cook’s three great voyages through original documents, many of which were produced by the artists, scientists and seamen on board the ship. From Cook’s journal detailing the first crossing of the Antarctic Circle to handwritten log books, stunning artwork and intricate maps, chart the voyages, which spanned more than a decade, and explore the experiences of people on the ship and in the places visited.

Drawings by the Polynesian high priest and navigator Tupaia, who joined the first voyage at Tahiti and accompanied Cook to New Zealand and Australia, will be going on public display for the first time together, alongside works by expedition artists Sydney Parkinson, John Webber and William Hodges. Tupaia’s paintings include a series of depictions of Tahitian society and culture, as well as drawings from New Zealand and Australia.

Our collection of original maps, artworks and journals from the voyages, alongside rare printed books and newly commissioned videos, seek to shed new light on the encounters that completed the outline of the known world and formed the starting point for two centuries of globalisation.

Mon - Thu 09.30 - 20.00
Fri 09.30 - 18.00
Sat 09.30 - 17.00
Sun & English Public Holidays 11.00 - 17.00

PACCAR Gallery
The British Library
96 Euston Road
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
April 28 -
July 30, 2018
Radiant Beauty
A rare set of exquisite lithographs depicting the pastel drawings of planets, comets, eclipses, and other celestial wonders by artist/astronomer Étienne Léopold Trouvelot (1827-1895) are highlighted in the focused exhibition “Radiant Beauty: E. L. Trouvelot’s Astronomical Drawings.” The set of 15 chromolithographs, published in two portfolios as The Trouvelot Astronomical Drawings in 1882, was the crowning achievement of an extraordinarily talented artist and scientist who produced more than 7,000 astronomical illustrations and some 50 scientific articles during his lifetime. Initially, the Astronomical Drawings portfolios were sold to astronomy libraries and observatories as reference tools, but as early 20th-century advances in photographic technology allowed for more accurate and detailed depictions of the stars, planets, and phenomena, Trouvelot’s prints were discarded or sold to collectors. The Huntington’s set was acquired by collector Jay T. Last as part of his collection of graphic arts and social history, and then donated to The Huntington.

Mon, Wed - Sun 10am - 5pm
Tuesday Closed*

Last entry time: 4pm

Library, West Hall
The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens
151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
May 03 -
August 12, 2018
Text and Textile
Even as the Fates spin the thread of our lives, text and textile enshroud the body in the fabric of myth, the costume of the domestic or the exotic, the imperatives of the industrious or the industrial. This exhibition draws on Yale University’s extraordinary collections to explore the intersections of text and textile in literature and politics, from Eve spinning in a thirteenth-century manuscript to the mill girls of New England in the nineteenth century. Particular highlights include: Gertrude Stein’s waistcoat; manuscript patterns and loom cards from French Jacquard mills; the first folio edition of William Shakespeare’s plays; the “Souper” paper dress by Andy Warhol; American samplers; Renaissance embroidered bindings; Christa Wolf’s “Quilt Memories”; Zelda Fitzgerald’s paper dolls for her daughter; Edith Wharton’s manuscript drafts of “The House of Mirth”; an Incan quipu; poetry by Langston Hughes, Emily Dickinson, Susan Howe, and Walt Whitman; and the Kelmscott Chaucer by William Morris.

Mon 10am - 7pm
Tue - Thu 9am - 7pm
Fri 9am - 5pm
Sat (Exhibitions only) 12pm - 5pm
Sun (Exhibitions only) 12pm - 4pm

Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library
121 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
May 04 -
August 22, 2018
Biting Wit and Brazen Folly: British Satirical Prints, 1780s–1830s
A riot of color and a roar of laughter

Printed satirical caricatures were inescapable in London during the 1700s and 1800s. Often lighthearted and cheeky upon first glance, the images could also be mulled over and picked apart at leisure. A bawdy scene or grotesque facial expression instantly amused, while closer study revealed deeper literary or political references. Whether a fashionable dandy or a poor chimney sweep, no one escaped the scrutiny of caricaturists.

This exhibition reveals the widespread appeal of caricature in Georgian England and demonstrates the ways in which such images teased and provoked audiences. Featuring over sixty brightly colored etchings from the Museum’s large collection of British satirical prints, it presents images of the everyday with a riot of color and a roar of laughter.

Tue – Sun 10am – 5pm
Wed & Fri open until 8:45pm
Closed Monday except some holidays*

Korman Galleries 121–123, first floor
Philadelphia Museum of Art
2600 Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 05 -
August 27, 2018
In Search of Mary Shelley: The Girl who wrote Frankenstein
2018 marks the bicentenary of Frankenstein, the literary masterpiece that today is world famous as source of two of our most enduring archetypes, the obsessive scientist and the almost-human he creates. Lesser known, perhaps, is the story of the teenager who wrote it. Daughter of philosopher William Godwin and feminist Mary Wollstonecraft, and wife of Romantic Poet Percy Bysshe Shelley, Mary Shelley grew up in a world of political passion and scientific curiosity and within a household at the very centre of the era's radical new thought. This exhibition, curated by award winning poet and writer Fiona Sampson to coincide with her new biography In Search of Mary Shelley, will explore the circumstances that shaped Shelley as a child and a young woman - the making of the girl who wrote Frankenstein.

Dove Cottage
Wordsworth Museum
Grasmere
Cumbria
Exhibit International
May 07 -
July 31, 2018
Henry Evans, the Porpoise Bookshop, and the Peregrine Press (1948-1964)
A retrospective look at the unique and delightful work of one of California’s pioneering small press printers and booksellers, Henry Evans. Together with his wife Patricia and daughter Judith, Evans produced some of the most endearing letterpress publications of the 1950s, and his work was singularly influential on California’s small press movement of the 1960s and 70s.

Mon – Fri 10am - 5pm

The Book Club of California
312 Sutter Street, Suite 500
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
May 11, 2018 -
March 10, 2019
Black Out: Silhouettes Then and Now
Silhouettes—cut paper profiles—were a hugely popular and democratic form of portraiture in the 19th century, offering virtually instantaneous likenesses of everyone from presidents to those who were enslaved. The exhibition “Black Out: Silhouettes Then and Now” explores this relatively unstudied art form by examining its rich historical roots and considering its forceful contemporary presence. The show features works from the Portrait Gallery’s extensive collection of silhouettes, such as those by Auguste Edouart, who captured the likenesses of such notable figures as John Quincy Adams and Lydia Maria Child, and at the same time, the exhibition reveals how contemporary artists are reimagining silhouettes in bold and unforgettable ways.

Highlights of the historical objects include a double-silhouette portrait of a same-sex couple and a rarely seen life-size silhouette of a nineteen-year-old enslaved girl, along with the bill of her sale from 1796. The featured contemporary artists are Kara Walker, who makes panoramic silhouettes of plantation life and African American history; Canadian artist Kristi Malakoff, who cuts paper to make life-size sculptures depicting a children’s Maypole dance; MacArthur-prize-winner Camille Utterback, who will present an interactive digital work that reacts to visitors’ shadows and movements; and Kumi Yamashita, who “sculpts” light and shadow with objects to create mixed-media profiles of people who are not there. With both historical and contemporary explorations into the silhouette, Black Out reveals new pathways between our past and present, particularly with regard to how we can reassess notions of race, power, individualism, and even, our digital selves.

Daily 11:30am - 7pm

Free admission

National Portrait Gallery
8th and F Streets NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 17 -
September 30, 2018
Print, Protest, and The Polls: The Irish women’s suffrage campaign and the power of print media, 1908 – 1918
In 2018, the centenary of the first granting of votes for women in Ireland, we are delighted to announce the details of our upcoming new exhibition – “Print, Protest, and The Polls: The Irish women’s suffrage campaign and the power of print media, 1908 – 1918”.

This exhibition will commemorate the centenary of the first female vote in Ireland through exploration of the use of print media by the Irish suffragists, and their opponents, in their methods of promotion and protest. The exhibition aims to shine a light on a neglected period in Irish women’s history, while simultaneously exploring the powerful relationship between the contemporary political protest and the developing print media. Exhibition content will include print ephemera, photographs, and newspaper publications which illustrate the influence and effect of protest through print in a period of early media. It will demonstrate the role which the process of print played in the Irish fight for women’s rights to vote, and will feature print ephemera which has never before been exhibited publicly. The exhibition will be curated by Donna Gilligan, a material culture historian who specialises in the research of the objects and images of the Irish suffrage campaign.

Former President Mary Robinson will officially open the exhibition on the evening of Wednesday 16 May 2018 (invite only event).

Mon – Fri 9.00 – 17.00
Sat – Sun 14.00 – 17.00
Closed bank holiday weekends

Free admission

National Print Museum
Beggars Bush Barracks
Haddington Road
Dublin, IRELAND
Exhibit International
May 18 -
September 23, 2018
Wayne Thiebaud, Draftsman
Best known for his luscious paintings of pies and ice-cream cones, California artist Wayne Thiebaud (born 1920) has been an avid and prolific draftsman since he began his career as an illustrator and cartoonist. Featuring subjects that range from deli counters and isolated figures to dramatic views of San Francisco’s plunging streets, Thiebaud’s drawings invariably endow the most banal, everyday scenes with a sense of poetry and nostalgia. The show is the first to explore the full range of the artist's works on paper, from quick sketches to pastels, watercolors, and charcoal drawings.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 19 -
August 12, 2018
Analog Culture: Printer’s Proofs from the Schneider/Erdman Photography Lab, 1981–2001
This exhibition takes an unprecedented look at the productive and dynamic collaboration between photographer and printer, through the lens of the Harvard Art Museums’ Schneider/Erdman Printer’s Proof Collection, a remarkable group of nearly 450 photographs printed over three decades by Gary Schneider of the Manhattan-based studio Schneider/Erdman, Inc. The collection includes works by Richard Avedon, James Casebere, Robert Gober, Nan Goldin, Peter Hujar, Gilles Peress, and David Wojnarowicz, among many other artists, photojournalists, and fashion photographers who made up New York’s cultural milieu in the 1980s and ’90s. As Schneider and Erdman began to build a collection of photographs, through their practice of retaining a print from each artist with whom they collaborated, they came to realize the educational value of this unique body of work. Comprising approximately 90 printer’s proofs as well as related archival material and artist’s tools, the exhibition highlights the collection’s teaching potential by looking closely at the techniques and methods of darkroom photography. It ties the material history of darkroom photography to the historical narratives that Schneider and Erdman experienced, such as the transformation of New York’s urban landscape, the AIDS crisis and its repercussions in American culture, and September 11, 2001.

The Schneider/Erdman Printer’s Proof Collection was acquired by the Harvard Art Museums in two parts, in 2011 and 2016, as a combined gift and purchase through the support of the Margaret Fisher Fund. In addition, Schneider and Erdman gifted a collection of archival material, including photographs, test prints, glass plate negatives, vintage material, and studio records, in 2017. Altogether, these acquisitions have reinforced the museums’ place as a primary site for the study, research, exhibition, and interpretation of contemporary photography.

A publication accompanying the exhibition looks in-depth at the photography lab’s technical, material, and interpersonal intricacies. Part oral history, the book unites original essays with excerpts of interviews and conversations with Schneider as well as with Deborah Bell, James Casebere, Robert Gober, John Schabel, and Lorna Simpson. In addition, through two personal reflections, Schneider recalls what it was like to print works for Peter Hujar and David Wojnarowicz. Including an engaging glossary specific to the practice of Schneider/Erdman, Inc., this volume will capture the attention of students, scholars, and general analog enthusiasts. A complementary online Special Collection, featuring case studies by Harvard graduate students, will function as the primary digital repository for the printer’s proof collection and its related materials.

University Research Gallery
University Study Gallery
University Teaching Gallery
Harvard Art Museums
32 Quincy Street
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
May 24 -
November 11, 2018
Charles Dickens: Man of Science
In 1839, the writer and physiologist George Henry Lewes visited Charles Dickens at Doughty Street and examined his bookshelves. He left accusing Dickens of being ‘completely outside philosophy, science, and the higher literature’. For over 150 years, it was thought that Charles Dickens was either not interested in science, or was downright hostile to it. But Dickens's science was not the science of books or learned institutions; for Dickens, science mattered when it transformed lives by curing disease or cleaning streets, or opening up new vistas of wonder in a humdrum world.

Charles Dickens: Man of Science aims to reveal Dickens not only as a scientific enthusiast, but as the key communicator of science in the Victorian age. Displaying his writings alongside artefacts, instruments, and texts of the developing sciences, we share the story of Dickens’s friendships and scientific passions. Journeying through some of Dickens's favourite sciences - geology, thermodynamics, chemistry, and medicine - we reveal that what made him a great writer was precisely what made him a man of science.

10am - 5pm

Charles Dickens Museum
48-49 Doughty Street
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
May 25, 2018 -
September 30, 2020
ENDURING IDEALS: ROCKWELL, ROOSEVELT, & THE FOUR FREEDOMS
The first comprehensive traveling exhibition devoted to Norman Rockwell's iconic depictions of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Four Freedoms: Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Worship, Freedom of Want, and Freedom of Fear.

Rockwell, Roosevelt, & the Four Freedoms explores the indelible odyssey of humanity’s greatest ideals.

The notion of the Four Freedoms has inspired dozens of national constitutions across the globe, yet Franklin D. Roosevelt’s declaration that the United States was willing to fight for Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Worship, Freedom from Want, and Freedom from Fear—now considered a sublime moment in rhetorical history—did not turn out to be the immediate triumph envisioned by the President. As the nation found itself sliding ever closer to direct involvement in World War II, the underlying meaning of his words captured surprisingly little attention among Americans. Following his January 6, 1941, Annual Message to Congress, government surveys showed that only half of Americans were aware of FDR’s Four Freedoms and that less than a quarter could identify them correctly. Moreover, many had no clear idea why the United States was being called upon to enter the war.

It would take the continuous efforts of the White House, the Office of War Information, and scores of patriotic artists to give the Four Freedoms new life. Most prominent among those was Norman Rockwell, whose images became a national sensation in early 1943 when they were first published in The Saturday Evening Post. Roosevelt’s words and Rockwell’s artworks soon became inseparable in the public consciousness, with millions of reproductions publicizing the Second War Loan Drive bringing the Four Freedoms directly into American homes and workplaces. When Eleanor Roosevelt convinced United Nations delegates to include these ideals in its postwar statement of human rights, FDR’s words—now forever entwined with Rockwell’s images—achieved immortality.

Born amid the turmoil of World War II, the Four Freedoms have since become one of its greatest legacies, a testament to the paramount importance of human rights and dignity. Brought forward by one of America’s greatest presidents and immortalized by one of its most beloved artists more than seventy-five years ago, the Four Freedoms continue to inspire, resonating across generations as strongly today as they did in their time.

CO-PRESENTING MAY 25, 2018 - SEPTEMBER 2, 2018:
ROOSEVELT HOUSE (REIMAGINING THE FOUR FREEDOMS)

OCTOBER 13, 2018 - JANUARY 13, 2019:
THE HENRY FORD MUSEUM
20900 Oakwood Blvd.
DEARBORN, MI


FEBRUARY 9, 2019 - MAY 6, 2019:
THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MUSEUM AND THE TEXTILE MUSEUM
701 21st Street, NW
WASHINGTON, DC


JUNE 4, 2019 - OCTOBER 27, 2019:
Le Mémorial de Caen
Esplanade Général Eisenhower
CS 55026
14050 Caen Cedex 4
CAEN, FRANCE


DECEMBER 15, 2019 - MARCH 22, 2020:
MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, HOUSTON
1001 Bissonnet
HOUSTON, TEXAS


FALL 2020:
NORMAN ROCKWELL MUSEUM
9 Glendale Rd / Rte 183
STOCKBRIDGE, MA


The New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West
at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 01 -
October 28, 2018
Tolkien: Maker of Middle-earth
This exhibition will explore the full breadth of Tolkien’s unique literary imagination from his creation of Middle-earth, the imagined world where The Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit and his other works are set, to his life and work as an artist, poet, medievalist and scholar of languages.

For the first time since the 1950s, an unprecedented array of Tolkien materials from the UK and the USA will be reunited in Oxford and displayed together in this seminal exhibition. Tolkien: Maker of Middle-earth will feature manuscripts, artwork, maps, letters and artefacts from the Bodleian’s foremost Tolkien Archive, the Tolkien Collection at Marquette University in the USA and from private collections. The exhibition will delight both Tolkien fans as well as scholars, families and visitors of all ages.

Mon - Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 11am - 5pm

Weston Library
Broad Street
Oxford, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
June 01 -
September 16, 2018
The Magic of Handwriting: The Pedro Corrêa do Lago Collection
Handwriting works magic: it transports us back to defining moments in history, creativity, and everyday life and connects us intimately with the people who marked the page. For nearly half a century, Brazilian author and publisher Pedro Corrêa do Lago has been assembling one of the most comprehensive autograph collections of our age, acquiring thousands of handwritten letters, manuscripts, and musical compositions as well as inscribed photographs, drawings, and documents. This exhibition—the first to be drawn from his extraordinary collection—features some 140 items, including letters by Lucrezia Borgia, Vincent Van Gogh, and Emily Dickinson, annotated sketches by Michelangelo, Jean Cocteau, and Charlie Chaplin, and manuscripts by Giacomo Puccini, Jorge Luis Borges, and Marcel Proust.

Rather than focusing on a single figure, era, or subject, Corrêa do Lago made the ambitious decision to seek significant examples in six broad areas of human endeavor—art, history, literature, science, music, and entertainment—spanning nearly nine hundred years. From an 1153 document signed by four medieval popes to a 2006 thumbprint signature of physicist Stephen Hawking, the items on view convey the power of handwriting to connect us with writers, artists, composers, political figures, performers, explorers, scientists, philosophers, rebels, and others whose actions and creations have made them legends.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 02 -
December 30, 2018
DAVID LEVINTHAL: WAR, MYTH, DESIRE
David Levinthal: War, Myth, Desire is the first museum retrospective of the artist’s work in more than twenty years. The exhibition will include nearly 200 prints, along with related books and ephemera, giving visitors a unique opportunity to consider Levinthal’s most recent work alongside key works from the full scope of his career.

Since the mid-1970s, David Levinthal has been exploring the relationship between photographic imagery and the fantasies, myths, events, and characters that shape contemporary America’s mental landscape. The exhibition will include photographs from all of his major series to date—the best-known of which include Hitler Moves East (1972–75), Modern Romance (1983–85), The Wild West (1986–89), Desire (1991–92), Blackface (1995–98), Barbie (1997–98), Baseball (1998–2004), and History (2010–15)—in addition to never-before-exhibited outtakes, commissions, and archival materials.

Tue – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 11am – 5pm

Adults $15
Seniors (65+) $13
Students (with ID) $5
Ages 5-17 $5
Ages 4 & under Free
Members Free

Main Galleries
Eastman Museum
900 East Avenue
Rochester, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 03 -
September 16, 2018
The Chiaroscuro Woodcut in Renaissance Italy
Displaying exquisite designs, technical virtuosity, and sumptuous color, chiaroscuro woodcuts are among the most striking prints of the Renaissance. First introduced in Italy around 1516, the chiaroscuro woodcut, which involves printing an image from two or more woodblocks inked in different hues, was one of the most successful early forays into color printing in Europe. Taking its name from the Italian for “light” (chiaro) and “shade” (scuro), the technique creates the illusion of depth through tonal contrasts.

Over the course of the century, the chiaroscuro woodcut underwent sophisticated technical advancements in the hands of talented printmakers such as Ugo da Carpi, Antonio da Trento, Niccolò Vicentino, Nicolò Boldrini, and Andrea Andreani, and engaged some of the most celebrated painters of the time, including Titian, Raphael, and Parmigianino. The medium evolved in format, scale, and subject, testifying to the vital interest of artists and collectors in the range of aesthetic possibilities it offered.

For this first major presentation of the subject in the United States, some 100 rare chiaroscuro woodcuts will be brought together alongside related drawings, engravings, and sculpture. With its accompanying scholarly catalogue, The Chiaroscuro Woodcut in Renaissance Italy explores the materials and means of its production, offering a fresh perspective on the remarkable art of the chiaroscuro woodcut.

Mon, Tue, & Thu 11am – 5pm
Fri 11am – 8pm
Sat & Sun 10am – 7pm

Resnick Pavilion
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
5905 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
June 07 -
September 02, 2018
WINNIE-THE-POOH: EXPLORING A CLASSIC
The stories of Winnie-the-Pooh—a much-loved bear with a weakness for honey—have delighted both children and adults for more than ninety years. Generations of readers have been captivated by the adventures of Christopher Robin and his bear, and today Pooh remains one of the most popular children’s characters of all time.

Pooh and his companions Piglet, Eeyore, Rabbit, Tigger, Kanga, and Roo were created by the writer A. A. Milne and illustrator E. H. Shepard. Their partnership combined Milne’s humorous wordplay with Shepard’s expressive drawings to create an extremely successful style of storytelling. Since Pooh first bumped down the stairs in 1926, millions of copies of Milne’s books have sold, and the residents of the Hundred Acre Wood have found a home in the collective imagination of readers worldwide.

This exhibition, organized by the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, explores the history and legacy of Pooh through original sketches, photographs, memorabilia, and letters. The exhibition also includes interactive elements that bring Shepard’s illustrations to life.

Winnie-the-Pooh Musical at the Alliance
Concurrently with the exhibition, the Alliance Theatre at The Woodruff Arts Center will present “Winnie-the-Pooh” (June 7–July 8, 2018), a musical based on Milne’s beloved stories. This collaboration is the High and the Alliance’s fourth in a series of exhibition and theatre productions based on the work of children’s book authors and artists.

Tue - Thu, & Sat 10am – 5pm
Fri 10am – 9pm
Sunday 12 noon – 5pm
Monday Closed

Members free
Age 6 & above $14.50
Age 5 & under free

High Museum of Art
1280 Peachtree St NE
Atlanta, GA
Exhibit South
June 08 -
September 23, 2018
Medieval Monsters: Terrors, Aliens, Wonders
Monsters captivated the imagination of medieval men and women, just as they continue to fascinate us today. Drawing on the Morgan's superb collection of illuminated manuscripts, this major exhibition, the first of its kind in North America, will explore the complex social role of monsters in the Middle Ages. Medieval Monsters will lead visitors through three sections based on the ways monsters functioned in medieval societies. "Terrors" explores how monsters enhanced the aura of those in power, be they rulers, knights, or saints. A second section on "Aliens" demonstrates how marginalized groups in European societies—such as Jews, Muslims, women, the poor, and the disabled—were further alienated by being figured as monstrous. The final section, "Wonders", considers a group of strange beauties and frightful anomalies that populated the medieval world. Whether employed in ornamental, entertaining, or contemplative settings, these fantastic beings were meant to inspire a sense of marvel and awe in their viewers.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

$20 Adults
$13 Seniors (65 & over)
$13 Students (with current ID)
Free to members & children 12 & under (must be accompanied by an adult)

Admission is free on Fridays from 7pm - 9pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 12 -
October 07, 2018
Ed Ruscha: Course of Empire
See Ed Ruscha's modern take on the cyclical nature of civilisation, evocative of Thomas Cole's series of the same name

Ed Ruscha (1937–) has shaped the way we see the American landscape over the span of his influential six-decade career. Elegant, highly distilled, and often humorous, Ruscha’s work conveys a unique brand of visual American zen.

In 2005, Ruscha was asked to represent the United States at the 51st Venice Biennale. Dealing with the theme of "progress, or the course of progress," Ruscha's Biennale installation evoked Thomas Cole's famous painting cycle of 1833–36, 'The Course of Empire', concurrently on display in the Ground Floor Galleries.

Unlike Cole’s grandiose vision of the rise and fall of a classical civilisation, Ruscha’s ‘Course of Empire’ focuses on the industrial buildings of Los Angeles – simple, box-like, utilitarian structures with no pretension to beauty but redolent of economic might and global reach.

Free admission

Room 1
The National Gallery
Trafalgar Square
London, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
June 14 -
September 09, 2018
DOUBLE EXPOSURE: EDWARD S. CURTIS, MARIANNE NICOLSON, TRACY RECTOR, WILL WILSON
150 years after Edward S. Curtis' birth, his haunting portraits of Native Americans have an indelible place in the American consciousness. This major exhibition of more than 180 works by Curtis, as well as contemporary works by indigenous artists Marianne Nicolson, Tracy Rector, and Will Wilson seeks to evaluate this photographic legacy from 21st-century perspectives.

Mon & Tues CLOSED
Wed, Fri, Sat & Sun 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 9pm

Adults $19.95​​
Seniors (65+) $17.95
Military (with ID) $17.95
Students​ (with ID) $12.95
Teens (13–19) $12.95
Children 12 & Under FREE
SAM Members FREE

Simonyi Special Exhibition Galleries
Seattle Art Museum
1300 First Avenue
Seattle, WA
Exhibit West
June 15, 2018 -
June 02, 2019
Daguerreotypes: Five Decades of Collecting
The 2018 installation of the Daguerreian Gallery celebrates the National Portrait Gallery’s golden anniversary by highlighting fifty years of daguerreotype collecting by the museum. Included will be portraits of such iconic figures as activist and reformer Dorothea Dix, entrepreneur and showman P. T. Barnum with Tom Thumb, Seneca Chief Governor Blacksnake, U.S. Navy Commodore Matthew C. Perry, and artist Alfred Waud.

Daily 11:30am - 7pm

Free admission

National Portrait Gallery
8th and F Streets NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 15 -
October 21, 2018
Formation: A Juried Exhibition of the Guild of Book Workers
Formation includes 50 works by members of the Guild of Book Workers. These works span the genre of “book arts”, including artist books, fine bindings, and broadsides. The exhibition is juried by three outstanding artists and Guild members – Sarah Smith, Coleen Curry, and Graham Patten. The exhibition will travel to five locations around the country, beginning at the Minnesota Center for Book Arts and closing at the University of the Arts in Philadelphia, PA. The annual Guild of Book Workers Standards of Excellence conference will coincide with the show being at MCBA, hopefully providing opportunity for added conversation and exposure of the world of book production to a larger community of people.

OPENING RECEPTION
Fri, June 22nd 6pm - 8pm

Mon – Sat 9:30am - 6:30pm
Tue 9:30am - 9pm
Sun noon - 4pm

Free admission, open to the public

Main Gallery
Minnesota Center for Book Arts
(first floor of the Open Book building)
1011 Washington Avenue S., Suite 100
Minneapolis, MN
Exhibit Midwest
June 15 -
September 16, 2018
Summer of Magic: Treasures from the David Copperfield Collection
Summer of Magic: Treasures from the David Copperfield Collection features highlights from the International Museum and Library of the Conjuring Arts, the incomparable trove of magical historical artifacts from the Emmy Award-winning illusionist David Copperfield. Evoking the New York magic shops that sparked Copperfield’s imagination, displays explore the careers and achievements of legendary magicians from the Golden Age of Magic (1800s–1930s) and showcase iconic objects used by Harry Houdini in his famous escape stunts, culminating with the Death Saw—one of Copperfield’s groundbreaking illusions. Curated by Cristian Petru Panaite, assistant curator of exhibitions.

Iconic objects on view include the Metamorphosis Trunk, used by Harry and Bess Houdini, that allowed the couple to magically trade places; handcuffs from the 1904 London Daily Mirror challenge, from which Houdini struggled to escape for more than 70 minutes; and Houdini’s Milk Can, an act that premiered in 1908 in which he attempted to escape from this colossal, locked can filled to the brim with water. Also on display are a dress believed to be worn by Adelaide Herrmann (1853–1932), the “Queen of Magic,” who started out as her husband’s assistant and carried on the show after his death, performing her dangerous death-defying bullet catch act; Harry Kellar’s Nested Boxes, an illusion performed for President Roosevelt’s family; and an Inexhaustible Barrel from Dante the Magician’s Broadway show Sim Sala Bim.

A recreation of a magic shop evokes the legendary New York City stores like Macy’s Magic Counter and Tannen’s Magic Shop that inspired and nurtured many magicians. On display are A. C. Gilbert Mysto Magic sets and props from Tannen’s grand catalog—decks of cards, linking rings, a disappearing bird cage, and wands.

Tue - Thu, & Sat 10am - 6pm
Fri 10am - 8pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

New-York Historical Society Museum & Library
170 Central Park West (at Richard Gilder Way / 77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 15, 2018 -
June 02, 2019
Daguerreotypes: Five Decades of Collecting
The 2018 installation of the Daguerreian Gallery celebrates the National Portrait Gallery’s golden anniversary by highlighting fifty years of daguerreotype collecting by the museum. Included will be portraits of such iconic figures as activist and reformer Dorothea Dix, entrepreneur and showman P. T. Barnum with Tom Thumb, Seneca Chief Governor Blacksnake, U.S. Navy Commodore Matthew C. Perry, and artist Alfred Waud.

11:30am - 7pm daily
Closed December 25th

Free admission

National Portrait Gallery
8th and F Streets NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 16 -
September 23, 2018
Form & Function: The Genius of the Book
Dive deep into one of the world’s greatest technologies—the book. Discover a history beyond what’s printed on the page, seen in the structure, craftsmanship, and beauty of this often-overlooked marvel. Curated by the Folger's head of conservation, Genius of the Book shows the Folger collection from a completely different perspective.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun noon – 5pm

Folger Shakespeare Library
201 East Capitol Street, SE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 16 -
September 09, 2018
ISABELLE DE BORCHGRAVE: FASHIONING ART FROM PAPER
Isabelle de Borchgrave: Fashioning Art from Paper features the life-size, trompe l’œil paper costumes of Belgian artist Isabelle de Borchgrave (born 1946). Following a visit to the Costume Institute at the Metropolitan Museum in 1994, de Borchgrave began working in the new medium, creating trompe l’œil paper works in what eventually would become four major paper fashion collections. The first, Papiers à la Mode (Paper in Fashion), takes a fresh look at three hundred years of fashion history from Elizabeth I to Coco Chanel. The World of Mariano Fortuny immerses museumgoers in the elegant world of twentieth-century Venice. Splendor of the Medici leads visitors through the streets of Florence, where they come across famous figures in their sumptuous ceremonial dress. And in Les Ballets Russes, de Borchgrave pays tribute to Sergei Diaghilev, Pablo Picasso, Léon Bakst, and Henri Matisse, who all designed for this extraordinary ballet company.

For this exhibition, all four collections will be presented together, for the first time, in a survey of de Borchgrave’s innovative work. Along with these pieces, a series of kaftans highlighting Silk Road textiles will be included, as well as a newly commissioned costume inspired by a painting by Peter Paul Rubens, Portrait of Charlotte-Marguerite de Montmorency, Princess of Condé, c. 1610. Both the original costume and the Rubens portrait will be included in the exhibition.

Tue - Sat 10am - 5pm
Thu 10am 9pm
Sun noon - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

The Oklahoma City Museum of Art
415 Couch Drive
Oklahoma City, OK
Exhibit Southwest
June 22 -
September 16, 2018
Clarence White and His World
This exhibition is the first in over forty years to survey the work of Clarence White (United States, 1871–1925), a founding member of the Photo-Secession, a gifted photographer known for his beautiful scenes of quiet domesticity and outdoor idylls, and a major teacher and mentor. It will survey White's career from its beginnings in 1895 in Newark, Ohio, to his death in Mexico in 1925.

Clarence White and His World will bring this essential American artist to the attention of new generations of art enthusiasts and reclaim his place in the American art canon. The exhibition will provide a fresh understanding of White's career, as shaped by the aesthetic, social, economic, technological, and political transformations of the Gilded Age and the Progressive Era. White's early work shares with the nascent Arts and Crafts Movement some of the most progressive values of the time, including the advocacy of hand production, closeness to nature, socialism, Japonisme, and the simple life. His move to New York in 1906 and involvement with the influential Photo-Secession group mark a fundamental shift in his production as it grew to encompass nudes made in collaboration with Alfred Stieglitz, commercial illustration for literary works, and deepening relevance to his teaching. Indeed, Clarence White the teacher has often overshadowed Clarence White the artist; this exhibition seeks to strike a new balance, demonstrating his radical techniques in both arenas. In addition to more than 100 prints, albums, and illustrated books by White himself, the exhibition will include paintings, prints, and drawings by artists who influenced or were influenced by pictorial photography, as well as photographs by White's closest friends, collaborators, and students, including Gertrude Käsebier, Alfred Stieglitz, and Alvin L. Colburn.

Sat - Wed 10am - 6pm
Thu & Fri 10am - 8pm
Mon & Tue Closed

$15 adults
$13 seniors
$10 students with valid i.d.

Everyone age 21 & under is free, through the generosity of Susie Konkel

Free on Friday evenings from 4pm - 8pm
Free for members

Portland Museum of Art
7 Congress Square
Portland, ME
Exhibit New England
June 22 -
October 28, 2018
Winslow Homer and the Camera: Photography and the Art of Painting
The first exhibition to look at the role of photography in Homer’s artistic practice.

Winslow Homer and the Camera brings together over 130 objects by the artist across all mediums, ranging from master paintings to oil studies, drawings, prints, and photographs created in the United States and during his travels to Europe and the Caribbean. This comprehensive survey was inspired by the BCMA’s 2013 acquisition of a camera once owned by Homer and presents new research drawn in part from the museum’s extensive collection of works by the artist.

Winslow Homer maintained a lifelong fascination and engagement with the medium of photography. The featured paintings, watercolors, drawings, prints and photographs reveal insights into Homer’s artistic process and add an important new dimension to an appreciation of this pioneering American painter.

The exhibition will present a full picture of the artist’s working methods and will include noteworthy archival objects, such as three wooden mannequins, his palette and watercolor brushes, his walking stick and fishing net, and two of the three cameras he owned in his lifetime. Homer acquired his first cameras during a two-year sojourn abroad in England, a trip he took in his mid-forties seeking a new direction in his art. Upon his return in 1882, scholars noted a demonstrable change in his style of painting and choice of subjects. Taking this shift and the artist’s penchant for experimentation across mediums as a point of departure, Winslow Homer and the Camera questions how new visual technology impacted the artist’s production and engagement with subjects and unveils how photography became increasingly a part of Homer’s visual investigation and broader creative practice.

Free & open to the public

Keynote lecture by Frank Goodyear and Dana Byrd at 4:00pm
Kresge Auditorium
Visual Arts Center

Followed by a reception at the Museum of Art

Halford Gallery, Center Gallery, John A. and Helen P. Becker Gallery, Focus Gallery, Bernard and Barbro Osher Gallery
Bowdoin College Museum of Art
9400 College Station
Brunswick, ME
Exhibit New England
June 23 -
October 28, 2018
Winslow Homer and the Camera: Photography and the Art of Painting
This exhibition explores the question of Homer’s relationship with the medium of photography and its impact on his artistic practice. As one attuned to appearances and how to represent them, Homer understood that photography, as a new technology of sight, had much to reveal. This exhibition thus adds an important new dimension to our appreciation of this pioneering American painter, demonstrating his recognition that photography did not undermine, but instead complemented his larger artistic interests.

Major support for this exhibition and catalogue is provided by The Mr. and Mrs. Raymond J. Horowitz Foundation for the Arts, the Elizabeth B. G. Hamlin Fund, the Stevens L. Frost Endowment Fund, the Becker Fund for the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Peter J. Grua ’76 and Mary G. O’Connell ’76, the Devonwood Foundation, Robert and Elisabeth Freson, and the Wyeth Foundation for American Art. Additional support has been provided by the Morton-Kelly Charitable Trust, Charles and Elizabeth Lyman, Judy Glickman Lauder, Steven P. Marrow ’83, P’21 and Dianne A. Pappas P’91, Lee Sprague, John A. Gibbons, Jr. ’64 and Lile R. Gibbons P’88, ’91, ’93 and ’96, the Karl R. Philbrick Art Museum Fund, The Cowles Charitable Trust, Betsy Evans Hunt, the Roy A. Hunt Foundation, Patricia Brown, and an anonymous donor.

EVENTS:
"Revisiting Winslow Homer: A Conversation with the Curators"

June 23, 20184:00 PM – 6:00 PM
Visual Arts Center, Kresge Auditorium

Keynote lecture to open the major exhibition "Winslow Homer and the Camera: Photography and the Art of Painting" by Frank Goodyear and Dana E. Byrd.

Reception to celebrate the exhibition "Winslow Homer and the Camera: Photography and the Art of Painting"

June 23, 20185:00 PM – 6:30 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Reception and family activities celebrate the major exhibition, "Winslow Homer and the Camera: Photography and the Art of Painting" at the Museum of Art.

Bowdoin International Music Festival at the Museum of Art

June 28, 201811:00 AM – 12:00 PM
Museum of Art, Pavilion

Faculty from the Bowdoin International Music Festival perform at the Museum of Art

Halford Gallery, Center Gallery, John A. and Helen P. Becker Gallery, Focus Gallery, Bernard and Barbro Osher Gallery
Bowdoin College Museum of Art
9400 College Station
Brunswick, ME
Exhibit New England
June 26 -
October 28, 2018
Artists and Their Books/Books and Their Artists
Artists' books occupy a creative space between traditional books and contemporary works of art, challenging what a book can be. This highly visual and experiential presentation of some of the most lively and surprising works from the Research Institute's extensive collections focuses on artists' books that can be unpacked, unfolded, unfurled, or disassembled. They are made to be displayed on the wall or deployed as sculptures or installations. The exhibition seeks to provoke new inquiry into the nature of art and to highlight the essential role that books play in contemporary culture.

Free admission

10am – 5:30pm
*Fri & Sat 10am – 9pm
Mon CLOSED

* Extended hours until August 31, 2018

Research Institute Galleries I and II
Getty Center
1200 Getty Center Drive (at N. Sepulveda Blvd.)
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
June 26 -
October 08, 2018
African American Portraits: Photographs from the 1940s and 1950s
This exhibition will present more than one hundred and fifty studio portraits of African Americans from the mid-twentieth century, part of an important recent acquisition by The Met. Produced by mostly unidentified makers, the photographs are a poignant, collective self portrait of the African American experience during the 1940s and 1950s—a time of war, middle-class growth, and seismic cultural change.

Free with museum admission

Gallery 852
The Met Fifth Avenue
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic