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June 04, 2015 -
November 30, 2017
British Guiana One-Cent Magenta: The World’s Most Famous Stamp
The 1856 British Guiana One-Cent Magenta is displayed in the museum’s William H. Gross Stamp Gallery. This exhibition of the stamp is the longest and most publicly accessible showing ever.

Open daily 10am - 5:30pm
(except December 25)

Free admission

Smithsonian's National Postal Museum
2 Massachusetts Avenue NE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 10, 2016 -
May 14, 2017
Now and Forever: The Art of Medieval Time
What time is it? The question seems simple, and with a watch on your wrist or a cell phone in your hand, the answer is easy. In the Middle Ages, however, the concept of time could be approached in many different ways, with vastly different tools.

Drawing upon the rich holdings of the Morgan’s collection of medieval and Renaissance illuminated manuscripts, Now and Forever explores how people told time in the Middle Ages and what they thought about it. The manuscripts range in date from the eleventh to the sixteenth centuries and come from all the major countries of Europe.

The exhibition begins with the quirks of the medieval calendar, exploring sacred feasts, the mysteries of Golden Numbers, the utility of Dominical Letters, and how the Middle Ages inherited the Roman Calendar of Julius Caesar. Visitors will engage with the complexities of time as defined by liturgical celebrations and their two overlapping systems of temporale (feasts of time) and sanctorale (feasts of saints), systems that still influence the way we tell time today. Now and Forever also explores how time beyond the grave preoccupied medieval people for whom life on earth was a mere dress rehearsal for the main event—the afterlife.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 17, 2016 -
June 04, 2017
Double Take: Daguerreian Portrait Pairs
Highlighting the depth of the National Portrait Gallery’s early photography collection, this exhibition will showcase fourteen daguerreotypes—two portraits each—of seven subjects: George Bancroft, Jenny Lind, Zachary Taylor, Frederick Douglass, Jefferson Davis, Daniel Webster, and John Quincy Adams. Only one loan—a daguerreotype of John Quincy Adams from the National Museum of American History—will supplement the Gallery’s collection.

By featuring two portraits of each famous sitter, the exhibition will encourage visitors to consider the ways in which various daguerreotypists approached the same subject and how different the results could be. In addition to discussing the early history of portrait photography, the accompanying text will compare images made for public consumption with those produced as personal keepsakes. Ann Shumard, senior curator of photographs, curates this installation.

11:30am - 7pm daily

Free admission

1st Floor
National Portrait Gallery
8th and F Streets NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 20, 2016 -
July 31, 2017
Truman Capote’s Brooklyn: The Lost Photographs of David Attie
In the spring of 1958 a young photographer named David Attie was led through the streets of Brooklyn Heights and to the Brooklyn waterfront by an unexpected guide—33-year-old Truman Capote. The images Attie took that day were to illustrate Capote’s essay for Holiday magazine about his life in Brooklyn. Decades later, these largely unseen photographs are being exhibited for the first time.

Wed - Sun 12pm - 5pm

Suggested Admission
BHS Member: Free
Adults: $10
Seniors 62 and over: $6
Teachers: $6
Students (with I.D.): Free
Children under 12: Free

The Museum and Library are closed Thanksgiving Day, the day after Thanksgiving, Christmas Day, New Year's Day, Easter Sunday, and Independence Day.

Please note: the Othmer Library will be CLOSED to the public Monday, August 1 - Wednesday, August 31. We will reopen on Thursday, September 1.

Brooklyn Historical Society
128 Pierrepont Street
Brooklyn, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 01, 2016 -
July 01, 2017
Guerra Civil @ 80
Marking the 80th anniversary of the beginning of the Spanish Civil War, the exhibition Guerra Civil @ 80 features selections from The Bancroft Library's Veterans of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, Bay Area Post records and photographic collections, along with posters, books, pamphlets, and other ephemera. A visual and textual display of the struggle to defend the Second Spanish Republic, the exhibition documents the role of both the Republicans, who were defending the democratically elected government, and the Nationalists, the right-wing rebel forces led by General Francisco Franco. The exhibition also addresses how the war, which unfolded from 1936 to 1939, affected the lives of the people of Spain and American volunteers fighting on the front lines or assisting in the war effort, as well as how the conflict precipitated an intense creative response from within and outside Spain.

Mon - Fri 9am - 5pm

2nd floor corridor (between The Bancroft Library & Doe Library)
University of California
Berkeley, CA
Exhibit West
September 01, 2016 -
December 09, 2017
Making the English Book: The Takamiya Deposit
The most impressive collection of medieval English manuscripts in private hands will be on exhibition for the first time in the United States at the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library in 2017. Four unique Chaucer manuscripts, numerous devotional rolls, and works as varied as Boethius’ Consolation of Philosophy, Langland’s Piers the Plowman and a Middle English medical manuscript—all from the collection of Toshiyuki Takamiya—will be shown in the context of the Beinecke’s own rich holdings of English and Continental manuscripts.

With a rare combination of scholarly and antiquarian expertise, Professor Emeritus Takamiya of Keio University in Tokyo assembled an unrivaled collection of medieval manuscripts over four decades. Held privately in Japan, the collection has been relatively unstudied in the West, and Professor Takamiya’s generous deposit of these manuscripts at the Beinecke makes a significant contribution to medieval scholarship at Yale University and internationally.

Mon 10am - 7pm
Tue - Thu 9am - 7pm
Fri 9am - 5pm
Sat (Exhibitions only) 12pm - 5pm

Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library
121 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
September 01, 2016 -
July 01, 2017
Guerra Civil @ 80
Marking the 80th anniversary of the beginning of the Spanish Civil War, the exhibition Guerra Civil @ 80 features selections from The Bancroft Library's Veterans of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, Bay Area Post records and photographic collections, along with posters, books, pamphlets, and other ephemera. A visual and textual display of the struggle to defend the Second Spanish Republic, the exhibition documents the role of both the Republicans, who were defending the democratically elected government, and the Nationalists, the right-wing rebel forces led by General Francisco Franco. The exhibition also addresses how the war, which unfolded from 1936 to 1939, affected the lives of the people of Spain and American volunteers fighting on the front lines or assisting in the war effort, as well as how the conflict precipitated an intense creative response from within and outside Spain.

9am - 5pm, Monday - Friday

2nd floor corridor between The Bancroft Library and Doe Library
University of California
University Drive
Berkeley, CA
Exhibit West
September 10, 2016 -
June 18, 2017
Janet Taylor Pickett: The Matisse Series
Janet Taylor Pickett: The Matisse Series explores the dialogue between Taylor Pickett’s artwork and that of renowned French artist Henri Matisse. Held in the Museum’s Roberts and Rotunda galleries, the exhibition features 76 collages, as well as 4 hand-made books.

An additional highlight of the exhibition will be the installation of Sixty Six Dresses: An Odyssey, 2014-15. Referring to the artist’s age at the time of its ongoing creation, this work will be augmented by two additional collaged dresses to match her current age when the exhibition opens. The artist has observed that “the dress is the symbol that we address, redress, and dress with meaning. Historically, women are defined by how they dress—our dresses have our DNA in them, our memory.” In many of her dresses, Taylor Pickett juxtaposes images of African sculpture, textiles, and cultural elements, with details from Matisse’s work, typically procured from exhibition catalogue reproductions. This multi-cultural dialogue is at the heart of her complex, archetypal work, which often features portraits of the artist herself. The artist’s interest in light, color, and multiple perspectives is also pervasive in some of her recent works in which she combines elements of Matisse’s work with tripartite spaces evoking medieval altarpieces, unifying past and present times.

This is the second time the artist has been featured in a one-person show at MAM; the first More than One Way Home in 1997 was a 25-year mid-career survey. Furthermore, Janet taught classes in the Museum’s Yard School of Art and served on the Museum’s Board of Trustees, as well as its African American Cultural Committee, which she co-founded. Pickett will also be represented in two concurrent complementary exhibitions, Matisse and American Art and Inspired by Matisse: Selected Works from the Collection, opening February 2017.

Montclair Art Museum
3 South Mountain Avenue
Montclair, NJ
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 16, 2016 -
September 11, 2017
Artists' Books and Africa
African artists are experimenting with the genre of artists’ books, while international artists are exploring African themes in theirs. Artists’ Books and Africa is the first exhibition to focus on African artists books from the Smithsonian Libraries’ Warren M. Robbins Library and the National Museum of African Art.

10am – 5:30pm

Free admission

Sublevel 3 (off the Ripley Center Concourse)
African Art Museum
950 Independence Avenue SW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 11, 2016 -
May 28, 2017
Cover Stories: What bindings say about books
A book cover can tell its own story. During the early history of book production, the manner in which a book was bound was unique. Each hand-crafted binding reveals information about the individuals who owned books, their social status, professions and how they valued the texts within. The type of covering also demonstrates the skill of the binder and the fashion of the times in which it was made.

This exhibition includes examples of the finest luxury coverings through to the purely utilitarian. It features a selection of books from the University of Aberdeen’s Special Collections that were bound for, or belonged to, persons of note: A fine leather volume with lions tooled in gold for Prince Henry Stuart; a mathematical text wrapped in waste manuscript for daily use by the Renaissance scholar Duncan Liddel; a work of fiction bound in an Arts and Crafts chintz designed by William Morris.

The exhibition also presents covers that illustrate the moment in the mid 1800s when the art of bookbinding changed from being the means of customising a text for an individual into a new graphic art of book design aimed at the mass market.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a series of talks and events.

Mon - Wed: 10am - 5pm
Thu 10am - 7pm
Fri - Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 11am - 4pm

Special Collections
Special Collections Centre
The Sir Duncan Rice Library
Bedford Road
Aberdeen, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
November 17, 2016 -
August 31, 2017
Broken Beauty: Ruins of the Ancient World
This compelling new exhibition focuses on the Library’s holdings of books devoted to historic sites in the Middle East and beyond. It was the 2015 bombing of the Temple of Baalshamin in the Syrian city of Palmyra that compelled us to examine our collection of books on the historic cities of Paestum, Petra, Persepolis, and Baalbek, among others.

The Library’s collection contains books written by eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and twentieth-century travelers to the Middle East from Cornelis de Bruyn and Sir Austen Henry Layard to Mark Twain and Vita Sackville-West. Les Ruines de Palmyra, Robert Wood’s documentation of Palmyra during his 1751 visit, became an instant classic for future travelers and today is consulted by archaelogists and historians seeking to reconstruct its legendary past. Accounts of ancient ruins were popular among early members, including John Jay and DeWitt Clinton. Two nineteenth-century Library members also ventured beyond Europe’s more comfortable boundaries. John Lloyd Stephens’ Incidents of Travel in Egypt, Arabia Petraea, and the Holy Land was published in 1838, George William Curtis’s The Howadji in Syria in 1852. One of the treasures of the Library is Giovanni Battista Piranesi’s 1778 folio Differentes vues de quelques restes de trois grands edifices qui subsistent encore dans le milieu de l’ancienne ville de Peste.

“Ruin-fever,” as one writer described it, runs like an electrical current through many of these early accounts. The travelers are nearly all struck with awe at what the past, however fractured and senselessly deconstructed, reveals. We believe that mounting an exhibition of this historic dimension will allow visitors to Broken Beauty to experience the beauty of these legendary ruins. In the end, words may outlive what has been lost.

Mon & Fri 9am - 5pm
Tue, Wed & Thu 9am - 8pm
Sat & Sun 11am - 5pm

THE NEW YORK SOCIETY LIBRARY
53 East 79th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
December 13, 2016 -
May 07, 2017
A Friend Among Us: The Art of Brinton Turkle
Step back in time with Brinton Turkle and his tales of American lore. Whether set on the island of Nantucket or in the mountains of Appalachia, his stories and poetic imagery capture both the history and nuances of place. Turkle follows the escapades of a young Quaker boy in his Obadiah series, offers a surprising twist on a favorite fairy tale in Deep in the Forest, and sprinkles magic realism throughout the pages of Sky Dog. All work is from the museum’s permanent collection, generously donated by the artist’s children. A highlight is surely Turkle’s watercolor illustrations from Thy Friend, Obadiah, awarded a 1970 Caldecott Honor.

Tue – Fri 10am – 4pm
Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

$9 Adult
$6 Youth (1-18), Student, Teacher, and Senior
$22.50 Family (2 adults and 2 youth)

The Central Gallery
The Eric Carle Museum
of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
December 16, 2016 -
May 20, 2017
The Dance of Death
Reflections on death and its meaning for Christian communities have taken many forms in art and literature. During the Middle Ages a genre called the Dance of Death developed which depicted a personification of death leading a procession of people ranging from kings to paupers, emphasizing the mortality of all persons regardless of social status. The genre included poetry, prose works, and visual art. While individual works sometimes focused exclusively on images or literature, many included both. This exhibition features images popularized in print by Hans Holbein the Younger (1497–1543) and explores the artist’s possible inspirations and his influence on subsequent illustrators.

Southern Methodist University
6425 Boaz Lane
Dallas, TX
Exhibit Southwest
January 06 -
June 02, 2017
From the Desk of Simone de Beauvoir
Consider the influence and intellect of feminist philosopher Simone de Beauvoir in an interpretation of her Paris studio alcove. This installation invites visitors to reflect on Beauvoir’s impact, not only in her time and not only as a feminist, but in our own time and in the areas of literature, philosophy, and popular culture. A zealous writer, speaker, and lover of all sensations life had to offer—what does Beauvoir say to you?

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

4th floor (in front of the Dix Gallery)
National Museum of Women in the Arts
1250 New York Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 12 -
May 13, 2017
India, Empire, Nation: 200 Years of Indian History
“India, Empire, Nation” presents for public viewing a small part of the extensive collection of rare books and manuscripts relating to the Indian subcontinent that the Lilly Library has recently acquired from antiquarian bookseller and collector Glenn Horowitz. This collection is without parallel in the United States, given its sheer range and diversity, as well as the uniqueness of many of its constituent parts. Taken together, these materials tell a compelling story of South Asia over the past two centuries, and they do so from distinctive and often surprising vantage points. This extraordinary collection of Indian materials will, without question, position the Lilly Library as one of the leading research libraries in the world for South Asian studies.

9am - 6pm

Lilly Library
Indiana University
1200 E Seventh Street
Bloomington, IN
Exhibit Midwest
January 17 -
May 31, 2017
Innovation and Abstraction: Women Artists and Atelier 17
Innovation and Abstraction: Women Artists and Atelier 17 examines the formal innovations and burgeoning feminist consciousness of eight artists—Louise Bourgeois, Minna Citron, Worden Day, Dorothy Dehner, Sue Fuller, Alice Trumbull Mason, Louise Nevelson, and Anne Ryan—all of whom worked at the legendary Atelier 17 printmaking studio. Founded in 1927 in Paris by the British artist Stanley William Hayter, Atelier 17 relocated to New York from 1940 to 1955 to escape the political conflicts in Europe. Hayter championed technical experimentation and collaboration among the two hundred artists who worked there, nearly half of whom were women.

Experimental, often unorthodox, prints by the featured artists are displayed alongside their paintings and sculptures to explore how Atelier 17 catalyzed their creativity and inspired these women to reshape American abstraction. The exhibition includes loans from private collections, as well as the Brooklyn Museum, the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Voorhees Gallery
71 Hamilton Street (at George Street)
College Avenue Campus
Rutgers University
New Brunswick, NJ
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 17 -
May 11, 2017
The Lost Generation : World War I Poetry Selected From The Donald Thomas War Poetry Collection
If asked which twentieth-century war had the greatest impact on the world, the average American is likely to respond with World War II—and that conflict had an enormous effect in the staggering number of casualties, the number of nations engaged in the conflict, the introduction of nuclear weapons, and the ushering in of the Cold War. Despite this, for Europeans, and particularly for the British, World War I had an equal, if not greater, impact.

In the years prior to the First World War, Britain experienced the continued aftereffects of Victorian optimism. Some even referred to this Edwardian period as a time of endless summer, when people believed in progress, that everything was moving in a positive direction. Furthermore, in the second half of the nineteenth century war remained a romanticized phenomenon, with patriotism and gallantry as its primary features. World War I, or the Great War, as it came to be known, exploded those notions—quite literally. Because of extensive and entangling alliances, the conflict evolved from relatively insignificant origins (the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand of the Austro-Hungarian empire) to involve a greater portion of the developed world. Beyond the sheer number of nations involved, it was a war unlike any previous one, depending less on troop numbers and movement and more on technological superiority and military prowess. It was the first conflict in which weaponry became especially important, with the introduction of U-boats, aerial dogfights, Zeppelin bombings, gas attacks, trench battles, and tank warfare. The effect was a dehumanized conflict in which the superior machine mattered more than the superior soldier.

Perhaps most significant, however, was the enormous number of young soldiers who were either killed or wounded in the conflict. As Ezra Pound was to write, “There died a myriad / And of the best, among them” (Hugh Selwyn Mauberley), and for poets during and after the conflict the world would no longer be the same. All of the pre-war optimism disappeared, as did confidence in the traditional Western way of looking at the world. In its place was a profound skepticism of meaning in the universe and of the privileged position of the West, as well as an increased feeling that individuals were ultimately isolated from the workings of the universe and even from their fellow humans. What followed has come to be known as the “lost generation”—writers who longed for meaning and order in the universe but were unable to find them in an alienating and fragmented existence.

Because of the pre-war optimism and the romanticized view of warfare, those writers who entered the conflict were entirely unprepared for what they encountered, and the primary power of their writings comes from the profound disillusionment they experienced. Rather than patriotism, glory, and honor, they found instead death, absurdity, and dehumanization. One of the most famous poems of the war, Wilfred Owen’s “Dulce et Decorum Est,” rejects the romantic view that it is sweet and fitting to die for one’s country: the poem’s effect comes partly from Owen’s descriptions of battle but more from the conflict between what he had been taught was war and what he actually found was war. This was the lesson writer after writer learned, and it is reflected in the works of so many who wrote of their experiences.

This exhibit and catalogue explore the work of many such “soldier poets,” whose aesthetically rich and haunting verse often sits uncomfortably alongside popular ballads, songs and toasts that attempt to sustain, or gently mock, the romanticized ideals of heroic self-sacrifice for the nation’s glory. In between these opposed perspectives we find responses to the war, both critical and laudatory, from poets who did not enlist, including women on the home front and those in active service as nurses. To set these perspectives in context, we add sections on visual images of war, particularly photography and poets’ responses to this documentary technology, and retrospective collections that advocate for peace in the aftermath of the Great War and on the eve of WWII.

Fourth Floor, Room 437
Judge Sarah T. Hughes Reading Room
Willis Library
University of North Texas
1506 Highland Street
Denton, TX
Exhibit Southwest
January 20 -
May 21, 2017
I’m Nobody! Who are you? The Life and Poetry of Emily Dickinson
One of the most popular and enigmatic American writers of the nineteenth century, Emily Dickinson wrote more than 1,700 poems. Nevertheless, her work was essentially unknown to contemporary readers since only a handful of poems were printed during her lifetime and the vast trove of her manuscripts was not discovered until after her death in 1886.

Typecast as a reclusive writer who rarely left her Amherst home, Dickinson was, in fact, socially active as a young woman and maintained a broad network of friends and correspondents even as she grew older and retreated into seclusion. Bringing together nearly one hundred rarely seen items, including manuscripts and letters in the poet’s hand, the exhibition will explore a side of the Dickinson’s life that is seldom acknowledged: one filled with rich friendships and long-lasting relationships with mentors and editors.

In addition to her writings, the exhibition will also feature a wide array of visual material, including hand-cut silhouettes, unique photographs and daguerreotypes, contemporary illustrations, and other items that speak to the rich intellectual and cultural environment in which Dickinson lived and worked.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 20 -
May 14, 2017
Delirium: The Art of the Symbolist Book
The Symbolist movement of the nineteenth century grew out of Charles Baudelaire’s visionary poetry, which explored correspondences between the sensory and the spiritual. Baudelaire believed poetry should not describe the external world but suggest the writer’s interior reality, using a vocabulary of delirium, dreams, mysticism, and disordered states of mind. His revolt against the dominant naturalism of the day influenced a younger generation of writers who helped to shape the Symbolist movement in literature. Visual artists who collaborated on Symbolist publications were challenged to create illustrations for works that were deliberately devoid of concrete imagery.

This exhibition, drawing entirely on the Morgan’s collection, explores some of the encounters between Symbolist authors and artists and the creative approaches they took to illustrate the invisible. Works by Stephane Mallarmé, Odilon Redon, Maurice Denis, Paul Verlaine, Fantin-Latour, Arthur Rimbaud, Alfred Jarry, Maurice Maeterlinck, and Fernand Khnopff will be featured.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 21 -
July 30, 2017
Toutes Les Nouvelles – All the News: Current Events in Nineteenth-Century French Prints
Beginning in the sixteenth century, prints became the primary medium for circulating and preserving images of current events, including public ceremonies and celebrations, battles, and other noteworthy incidents. Industrialization and rapid urbanization during the 1800s created not only the means to quickly print and publish text and images but the market for such news sources as well. Artists relished the opportunity to create original compositions based on recent happenings that would be widely circulated in illustrated weekly and monthly journals and inexpensive books in addition to being issued as independent prints.

The works in this exhibition present images of various Parisian news items from the mid- to late nineteenth century, ranging from mundane political intrigues to serious foreign affairs. Artists took different approaches to presenting such subject matter: the etchers Auguste Lançon and Félix Buhot created highly detailed, documentary scenes, while the caricaturists Cham and Charles Vernier focused on satirizing French government officials. Particularly remarkable are compositions, such as the one by Honoré Daumier, that portray current events in the guise of biblical or mythological subjects that would have been understood by a broad public. In this way, artists presented new ideas within familiar narratives while investing their subjects with historical significance. Near the end of the century, artists became more partisan in their depictions of current events and revealed their personal positions on sensational topics, which included France’s colonial ambitions and the false claim accusing a Jewish army officer of treason now known as the Dreyfus Affair. The works on view were selected from the Zimmerli Art Museum’s rich collection of nineteenth-century French prints and drawings.

Volpe Gallery
71 Hamilton Street (at George Street)
College Avenue Campus
Rutgers University
New Brunswick, NJ
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 24 -
May 26, 2017
Harper & Brothers to HarperCollins Publishers: A Bicentennial Exhibition
The company that is now HarperCollins began as a small family business in 1817, publishing first as J. & J. Harper and as Harper & Brothers beginning in 1833. The company survived several fires and financial crises to become one of the biggest and most successful publishing companies in the United States by the middle of the nineteenth century. Today HarperCollins Publishers is considered one of the five most influential English-language publishers in the world.

This exhibition charts continuity and change in the publishing industry by dedicating cases to the publishing functions that have remained constant even as practices and technologies have changed: acquisitions, editorial, manufacturing, art, marketing, publicity, rights & permissions, and finance. Harper was quick to adopt emerging printing technologies from its earliest days and the exhibition displays wood engravings, stereotype plates and case bindings from the nineteenth century. The exhibition puts on display the behind-the-scenes work that publishers do to bring together authors and readers, whether the publication in question is print or digital.

Drawing on the archives of Harper & Brothers and Harper & Row held by the Columbia Rare Book & Manuscript Library, this major RBML exhibition shows how the company grows with the nation, its publications not merely reflecting but actively shaping local and national politics. Highlights include the contract for Melville’s Moby Dick, Nast’s political cartoons for Harper’s Weekly Magazine, posters advertising various Harper’s periodicals, correspondence with luminaries including John F. Kennedy and Richard Wright, and profiles of pioneering female editors Virginia Kirkus and Ursula Nordstrom.

Kempner Gallery
Columbia University
Rare Book & Manuscript Library
535 West 114th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 24 -
May 28, 2017
Remembering Antiquity: The Ancient World through Medieval Eyes
In a rare juxtaposition of antiquities from the Getty Villa and manuscripts from the Museum’s collection, this exhibition explores medieval responses to the ancient world. For more than a thousand years following the fall of Rome (476 A.D.), classical culture lived on in European literature and art. Medieval scribes translated and preserved classical texts, while artists adapted and embellished images of ancient rulers and mythical heroes for inclusion in Christian manuscripts. Although the “rediscovery” of Greek and Roman culture is often associated with the Renaissance, antiquity was never forgotten.

Tue – Fri & Sun 10am – 5:30pm
Sat 10am – 9pm
Mon Closed

Admission is free, parking is $15 ($10 after 3pm)

GETTY CENTER
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
January 27 -
June 18, 2017
State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda
A traveling exhibition from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

This powerful exhibition explores how the Nazi propaganda machine used biased information to sway public opinion during World War II. It examines the definition of propaganda, how it operates, why it works, and how important it is to protect ourselves from its dangers. The exhibit asks visitors to actively question and engage with the messages they see, and to learn from this extreme example that democracies, while appearing strong, are fragile without the responsibility and action of their people. Using posters, photos, newsreels, and eight media pieces, this exhibition aims to help society understand propaganda in order to protect against divisive messages and violent agendas.

9am – 5pm

National WWII Museum
945 Magazine Street
New Orleans, LA
Exhibit South
February 01 -
May 31, 2017
Woof, Moo & Grr: A Carnival of Animals in Law Books
A charming exhibit of animals pictured in law books opens February 1, courtesy of the Yale Law Library’s Rare Book Collection. Titled “Woof, Moo & Grr: A Carnival of Animals in Law Books,” the exhibit is narrated from the perspective of the animals themselves and is aimed at animal lovers of all ages.

Twenty books from around the world will be on display, more than half of them printed before the nineteenth century and the earliest published in 1529. They feature illustrations of a wide variety of animals that visitors may be surprised to find in the pages of serious legal literature.

10am - 6pm

Rare Book Exhibition Gallery
Level L2, Lillian Goldman Law Library
Yale Law School
127 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
February 01, 2017 -
January 01, 2018
BRONTË 200 - MANSIONS IN THE SKY
Who was Branwell Brontë? This new exhibition, curated by poet Simon Armitage, invites us inside the mind and world of the notorious Brontë brother in a search for answers to this question. Inspired by an early poem sent to William Wordsworth by the optimistic and precocious twenty-year old, Armitage explores Branwell’s colourful personal history through his writings, drawings and possessions, displayed at the Parsonage alongside newly created installations.

Highlights include a series of new poems by Armitage in response to Branwell’s belongings in the Museum collection, a dramatic recreation of Branwell’s studio designed in collaboration with the production team of the BBC’s To Walk Invisible, and the actual letter and poem posted to Wordsworth, loaned by the Wordsworth Trust especially for the bicentenary. In delving into the life and times of the infamous Branwell, Mansions in the Sky will provoke new insights into the charismatic and complicated brother of Charlotte, Emily and Anne.

10am - 5pm

Exhibition free with admission to the Museum.

Brontë Parsonage Museum
Church Street
Haworth
Keighley
West Yorkshire, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
February 01, 2017 -
January 01, 2018
TO WALK INVISIBLE: FROM PARSONAGE TO PRODUCTION
An exhibition of costumes, props and photography

An exclusive opportunity to see the costumes from To Walk Invisible, Sally Wainwright's acclaimed Brontë drama, in the historic setting of the Parsonage. Designer Tom Pye worked closely with academics and experts to create costumes which are authentic to the period and which evoke the separate personalities of each member of the Brontë family. Also on display in this arresting exhibition are props made especially for the drama and a selection of stills from photographer Michael Prince which give an enticing behind-the-scenes glimpse into the filmmaking process.

10am - 5pm

Exhibition free with admission to the Museum.

Brontë Parsonage Museum
Church Street
Haworth
Keighley
West Yorkshire, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
February 06 -
July 16, 2017
Stories to Tell: Selections from the Harry Ransom Center
Many stories can be told from the Ransom Center's extensive cultural collections—stories of inspiration, adaptation, innovation, confrontation, collaboration, and even frustration. By acquiring and preserving collections created by diverse individuals working in literature, art, and other humanities disciplines, the Ransom Center helps to tell these stories, unlocking and illuminating the profoundly human reach of archives.

This exhibition of more than 250 items includes, among many others, manuscripts of David Foster Wallace, Julia Alvarez, and Gabriel García Márquez, Henri Matisse's Jazz, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's spirit photographs, and the hat that accompanied the green curtain dress worn by Vivien Leigh in Gone With The Wind.

This exhibition helps us better understand how the humanities affect our lives, connecting the past to the present in personal and meaningful ways.

Mon, Tue, Wed, & Fri 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 7pm
Sat & Sun Noon – 5pm

Closed: hanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day

Free admission

Harry Ransom Center
The University of Texas at Austin
21st and Guadalupe Streets
Austin, TX
Exhibit Southwest
February 09 -
May 19, 2017
Expanding Earth: Travel, Encounter, and Exchange
Globalization is no recent phenomenon. People, ideas, and objects have always been on the move, encountering and changing one another as a result. This exhibit presents some of the textual and material residues of these encounters and travels, characteristic of past as well as present human activity and curiosity. Focusing on the years 1400 to 1800, the exhibit examines and looks beyond familiar Eurocentric ideas of exploration, conquest, and "discovery." Using manuscripts, printed books, drawings, maps, and artifacts, Expanding Earth highlights the movements of peoples, ideas, and goods across the world in their own words and in material objects.

To the Ends of the Earth
Thursday, March 2, 5:30 PM - Conference Keynote and Exhibition Reception
Friday, March 3-4, 8:30 AM-6:00 PM - Conference
Class of 1978 Orrery Pavilion, Van Pelt-Dietrich Library, sixth floor

Mon - Fri 10am - 5pm
Wed 10am - 8pm

Free & open to the public

Goldstein Family Gallery
Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Van Pelt Dietrich Library Center, sixth floor
3420 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 10 -
May 21, 2017
Volcanoes
From fire-belching mountains to blood-red waves of lava, volcanoes have captured the attention of scientists, artists and members of the public for centuries. In this exhibition, discover a spectacular selection of eye witness accounts, scientific observations and artwork charting how our understanding of volcanoes has evolved over the past two millennia.

Discover the impact of some of the world's most spectacular volcanoes including the 79 AD eruption of Vesuvius, one of the most catastrophic eruptions in European history, and the 19th-century eruptions of Krakatoa and Santorini, two of the first volcanic eruptions to be intensely studied by modern scientists.

Featuring fragments of 'burnt' papyrus scrolls which were buried during the 76 AD eruption of Vesuvius, the earliest known manuscript illustration of a volcano, and lava and rock samples and notes from 19th-century volcanologists and explorers, this spectacular exhibition brings together science and society, art and history.

Mon - Frid 10am - 5pm
Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 11am - 5pm

Free admission

ST Lee Gallery
Weston Library
Bodleian Library
Broad Street
Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
February 14 -
June 04, 2017
It’s Me, Eloise: The Voice of Kay Thompson and the Art of Hilary Knight
More than 60 years after her debut, Eloise remains a six-year-old star. What accounts for her enduring appeal? Perhaps it is her sly face transfigured with successful sin, that endearing potbelly, or the extravagant world in which she lives. Whatever her magic, Eloise’s charm comes down to two things: that audacious voice and those filigree illustrations. The voice was cabaret star Kay Thompson’s, a comic riff with which she amused her friends. The pictures came from the pen of a young artist, Hilary Knight. Their unlikely collaboration was the alchemical formula from which the successful Eloise series was born.

It’s Me, Eloise: The Voice of Kay Thompson and the Art of Hilary Knight includes more than 90 artworks from the Eloise collaborations—as well as art from the rest of Knight’s prodigious career as a children’s book artist, poster artist, magazine illustrator, and painter. Never before-seen artwork from Knight’s archive include his 1954 trial drawings for the first Eloise book, two Eloise In Paris sketchbooks, a Hollywood notebook with a double-page spread of Thompson belting out “Think Pink!” from Funny Face, a magnificent suite of final art from Eloise In Moscow, and the 1993 Eloise watercolor for New York Is Book Country. There’s a kicker, too: for the first time since its infamous disappearance from the Plaza Hotel in 1960, Knight’s original 1956 Eloise portrait will be on public display.

Tues. – Fri. 10am – 4pm
Saturday 10am – 5pm
Sunday 12pm – 5pm

The East Gallery
The Eric Carle Museum
of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
February 14 -
June 03, 2017
The 2017 Mark Samuels Lasner Symposium & Exhibition
EXHIBITION
“Victorian Passions: Stories from the Mark Samuels Lasner Collection”

The Mark Samuels Lasner Collection focuses on British literature and art of the period 1850 to 1900, with an emphasis on the Pre-Raphaelites and writers and illustrators of the 1890s. It boasts more than 9,000 books, letters, manuscripts, and artworks, including many items signed by such figures as Oscar Wilde, George Eliot, Max Beerbohm, William Morris, Christina and Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and Aubrey Beardsley. It provides a tremendous opportunity for students and scholars to enrich their academic pursuits through the historical, cultural and material value of the documents. (Please note that materials in the Mark Samuels Lasner Collection are not listed in DELCAT.)

In 2016, Mark Samuels Lasner generously gifted his collection, worth more than $10 million, to the University of Delaware. It is the largest and most valuable donation in the Library’s history.

Hours
Access is by appointment only.

SYMPOSIUM:
“Celebrating the Mark Samuels Lasner Collection: Rare Books and Manuscripts, Victorian Literature and Art”

March 17 – 18, 2017

Keynote Speaker: Elaine Showalter, Professor Emerita of English at Princeton University

Special Collections reading room
2nd floor, Morris Library

Special Collections Gallery
Morris Library
University of Delaware Library
181 South College Avenue
Newark, NJ
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 17 -
May 15, 2017
A Most Magnificent Sight
One hundred years ago, in towns across the country, circus day began with a parade that filled the everyday streets with hundreds of exotically costumed performers, some elephants, camels and zebras, and powerful teams of horses pulling beautifully carved wagons. The free show was just a taste of the wonders that could be seen under the big top and the whistling sounds of the calliope, which was at the end of the procession, beckoned audiences to come to the circus.

As early as the 1840s, circus impresarios understood the importance of the parade as a way to impress potential audiences. Shows invested in magnificent chariots and bandwagons with delicately carved and brilliantly gilded figures to create a stunning spectacle in the streets. As soon as there were circus parades, there was circus advertising to bill them. Enjoy a selection of posters dating from 1848 to 1920 and imagine the excitement of the “The Most Magnificent Street Spectacle Ever Seen,” the circus parade.

Open Daily 10am - 5pm
Thursdays until 8pm

FREE WITH MUSEUM ADMISSION

The Ringling
5401 Bay Shore Road
Sarasota, FL
Exhibit South
February 17 -
May 28, 2017
A Taste for Chocolate
The Morris-Jumel Mansion (MJM), Manhattan’s oldest house, will present a special exhibition exploring cacao and chocolate as a commodity and emerging breakfast tradition in colonial and post-colonial America. Stephen Jumel’s role as an importer and purveyor will be revealed in archival material from MJM’s collection. The exhibition focuses on how cocoa— typically sold in “cakes” and served as a hot drink flavored with vanilla, honey, and spices—became a popular beverage during Eliza Jumel’s lifetime (1775‒1865).

Known for its effect as a stimulant and easily transported, both British and American soldiers were supplied with cocoa cakes to mix with hot water for breakfast. Benjamin Franklin, who sold chocolate in his Philadelphia print shop, ensured that the Continental Army marching against General Braddock’s forces in 1775 were equipped with chocolate to boost their energy. In 1785, Thomas Jefferson predicted that cocoa would become American’s favorite after the Boston Tea Party and before coffee rose as the popular choice. Abigail Adams wrote to her husband about drinking breakfast chocolate during a trip to London, and Martha Washington made “cocoa tea.” George Washington and his officers used the Mansion as their headquarters in the fall of 1776. Despite its use in the military as a ration, when Stephen Jumel was importing cacao in the early nineteenth century (ca. 1820) it was enjoyed mostly by the upper and upper-middle classes. Eliza Jumel’s generation saw the democratization of chocolate as production techniques improved, the taste and texture became more palatable, and peoples’ taste for chocolate grew. A Taste for Chocolate will feature art objects from a private collection including rare books, antiquarian botanical prints, chocolate services and pots, and other decorative arts. Advertisements for Cadbury’s and Frye’s provide a window onto how cocoa was marketed in Europe and the U.S., and an original printed inventory from Stephen Jumel’s dry goods business lists a cacao shipment from the West Indies.

Adults $10
Seniors/Students $8
Children under 12 Free
Members Free

Mon Closed to general public, visitation by advanced appt. only
Tue - Fri 10am - 4pm
Sat & Sun 10am - 5pm

Morris-Jumel Mansion
65 Jumel Terrace
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 17 -
May 29, 2017
Seurat Circus Sideshow
Taking as its focus one of The Met's most captivating masterpieces, this thematic exhibition will afford a unique context for appreciating the heritage and allure of Circus Sideshow (Parade de cirque), painted in 1887–88 by Georges Seurat (1859–1891). Anchored by a remarkable group of related works by Seurat that will fully illuminate the lineage of the motif in his inimitable conté crayon drawings, the presentation will explore the fascination the sideshow subject held for other artists in the nineteenth century, ranging from the great caricaturist Honoré Daumier at mid-century to the young Pablo Picasso at the fin de siècle.

This rich visual narrative will unfold in a provocative display of more than 100 paintings, drawings, prints, period posters, and illustrated journals, supplemented by musical instruments and an array of documentary material intended to give a vivid sense of the seasonal fairs and traveling circuses of the day. Among the highlights will be Fernand Pelez's epic Grimaces and Misery—The Saltimbanques (Petit Palais, Paris), of exactly the same date as Seurat's magisterial work and, with its lifesize performers aligned in friezelike formation across a 20-foot stage, a match for his ambition.

Galleries 964–965
The Met Fifth Avenue
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 19 -
December 31, 2017
IMAGES OF INTERNMENT: THE INCARCERATION OF JAPANESE AMERICANS DURING WORLD WAR II
On February 19, 2017 -- the 75th anniversary of the signing of Executive Order 9066 -- the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum will open a new photographic exhibition entitled, IMAGES OF INTERNMENT: THE INCARCERATION OF JAPANESE AMERICANS DURING WORLD WAR II, with over 200 photographs including the work of Dorothea Lange and Ansel Adams. Signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Executive Order 9066 led to the incarceration of 120,000 people of Japanese descent -- including approximately 80,000 American citizens -- during World War II.

In the tense weeks after Japan's December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, many Americans -- particularly those on the Pacific Coast -- feared enemy attack and saw danger in every corner. Rumors and sensational media reports heightened the climate of fear. Under pressure from military and political leaders, President Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066 on February 19, 1942. It is widely viewed today as a serious violation of civil liberties.

IMAGES OF INTERNMENT begins with a small document-focused display that briefly introduces the context behind FDR's decision to issue Executive Order 9066. It includes the role of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, who disagreed with FDR's decision. In April 1943, the First Lady visited an internment camp. Shortly after that the Japanese American Citizens League presented her with a painting of the Topaz camp by Chiura Obata (1885-1975), a Japanese American artist who was confined there. Mrs. Roosevelt displayed the painting in her New York City home until her death in 1962. It is included in the exhibition.

Visitors then enter the exhibition's main gallery where they will encounter over 200 photographs (including some reproduced in dramatically large formats) that provide a visual record of the forced removal of Japanese Americans and their lives inside the restricted world of the remote government camps operated by the War Relocation Authority (WRA). Most of these images were shot by skilled photographers hired by the WRA. The WRA visual records (held at the National Archives and Records Administration in College Park, Maryland) include the work of Dorothea Lange, Clem Albers, Francis Stewart, and Hikaru Iwasaki. IMAGES OF INTERNMENT also features photographs taken by Ansel Adams at the Manzanar camp and a selection of photos shot by George and Frank Hirahara, who were held at the Heart Mountain camp in Wyoming.

The exhibit includes a short film that features excerpts from oral history accounts of Japanese Americans in which they describe their experiences. There is also a video presentation of President Ronald Reagan's remarks when he signed the 1988 bill that provided an official government apology and cash payment to each surviving person covered under Executive Order 9066.

9am - 5pm November - March
9am - 6pm April - October

Closed: Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's Day

William J. vanden Heuvel Gallery
FDR Library
4079 Albany Post Road
Hyde Park, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 03 -
June 11, 2017
Prints in Paris 1900: From Elite to the Street
The Van Gogh Museum has 1,800 French prints from the fin de siècle (1890–1905), making this one of the world’s leading print collections.

The exhibition takes you to the French capital, where the revolution in printmaking erupted from 1890 onwards. It focuses on the one hand on prints that were raised to the level of high art and could only be seen in private collections, fashionable theatres and exclusive galleries. And on the other, on world-famous posters such as those for Le Chat Noir and Le Moulin Rouge, which filled the public space along the boulevards and in popular cafés.

Daily: 9am - 5pm
Fridays until 10pm

The Van Gogh Museum
Museumplein 6
Amsterdam, NETHERLANDS
Exhibit International
March 07 -
August 26, 2017
Love in Venice
This exhibition is part of Carnegie Hall’s citywide festival La Serenissima: Music and Arts from the Venetian Republic.

A tolerant and secular state, the Venetian Republic originated in the lagoon communities around Venice and existed for half a millennium, from 1297 until 1797. Dominated by a merchant capitalist elite who did business through sea trade, the Republic of Venice enjoyed an autonomy and freedom that was not typical of the rest of Italy, and which for centuries made it a destination for love and pleasure.

Titled “Love in Venice,” the exhibition at The New York Public Library will examine the literary, artistic, musical and cultural aspects of Venice’s seductiveness, including its beautiful courtesans, lavish festivals, lively carnivals and libertine counter-culture. On view will be works as diverse as the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, one of the most iconic works produced in Venice to explore ideas of desire, to flap books showing the undergarments of Venetian prostitutes, etchings by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, letters from Lord Byron’s paramours and examples of wedding poetry celebrating the unions of leading European families.

Sun 1pm – 5pm
Mon & Thu - Sat 10am – 6pm
Tues & Wed 10am – 8pm

Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
New York Public Library
476 Fifth Avenue (42nd St & 5th Ave)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 07 -
May 07, 2017
The Shape of Things: Photographs from Robert B. Menschel
The Shape of Things: Photographs from Robert B. Menschel presents an engaging survey of The Museum of Modern Art’s multifaceted collection of photography. Borrowing its title from the eponymous work by Carrie Mae Weems, the exhibition is drawn entirely from works acquired over the past 40 years with the support of Robert B. Menschel, telling the story of photography from its beginnings.

Covering more than 150 years of photography—from an 1843 view of Paris by William Henry Fox Talbot, the English father of photography, to An-My Lê's depictions of US military exercises in preparation for war in Iraq and Afghanistan—the exhibition underscores an equal attention to the past and the present, and a strong belief that they complement each other; and that each generation reinvents photography. Since Menschel joined the Committee on Photography at MoMA in 1977, over 500 works have entered the collection through his support, including 162 photographs he recently donated from his personal collection.

10:30am – 5:30pm
Open until 8:00 p.m. on Fridays
Members Early Hours begin at 9:30am

Floor 2, Exhibition Galleries
The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 08 -
July 30, 2017
Saving Washington
First Lady Dolley Madison is often remembered as a hostess who saved the White House portrait of George Washington from British vandalism during the War of 1812. But in fact, she was the most influential woman in America during the nation’s formative years—a national, almost mythic figure. Even more, she was a powerful force during a time when women were excluded from affairs of state.

As the inaugural exhibition in the Joyce B. Cowin Women’s History Gallery, Saving Washington recasts the traditional Founding Fathers narrative to consider the less-examined contributions of women whose behind-the-scenes efforts helped implement the Constitution “on the ground.” In spite of laws restricting their broader participation, elite and non-elite women alike sought various avenues for empowerment, activism, and leadership.

Featuring more than 150 objects—such as artworks, books, documents, clothing, jewelry, and housewares—within immersive installations, Saving Washington evokes Dolley Madison’s famous “Wednesday night squeezes,” her popular social gatherings that drew a wide range of people to “squeeze” into the President’s mansion and encouraged informal diplomacy.

Tue - Thu & Sat 10am - 6pm
Fri 10am - 8pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West (at Richard Gilder Way / 77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 10 -
May 28, 2017
Asemic Writing: Offline & In the Gallery
Asemic writing is a wordless semantic form that often has the appearance of abstract calligraphy. It allows writers to present visual narratives that move beyond language and are open to interpretation, relying on the viewer for context and meaning. Beyond works on paper, asemic writing enjoys a growing presence online and continues to evolve with new performance-based explorations and animated films.

Asemic Writing: Offline & In the Gallery, curated by Michael Jacobson, is the first large-scale exhibition of asemic art in the United States, featuring the work of over 50 international artists who together create an eclectic assemblage of inventing, designing, and dreaming.

Asemic Translations
Sat, March 25th 7 - 9pm
Free and open to the public
Join us for a special reading by various asemic artists and scholars, and music by Ghostband. This event is sponsored by Rain Taxi.

Opening reception Friday, March 10th 6 - 9pm

Mon – Sat 9:30am - 6:30pm
Tue open late: 9:30am - 9pm
Sun noon - 5pm

Gallery admission is always free.

Main Gallery
Minnesota Center for Book Arts
first floor, Open Book building
1011 Washington Avenue S., Suite 100
Minneapolis, MN
Exhibit Midwest
March 11 -
May 21, 2017
Salvador Dali's Fantastical Fairy Tales
Explore the connections between art and literature while marveling at Dalí’s inventiveness and fine craftsmanship.

This beautiful exhibition features 36 colorful prints from The Dalí Museum that will delight visitors of all ages. Prints are a major part of Salvador Dalí’s work, and here we celebrate his fine and varied techniques in illustrations for stories including Alice in Wonderland, Don Quixote, and the tales of Hans Christian Andersen. Salvador Dalí is one of the great modern artists of the 20th century. He believed that dreams were as real as so-called reality and that art created from visions could be as insightful as realism, if not more so. Visitors get a chance to explore the connections between art and literature while marveling at Dalí’s inventiveness and fine craftsmanship.

Sun 12pm - 5pm
Mon CLOSED
Tues - Fri 11am - 5pm
Sat 10am - 5pm

Museum Members FREE
Adults $12
Senior citizens (65 and over) $10
Military $10
Students $5
Children (6 and under) FREE
Does not apply to groups

Free Sunday admission to the second floor collection galleries sponsored by BlueCross BlueShield of South Carolina. Does not include featured exhibitions.

Columbia Museum of Art
1515 Main Street
Columbia, SC
Exhibit South
March 12 -
July 16, 2017
East of the Mississippi: Nineteenth-Century American Landscape Photography
The first exhibition to focus exclusively on photographs made in the eastern half of the United States during the 19th century, East of the Mississippi showcases some 175 works—from daguerreotypes and stereographs to albumen prints and cyanotypes—as well as several photographers whose efforts have often gone unheralded. Celebrating natural wonders such as Niagara Falls and the White Mountains, as well as capturing a cultural landscape fundamentally altered by industrialization, the Civil War, and tourism, these photographs not only helped shape America’s national identity but also played a role in the emergence of environmentalism.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 11am – 6pm

Admission is always free and passes are not required

Other venues: New Orleans Museum of Art, New Orleans, October 5, 2017–January 7, 2018

West Building, Ground Floor, Inner Tier
National Gallery of Art
between 3rd & 9th Streets along Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 20 -
July 31, 2017
The Working Library: Clifford Burke and Fine Printing

The Book Club of California
312 Sutter Street, Suite 500
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
March 23 -
May 27, 2017
Vive les Satiristes: Caricature during the Reign of Louis Philippe 1830-1848, From the Collection of Josephine Lea Iselin
A fascinating overview of the Golden Age of social and political satire in 19th-century France, focusing on the role of controversial and wildly popular journals such as La Caricature and Le Charivari, and the great illustrators — Daumier, Grandville, and others — who captured in these pages the foibles of those around them with unmatched humor, skill, and style.

Mon – Sat 10am - 5pm

Free & open to the public

2nd Floor Gallery
THE GROLIER CLUB
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 27 -
June 09, 2017
The Renaissance: Highlights from Special Collections
This exhibition will present highlights from the rare book and manuscript holdings of the Special Collections Research Center exemplifying the history of the Renaissance. The opening of the exhibition will coincide with the annual meeting of the Renaissance Society of America in Chicago, March 30-April 1, 2017.

9am - 5:45pm

Special Collections Research Center
University of Chicago
1100 E. 57th Street
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
April 01 -
May 14, 2017
50 Years, 50 Works, 50 Reasons. Maurice Sendak: The Memorial Exhibition
In words and images, Maurice Sendak gave form to the fierce power of a child's imagination. This commemorative exhibition will include many highlights from his 60-year-long career, including original illustrations from Where the Wild Things Are, Little Bear, In the Night Kitchen, and other books; set design and costume sketches; animation reels; posters; sculpture; and more. The fifty works of art will be accompanied by quotes from fifty celebrities, renowned illustrators, friends of the artist, politicians, and other personalities who will share their thoughts about Maurice Sendak and how he inspired them, influenced their careers, and touched their lives. In the words of former President Bill Clinton, "Perhaps no one has done as much to show the power of the written word on children, not to mention on their parents, as Maurice Sendak."

April 1st - May 9th
Tue – Sun 10am – 4pm
Mon Closed

May 10th - October 10th (Columbus Day)
Daily 10am – 5pm

Adults & Juniors (13-64) $12.00
Seniors (65+) $10.50
Children (12 & under) FREE

Admission is always FREE for members, active military, and retired career military personnel.

The Fenimore Art Museum
5798 State Highway 80
Cooperstown, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 01 -
July 30, 2017
AUDUBON: DRAWN TO NATURE
Soar to the IMA to experience Audubon: Drawn to Nature, an exhibition featuring the lifelike drawings of John James Audubon. From stern owls to playful parakeets these beautiful drawings feature birds of North America carefully studied and documented by Audubon, a leader in ornithology and conservation.

Along with the artwork and accompanying descriptions of the bird’s habitat and characteristics, experience an immersive gallery where Audubon’s birds will come to life, giving the feeling of being outdoors in a forest. Learn about habitat conservation and test your wingspan against some of nature’s biggest birds. See one of the few remaining printing plates made for the original printing of Audubon’s The Birds of America book, lent to the IMA by the Smithsonian Museum of American History.

While visiting our campus, be sure to walk to the Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park where you can see real life birds up close.

Tue, Wed, Fri, & Sat 11am - 5pm
Thu 11am - 9pm
Sun noon - 5pm

IMA Members: FREE
Adults: $18
Ages 5 & under: FREE
Youth ages 6-17: $10
Access Pass $2
Children 15 and under must be accompanied by an adult.

Indianapolis Museum of Art
4000 Michigan Road
Indianapolis, IN
Exhibit Midwest
April 05 -
June 11, 2017
Books of Course
From the teaching collections of Macy Chadwick, Julie Chen, Betsy Davids, Alisa Golden, Michael Henninger, Charles Hobson, Nance O'Banion, Karen Sjoholm, and Kathleen Walkup

Drawing from their collections, nine Bay Area teachers have chosen books, objects, and creative assignments from their libraries to share in one exhibition. Presenting different teaching approaches through their selections, these educators shed light on their philosophies as well as their passions. Individual collections are reflected in different themes, for example: as a historical timeline; top ten student favorites; and books with an emphasis on language and culture. Over forty artists' works are included, each with a unique vision, and including a wide variety of processes and materials. From a book with intentionally bad printing to a book made to resemble a purse, each work serves as a gem to contemplate, with the hope that you, too, will be inspired to make books, of course.

Opening Reception :: Wednesday, April 5, 2017 :: 6pm - 8pm (RSVP required)

Book Talk

Book Talk :: Friday, April 21, 2017 :: 6:00 PM to 8:00 PM

The Book Talk will feature a lively informal tour of the exhibition with Macy Chadwick, Julie Chen, Betsy Davids, Michael Henninger, Charles Hobson, and Kathleen Walkup

San Francisco Center for the Book
375 Rhode Island Street
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
April 07 -
June 11, 2017
Big Bird: Looking for Lifesize
At the dawn of ornithology, 16th-century artists aspired to portray birds lifesize, but the largest paper available measured roughly 11 x 16 inches, allowing only smaller species to be depicted lifesize. Three hundred years later, John James Audubon was able to depict, for the first time, larger species thanks to technological innovations that perfected high-quality, large-size watercolor paper with a smooth surface.

Featuring 28 works from two time periods, Big Bird: Looking for Lifesize contrasts a group of exceptional European watercolors from the 1500s—which were recently featured to great acclaim in an exhibition in France—with spectacular examples of the rarest jewel of the New-York Historical Society’s extraordinary Audubon collection: the cache of watercolor models by Audubon in the special folio series The Birds of America, engraved by Robert Havell Jr. In contrast to the 16th-century artists, Audubon portrayed species lifesize on double-elephant-size-paper, around 40 x 26.5 inches.

Audubon’s watercolors display his brilliant contributions to ornithological illustration and his inventive use of the medium, while the 16th-century “portraits” document one of the most complex, early scientific efforts to catalogue natural phenomena taxonomically. This fascinating exhibition is as much an aesthetic journey as it is a demonstration of how technological innovation—of something even as simple as paper—can influence art and our understanding of nature.

The Audubon watercolors were purchased for the New-York Historical Society by public subscription from Mrs. John J. Audubon, and the sixteenth-century avian works were the gift of Nathaniel H. Bishop.

Tue - Thu, & Sat 10am - 6pm
Fri 10am - 8pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

Gallery
New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West (at Richard Gilder Way/77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 07 -
July 06, 2017
Thomas Jefferson: The Private Man, from the Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society
One of American history’s protean figures, Thomas Jefferson’s role as a private citizen is as defining as his personae as founder, president, and political standard-bearer. A gifted writer and political philosopher, Jefferson was also an accomplished gardener, farmer, and architect. Thomas Jefferson: The Private Man provides a glimpse of his life outside the public sphere through the iconic documents he created.

Among the 36 documents and artifacts from the collection of the Massachusetts Historical Society on display in the exhibition are Jefferson’s garden book, his last letter to John Adams, manuscript leafs from his Notes on the State of Virginia, early drawings of Monticello, and a copy of the Declaration of Independence in Jefferson’s hand.

Tue - Thu & Sat 10am - 6pm
Fri 10am - 8pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West (at Richard Gilder Way / 77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 08 -
August 07, 2017
Octavia Butler: Telling My Stories
A new exhibition opening this spring examines the life and work of celebrated author Octavia E. Butler (1947-2006), the first science fiction writer to receive a prestigious MacArthur “genius” award and the first African American woman to win widespread recognition writing in that genre. Butler’s literary archive resides at The Huntington.

The exhibition follows a roughly chronological thread and includes approximately 100 items that reveal the writer’s early years and influences. It also highlights specific themes that repeatedly commanded her attention. Butler was born June 22, 1947, to a maid and a shoeshine man. Her father died when she was quite young. An only child, she discovered writing very early because it suited her shy nature. The exhibition will feature samples of her earliest stories.

The exhibition will include examples of journal entries, photographs, and first editions of her books, including Kindred, arguably her best-known work. The book is less science fiction and more fantasy, involving an African American woman who travels back in time to the horrors of plantation life in pre-Civil War Maryland. “I wanted to reach people emotionally in a way that history tends not to,” Butler said about the book. Published in 1979, Kindred continues to command widespread appeal and is regularly taught in high schools and at the university level, and is frequently chosen for community-wide reading programs and book clubs.

Mon 10am - 5pm
Tue Closed
Wed - Sun 10am - 5pm

The last ticketed entry time is 4 p.m. The library and art galleries close at 4:30 p.m

Library West Hall
The Huntington
1151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
April 08 -
September 01, 2017
Clever Criminals and Daring Detectives
Since the beginning of printing, readers have thrilled to true crime tales of highwaymen and murderers and the last words of executed criminals. These narratives provided a mix of lurid details, moral uplift, and reassurance of the workings of justice. While true crime attracted readers through the centuries, fictional crime stories came into their own with the advent of the modern detective novel in the 19th century. Edgar Allan Poe’s “Murders in the Rue Morgue” launched a new genre that blossomed through the century in works ranging from Charles Dickens’s Mystery of Edwin Drood to Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes and even Bram Stokers’ Dracula.

This exhibition chases both criminal and detective characters across a wide historical landscape and offers the chance to test visitors’ own sleuthing skills. Objects on display include the earliest account of an American multiple murderer, the manuscript of “The Adventure of the Empty House” by Arthur Conan Doyle, and Ellery Queen’s thoughts on collecting detective fiction.

Hours

Mon Closed
Tue Noon — 5pm
Wed & Thu Noon — 8pm
Fri Noon — 5pm
Sat & Sun Noon — 6pm
*Closed on National Holidays

Adults: $10.00
Seniors (ages 65 & older): $8.00
Students & Children: $5.00
Children under 5: Free
Rosenbach Members: Free!
Members of AAM,ICOM, & the North American Reciprocal Museum (NARM) Program: Free

The Rosenbach
2008-2010 Delancey Place
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 21 -
July 01, 2017
EN MASSE: BOOKS ORCHESTRATED
Books, foremost agents of intellectual and visual stimuli, pose as objects of desire and forms of aesthetic due to their psychical precision that stems from their geometric formations and mysterious potential. When loosely arranged together through a conceptual or aesthetic vision–whether piled or adjoined– books adopt further narratives distinct in their structure, yet still original in their intellectual content. En Masse: Books Orchestrated, organized by Osman Can Yerebakan, contemplates various possibilities on intellectual thinking and collective culture, bringing together various artists that utilize book arrangement in their practice, while suggesting an alternative perspective on analyzing and interpreting materials beyond their physicality and content.

Complex and profound in their pristine forms, books endure as agents of both subjective specification and individualistic expression. Embedded with certain connotations, each book transfers an aura via its outer case. Authors, titles or artwork covering their layers convey the content of a book, while dictating assumptions on its subject matter. The exhibition aims to investigate cultural, historical, and emotional attributions on books as phenomenons while analyzing the dialogue between every individual edition with one another and their audience.

The artists include Louis Zoellar Bickett, Jordan Buschur, Emilio Chapela, Özgür Demirci, Donald Daedalus, Leor Grady, Katarina Jerinic, Nina Katchadourian, j.c. lenochan, Liz Linden, Michael Mandiberg, Phil Shaw, Ward Shelley & Douglas Paulson, Yinka Shonibare MBE, and Julia Weist.

Mon - Fri 11am - 6pm
Sat 10am - 5pm

Main Gallery
The Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 22 -
September 06, 2017
Witness: Reality and Imagination in the Prints of Francisco Goya
Visions of Spanish life from one of the greatest graphic artists of all time

Francisco Goya witnessed decades of political turmoil and social upheaval as court painter to four successive rulers of Spain. Among his greatest achievements were four series of etchings that chronicle the transformation of Spanish society and his own personal visions: Los Caprichos (The Caprices), Los Desastres de la Guerra (The Disasters of War), La Tauromaquia (Bullfighting), and Los Disparates (The Follies). Near the end of his life, Goya also produced a set of four grand lithographs known as the Bulls of Bordeaux. This exhibition highlights prints from each series, exploring the imagery and techniques that make Goya one of the greatest graphic artists of all time.

From the chaos of war to the spectacle of the bullfight, the prints in the exhibition show Goya’s remarkable ability to move between documentary realism and expressive invention. Unlike his commissioned paintings, his graphic works allowed him the freedom to explore provocative subjects such as prostitution, witchcraft, and political corruption. This exhibition also highlights how Goya pushed the limits of printmaking to heighten the expressive effect of his subjects.

Tue – Sun 10am – 5pm
Wed & Fri open until 8:45pm
Closed Monday

Korman Galleries 121–123
first floor, main building
Philadelphia Museum of Art
2600 Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 22 -
July 28, 2017
William Blake in Color
For the first time a massive volume of 2500+ rare plates from the Trianon Press Illuminated Book series enters the collector market. Additional proofs and personal archives from legendary Trianon producer, Arnold Fawcus are also made publicly available.

Tue - Sat 11am - 5pm

The William Blake Gallery
49 Geary Street, Suite 205
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
April 26 -
July 15, 2017
Mark Mothersbaugh: Myopia
A founding member of the trailblazing band DEVO, Mark Mothersbaugh (b. 1950) has been a visual artist since before the group’s formation. Beginning in the early 1970s, he has created a large body of work—paintings, prints, photographs, sculpture, decorative arts, video, film, and performance—which often originates from his visual diaries of over 30,000 postcard-sized drawings. Mothersbaugh’s fascination with obscure historical material and mass-culture consumerism pervades his diverse artistic output. Also key is his severe myopia, undiagnosed in his early childhood, which he employs as a springboard for celebrating outsiders and mutations. Since 1986, he has produced scores for films, television, and video games.

DEVO’s foundational concept of de-evolution—the belief that the world is falling apart—informs the band’s irreverent, polymorphous persona, first cultivated at Kent State University in Ohio. A studio-art major, Mothersbaugh helped develop the group’s iconoclastic identity less as a band and more as performance artists. Precedents such as Dada, Surrealism, and German Expressionism also inspired DEVO’s distinctive look: its eccentric costumes, inventive characters, and unconventional stage presence. The group’s original album artwork, production of some of the first-ever music videos, and interrogation of the peculiar relationship between industry and identity all play on notions of conformity and deviance. Known for the trademark “energy dome” headwear in their 1980 hit song “Whip It,” they also donned matching workers’ coveralls, hazmat suits, and garbage bags, and always appeared on stage with the man-child character Booji Boy, Mothersbaugh’s alter ego.

Indeed, central to Mothersbaugh’s ethos is this childlike perspective, which allows him to deflate the self-seriousness of music, art, and even society itself—to offer a juvenile subversion of adult imagery. Projecting a mordant, confrontational aesthetic and a critique of consumerism linked, but not limited, to punk, Mothersbaugh has long investigated the relationship between technology and individuality in our contemporary capitalist society—often through self-critical adoptions of some of its most recognizable forms.

Grey Art Gallery, New York University
100 Washington Square East
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 28 -
August 29, 2017
Russian Revolution: Hope, Tragedy, Myths
From the fall of Russia’s last Tsar to the rise of the first communist state, this definitive exhibition takes a fresh look at the Russian Revolution 100 years on.

With rarely seen items from both sides of the conflict – from a first edition of the Communist Manifesto to anti-Bolshevik propaganda – this is a unique chance to understand the lesser-known personal stories behind the events that changed the world.

Also on display for the first time, from the British Library’s own archive: Lenin’s handwritten application for a Reader Pass.

Uniting the political and the personal, explore the Russian Revolution’s central characters, most notably Lenin and Trotsky, alongside the tales of ordinary people living through extraordinary times. Did events in Russia in 1917 transform the international landscape forever? Did they shape the world we live in today?

Bringing to life the hope, tragedy and myths of this seismic revolution, discover Russia 1917 – the biggest flame in a world on fire.

PACCAR Gallery
The British Library
96 Euston Road
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
April 29 -
June 10, 2017
COLLECTING MEDIEVAL MASTERS NOW
The works presented here - manuscripts, miniatures, drawings, and rings - offer a meaningful counterpoint to more recent artistic productions and celebrate the legacy of thoughtful collecting from generations past and present. Highlights of the exhibition include a majestic two volume illustrated manuscript made in the court of King Charles V (reigned 1364-1380), a masterpiece of French Gothic manuscript illumination known as the “Soisson Missal”, a miniature attributed to a follower of Giovanni di Paolo from the collection of Lord Clark of Saltwood, and a Roman ring with message of friendship hidden in its intricate open-work.

OPENING
Madison Avenue Gallery Walk
Saturday, April 29, 2017
10am to 7pm

Tue - Sat 10am - 6pm

Les Enluminures - New York
23 East 73rd Street, 7th Floor, Penthouse
NewYork, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 03 -
September 03, 2017
Why Draw? 500 Years of Drawings and Watercolors at Bowdoin College
North America’s First Public Drawing Collection Surveyed at Bowdoin College Museum of Art.

This is the first-ever survey exhibition of the Museum’s extensive collection of drawings, widely considered the oldest public collection of works on paper on the continent, illuminating the foundational and evolving role of drawing within Western artistic practice.

Exhibition spans 500 years, including more than 150 works by American and European artists across cultures, genres, and time periods; drawings by Peter Paul Rubens, Winslow Homer, John Singer Sargent, Michelle Stuart, and more to examine the significance of the medium to Western artistic practice and study.

Free admission & open to the public

Tue - Sat 10am - 5pm
Thu 10am - 8:30pm
Sun 1pm - 5pm

Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Walker Art Building
Bowdoin College
9400 College Station
Brunswick, ME
Exhibit New England
May 05 -
August 12, 2017
Happiness: The Writer in the Garden, with companion exhibition Bird Watching
Like a wandering vine, the subject of garden-making winds through the shelves of books and boxes of archives in the collection of the Beinecke Library. In the materials that make up this exhibition, one state of mind appears over and again: Happiness. Writers of all dispositions seem to agree that the work of shaping the natural world into manageable plots brings particularly rewarding forms of joy and satisfaction.

Many parts of the Beinecke’s collections are represented in this exhibition – from 17th century printed books to contemporary archives. Because of the history of the collections in the library, the selections are weighted towards English language materials, but they stand for versions of joy felt around the world when a writer looks into the face of a fresh blossom.

Special events:

Friday, May 5, 5 pm: Opening reception, with Douglas Crase, author of Both: A Portrait in Two Parts, speaking on "The Enduring Influence of a Painter's Garden"

Friday, June 16, 5 pm: Juliet Nicolson, author of A House Full of Daughters, on the role of gardens in her life and in the story of her grandmother, Vita Sackville-West, creator of the celebrated gardens at Sissinghurst; presented in conjunction with the International Festival of Arts and Ideas

About Bird Watching:

Part scientific endeavor, part leisurely pastime, the activity we call “bird watching” includes the careful work of devoted scholars and that of curious backyard observers. Seeing and identifying the birds around us gives many a sense of connection to our natural world, even as the very creatures we watch have long symbolized the untethered flight of the spirit. In games and children’s literature, personal notes and intimate correspondence, birds and their lives on the wing captivate the imagination.

Conjuring the observer in the field, the image of the bird watcher may seem far removed from libraries like the Beinecke. Although they may seem quite different at first glance, bird watching and archival research have a good deal in common. Like both ornithologist and amateur enthusiast, the archival scholar may be keenly focused on minute details, seeing and evaluating minor variation in seemingly similar things; she is patient—she sits quietly (sometimes for long stretches) waiting for something special to appear in a familiar place; she carefully records her findings in detailed—sometimes idiosyncratic—lists and descriptive narratives; she is, by turns, solitary in her contemplation and engaged in lively discourse with those who share her interests.

Bird Watching documents the real lives of birds—their forms, their songs, their behavior—in word and image; the exhibition honors, too, the birds of fantasy and wild imagination. Together these reflect an ongoing human fascination with the life of the skies.

Mon 10am - 7pm
Tue - Thu 9am - 7pm
Fri 9am - 5pm
Sat 12pm - 5pm

Free & open to all

Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library
Yale University
121 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
May 08 -
July 07, 2017
Collecting Mesoamerica: The Hemispheric Roots of U.S. Anthropology
In the second half of the nineteenth century, Penn Professor Daniel Garrison Brinton assembled an impressive collection of books, manuscripts, and artifacts related to Mesoamerica; at the same time, his published work helped to define the emerging discipline of anthropology in the United States. This exhibit explores the relationship between collecting and anthropology at Penn by bringing together materials drawn from Brinton's papers and his manuscript linguistic collection, as well as books from the Penn Museum Library, images of artifacts from the Penn Museum, and records drawn from the Museum Archives.

Mon - Fri 9am - 5pm

Free & open to the public

Snyder-Granader Alcove
Van Pelt-Dietrich Library, sixth floor
3420 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 09, 2017 -
January 05, 2018
The Living Book: New Perspectives on Form & Function
Books of all shapes and sizes are common objects in our lives. We use them for education, reflection, work, and fun. The Library Company's new exhibition, curated by the Conservation Department, will provide a new perspective on the material culture of the book. This multi-media presentation will highlight the evolution of books within our lives and history. We'll explore details, such as homemade repairs, handwritten notes, and sentimental tokens that bring the book to life. These details, which are often overlooked, convey a sense of each book's unique story. Also included are various materials and ephemera, including prints, photographs, broadsides, and advertisements. The Living Bookwill inspire you to think about the role of the book in our lives, and the value of its preservation for discovery and exploration in the future.

Collector's Discussion Featuring Michael Zinman & The Living Book: Exhibition Opening: Tue, May 9th
6:00pm - 7:00pm
Reception to follow

The Library Company welcomes you to an evening featuring special remarks from renowned book collector and Library Company Emeritus Trustee Michael Zinman for his talk Life and Loves: adventures with books and booksellers (highly enjoyable and often successful); with women (entertaining but a non-starter in this environment); and with my epiphanies du jour (invariably disastrous); in all, a merry dessert for a merry evening.

Annual Business Meeting
for Library Company Shareholders
Tue, May 9th 5:00pm - 6:00pm

Shareholders will approve current nominations to the Board of Trustees, celebrate past year's accomplishments, and catch a glimpse of future initiatives.
The Living Book Symposium: May 18th, 2017
1:00pm - 5:00pm
Free for Members/ $15 for Non-Members

Mon - Fri 9:00am - 4:45pm

The Library Company of Philadelphia
1314 Locust Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 09 -
October 29, 2017
Restless Shadow: Dickens the Campaigner
Charles Dickens was a novelist who addressed social ills in his fiction. He was also a journalist and activist who boldly and imaginatively campaigned to improve the lives of the most desperate and overlooked in Victorian society.

The exhibition Restless Shadow explores a largely unknown and under-rated body of Dickens’s work that speaks plainly to social justice with energy and relevance—both then and now. It reveals his keen interest in ‘street level’ problems along with other Victorian reformers such as Florence Nightingale and Angela Burdett-Coutts. It shows the practical, hands-on solutions which flowed from his campaigns.

Dickens was especially powerful in pioneering new forms of investigative reporting and satirical exposé. As a young journalist and shorthand-writer with the pen-name ‘Boz’, he honed a peerless style of urban description, combining humour, pathos and a heightened kind of graphic realism. In his artistic maturity as a journalist, editor and speech-maker, Dickens drew the attention of a huge and diverse international readership to an astonishingly broad range of campaigns.

Core Themes

Restless Shadow focuses in particular on Dickens’s campaigning on homelessness; workhouses for the poor; schools and schooling; conditions in the armed forces and for veterans; and prisons and punishment, including his fervent opposition to the death penalty. It also shows how Dickens’s investigative reporting informed his fiction, for example, in Fagin’s sentencing and Bill Sikes’s accidental hanging in Oliver Twist.

New Discovery

At the heart of this exhibition is the monthly journal, All The Year Round, which Dickens founded in 1859. It represents the pinnacle of his ability to turn magazine articles into activism and activism into literary art.

As editor, Dickens published others’ contributions to All The Year Round anonymously. For more than a century, researchers were unable to prove their authorship. Then, in 2014, Dr Jeremy Parrott discovered a unique set of volumes annotated with contributors’ names. This is the first time that Dr Parrott’s discovery has been on display to the public. It reveals the identities of the men and women whom Dickens gave a platform to write on the most vital and controversial issues of the day.

The exhibition also includes Dickens’s editorial chair, and his walking stick from the 1860s. He used the stick to walk huge distances exploring London’s streets by day and night. It’s a powerful symbol of his desire to go into every corner of society, to bring himself face-to-face with suffering, and expose what others couldn’t see.

Tue - Sun 10am - 5pm
Mon Closed (except for Bank Holidays)

Last admission is at 4pm.
Once a month we are open until 8pm with last admission at 7pm.

Free with general admission

Charles Dickens Museum
48 Doughty Street
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
May 17 -
July 29, 2017
The Revival of Calligraphy: 1906 to 2006
Calligraphy is an art with a long and noble history, going back many centuries and spanning cultures. No major museum exhibition of Persian art, or Asian art, or even Medieval Western art would be considered complete without examples of calligraphy from these cultures. Yet, curiously, modern Western calligraphy has been ignored by the art establishment. This show aims to correct that oversight, showing major calligraphic art by over 70 Western artists from 1906-2006, demonstrating how alive – even thriving – the art is in the West in the computer age. Lenders include Letterform Archive, San Francisco, CA, and several private collectors.

Mon – Sat 10am - 5pm

Free & open to the public

THE GROLIER CLUB
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 19 -
September 11, 2017
Amazing Acts of The Greatest Show on Earth
For 146 years some of the most astounding and exciting acts in circus history have performed for circuses bearing the title of the Greatest Show on Earth. From P.T. Barnum’s Great Traveling Museum, Menagerie, Caravan and Hippodrome, first put on the road in 1871, through his partnership with James Bailey and the later combination of American’s two largest shows by the Ringling brothers, up to the contemporary shows produced by Feld Entertainment, the title has become synonymous with the highest quality of circus performance. This exhibition features original posters spanning the history of this singular brand, giving us another opportunity to marvel at a few of the amazing talents that have performed for the Greatest Show on Earth.

Open Daily 10am - 5pm
Thusdays until 8pm

Circus Museum (The Ringling)
The John & Mable Ringling Museum of Art
5401 Bay Shore Road
Sarasota, FL
Exhibit South
May 20 -
August 13, 2017
A New Light on Bernard Berenson: Persian Paintings from Villa I Tatti
This focused exhibition features illustrated Persian manuscripts and detached folios that were collected in the early 20th century by Harvard alumnus Bernard Berenson (1865–1959), the famous American art historian and connoisseur of Italian Renaissance painting. Berenson prized these works at his home in Florence, Villa I Tatti, which he bequeathed to Harvard and which now serves as the Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies. The exhibition offers the first opportunity to see these works outside Villa I Tatti.

Works in the exhibition are grouped according to the style in which each was created between the 14th and 17th centuries in Iran and Central Asia. Berenson’s important 15th-century Timurid manuscript will be displayed in an unbound state as part of an ongoing conservation and rebinding process. The show will also include additional related works from the Harvard Art Museums, the Morgan Library and Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. These works were collected by close associates of Berenson who shared his enthusiasm for Persian painting, at a time when this area of art was gaining considerable prestige among collectors.

The exhibition sheds important new light on Berenson’s little-known and understudied Persian collection, highlighting current research from various scholars on Berenson’s collecting interests and the artistic and cultural significance of the objects.

University Research Gallery
Harvard Art Museums
32 Quincy Street
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
May 22 -
September 02, 2017
Henry David Thoreau at 200
As scholars, teachers, politicians, and pundits debate what America is and means by reimagining or rewriting the America in which we live, it is worth recalling the America actually lived in and written about by the country’s first generation born after the American Revolution. The bicentenary of Henry David Thoreau, who was born in Concord, Massachusetts, on July 12, 1817 and died there on May 6, 1862, provides such an occasion.

A contemporary of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Margaret Fuller, Walt Whitman, and Frederick Douglass, Thoreau did not always share in the prominence they enjoyed. Although his story invariably opens with reference to Emerson, Emerson’s belief that American exceptionalism was synonymous with capitalism made for a stark distinction between the two, a distinction Thoreau underscored in 1853, writing, “I am a mystic—a transcendentalist—& a natural philosopher.” The dominant Thoreau who has emerged among recent generations of readers is an environmentalist who argued for the restoration of the landscape with which humankind was originally blessed, a humanitarian who read capitalism as the supreme threat to individualism and equal rights under the law, and a political thinker who critiqued the popular concept of exceptionalism as promoting destructive impulses such as the virtual eradication of Native American culture and the extension of slavery into the American West.

Henry David Thoreau at 200 invites you to examine the life and thought of the author of “Civil Disobedience” and Walden. Highlights of the exhibition include:

-First editions of his major works
-Drawings of Thoreau by his close friend, Daniel Ricketson
-Thoreau’s own copy of Ralph Waldo Emerson’s Nature
-One of his Harvard College examination papers
-Manuscripts of “Reform and the Reformers” and “Walking”
-The recently discovered notes on his search for Margaret Fuller after her shipwreck.

Lowell Room
Houghton Library
Harvard Yard
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
May 23 -
November 22, 2017
Collecting Inspiration: Contemporary Illustrators and Their Heroes
Picture books instill in children a sense of awe, magic, and wonderment, but who inspires the illustrators themselves—the people who bring incredibly imaginative worlds to life? Organized by two prominent figures in the field, Tony DiTerlizzi and Mo Willems, this exhibition gives visitors a peek into the minds and motivations of an array of talented artists working today. Visit The Carle to find out who inspires Tony and Mo, as well as Sophie Blackall, Sandra Boynton, Ashley Bryan, Eric Carle, Bryan Collier, Marla Frazee, Laurie Keller, Lauren Long, Patrick McDonnell, Yuyi Morales, Kadir Nelson, LeUyuen Pham, Jerry Pinkney, Robin Preiss Glasser, Judy Schachner, Lane Smith, and—with a special contribution from his foundation—the late Maurice Sendak.

Tue – Fri 10am – 4pm
Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

Central Gallery
The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England