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April 15, 2015 -
March 31, 2018
America in Circulation: A History of US Currency
Exhibit will feature the collection of Mark R. Shenkman

Visitors will have the opportunity to view hundreds of beautiful and rare examples of American paper money and to explore them in more depth through large interactive touch screen displays.

From Colonial times, American money has told a fascinating and detailed story of the country’s struggles and successes. Pivotal moments in history have led to changes in the nation’s money, as crises have brought about innovation. Often local and national currencies competed and coexisted with each other, while economic depression, war and counterfeiting drove constant advances in design.

“Today, there are only seven notes in circulation. Yet most Americans don’t realize that both the banks and the government were issuing many different types of currency for most of our nation’s first 150 years,” said Museum President David Cowen. “The notes in this exhibit tell the story of the development of America, and their striking beauty makes them pieces of art in and of themselves.”

The exhibition will feature approximately 250 notes spanning from the Colonial era to the present day. Highlights include rare examples of currency bearing the signatures of signers of the US Constitution and Declaration of Independence; a complete set of notes from the Educational Series of 1896, renowned for being the most beautiful paper money in American history; and rare examples of high denomination notes including $5,000 and $10,000 bills.

Tues–Sat 10am – 4pm

MUSEUM OF AMERICAN FINANCE
48 Wall Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 04, 2015 -
November 30, 2017
British Guiana One-Cent Magenta: The World’s Most Famous Stamp
The 1856 British Guiana One-Cent Magenta is displayed in the museum’s William H. Gross Stamp Gallery. This exhibition of the stamp is the longest and most publicly accessible showing ever.

Open daily 10am - 5:30pm
(except December 25)

Free admission

Smithsonian's National Postal Museum
2 Massachusetts Avenue NE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 10, 2016 -
May 14, 2017
Now and Forever: The Art of Medieval Time
What time is it? The question seems simple, and with a watch on your wrist or a cell phone in your hand, the answer is easy. In the Middle Ages, however, the concept of time could be approached in many different ways, with vastly different tools.

Drawing upon the rich holdings of the Morgan’s collection of medieval and Renaissance illuminated manuscripts, Now and Forever explores how people told time in the Middle Ages and what they thought about it. The manuscripts range in date from the eleventh to the sixteenth centuries and come from all the major countries of Europe.

The exhibition begins with the quirks of the medieval calendar, exploring sacred feasts, the mysteries of Golden Numbers, the utility of Dominical Letters, and how the Middle Ages inherited the Roman Calendar of Julius Caesar. Visitors will engage with the complexities of time as defined by liturgical celebrations and their two overlapping systems of temporale (feasts of time) and sanctorale (feasts of saints), systems that still influence the way we tell time today. Now and Forever also explores how time beyond the grave preoccupied medieval people for whom life on earth was a mere dress rehearsal for the main event—the afterlife.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 25, 2016 -
February 19, 2017
Bodleian Treasures: 24 pairs
An exhibition displaying a selection of the Bodleian Libraries most magnificent items. It features rare and renowned items including Tolkien's illustrations from The Hobbit, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, the Bay Psalm Book, the 'most expensive' printed book in the world and the venerated Shikshapatri.

The exhibition presents some of the best of the 12 million items in the Bodleian's collections and uniquely displays these treasures in 24 pairs. Familiar icons of the Libraries' extraordinary holdings are shown alongside the less familiar, opening new avenues into the wealth of the Bodleian's famous collections. Rare books are joined together with manuscripts while modern ephemera sit alongside 400-year-old rolls, drawing out themes and unique stories that bring the pairs together.

Opening times:
Monday to Friday 10am-5pm
Saturday 10am-5pm
Sunday 11am-5pm

Free admission

Treasury
Weston Library
Broad Street
Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
February 27, 2016 -
February 12, 2017
Natural Selections: Flora and the Arts
Natural Selections: Flora and the Arts explores through more than 20 objects how nature has inspired, impressed, and enlightened society long before the publication of Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species in 1859. Using three themes, the exhibition explores the subject of flora and how it inspired the decorative arts. "Botanizing" looks at the movement to classify, study, and teach though a selection of educational books and prints detailing floral anatomy and stages of life. "Art in Nature" delves into the museum's rich collection of decorative arts to see how plants and flowers have influenced designers and craftspeople in fields as diverse as textiles, ceramics, furniture, and architecture. Finally, "Bringing the Outdoors In" showcases ceramic and glass vessels which literally brought colorful and fragrant flowers and plants indoors for personal enjoyment and study.

Daily 9:30am - 4:30pm

Lobby
Flynt Center of Early New England Life
Historic Deerfield Village
80 Old Main Street
Deerfield, MA
Exhibit New England
April 23, 2016 -
March 19, 2017
REVEALING THE INVISIBLE: THE HISTORY OF GLASS AND THE MICROSCOPE
Glass made it possible for scientists and artists to see tiny living creatures once invisible to the human eye. Revealing the Invisible: The History of Glass and the Microscope tells the stories of scientists’ and artists’ exploration of the microscopic world between the 1600s and the late 1800s. Their discoveries fed people’s hunger to learn more about nature, increasing the popularity of microscopes and driving improvements in scientific glass. These advances culminated in the 19th century with the advent of modern scientific glassmaking and the perfection of the microscope. Unleash your sense of discovery as you explore the invisible through historic microscopes, rare books, and period illustrations.

9am – 5pm every day

Rakow Research Library
The Corning Museum of Glass
One Museum Way
Corning, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 17, 2016 -
June 04, 2017
Double Take: Daguerreian Portrait Pairs
Highlighting the depth of the National Portrait Gallery’s early photography collection, this exhibition will showcase fourteen daguerreotypes—two portraits each—of seven subjects: George Bancroft, Jenny Lind, Zachary Taylor, Frederick Douglass, Jefferson Davis, Daniel Webster, and John Quincy Adams. Only one loan—a daguerreotype of John Quincy Adams from the National Museum of American History—will supplement the Gallery’s collection.

By featuring two portraits of each famous sitter, the exhibition will encourage visitors to consider the ways in which various daguerreotypists approached the same subject and how different the results could be. In addition to discussing the early history of portrait photography, the accompanying text will compare images made for public consumption with those produced as personal keepsakes. Ann Shumard, senior curator of photographs, curates this installation.

11:30am - 7pm daily

Free admission

1st Floor
National Portrait Gallery
8th and F Streets NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 20, 2016 -
July 31, 2017
Truman Capote’s Brooklyn: The Lost Photographs of David Attie
In the spring of 1958 a young photographer named David Attie was led through the streets of Brooklyn Heights and to the Brooklyn waterfront by an unexpected guide—33-year-old Truman Capote. The images Attie took that day were to illustrate Capote’s essay for Holiday magazine about his life in Brooklyn. Decades later, these largely unseen photographs are being exhibited for the first time.

Wed - Sun 12pm - 5pm

Suggested Admission
BHS Member: Free
Adults: $10
Seniors 62 and over: $6
Teachers: $6
Students (with I.D.): Free
Children under 12: Free

The Museum and Library are closed Thanksgiving Day, the day after Thanksgiving, Christmas Day, New Year's Day, Easter Sunday, and Independence Day.

Please note: the Othmer Library will be CLOSED to the public Monday, August 1 - Wednesday, August 31. We will reopen on Thursday, September 1.

Brooklyn Historical Society
128 Pierrepont Street
Brooklyn, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 20, 2016 -
July 30, 2017
Truman Capote’s Brooklyn: The Lost Photographs of David Attie
In the spring of 1958 a young photographer named David Attie was led through the streets of Brooklyn Heights and to the Brooklyn waterfront by an unexpected guide—33-year-old Truman Capote. The images Attie took that day were to illustrate Capote’s essay for Holiday magazine about his life in Brooklyn. Decades later, these largely unseen photographs are being exhibited for the first time.

Museum Hours: Wed - Sun 12pm - 5pm
Library Hours: Wed - Sat 1pm - 5pm

Students (with I.D.): Free
Children under 12: Free

Suggested admission:
Free - BHS Member
$10 - Adults
$6 - Seniors 62 & over
$6 - Teachers
Free - Students (with I.D.)
Free - Children under 12

Brooklyn Historical Society
128 Pierrepont Street
Brooklyn, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 01, 2016 -
July 01, 2017
Guerra Civil @ 80
Marking the 80th anniversary of the beginning of the Spanish Civil War, the exhibition Guerra Civil @ 80 features selections from The Bancroft Library's Veterans of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, Bay Area Post records and photographic collections, along with posters, books, pamphlets, and other ephemera. A visual and textual display of the struggle to defend the Second Spanish Republic, the exhibition documents the role of both the Republicans, who were defending the democratically elected government, and the Nationalists, the right-wing rebel forces led by General Francisco Franco. The exhibition also addresses how the war, which unfolded from 1936 to 1939, affected the lives of the people of Spain and American volunteers fighting on the front lines or assisting in the war effort, as well as how the conflict precipitated an intense creative response from within and outside Spain.

Mon - Fri 9am - 5pm

2nd floor corridor (between The Bancroft Library & Doe Library)
University of California
Berkeley, CA
Exhibit West
September 01, 2016 -
December 09, 2017
Making the English Book: The Takamiya Deposit
The most impressive collection of medieval English manuscripts in private hands will be on exhibition for the first time in the United States at the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library in 2017. Four unique Chaucer manuscripts, numerous devotional rolls, and works as varied as Boethius’ Consolation of Philosophy, Langland’s Piers the Plowman and a Middle English medical manuscript—all from the collection of Toshiyuki Takamiya—will be shown in the context of the Beinecke’s own rich holdings of English and Continental manuscripts.

With a rare combination of scholarly and antiquarian expertise, Professor Emeritus Takamiya of Keio University in Tokyo assembled an unrivaled collection of medieval manuscripts over four decades. Held privately in Japan, the collection has been relatively unstudied in the West, and Professor Takamiya’s generous deposit of these manuscripts at the Beinecke makes a significant contribution to medieval scholarship at Yale University and internationally.

Mon 10am - 7pm
Tue - Thu 9am - 7pm
Fri 9am - 5pm
Sat (Exhibitions only) 12pm - 5pm

Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library
121 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
September 01, 2016 -
July 01, 2017
Guerra Civil @ 80
Marking the 80th anniversary of the beginning of the Spanish Civil War, the exhibition Guerra Civil @ 80 features selections from The Bancroft Library's Veterans of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, Bay Area Post records and photographic collections, along with posters, books, pamphlets, and other ephemera. A visual and textual display of the struggle to defend the Second Spanish Republic, the exhibition documents the role of both the Republicans, who were defending the democratically elected government, and the Nationalists, the right-wing rebel forces led by General Francisco Franco. The exhibition also addresses how the war, which unfolded from 1936 to 1939, affected the lives of the people of Spain and American volunteers fighting on the front lines or assisting in the war effort, as well as how the conflict precipitated an intense creative response from within and outside Spain.

9am - 5pm, Monday - Friday

2nd floor corridor between The Bancroft Library and Doe Library
University of California
University Drive
Berkeley, CA
Exhibit West
September 02, 2016 -
February 26, 2017
Tour: Shakespeare’s World
William Shakespeare’s comedies, tragedies and histories were situated in a number of locations throughout Europe, Asia and Africa. These plays spanned the centuries, from classical times to the Renaissance. In this exhibition of forty maps, images and three-dimensional objects, visitors will learn about Britain in the time of Shakespeare, discover centuries-old maps illustrating where the plays were set, and understand the symbolic role that geography held to the dramas.

Kronborg Castle in Denmark, known as Elsinore in Hamlet, will be highlighted in the exhibition. A 1629 Dutch map depicting the Danish Kingdom, along with a vignette illustrating “Elsenor,” will be on display. Complementing this map will be an original print of “Cronenburg” from Samuel von Pufendorf’s 1696 historical atlas. Shakespeare’s World will complement a larger exhibition which will open at the Boston Public Library in October 2016, highlighting the Bard’s first folios.

Mon – Thu 10am - 7pm
Fri & Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 1pm - 5pm

Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library
Copley Square
700 Boylston Street
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
September 03, 2016 -
February 20, 2017
Lari Pittman: Mood Books
Los-Angeles based artist Lari Pittman (b. 1952) is known for his exuberant, colorful, and graphically complex works. Huntington visitors can see the artist at his hallucinogenic best in a new exhibition opening this fall. Six monumental illustrated books, each opening to more than four feet in width, contain 65 paintings by the artist. They draw from a variety of aesthetic traditions, ranging from decorative art and design to advertising and folk art. Combined with Pittman’s brilliant draftsmanship and acidic color, the images advance an astute and acerbic social commentary embedded in narratives rich with real and invented mythologies.

The impact of the books is further elevated by an installation conceived by award-winning Los Angeles architect Michael Maltzan. Grand, sculptural pedestals hold the books open so visitors can enjoy a direct, unimpeded experience. Page openings will be changed periodically during the run of the show, and a large touch screen will make it possible to view all the paintings and text in sequential order.

Scott Galleries
The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
September 10, 2016 -
June 18, 2017
Janet Taylor Pickett: The Matisse Series
Janet Taylor Pickett: The Matisse Series explores the dialogue between Taylor Pickett’s artwork and that of renowned French artist Henri Matisse. Held in the Museum’s Roberts and Rotunda galleries, the exhibition features 76 collages, as well as 4 hand-made books.

An additional highlight of the exhibition will be the installation of Sixty Six Dresses: An Odyssey, 2014-15. Referring to the artist’s age at the time of its ongoing creation, this work will be augmented by two additional collaged dresses to match her current age when the exhibition opens. The artist has observed that “the dress is the symbol that we address, redress, and dress with meaning. Historically, women are defined by how they dress—our dresses have our DNA in them, our memory.” In many of her dresses, Taylor Pickett juxtaposes images of African sculpture, textiles, and cultural elements, with details from Matisse’s work, typically procured from exhibition catalogue reproductions. This multi-cultural dialogue is at the heart of her complex, archetypal work, which often features portraits of the artist herself. The artist’s interest in light, color, and multiple perspectives is also pervasive in some of her recent works in which she combines elements of Matisse’s work with tripartite spaces evoking medieval altarpieces, unifying past and present times.

This is the second time the artist has been featured in a one-person show at MAM; the first More than One Way Home in 1997 was a 25-year mid-career survey. Furthermore, Janet taught classes in the Museum’s Yard School of Art and served on the Museum’s Board of Trustees, as well as its African American Cultural Committee, which she co-founded. Pickett will also be represented in two concurrent complementary exhibitions, Matisse and American Art and Inspired by Matisse: Selected Works from the Collection, opening February 2017.

Montclair Art Museum
3 South Mountain Avenue
Montclair, NJ
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 10, 2016 -
February 26, 2017
You Say You Want a Revolution? Records and Rebels 1966 - 1970
This major exhibition will explore the era-defining significance and impact of the late 1960s, expressed through some of the greatest music and performances of the 20th century alongside fashion, film, design and political activism. The exhibition considers how the finished and unfinished revolutions of the time changed the way we live today and think about the future.

Daily: 10.00 - 17.45
Friday: 10.00 - 22.00

Exhibitions close 15 minutes prior to Museum closing times.
Closed 24, 25 & 26 December.

Free admission

Temporary Exhibition Space
Cromwell Road
London, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
September 12, 2016 -
February 05, 2017
Faith and Photography: Auguste Salzmann in the Holy Land
This exhibition will be the first devoted exclusively to the career of Auguste Salzmann (1824–1872), the French academic painter, archaeologist, and photographer who, in 1853, embarked on the arduous journey from Paris to Jerusalem. Hoping to verify religious faith through the objective documentation of the city's holy sites, he turned to photography, creating one of the most enigmatic bodies of work of the 19th century.

Despite a high-caliber photographic oeuvre of great variation and creativity, Salzmann remains relatively unknown. Some three dozen rare salted paper prints from paper negatives have been selected from his influential 1856 album, Jerusalem: A Study and Photographic Reproduction of the Monuments of the Holy City. All the works are in the Gilman Collection of The Met's Department of Photographs.

Exhibitions are free with Museum admission.

Gallery 899
The Met Fifth Avenue
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 13, 2016 -
March 19, 2017
Brown Bear Turns 50
Published in 1967, Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? had an immediate appeal to children and adults alike. Bill Martin Jr’s rhythmic call-and-response text builds anticipation at each turn of the page, while Eric Carle’s bold graphics and parade of animals encourage learning and imagination. Brown Bear has been translated into 31 languages—from Arabic to Vietnamese—and has sold 16 million copies. In addition to the original 1967 book, Carle re-illustrated editions in 1970, 1984, and 1992.

Artwork from every page of the famous book is on display, as well as a selection of Carle’s collages from additional collaborations with Martin. One of only two surviving collages from the 1967 edition—Brown Bear himself—has been faithfully restored and is on view for the first time.

Tue – Fri 10am – 4pm
Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

$9 Adult
$6 Youth (1-18), Student, Teacher, and Senior
$22.50 Family (2 adults and 2 youth)

The East Gallery
The Eric Carle Museum
of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
September 16, 2016 -
September 11, 2017
Artists' Books and Africa
African artists are experimenting with the genre of artists’ books, while international artists are exploring African themes in theirs. Artists’ Books and Africa is the first exhibition to focus on African artists books from the Smithsonian Libraries’ Warren M. Robbins Library and the National Museum of African Art.

10am – 5:30pm

Free admission

Sublevel 3 (off the Ripley Center Concourse)
African Art Museum
950 Independence Avenue SW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 20, 2016 -
February 26, 2017
David Garrick: Book Collector
David Garrick was perhaps the most famous English actor before Laurence Oliver. Less well known is his passion for book collecting. Garrick assembled a private library of considerable range and distinction, which offers an entertaining if unconventional perspective on his professional and recreational interest. This display, which marks the 300th anniversary of Garrick's birth, showcases a selection of his books alongside manuscript and graphic materials to illuminate his complementary roles of performer and bibliophile.

Daily: 10.00 - 17.45
Friday: 10.00 - 22.00

Exhibitions close 15 minutes prior to museum closing times.

Free admission

NAL Library Landing
Victoria and Albert Museum
Cromwell Road
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
September 22, 2016 -
February 05, 2017
The Tale of Kitty-in-Boots
See Quentin Blake's original drawings for Beatrix Potter's newly re-discovered story The Tale of Kitty-in-Boots

An exhibition of Quentin Blake's original illustrations for The Tale of Kitty-in-Boots, the recently re-discovered unpublished Beatrix Potter manuscript, to be published on 1 September by Penguin Random House.

The book about 'a well-behaved prime black Kitty cat, who leads rather a double life', features classic Potter characters including Mrs Tiggy-Winkle and Mr Tod re-drawn by Blake.

The exhibition will feature Blake’s 50 illustrations for the book, a sketchbook and reference material. It will also contain the original Beatrix Potter manuscript and one of Potter’s only two illustrations for the book, on loan from the V&A.

This will be the second exhibition to be held in the new Quentin Blake Gallery at House of Illustration, which opened in April. The Quentin Blake Gallery offers a continuous series of exhibitions of different aspects of Blake’s work, drawing on the unparalleled diversity of his personal archive of thousands of original illustrations, roughs and preparatory drawings.

Tue - Sun 10:00am - 6:00pm
Mon Closed

HOUSE OF ILLUSTRATION
2 Granary Square
King's Cross
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
September 23, 2016 -
February 17, 2017
The Gift to Sing: Highlights of the Leon F. Litwack & Bancroft Library African American Collections
For decades professor emeritus of history Leon F. Litwack has been accumulating what is arguably the world’s finest private collection of books on African American history and culture. This exhibition displays highlights of the collection that will be coming to The Bancroft Library as a bequest. The Litwack collection is particularly noteworthy for its Harlem Renaissance first editions in strikingly illustrated dust jackets. The exhibition includes books with distinguished provenance such as a copy of Frederick Douglass’s Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave with an inscription by the famous abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison. Complementing the Litwack books are treasures from Bancroft’s significant African American holdings, including the first book by an African American, Phyllis Wheatley’s Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral, published in 1773.

Mon - Fri 9am - 4pm

The Bancroft Library Gallery
The Bancroft Library
University of California
Berkeley, CA
Exhibit West
September 23, 2016 -
February 17, 2017
The Gift to Sing: Highlights of the Leon F. Litwack & Bancroft Library African American Collections
or decades professor emeritus of history Leon F. Litwack has been accumulating what is arguably the world’s finest private collection of books on African American history and culture. This exhibition displays highlights of the collection that will be coming to The Bancroft Library as a bequest. The Litwack collection is particularly noteworthy for its Harlem Renaissance first editions in strikingly illustrated dust jackets. The exhibition includes books with distinguished provenance such as a copy of Frederick Douglass’s Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave with an inscription by the famous abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison. Complementing the Litwack books are treasures from Bancroft’s significant African American holdings, including the first book by an African American, Phyllis Wheatley’s Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral, published in 1773.

9am - 4pm, Monday - Friday

The Bancroft Library Gallery
The Bancroft Library
University of California
University Drive
Berkeley, CA
Exhibit West
October 01, 2016 -
March 31, 2017
Deep Cuts: The B-Side of Historical & Special Collections
Deep Cut: True gems that are found later in an album, a B-side. Rarely if ever played on the radio.
(Urban Dictionary)

B-Side: (the music recorded on) the supporting or less important side of a single-playing gramophone record.
(Oxford English Dictionary)

The Harvard Law School Library’s Historical & Special Collections (HSC) is home to one of the largest collections of rare legal materials in the world. You might expect to find rare books, illuminated manuscripts, collections of scholarly papers, portraits, photographs, and material documenting the history of HLS in our collections … and you would be right. This is the “A-side” of HSC – the popular items people expect to find when they visit HSC in person and online.

But this exhibit is about the B-side of HSC: the bizarre, the unusual, the hidden gems. Locks of hair, fabric flowers, books bound in wallpaper, recordings in nearly obsolete formats, long-forgotten student publications, and surprising items in otherwise traditional collections of faculty papers … it’s all here in the B-side of HSC.

Historical & Special Collections
Harvard Law School Library
Langdell Hall
1545 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
October 04, 2016 -
February 05, 2017
EDGAR ALLAN POE IN BALTIMORE
THE ENIGMATIC EDGAR A. POE IN BALTIMORE & BEYOND: SELECTIONS FROM THE SUSAN JAFFE TANE COLLECTION

What did Edgar Allan Poe’s tales and poems mean to readers in his own time? How did he master so many forms of literature—and invent exciting new varieties, from science fiction to the detective story? Why did he move so often between cities, calling Richmond, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Baltimore “home” at different points in his life? Meet the enigmatic Edgar A. Poe: a man who lived in the real world, but tried to write his way out of it.

This exhibition of rare materials gives viewers the chance to see Poe at work, up close: “The Raven” in Poe’s own handwriting… first editions of Poe’s writings in books, newspapers, and magazines from the 1800s… and examples of the translations, illustrations, comic books, and portraits that have helped extend Poe’s global popularity. The exhibition is free and open to the public.

Mon Closed
Tue – Thu 10am – 5pm
Fri – Sat 10am – 3pm
Sun 10am – 1pm

THE ENIGMATIC FILM SERIES
Calling all Poe fans, cinephiles, and popcorn enthusiasts: join us for a short series of films based on the works and life of Edgar Allan Poe.

THE RAVEN (2012)
Fri, Oct. 7, 2016, 7pm
Free & open to the public

EDGAR ALLAN POE: BURIED ALIVE (2016)
Invitation-only premiere of a brand-new documentary about Poe's life.

SPIRITS OF THE DEAD (HISTOIRES EXTRAORDINARES, 1968)
Sun, Feb. 5, 2017, 4pm
Free & open to the public

George Peabody Library
17 E. Mount Vernon Place
Baltimore, MD
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 07, 2016 -
February 19, 2017
DANIEL CHESTER FRENCH: THE FEMALE FORM REVEALED
For nearly half a century, from the late 1870s to the late 1920s, Daniel Chester French (1850-1931) was America’s foremost sculptor of public monuments. His outdoor masterpieces can be seen in the cosmopolitan centers of New York, Boston, Chicago, Detroit, and Washington, DC, as well as in smaller American towns such as Concord, Massachusetts, Saratoga Springs, New York, and Lincoln, Nebraska. French’s projects adorn civic spaces including New York’s Central Park, Boston’s Public Garden, and Washington’s Dupont Circle; are focal points on college and university campuses at Harvard, Columbia, Bowdoin, and Gallaudet; enhance the facades of grand Beaux-Arts structures such as the United States Custom House in New York, the Brooklyn Museum, and the Boston Public Library; and are focal points in some of this country’s great historic cemeteries such as Woodlawn in New York, Graceland in Chicago, and Forest Hills in Boston.

Many of French’s public works depict or otherwise commemorate historical figures. These range from his herioc allegory, The Minute Man, created in 1875 for the town of Concord, Massachusetts, to grand-manner portraits, such as the colossal figure of Abraham Lincoln, executed in 1922 for the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC. French’s fame for these male-oriented masterpieces is well deserved, but in fact he was equally proficient at modeling the female figure, especially in its classicizing, idealized form. This aspect of his career has been little studied and it is the goal of this exhibition to help fill that gap in French scholarship.

Characteristically, French’s female figures are allegorical. Often idealized, seductively posed, and classically draped, they typically memorialize great human actions, events, or emotions. They fulfill their purpose not through portraiture but by means of a more sensual, tactile, and cerebral narrative. As an American classicist who trained in Europe, French looked first to the visible world for inspiration; but he always improved on what nature provides in order to achieve an ideal beauty in three-dimensional form. This was especially true of his interpretations of the female face and body. In fact, feminine beauty in allegorical form was often at the forefront of French’s work, even the public ones. Daniel Chester French: The Female Form Revealed explores this aspect of French’s career by focusing on a selection of evocative preliminary models and studies that he made in preparation for some of his great public commissions as well as for a number of his more intimate and personal works.

Mon - Thu 9am - 8pm
Fri 9am - 5:30pm
Sat 9am - 4pm
Sun 12pm - 4pm

Members free
non-members $5.00

BOSTON ATHENÆUM
10½ Beacon Street
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
October 11, 2016 -
February 12, 2017
The Art of Alchemy
Long shrouded in secrecy, alchemy is now recognized as the ancestor of modern chemistry. Alchemists were notorious for attempting to make synthetic gold, but their goals were far more ambitious: to transform and bend nature to the will of an industrious human imagination. For scientists, philosophers, and artists alike, alchemy seemed to hold the key to unlocking the secrets of creation. Alchemists’ efforts to discover the way the world is made have had an enduring impact on artistic practice and expression around the globe. Inventions born from alchemical laboratories include metal alloys for sculpture and ornament, oil paints, effects in glassmaking, and even the chemical baths of photography. The mysterious art of alchemy transformed visual culture from antiquity to the Industrial Age, and its legacy still permeates the world we make today.

Tue – Fri & Sun 10am – 5:30pm
Sat 10am – 9pm

Free admission
Closed Mondays

Getty Research Institute
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
October 14, 2016 -
February 26, 2017
Wanderer/Wonderer: Pop-Ups by Colette Fu
Colette Fu is renowned for her immense, sculptural pop-up books. This focus exhibition presents works from her series “Haunted Philadelphia,” inspired by eerie historical sites in her hometown, and “We are Tiger Dragon People,” her visual explorations of the culture in China’s Yunnan Province—her ancestors’ homeland. Fu’s works combine images of landscapes she has explored with elements of fairy tales and folklore. Through engineering feats, she transforms her photographs into oversized pop-ups, some with kinetic elements and blinking lights. Gathered together, Fu’s books form a pop-up fantasy world.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

National Museum of Women in the Arts
1250 New York Ave NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 14, 2016 -
February 12, 2017
Victorian Entertainments: There Will Be Fun
Performing pigs, magic tricks and pantomime! Roll up to celebrate some of the most popular entertainments of Victorian times performed in a variety of venues from fairground tents to musical stages.

Focusing on five colourful characters, follow their stories as we bring the worlds they inhabited to life. These Victorian A-listers include Dan Leno, the original pantomime dame and ‘funniest man on earth’, John Nevil Maskelyne, magician and manager of ‘England’s Home of Mystery’, and the great circus showman ‘Lord’ George Sanger. Also hear of those whose fame has now faded such as Annie De Montford, a mill worker turned mesmerist, and Evanion the Royal conjuror.

Step back in time with wonderfully decorative original posters, handbills, advertisements and tickets – all glorious examples of rare ephemera – alongside contemporary film and sound recordings. Explore the Victorians’ influence on the world of entertainment today. Without them we might never have experienced the joys of panto, stand-up comedy and even Britain’s Got Talent.

Every Saturday (15 October – 17 December, 15.00 – 17.00), a company of actors and performers will present archive material from the exhibition through the prism of contemporary performance.

Free admission

Entrance Hall
The British Library
96 Euston Road
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
October 14, 2016 -
February 13, 2017
States of Mind: Picasso Lithographs 1945–1960
By the end of the Second World War, Pablo Picasso had reached what he called “the moment... when the movement of my thought interests me more than the thought itself.” This new interest in “movement”—the successive permutations of an artistic statement—found its most remarkable expression in Picasso’s practice as a printmaker. Whereas oil paintings inevitably covered their tracks, concealing the process of their making under layers of opaque color, prints—especially lithographs—promised to record their own development through sequential stages, charting the movement of their maker’s thoughts from state to state. Picasso could work up a design, print it (in a first state), rework it, and print it again (in a second state), repeating the process two or ten or twenty times to chart the metamorphoses of a particular compositional idea. Drawing on the Norton Simon Museum’s holdings of over 700 Picasso prints—among the deepest collections of its kind anywhere in the world—States of Mind traces the evolution of individual compositions from the 1940s and 1950s through multiple states, subtle adjustments, and radical revisions.

Norton Simon Museum
411 W. Colorado Blvd. (corner of Orange Grove & Colorado Blvd)
Pasadena, CA
Exhibit West
October 17, 2016 -
February 11, 2017
Irish Women Rising: Gender and Politics in Revolutionary Ireland, 1900-1923
As they engaged in the national struggle for independence from British rule, Irish women had to break through cultural and social restraints. They organized politically and militarily. They fought alongside men, went to jail, and on hunger strikes. Kathleen Clarke, Maud Gonne, Constance Markievicz, Margaret Skinnider, and hundreds of other brave and determined women achieved their purpose and place in history. Featuring newly acquired, never-before-seen documents and artifacts, as well as an original 1916 Easter Rising Proclamation, this exhibition tells their stories.

Daily 9am - 5pm

The John J. Burns Library
Boston College
140 Commonwealth Avenue
Chestnut Hill, MA
Exhibit New England
October 22, 2016 -
February 20, 2017
THE ART OF THE QUR’AN: TREASURES FROM THE MUSEUM OF TURKISH AND ISLAMIC ARTS
In recognition of one of the world’s extraordinary collections of Qur’ans, the Freer|Sackler is hosting a landmark exhibition, the first of its kind in the United States. Some fifty of the most sumptuous manuscripts from Herat to Istanbul will be featured in The Art of the Qur’an: Treasures from the Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts, opening this fall. Celebrated for their superb calligraphy and lavish illumination, these manuscripts—which range in date from the early eighth to the seventeenth century—are critical to the history of the arts of the book. They were once the prized possessions of Ottoman sultans and the ruling elite, who donated their Qur’ans to various institutions to express their personal piety and secure political power. Each manuscript tells a unique story, which will be explored in this once-in-a-lifetime exhibition.

10am – 5:30pm

Free admission

Freer|Sackler, The Smithsonian's Museums of Asian Art
National Mall
1050 Independence Avenue SW

Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 22, 2016 -
March 20, 2017
Real American Places
A new exhibition opening this fall considers a rich dialogue between two iconic figures in American culture: the renowned photographer Edward Weston (1886–1958) and poet Walt Whitman (1819–1892). The 25 photographs included in the exhibition illuminate an understudied chapter of Weston’s career. In 1941, the Limited Editions Book Club approached Weston to collaborate on a deluxe edition of Whitman’s poetry collection, Leaves of Grass. The publisher’s ambitious plan was to capture “the real American faces and the real American places” that defined Whitman’s epic work. Weston eagerly accepted the assignment and set out with his wife, Charis Wilson, on a cross-country trip that yielded a group of images that mark the culmination of an extraordinarily creative period in his career. While Weston believed the photographs to be some of his best (he donated 90 pictures from the series to The Huntington in 1944, along with hundreds of other images), the resulting Limited Editions publication proved a failure on many fronts. As a result, the photographs from the Leaves of Grass project have been relegated to footnote status in Weston’s oeuvre. “Real American Places” seeks to give this unjustly overlooked body of work its due. In addition to selections from the series, the exhibition will include a number of original Whitman items from the Library’s holdings, allowing visitors to explore the creative response of one giant of American culture in conversation with another.

Scott Galleries, Chandler Wing
The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
October 22, 2016 -
April 09, 2017
Historic Futures: Artists Reinvent the Book
The lineage of the artist’s book descends from the common impulse to use pictures to tell stories. This connection has held constant from Paleolithic cave paintings onward, through the emergence of the artist’s book as a recognized creative medium in the twentieth century. Historically, artists have used the familiar elements of the book form—paper, printing, binding—as opportunities for expression and reinvention, sometimes challenging our notion of what a book can be. Historic Futures features examples documenting key moments in the evolution of the artist’s book from the late 1700s to today.

During the social and political upheavals of early twentieth-century Europe, avant-garde artists, poets, and designers re-imagined the book radically. This exhibition features Dlia Golosa (For the Voice), the 1923 collaboration by El Lissitzky and Vladimir Vladimirovich Mayakovsky that was groundbreaking in its compositional interpretations of poetry; Filippo Marinetti’s wild typographic transgressions, as exemplified by his Les mots en liberté futuristes (Futurist Words in Freedom, 1919); and LidantYU (1923), an early book by publisher and artist Ilia Zdanevich (Ilazd), with a text composed in Zaum, a Russian Futurist–invented language.

The exhibition continues with contemporary works, including Musashimaro (2013), by German artist Veronika Schaepers, whose treatment of a short story by Japanese author Choukitsu Kurumatani creates an immersive environment for reading. Examples such as this demonstrate how artists continue to approach the book as a medium still offering myriad possibilities for the creative imagination.

$15 Adults $15
$10 Seniors 65+
$6 Students with current ID
Free Members & youth 17 & under
Prices subject to change without notice.

Tues–Sun 9:30am – 5:15pm
Open select Mondays
Dec 26, 2016 9:30am – 5:15pm

Reva & David Logan Gallery of Illustrated Books
Legion of Honor
Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco
Lincoln Park
100 34th Avenue
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
October 28, 2016 -
February 24, 2017
'Moments of Vision': The Life and Work of Thomas Hardy
Thomas Hardy (1840-1928) is one of the few writers to have achieved equal distinction as both a novelist and a poet. He established his reputation in the Victorian period with such iconic novels as Far from the Madding Crowd, The Mayor of Casterbridge and Tess of the d’Urbervilles, set in the semi-fictional world of “Wessex.” In 1897, embittered by critics who branded his last two novels “distasteful” and “obscene,” Hardy abandoned prose and devoted the remaining thirty years of his life to writing poetry. By the time of his death, he was not only the last of the great Victorian novelists but had also become one of England's most important and influential modern poets

Drawing on the magnificent collection donated to the Fisher Library by the pre-eminent Hardy scholar and University of Toronto Professor Emeritus, Michael Millgate, this exhibition includes first editions, correspondence, manuscripts, photographs and ephemera illustrating Hardy’s professional and personal life.

Mon - Wed, & Fri 9am - 5pm
Thu 9am - 8pm*
(*extended hours: Sept 22nd until April 27th)

Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library
120 St. George Street
Toronto, ON, CANADA
Exhibit International
November 02, 2016 -
February 26, 2017
A Curious Hand: The Prints of Henri-Charles Guérard (1846-1897)
Described by the influential nineteenth-century art critic Roger Marx as “the engraver of curiosity par excellence,” Henri-Charles Guérard was one of the most skilled and inventive French printmakers of his day. It was to Guérard that the Impressionist painter Édouard Manet turned whenever he needed help making etchings, no doubt owing to Guérard’s expertise as a professional printmaker as well as to his innovative approach to the medium. He reacted to a broad array of artistic styles and worked in a variety of print techniques, testing the boundaries of each. Particularly noteworthy in this regard are his works that respond to the nineteenth-century vogue for Japanese ukiyo-e woodcuts, which embody some of the artist’s most original expressions.

Thanks to a generous gift from the art collector and connoisseur Samuel Putnam Avery (1822–1904), The New York Public Library has the largest collection of Guérard’s work in the United States. The exhibition on the third floor of the Library will feature close to ninety of his prints, including many states and impressions that have only recently come to light and which reveal his range and virtuosity.

3rd floor
NY Public Library
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
476 Fifth Avenue (42nd St and Fifth Ave)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 04, 2016 -
March 01, 2017
Maps and the 20th Century: Drawing the Line
Have you ever tried disappearing off the map? It’s harder than you think to be invisible nowadays.

That’s because 100 years of mapping technology – from the original sketch of today’s London Underground to the satellite imagery of the 1990s – has monitored and shaped the society we live in.

Two World Wars. The moon landings. The digital revolution. This exhibition of extraordinary maps looks at the important role they played during the 20th century. It sheds new light on familiar events and spans conflicts, creativity, the ocean floor and even outer space.

It includes exhibits ranging from the first map of the Hundred Acre Wood to secret spy maps, via the New York Subway. And, as technology advances further than we ever imagined possible, it questions what it really means to have your every move mapped.

Win an out-of-hours curator tour! Go behind the scenes of our exhibition and enjoy a show-and-tell session featuring rare cartographic treasures. Hosted by lead curator Tom Harper. Enter our ballot to be in with the chance of winning.

PACCAR Gallery
The British Library
96 Euston Road
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
November 05, 2016 -
March 05, 2017
Travel Posters from the Lowry Collection
For a small country, the former Czechoslovakia produced a large number of posters, owing to a combination of the country’s rich artistic legacy and strong economic climate. Even Czech fine artists, in the addition to commercial designers, contributed work to the category. The travel posters showcase the beauty, intrigue, and architecture of the Czech lands, urging foreigners to travel to Czechoslovakia.

The Lowry family has built their collection of Czech posters over the past 25 years, amassing more than 1,000 pieces—making it the largest collection in the world outside the Czech Republic. Father and son, George S. and Nicholas D. Lowry, have selected over 30 striking travel posters for this exhibition. It is the first organized exhibition of Czech travel posters ever presented.

The collection grew out of the family’s Czech origins and George and Nicholas’s mutual passion for these images. Viewers of PBS’s Antiques Roadshow will recognize Nicholas Lowry as a regularly appearing expert.

Mon - Sat 9:30am - 4pm
Sun 12pm - 4pm

National Czech and Slovak Museum
1400 Inspiration Place SW
Cedar Rapids, IA
Exhibit Midwest
November 11, 2016 -
May 28, 2017
Cover Stories: What bindings say about books
A book cover can tell its own story. During the early history of book production, the manner in which a book was bound was unique. Each hand-crafted binding reveals information about the individuals who owned books, their social status, professions and how they valued the texts within. The type of covering also demonstrates the skill of the binder and the fashion of the times in which it was made.

This exhibition includes examples of the finest luxury coverings through to the purely utilitarian. It features a selection of books from the University of Aberdeen’s Special Collections that were bound for, or belonged to, persons of note: A fine leather volume with lions tooled in gold for Prince Henry Stuart; a mathematical text wrapped in waste manuscript for daily use by the Renaissance scholar Duncan Liddel; a work of fiction bound in an Arts and Crafts chintz designed by William Morris.

The exhibition also presents covers that illustrate the moment in the mid 1800s when the art of bookbinding changed from being the means of customising a text for an individual into a new graphic art of book design aimed at the mass market.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a series of talks and events.

Mon - Wed: 10am - 5pm
Thu 10am - 7pm
Fri - Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 11am - 4pm

Special Collections
Special Collections Centre
The Sir Duncan Rice Library
Bedford Road
Aberdeen, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
November 11, 2016 -
April 21, 2017
Together We Win
The Philadelphia Homefront During The First World War

9am - 4:45pm

Free & open to the public

The Library Company of Philadelphia
1314 Locust Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 16, 2016 -
April 09, 2017
KAHBAHBLOOOM: The Art and Storytelling of Ed Emberley
Opening this fall at the Worcester Art Museum, KAHBAHBLOOOM: The Art and Storytelling of Ed Emberley is the first comprehensive retrospective for artist Ed Emberley, among the most prolific and respected illustrators of children's literature of the last 60 years. The author of classic books such as the Caldecott Honored One Wide River To Cross (1965), the Caldecott Medal-winning Drummer Hoff (1967), and the bestselling Go Away, Big Green Monster (1992), Emberley also developed one of the bestselling series of teaching books for young artists, beginning with Ed Emberley's Drawing Book of Animals (1970).

The exhibition draws on the Massachusetts-based artist's personal archive of original hand-drawn sketches, woodblock prints, final proofs, and first edition books to survey his career and examine his influence on generations of readers and nascent artists. KAHBAHBLOOOM will include interactive areas throughout the exhibition, including a stylized reproduction of the artist's drawing and light table from his home studio—where visitors of all ages can try their hand at his techniques—and a specially designed reading area.

Wed - Fri, Sun 11am - 5pm
Sat 10am - 5pm
3rd Thu of every month 11am - 8pm

CLOSED on Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year's

Members FREE

Adults: $14
Seniors 65 and over: $12
College Students with ID: $12 / Free on the third Thursday of each month
Ages 4-17: $6
Ages 3 and under: FREE

Special Admission for EBT card holders $2 per person cash admission

FREE FIRST Saturday Mornings
The first Saturday of each month: 10am - noon

Worcester Art Museum
55 Salisbury Street
Worcester, MA
Exhibit New England
November 17, 2016 -
February 17, 2017
Making and Breaking Medieval Manuscripts
Both before and after the advent of movable type in Europe, circa 1450, artists created hand-drawn and hand-embellished scrolls, books, and maps. In Western Europe during the Middle Ages, manuscript ornamentation became a flourishing art form, enriching secular and sacred items alike.

Making and Breaking Medieval Manuscripts brings together a selection of works that are owned in whole or in part by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, including items in the Krannert Art Museum collection and items housed at the Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Spurlock Museum of World Cultures, and the Newberry Library in Chicago.

The exhibition showcases Western European manuscripts from the thirteenth to the sixteenth centuries and examines issues associated with the production of illuminations and other decorations, patronage, owner additions and modifications, the impact of printing technologies, the reuse of parchment, book breaking, and the legacy of the self-professed “biblioclast” Otto F. Ege.

Select programming for this exhibition:

Gallery Conversation | February 2, 2017 · 5:30 pm
Location: KAM Main Level, West Gallery

Medieval Studies Lecture | February 9, 2017 · 5:30 pm
Featuring Carol Symes, Lynn M. Martin Professorial Schollar and Associate Professor of History, Theatre, and Medieval Studies
Location: KAM Lower Level, Auditorium (room 62)

Mon – Sat 9am – 5pm
Thu "KAM After Hours" until 9pm (through Dec 8)
Sun Closed

Krannert Art Museum and Kinkead Pavilion
500 East Peabody Drive
Chapaign, IL
Exhibit Midwest
November 17, 2016 -
August 31, 2017
Broken Beauty: Ruins of the Ancient World
This compelling new exhibition focuses on the Library’s holdings of books devoted to historic sites in the Middle East and beyond. It was the 2015 bombing of the Temple of Baalshamin in the Syrian city of Palmyra that compelled us to examine our collection of books on the historic cities of Paestum, Petra, Persepolis, and Baalbek, among others.

The Library’s collection contains books written by eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and twentieth-century travelers to the Middle East from Cornelis de Bruyn and Sir Austen Henry Layard to Mark Twain and Vita Sackville-West. Les Ruines de Palmyra, Robert Wood’s documentation of Palmyra during his 1751 visit, became an instant classic for future travelers and today is consulted by archaelogists and historians seeking to reconstruct its legendary past. Accounts of ancient ruins were popular among early members, including John Jay and DeWitt Clinton. Two nineteenth-century Library members also ventured beyond Europe’s more comfortable boundaries. John Lloyd Stephens’ Incidents of Travel in Egypt, Arabia Petraea, and the Holy Land was published in 1838, George William Curtis’s The Howadji in Syria in 1852. One of the treasures of the Library is Giovanni Battista Piranesi’s 1778 folio Differentes vues de quelques restes de trois grands edifices qui subsistent encore dans le milieu de l’ancienne ville de Peste.

“Ruin-fever,” as one writer described it, runs like an electrical current through many of these early accounts. The travelers are nearly all struck with awe at what the past, however fractured and senselessly deconstructed, reveals. We believe that mounting an exhibition of this historic dimension will allow visitors to Broken Beauty to experience the beauty of these legendary ruins. In the end, words may outlive what has been lost.

Mon & Fri 9am - 5pm
Tue, Wed & Thu 9am - 8pm
Sat & Sun 11am - 5pm

THE NEW YORK SOCIETY LIBRARY
53 East 79th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 21, 2016 -
March 17, 2017
Bold Broadsides and Bitsy Books
From the public nature of broadsides to the intimacy of a tiny handmade book, the Library and Research Center revels in contrasts of delightful collection items. The “Dead Feminists” broadside series presents eye-catching typography and layouts profiling international feminist heroes, while miniature artists’ books demonstrate intricate, hand-held craft, meant to be easily carried and privately enjoyed.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

National Museum of Women in the Arts
1250 New York Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
December 07, 2016 -
February 04, 2017
A True Friend of the Cause: Lafayette and the Anti-Slavery Movement
Hailed as the “Hero of Two Worlds,” the Marquis de Lafayette (1757-1834) has received renewed attention for his multifaceted contributions in several areas, including international politics, diplomacy, the military, and the human rights movement. His sustained efforts deployed on both sides of the Atlantic on behalf of the abolition of slavery however are not widely known. This is the first public exhibition devoted to Lafayette’s role as an international anti-slavery advocate.

Co-curators Olga Anna Duhl, Oliver Edwin Williams Professor of Languages, and Diane Windham Shaw, Director of Special Collections and College Archivist, Skillman Library, Lafayette College, offer a comprehensive view of Lafayette’s activities in this ground breaking presentation.

Among the exhibition themes are the personal and intellectual origins of Lafayette’s interest in the welfare of enslaved people during the American War of Independence and the French Revolution; his continuing commitment to “the black part of mankind,” including his gradual emancipation experiment in French Guiana; his passionate correspondence with international political figures; as well as his enduring influence on the civil rights movement.

Drawn from Lafayette College’s rich collections of 18th and 19th century rare books, manuscripts, paintings, prints, and objects, some of which are on public view for the first time, the exhibition also includes loans from Cornell University, the New-York Historical Society, as well as supporting documents from French institutions such as the Fondation Josée et René de Chambrun, and the Le Puy-en-Velay Public Library.

Mon – Sat 10am - 5pm

Free & open to the public

THE GROLIER CLUB
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
December 10, 2016 -
March 05, 2017
Norman Rockwell and Friends: American Illustrations from the Mort Künstler Collection
Norman Rockwell and Friends: American Illustrations from the Mort Künstler Collection features masters from the Golden Age of American Illustration: Edwin Austin Abbey, Howard Chandler Christy, Dean Cornwell, Charles Dana Gibson, Winslow Homer, J.C. Leyendecker, Maxfield Parrish, Howard Pyle, Norman Rockwell, and N.C. Wyeth, among others. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, these artists contributed countless illustrations to the journals and books that were avidly read by an increasingly literate American public, assuming a cultural significance equivalent to that of television and digital technology today. Depicting sentimental themes or dramatic adventures, the country’s illustrators envisioned the aspirations of the nation and gave visual expression to the American character.

Wed - Fri 10am - 5pm
Sat & Sun 11am - 5pm

First Friday
Extended Evening Hours, FREE
5pm - 8:30pm
7pm Performance

Closed for Installation Change
March 8, 9, & 10
April 12, 13, & 14

The Heckscher Museum of Art
2 Prime Avenue
Huntington, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
December 13, 2016 -
May 07, 2017
A Friend Among Us: The Art of Brinton Turkle
Step back in time with Brinton Turkle and his tales of American lore. Whether set on the island of Nantucket or in the mountains of Appalachia, his stories and poetic imagery capture both the history and nuances of place. Turkle follows the escapades of a young Quaker boy in his Obadiah series, offers a surprising twist on a favorite fairy tale in Deep in the Forest, and sprinkles magic realism throughout the pages of Sky Dog. All work is from the museum’s permanent collection, generously donated by the artist’s children. A highlight is surely Turkle’s watercolor illustrations from Thy Friend, Obadiah, awarded a 1970 Caldecott Honor.

Tue – Fri 10am – 4pm
Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

$9 Adult
$6 Youth (1-18), Student, Teacher, and Senior
$22.50 Family (2 adults and 2 youth)

The Central Gallery
The Eric Carle Museum
of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
December 16, 2016 -
March 12, 2017
Muhammad Ali, LeRoy Neiman, and the Art of Boxing
Who could "float like a butterfly and sting like a bee"? Muhammad Ali was The Greatest—he even said so himself. Born Cassius Clay in Louisville, Kentucky, he was a three-time heavyweight champion and an outspoken, popular, and often controversial public figure. In the early 1960s, Ali found friendship with renowned artist LeRoy Neiman, with whom he shared an affinity for boxing, the limelight, and breaking with convention. Neiman even taught and encouraged Ali to draw. Using works on loan from the LeRoy Neiman Foundation, Muhammad Ali, LeRoy Neiman, and the Art of Boxing celebrates one of America's greatest boxers and one of the most popular artists of the sport. Neiman’s vivid watercolors and intimate, on-the-spot sketches capture Ali both in and outside the ring. Highlights include portraits, sketches of Ali's critical matches such as the "Fight of the Century" and the "Thrilla in Manila," and some works created by Ali himself.

Tue - Thu & Sat 10am - 6pm
Fri 10am - 8pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

New York Historical Society Museum & Library
170 Central Park West
at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
December 16, 2016 -
April 16, 2017
The Edible Monument: The Art of Food for Festivals
The Edible Monument includes about 140 prints, rare books and serving manuals from the Getty Research Institute collection and private collections. The artworks illustrate in lush detail the delectable monuments and sculptures made of food that were an integral part of street festivals as well as court and civic banquets in Europe in the 16th to 19th centuries. The exhibition has been organized by the Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles.

Public celebrations and street parades featured large-scale edible creations made of breads, cheeses and meats. At court festivals, banquet settings and dessert buffets featured elaborate table monuments made of sugar, flowers and fruit. These edible sculptures didn’t last long, but images of towering garden sculptures and lavish table pieces designed for Italian and French courts have survived in illustrated books and prints, many of which are featured in the exhibition.

The exhibition includes a monumental sugar sculpture based on an 18th-century print. “Palace of Circe” by sculptor and culinary historian Ivan Day is set on an 8-foot table and features sugar paste sculpted into a classical temple with sugar statues and sugar-sand gardens. The figures were meant to impart the consequences of gluttony with a story about the ancient Greek hero Ulysses. When he landed on the island of Aeaea, his men were so greedy that the sorceress Circe turned them into pigs.

By the mid-17th century cookbooks and guides to the new skills and professions of carving and pastry-making were published. Copied and plagiarized, they became models that spread throughout European court culture. Examples of such books are included in the exhibition, such as one by Bartolomeo Scappi, the “private cook” to Pope Pius V; Joseph Gilliers, the dessert chef to King Augustus of Poland; and Juan de la Mata, court chef to the Spanish kings Philip V and Ferdinand VI.

Tue - Thu 9am – 4pm
Fri 9am – 10pm
Sat & Sun 10am – 5pm
Mon Closed

Detroit Institute of Arts
5200 Woodward Avenue
Detroit, MI
Exhibit Midwest
December 16, 2016 -
May 20, 2017
The Dance of Death
Reflections on death and its meaning for Christian communities have taken many forms in art and literature. During the Middle Ages a genre called the Dance of Death developed which depicted a personification of death leading a procession of people ranging from kings to paupers, emphasizing the mortality of all persons regardless of social status. The genre included poetry, prose works, and visual art. While individual works sometimes focused exclusively on images or literature, many included both. This exhibition features images popularized in print by Hans Holbein the Younger (1497–1543) and explores the artist’s possible inspirations and his influence on subsequent illustrators.

Southern Methodist University
6425 Boaz Lane
Dallas, TX
Exhibit Southwest
January 06 -
June 02, 2017
From the Desk of Simone de Beauvoir
Consider the influence and intellect of feminist philosopher Simone de Beauvoir in an interpretation of her Paris studio alcove. This installation invites visitors to reflect on Beauvoir’s impact, not only in her time and not only as a feminist, but in our own time and in the areas of literature, philosophy, and popular culture. A zealous writer, speaker, and lover of all sensations life had to offer—what does Beauvoir say to you?

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

4th floor (in front of the Dix Gallery)
National Museum of Women in the Arts
1250 New York Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 10 -
April 01, 2017
The Illustrated Alice: The Imagining of Wonderland An Exhibit
The Marjorie G. and Carl W. Stern Book Arts & Special Collections Center presents The Illustrated Alice, an exhibit of work by various artists featuring their interpretations concerning Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass and What Alice Found There. Alice has been illustrated by approximately 2,000 different artists since it was originally published in 1865. The exhibit will feature illustrators such as John Tenniel, Salvador Dali, Arthur Rackham, Robert Sabuda, Camille Rose Garcia, Barry Moser, and George Walker and show how each one imagined the story of Alice in their own version of "Wonderland."

Sun 12pm - 5pm
Mon 10am - 6pm
Tue, Wed, & Thu 9am - 8pm
Fri 12pm - 6pm
Sat 10am - 6pm

Skylight Gallery
Main Library
San Francisco Public Library
100 Larkin Street
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
January 11 -
March 09, 2017
Hamilton: The History Behind the Musical
Pop-up Exhibition

Lin-Manuel Miranda’s smash hit musical Hamilton has revived interest in Alexander Hamilton, one of the most complex and controversial founding fathers. Hamilton’s life and times are richly documented in primary sources here at the Newberry. This small exhibition highlights a few of these invaluable, rare sources.

How did the same man who was revered as a patriotic immigrant, Revolutionary aide to George Washington, and framer and defender of the Constitution, fall from grace to become reviled as a scheming bureaucrat, adulterer, and partisan politician? See first editions of Hamilton’s writings, original letters, and other materials that shed light on the many conflicting sides of Hamilton’s work and personality.

Tue - Thu 8:15am - 7:30pm
Mon, Fri & Sat 8:15am - 5pm
Sun Closed

Free & open to the public

R. R. Donnelly Gallery
The Newberry
60 West Walton Street
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
January 12 -
May 13, 2017
India, Empire, Nation: 200 Years of Indian History
“India, Empire, Nation” presents for public viewing a small part of the extensive collection of rare books and manuscripts relating to the Indian subcontinent that the Lilly Library has recently acquired from antiquarian bookseller and collector Glenn Horowitz. This collection is without parallel in the United States, given its sheer range and diversity, as well as the uniqueness of many of its constituent parts. Taken together, these materials tell a compelling story of South Asia over the past two centuries, and they do so from distinctive and often surprising vantage points. This extraordinary collection of Indian materials will, without question, position the Lilly Library as one of the leading research libraries in the world for South Asian studies.

9am - 6pm

Lilly Library
Indiana University
1200 E Seventh Street
Bloomington, IN
Exhibit Midwest
January 13 -
April 17, 2017
Gather Out of Star-Dust: The Harlem Renaissance & The Beinecke Library
A major building-wide exhibition

The Beinecke show features more than 300 artifacts from the library’s James Weldon Johnson Memorial Collection (JWJ) of African American Arts and Letters and is part of the 75th anniversary celebration of the collection’s founding in 1941. The JWJ Collection overall holds over 13,000 volumes, 3,000 pieces of sheet music, countless pages of manuscripts, correspondence, photographs, and ephemera, as well as 11,000 digital images. It is one of the most-consulted collections at Yale.

The show includes material by Langston Hughes, Bessie Smith, Bill “Bojangles” Robinson, Aaron Douglas, Ralph Ellison, Zora Neale Hurston, W.E.B. Du Bois, Countée Cullen, Augusta Savage, Carter Woodson, Alain LeRoy Locke, Gwendolyn Bennett, Jessie Redmon Fauset, Jean Toomer, James Van Der Zee, Gladys Bentley, Arna Bontemps, Laura Wheeler Waring, Wallace Thurman, Ethel Waters, Sterling Brown, and other creators of the era.

“Gather Out of Star-Dust” also features the work of writer and photographer Carl Van Vechten, a patron of the Harlem Renaissance and Johnson’s close friend. Van Vechten established the JWJ Collection at Yale in association with Grace Nail Johnson as a memorial to her husband after his death in 1938. More than 50 of Van Vechten’s portraits of Harlem Renaissance and related cultural leaders are on view in the Beinecke exhibition.

Among the many highlights of the show is the original artwork of E. Simms Campbell’s 1932 map of Harlem nightclubs. Campbell was the first African American illustrator to be syndicated, and his work was featured regularly in national magazines. His map provides a “who’s who” guide of the nightclubs that drove Harlem nightlife during and after Prohibition, including the Savoy Ballroom, the Cotton Club, and Gladys’s Clam Bar.

Interactive touchscreens in the exhibition allow visitors to hear sound recordings of the era and explore the collection further.

Mon 10am - 7pm
Tue - Thu 9am - 7pm
Fri 9am - 5pm
Sat (Exhibitions only) 12pm - 5pm

Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library
121 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
January 17 -
March 13, 2017
Lu Jingren: Master of Chinese Book Design
A contemporary artist who is a master of the ancient traditions of Chinese book design and also runs the Jingren Art Design Studio in Beijing, Lu Jingren is renowned not only for his prolific creative work and his cutting-edge design sensibilities, but also for his dedication to fostering an appreciation of the book as an art form. He is a recently retired professor of book design from Tsinghua University in Beijing and is known for involving young artists in every aspect of his work and social life in China. He has garnered numerous awards for book design in Hong Kong, Germany, the United States, and China and is a member of the Alliance Graphique Internationale (AGI). Lu Jingren will be a featured speaker at the 2017 CODEX symposium on February 6 and 7 in Berkeley.

In this exhibition, the Book Club of California is proud to showcase some of Professor Lu’s finest and most inventive works, which provide a modern response to the centuries-long traditions of both Chinese and Japanese book making.

Mon - Fri 10am - 5pm*
*Except on evenings when we feature public programs from 5 - 7pm
Closed on National Holidays

The Book Club of California
312 Sutter Street, Suite 500
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
January 17 -
March 17, 2017
Concrete Poetry, Concrete Book: Artists’ Books in German-Speaking Space after 1945
Drawing on the remarkable collection of rare artists’ books housed in the University of Chicago Library, Concrete Poetry, Concrete Book will explore how post-World War II artists in Austria, Germany, and Switzerland investigated the material and technical forms of the book. Referring to the way that language takes up space on the page, arrests the eyes, and insists on physical interaction, works of konkrete poesie (concrete poetry) tested the material display of language, focusing on the object-quality of letters and words. To accommodate this dual staging of textual production and reception, artists’ books took on unusual forms, as in Gerhard Rühm’s kinetic book bewegung (motion, 1964) and Hansjörg Mayer’s reinvention of the alphabet in the fold-out book typoaktionen (type-actions, 1967). At the same time that artists’ books often activate the process of reading, they also deemphasize textual cognition, foregrounding instead touch and materiality, as exemplified in die-cut multi-colored cellophane pages of Dieter Roth’s bilderbücher (picture-books, 1957) and in Wolf Vostell’s unreadable 20-pound Betonbuch (Concrete Book, 1971). This exhibition will form part of the University of Chicago campus-wide "Concrete Happenings" festival during 2016-2017.

9am - 5:45pm

Special Collections Research Center
University of Chicago
1100 E. 57th Street
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
January 17 -
May 31, 2017
Innovation and Abstraction: Women Artists and Atelier 17
Innovation and Abstraction: Women Artists and Atelier 17 examines the formal innovations and burgeoning feminist consciousness of eight artists—Louise Bourgeois, Minna Citron, Worden Day, Dorothy Dehner, Sue Fuller, Alice Trumbull Mason, Louise Nevelson, and Anne Ryan—all of whom worked at the legendary Atelier 17 printmaking studio. Founded in 1927 in Paris by the British artist Stanley William Hayter, Atelier 17 relocated to New York from 1940 to 1955 to escape the political conflicts in Europe. Hayter championed technical experimentation and collaboration among the two hundred artists who worked there, nearly half of whom were women.

Experimental, often unorthodox, prints by the featured artists are displayed alongside their paintings and sculptures to explore how Atelier 17 catalyzed their creativity and inspired these women to reshape American abstraction. The exhibition includes loans from private collections, as well as the Brooklyn Museum, the Museum of Modern Art, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and the Whitney Museum of American Art.

Voorhees Gallery
71 Hamilton Street (at George Street)
College Avenue Campus
Rutgers University
New Brunswick, NJ
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 17 -
May 11, 2017
The Lost Generation : World War I Poetry Selected From The Donald Thomas War Poetry Collection
If asked which twentieth-century war had the greatest impact on the world, the average American is likely to respond with World War II—and that conflict had an enormous effect in the staggering number of casualties, the number of nations engaged in the conflict, the introduction of nuclear weapons, and the ushering in of the Cold War. Despite this, for Europeans, and particularly for the British, World War I had an equal, if not greater, impact.

In the years prior to the First World War, Britain experienced the continued aftereffects of Victorian optimism. Some even referred to this Edwardian period as a time of endless summer, when people believed in progress, that everything was moving in a positive direction. Furthermore, in the second half of the nineteenth century war remained a romanticized phenomenon, with patriotism and gallantry as its primary features. World War I, or the Great War, as it came to be known, exploded those notions—quite literally. Because of extensive and entangling alliances, the conflict evolved from relatively insignificant origins (the assassination of Archduke Ferdinand of the Austro-Hungarian empire) to involve a greater portion of the developed world. Beyond the sheer number of nations involved, it was a war unlike any previous one, depending less on troop numbers and movement and more on technological superiority and military prowess. It was the first conflict in which weaponry became especially important, with the introduction of U-boats, aerial dogfights, Zeppelin bombings, gas attacks, trench battles, and tank warfare. The effect was a dehumanized conflict in which the superior machine mattered more than the superior soldier.

Perhaps most significant, however, was the enormous number of young soldiers who were either killed or wounded in the conflict. As Ezra Pound was to write, “There died a myriad / And of the best, among them” (Hugh Selwyn Mauberley), and for poets during and after the conflict the world would no longer be the same. All of the pre-war optimism disappeared, as did confidence in the traditional Western way of looking at the world. In its place was a profound skepticism of meaning in the universe and of the privileged position of the West, as well as an increased feeling that individuals were ultimately isolated from the workings of the universe and even from their fellow humans. What followed has come to be known as the “lost generation”—writers who longed for meaning and order in the universe but were unable to find them in an alienating and fragmented existence.

Because of the pre-war optimism and the romanticized view of warfare, those writers who entered the conflict were entirely unprepared for what they encountered, and the primary power of their writings comes from the profound disillusionment they experienced. Rather than patriotism, glory, and honor, they found instead death, absurdity, and dehumanization. One of the most famous poems of the war, Wilfred Owen’s “Dulce et Decorum Est,” rejects the romantic view that it is sweet and fitting to die for one’s country: the poem’s effect comes partly from Owen’s descriptions of battle but more from the conflict between what he had been taught was war and what he actually found was war. This was the lesson writer after writer learned, and it is reflected in the works of so many who wrote of their experiences.

This exhibit and catalogue explore the work of many such “soldier poets,” whose aesthetically rich and haunting verse often sits uncomfortably alongside popular ballads, songs and toasts that attempt to sustain, or gently mock, the romanticized ideals of heroic self-sacrifice for the nation’s glory. In between these opposed perspectives we find responses to the war, both critical and laudatory, from poets who did not enlist, including women on the home front and those in active service as nurses. To set these perspectives in context, we add sections on visual images of war, particularly photography and poets’ responses to this documentary technology, and retrospective collections that advocate for peace in the aftermath of the Great War and on the eve of WWII.

Fourth Floor, Room 437
Judge Sarah T. Hughes Reading Room
Willis Library
University of North Texas
1506 Highland Street
Denton, TX
Exhibit Southwest
January 20 -
May 21, 2017
I’m Nobody! Who are you? The Life and Poetry of Emily Dickinson
One of the most popular and enigmatic American writers of the nineteenth century, Emily Dickinson wrote more than 1,700 poems. Nevertheless, her work was essentially unknown to contemporary readers since only a handful of poems were printed during her lifetime and the vast trove of her manuscripts was not discovered until after her death in 1886.

Typecast as a reclusive writer who rarely left her Amherst home, Dickinson was, in fact, socially active as a young woman and maintained a broad network of friends and correspondents even as she grew older and retreated into seclusion. Bringing together nearly one hundred rarely seen items, including manuscripts and letters in the poet’s hand, the exhibition will explore a side of the Dickinson’s life that is seldom acknowledged: one filled with rich friendships and long-lasting relationships with mentors and editors.

In addition to her writings, the exhibition will also feature a wide array of visual material, including hand-cut silhouettes, unique photographs and daguerreotypes, contemporary illustrations, and other items that speak to the rich intellectual and cultural environment in which Dickinson lived and worked.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 20 -
May 14, 2017
Delirium: The Art of the Symbolist Book
The Symbolist movement of the nineteenth century grew out of Charles Baudelaire’s visionary poetry, which explored correspondences between the sensory and the spiritual. Baudelaire believed poetry should not describe the external world but suggest the writer’s interior reality, using a vocabulary of delirium, dreams, mysticism, and disordered states of mind. His revolt against the dominant naturalism of the day influenced a younger generation of writers who helped to shape the Symbolist movement in literature. Visual artists who collaborated on Symbolist publications were challenged to create illustrations for works that were deliberately devoid of concrete imagery.

This exhibition, drawing entirely on the Morgan’s collection, explores some of the encounters between Symbolist authors and artists and the creative approaches they took to illustrate the invisible. Works by Stephane Mallarmé, Odilon Redon, Maurice Denis, Paul Verlaine, Fantin-Latour, Arthur Rimbaud, Alfred Jarry, Maurice Maeterlinck, and Fernand Khnopff will be featured.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 20 -
April 01, 2017
Pulp as Portal: Socially Engaged Hand Papermaking

Mon - Fri 11am - 6pm
Sat 10am - 5pm

Main Gallery
The Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 21 -
July 30, 2017
Toutes Les Nouvelles – All the News: Current Events in Nineteenth-Century French Prints
Beginning in the sixteenth century, prints became the primary medium for circulating and preserving images of current events, including public ceremonies and celebrations, battles, and other noteworthy incidents. Industrialization and rapid urbanization during the 1800s created not only the means to quickly print and publish text and images but the market for such news sources as well. Artists relished the opportunity to create original compositions based on recent happenings that would be widely circulated in illustrated weekly and monthly journals and inexpensive books in addition to being issued as independent prints.

The works in this exhibition present images of various Parisian news items from the mid- to late nineteenth century, ranging from mundane political intrigues to serious foreign affairs. Artists took different approaches to presenting such subject matter: the etchers Auguste Lançon and Félix Buhot created highly detailed, documentary scenes, while the caricaturists Cham and Charles Vernier focused on satirizing French government officials. Particularly remarkable are compositions, such as the one by Honoré Daumier, that portray current events in the guise of biblical or mythological subjects that would have been understood by a broad public. In this way, artists presented new ideas within familiar narratives while investing their subjects with historical significance. Near the end of the century, artists became more partisan in their depictions of current events and revealed their personal positions on sensational topics, which included France’s colonial ambitions and the false claim accusing a Jewish army officer of treason now known as the Dreyfus Affair. The works on view were selected from the Zimmerli Art Museum’s rich collection of nineteenth-century French prints and drawings.

Volpe Gallery
71 Hamilton Street (at George Street)
College Avenue Campus
Rutgers University
New Brunswick, NJ
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 21 -
April 30, 2017
diane arbus: in the beginning
diane arbus: in the beginning considers the first seven years of the photographer’s career, from 1956 to 1962. A lifelong New Yorker, Arbus found the city and its citizens an endlessly rich subject for her art. Working in Times Square, the Lower East Side, and Coney Island, she made some of the most powerful portraits of the twentieth century, training her lens on the pedestrians and performers she encountered there. This exhibition highlights her early and enduring interest in the subject matter that would come to define her as an artist. It also reveals the artist’s evolution from a 35mm format to the now instantly recognizable and widely imitated look of the square format she adopted in 1962. Bringing together over 100 photographs from this formative period, many on display for the first time, diane arbus: in the beginning offers fresh insights into the distinctive vision of this iconic American photographer.

Fri – Tue 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 9pm
Wed Closed
Public spaces open at 9:30am

Entry to this exhibition is included with general admission.

Floor 3
San Francisco Museum of Modern Art
151 Third Street
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
January 24 -
May 26, 2017
Harper & Brothers to HarperCollins Publishers: A Bicentennial Exhibition
The company that is now HarperCollins began as a small family business in 1817, publishing first as J. & J. Harper and as Harper & Brothers beginning in 1833. The company survived several fires and financial crises to become one of the biggest and most successful publishing companies in the United States by the middle of the nineteenth century. Today HarperCollins Publishers is considered one of the five most influential English-language publishers in the world.

This exhibition charts continuity and change in the publishing industry by dedicating cases to the publishing functions that have remained constant even as practices and technologies have changed: acquisitions, editorial, manufacturing, art, marketing, publicity, rights & permissions, and finance. Harper was quick to adopt emerging printing technologies from its earliest days and the exhibition displays wood engravings, stereotype plates and case bindings from the nineteenth century. The exhibition puts on display the behind-the-scenes work that publishers do to bring together authors and readers, whether the publication in question is print or digital.

Drawing on the archives of Harper & Brothers and Harper & Row held by the Columbia Rare Book & Manuscript Library, this major RBML exhibition shows how the company grows with the nation, its publications not merely reflecting but actively shaping local and national politics. Highlights include the contract for Melville’s Moby Dick, Nast’s political cartoons for Harper’s Weekly Magazine, posters advertising various Harper’s periodicals, correspondence with luminaries including John F. Kennedy and Richard Wright, and profiles of pioneering female editors Virginia Kirkus and Ursula Nordstrom.

Kempner Gallery
Columbia University
Rare Book & Manuscript Library
535 West 114th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 24 -
May 28, 2017
Remembering Antiquity: The Ancient World through Medieval Eyes
In a rare juxtaposition of antiquities from the Getty Villa and manuscripts from the Museum’s collection, this exhibition explores medieval responses to the ancient world. For more than a thousand years following the fall of Rome (476 A.D.), classical culture lived on in European literature and art. Medieval scribes translated and preserved classical texts, while artists adapted and embellished images of ancient rulers and mythical heroes for inclusion in Christian manuscripts. Although the “rediscovery” of Greek and Roman culture is often associated with the Renaissance, antiquity was never forgotten.

Tue – Fri & Sun 10am – 5:30pm
Sat 10am – 9pm
Mon Closed

Admission is free, parking is $15 ($10 after 3pm)

GETTY CENTER
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
January 25 -
February 18, 2017
JAN HENDRIX BOOK VI HEANEY HENDRIX
In the presence of the artist and Catherine Heaney

Maestro Arts in collaboration with Shapero Modern are delighted to present Jan Hendrix’s first UK solo exhibition, featuring works from The Aeneid Book VI, his most recent collaboration with Seamus Heaney.

Shortly before his death in August 2013, Heaney had completed his translation of the Aeneid Book VI and had started working on a collector’s publication with Jan Hendrix and Hans van Eijk (Bonnefant Press). It was the proofs from this draft that enabled the Heaney family/estate and Faber & Faber (official publisher of Heaney’s work) to decide on the ‘final’ edition, published earlier this year to international acclaim.

Hendrix and Heaney had formed a friendship collaborating on two previous occasions. In 1992 Hendrix had illustrated The Golden Bough, Heaney’s earlier translation of a part of Aeneid Book VI. A second book, The Light of the Leaves, followed in 1999: poems mostly dedicated to his friends, all poets, Hughes, Brodsky, Herbert. It also carried images of the landscape of Yagul, this time printed in stark black and white on Nepalese paper.

For this latest collaboration, Hendrix has chosen to portray the landscape in a Dantesque setting in accordance with Book VI. Says Hendrix: “…As a farewell to a dear friend and a dear place, I have vowed never to return to Yagul again. The images are made in a panoramic fashion, as if standing on the great rock watching over the surrounding valleys. Strangely enough the cactuses that I portrayed in 1992 and 1999 and the years in between are now dying and disappearing.”

EXHIBITION PRIVATE VIEW & BOOK LAUNCH:
TUESDAY, 24 JANUARY 2017, 6.30 – 8.30pm

Shapero Modern
32 St George Street
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
January 26 -
April 17, 2017
Post World War II Drawings by Japanese School Children from Hiroshima
Special exhibition will showcase drawings inspired by a cross-cultural exchange program between Japanese and American students in the 1950s.

With the history of Hiroshima and US and Japanese relations at the forefront of international news, an upcoming exhibition at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art (BCMA), will shed important light on the ties between these two nations. Opening in early 2017, the BCMA exhibition will showcase approximately forty drawings created in the mid-1950s by Japanese school children from Hiroshima. The drawings grew out of an art exchange program between children in Santa Fe, N.M., and in Hiroshima that was organized in the early 1950s by the Japanese artist Chuzo Tamotzu. The show, to be on view from January 26 – April 17, 2017, will be researched and curated by Bowdoin College students. The project will focus on the history of the drawings exchange, its long-term significance for the young artists who took part, and its context within the career of Tamotzu.

Born in Japan but living in Santa Fe at that time, Tamotzu recognized the value of strengthening ties between the country of his birth and his new home in the wake of World War II and focused his personal efforts on the expressive capability of young people. Through the program organized by Tamotzu, drawings by students in Hiroshima and by students in Santa Fe were sent to their exchange partners in the other country. The Japanese drawings depict a festival of the arts, local neighborhoods and gardens, and children at play. Efforts are underway to track down the works made by the American students. Originally exhibited in New Mexico in the mid-1950s, the Japanese student drawings are now on loan to the Bowdoin College Museum of Art from a member of Tamotzu’s family. The special exhibition, of these works will be accompanied by a web-based resource, a short publication, a symposium, and other public programming.

Tue - Sat 10am - 5pm
Thu 10am - 8:30pm
Sun 1pm - 5pm

Open to the public free of charge

Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Walker Art Building
9400 College Station
Brunswick, ME
Exhibit New England
January 26 -
March 11, 2017
For Art's Sake: The Aesthetic Movement in Print & Beyond, From the Collection of Eric Holzenberg
With a mix of brilliantly colorful books, prints and other objects, the exhibition surveys the extraordinary artistry and wit of the Aesthetic Movement, the unique mash-up of medievalism and japonisme that captivated Oscar Wilde, inspired William Morris, and dominated the decorative arts in the period 1870-1890.

Mon – Sat 10am - 5pm

Free & open to the public

2nd Floor Gallery
THE GROLIER CLUB
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 27 -
June 18, 2017
State of Deception: The Power of Nazi Propaganda
A traveling exhibition from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

This powerful exhibition explores how the Nazi propaganda machine used biased information to sway public opinion during World War II. It examines the definition of propaganda, how it operates, why it works, and how important it is to protect ourselves from its dangers. The exhibit asks visitors to actively question and engage with the messages they see, and to learn from this extreme example that democracies, while appearing strong, are fragile without the responsibility and action of their people. Using posters, photos, newsreels, and eight media pieces, this exhibition aims to help society understand propaganda in order to protect against divisive messages and violent agendas.

9am – 5pm

National WWII Museum
945 Magazine Street
New Orleans, LA
Exhibit South
January 31 -
April 30, 2017
Recent Acquisitions from the Bequest of Maurice Sendak
The great author and illustrator Maurice Sendak (1928-2012) was an avid book collector as well as creator, and amassed a remarkable personal library of rare books during his lifetime. A longtime friend and supporter of the Rosenbach, becoming a trustee in 1973 and later serving as honorary president, Sendak bequeathed the museum and library more than 600 rare editions which enhance the Rosenbach collection in many important ways. Through selected objects from this collection, Recent Acquisitions from the Bequest of Maurice Sendak will explore not only the literary and historical significance of these books but also why they were meaningful to their collector.

Tue & Fri — Noon - 5pm
Wed & Thu — Noon - 8pm
Sat & Sun — Noon - 6pm
Mon closed

Rosenbach Museum & Library
2008-2010 Delancey Place
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 01 -
28, 2017
Clouds in a Bag: The Evelyn Way Kendall Ballooning and Early Aviation Collection
The invention of the balloon struck the men and women of the late 18th century like a thunderbolt. From August to December 1783 enormous crowds gathered to watch one balloon after another rise above the Paris rooftops, carrying the first human beings into the air. The excitement spread as daring aeronauts took to the sky in cities across Europe. The balloon was proof that the twin enterprises of science and technology could produce what looked very much like a miracle.

The objects in this exhibition represent a portion of the rich collection of Evelyn Way Kendall and her husband, Henry Plimpton Kendall. The Kendalls were among the great American collectors of their generation. From the early 1920s to the 1960s, Mrs. Kendall amassed over 1,000 works of art, prints, posters, objects, manuscripts, and books documenting the history of flight. The treasures in her collection provide a sense of the wonder and excitement experienced by those who witnessed the birth of flight over two centuries ago.

10:00am - 5:30pm

Free admission, parking $15

STEVEN F. UDVAR-HAZY CENTER
14390 Air and Space Museum Parkway
Chantilly, VA
Exhibit South
February 01 -
May 31, 2017
Woof, Moo & Grr: A Carnival of Animals in Law Books
A charming exhibit of animals pictured in law books opens February 1, courtesy of the Yale Law Library’s Rare Book Collection. Titled “Woof, Moo & Grr: A Carnival of Animals in Law Books,” the exhibit is narrated from the perspective of the animals themselves and is aimed at animal lovers of all ages.

Twenty books from around the world will be on display, more than half of them printed before the nineteenth century and the earliest published in 1529. They feature illustrations of a wide variety of animals that visitors may be surprised to find in the pages of serious legal literature.

10am - 6pm

Rare Book Exhibition Gallery
Level L2, Lillian Goldman Law Library
Yale Law School
127 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
February 03 -
April 30, 2017
Tattooed New York
For more than 300 years, New York has played a central role in the development of modern tattooing, from its origins in Native American body art to tattoo craft by sailors in colonial New York to the three-decade tattoo ban instituted in 1961 and the subsequent underground tattoo culture. Its diverse history is explored in ​​Tattooed New York, an exciting exhibition where history and pop culture converge to tell the complex story of a controversial art form in America’s cultural nucleus.

Among the 250+ elements on view are the New-York Historical Society’s set of 1710 Four Indian Kings prints and one of the earliest recordings (1706) in Western accounts of a pictograph done by a Seneca warrior representing his tattoos and personal signature. Highlights of the exhibition include Thomas Edison’s electric pen and early 20th-century tattoo machinery; ​dramatic ​sideshow banners and cabinet cards; a large selection of designs by the Bowery pioneers of modern tattooing, including Sam O'Reilly, Lew Alberts, Bob Wicks, Ed Smith, and Bill Jones; rare photography documenting the tattoo ban years and artwork by mainstream visual artists who tattooed during the ban; and works by some of the finest New York tattoo artists of today. Organized by the New-York Historical Society, this exhibition is curated by Research Associate Cristian Petru Panaite.

Tue - Thu & Sat 10am - 6pm
Fri 10am - 8pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

New-York Historical Society Museum & Library
170 Central Park West
at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 04 -
April 30, 2017
TOULOUSE-LAUTREC: Illustrates the Belle Époque
Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901) captured the heart of Parisian nightlife in dynamic cabaret and café-concert scenes inspired by the city’s burgeoning entertainment district. A frequent visitor to lively hotspots in Montmartre, like the Chat Noir, Mirliton, and Moulin Rouge, his record of local amusements fashioned a portrait of modern Parisian life. Toulouse-Lautrec’s arrival in the City of Light coincided with a resurgence in printmaking, and his experiments with lithography revolutionized the field.

For the first time in the US, Toulouse-Lautrec Illustrates the Belle Époque presents one of the foremost collections of the artist’s lithographs and posters. Drawn from the artist’s most prolific years (1891–1899), these iconic images and rarely exhibited unique proofs provide insight into his innovative and complex printmaking process. Encompassing nearly 100 examples of incomparable quality and color, these prints celebrate the premier performers of the belle époque—Aristide Bruant, Marcelle Lender, Cha-U-Kao and others—cleverly caricatured through Toulouse-Lautrec’s perceptive skills of observation and transformation. His modern aesthetic and sharp wit immortalized Paris’s celebrity elite, embraced bohemian culture, and fueled the public imagination.

Tue ‒ Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun Noon ‒ 7pm
Thu extended hours 5pm ‒ 8:30 pm*

*On the first Thursday of every month, general museum admittance ends at 5 pm due to Phillips after 5 events. Admission after 5 pm is restricted to members and Phillips after 5 ticket holders. Advance ticket purchase for Phillips after 5 strongly encouraged as this popular event tends to sell out.

$12 for adults
$10 62 & over & for students
Free 18 & under & for members

The Phillips Collection
1600 21st Street NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 04 -
April 30, 2017
500 Years of Treasures from Oxford
Founded 500 years ago in 1517, the library of Corpus Christi College, Oxford, is a repository of extraordinary treasures, few of which have ever been seen by the public. To mark the 500th anniversary, a selection of fifty manuscripts and early printed books, ranging in date from the 10th to the 17th centuries, is being brought to America for the first time.

Focusing on the first hundred years of the College’s existence the exhibition introduces its Founder, Richard Fox, Bishop of Winchester, and its first President, John Claymond, who laid the foundations of the Library’s great collection. From the start it was to follow Renaissance ideals scholarship in three languages: not just Latin, but also Greek and Hebrew, the original languages of the Bible. A series of display-cases present books in each of these languages in turn, as well as a considerable number that are bilingual and trilingual. Most important among them are a group that have been called “The Most Important Collection of Anglo-Jewish Manuscripts in the World”; these include a series of 13th-century volumes apparently commissioned by Christians from Jews, from which to learn Hebrew and study biblical texts in their original language.

In addition to the ancient languages, the origins of English are explored, with a 10th-century Latin and Old English bilingual copy of the Rule of St Benedict, the foundation work of monasticism in the West, and an illuminated copy of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales in Middle English. French is also represented, in a large paraphrase of the Old Testament, wonderfully decorated with full-page pictures, perhaps for a King and Queen of France, and donated to the College by Sir James Oglethorpe, founder of the colony of Georgia.

Representing the development of Science, and the increasing knowledge of the Universe and the natural world, the exhibition finishes with a series of ground-breaking works in the history of science and medicine, including works on astrology and astronomy ranging from the medieval zodiac, to Hooke’s observations of insects using a microscope, Galileo’s first observation of the moon using a telescope, and Sir Isaac Newton’s observations of Halley’s comet.

Folger Shakespeare Library
201 East Capitol Street, SE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 04 -
April 30, 2017
A Feast for the Senses: Art and Experience in Medieval Europe
Organized by The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, in partnership with The Ringling, this major exhibition will feature more than 80 objects, many on loan from prestigious institutions across the US and Europe including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Victoria and Albert Museum and the Louvre.

The exhibition focuses on the late medieval and early Renaissance period in Europe (roughly 1300-1500), a time in which societal changes prompted a new interest in human experience, the enjoyment of nature and the pursuit of pleasure. As a result, the art of this period functioned in a rich sensory world that was integral to its appreciation. These works were not only seen, but also touched, smelled and heard. The exhibition will bring together sacred and secular art—including paintings, tapestries, metalwork, and manuscripts—to reveal the role of the senses in courtly ritual and religious practice.

A Feast for the Senses: Art and Experience in Medieval Europe was organized by The Walters Art Museum, Baltimore, in partnership with The John and Mable Ringling Museum of Art, Sarasota.

This exhibition received generous support from the National Endowment for the Humanities: Exploring the human endeavor; the Institute of Museum and Library Services; the National Endowment for the Arts; and anonymous donors.

Open Daily 10am - 5pm
Thursdays until 8pm

FREE WITH MUSEUM ADMISSION

The Ringling
5401 Bay Shore Road
Sarasota, FL
Exhibit South
February 04 -
April 30, 2017
Who Shot Sports: A Photographic History, 1843 to the Present
This Exhibition is the first museum exhibitions to put sports photographers in the forefront and is the most comprehensive presentation of sports photography ever organized. It encompasses approximately 230 works—from daguerreotypes and salted paper prints to digital images—that capture the universal appeal of sports, highlighting unforgettable moments of drama and excitement from around the globe.

The photographers represented in Who Shot Sports include Richard Avedon, Al Bello, David Burnett, Rich Clarkson, Georges Demeny, Dr. Harold Edgerton, Rineke Dijkstra, Brian Finke, Toni Frissell, Ken Geiger, LeRoy Grannis, David Guttenfelder, Ernst Haas, Charles “Teenie” Harris, Walter Iooss, Jr., Heinz Kleutmeier, Stanley Kubrick, Jacques Henri Lartigue, Neil Leifer, Étienne-Jules Marey, Bob Martin, Martin Munkacsi, Edward Muybridge, Catherine Opie, Leni Riefenstahl, Robert Riger, Alexander Rodchenko, Howard Schatz, Flip Schulke, George Silk, Barton Silverman, and others.

Mon – Thurs 11am – 7pm
Fri 11am - 10pm
Sat & Sun 11am – 5pm

Please be advised that the Museum will close at 5pm on Friday, February 3, due to exhibition previews.

$15/adults
$7.50/seniors 65+/military/FL educators
Free/college students with ID
$5/students

Tampa Museum of Art
120 W. Gasparilla Plaza
Tampa, FL
Exhibit South
February 06 -
July 16, 2017
Stories to Tell: Selections from the Harry Ransom Center
Many stories can be told from the Ransom Center's extensive cultural collections—stories of inspiration, adaptation, innovation, confrontation, collaboration, and even frustration. By acquiring and preserving collections created by diverse individuals working in literature, art, and other humanities disciplines, the Ransom Center helps to tell these stories, unlocking and illuminating the profoundly human reach of archives.

This exhibition of more than 250 items includes, among many others, manuscripts of David Foster Wallace, Julia Alvarez, and Gabriel García Márquez, Henri Matisse's Jazz, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's spirit photographs, and the hat that accompanied the green curtain dress worn by Vivien Leigh in Gone With The Wind.

This exhibition helps us better understand how the humanities affect our lives, connecting the past to the present in personal and meaningful ways.

Mon, Tue, Wed, & Fri 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 7pm
Sat & Sun Noon – 5pm

Closed: hanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day

Free admission

Harry Ransom Center
The University of Texas at Austin
21st and Guadalupe Streets
Austin, TX
Exhibit Southwest
February 09 -
May 19, 2017
Expanding Earth: Travel, Encounter, and Exchange
Globalization is no recent phenomenon. People, ideas, and objects have always been on the move, encountering and changing one another as a result. This exhibit presents some of the textual and material residues of these encounters and travels, characteristic of past as well as present human activity and curiosity. Focusing on the years 1400 to 1800, the exhibit examines and looks beyond familiar Eurocentric ideas of exploration, conquest, and "discovery." Using manuscripts, printed books, drawings, maps, and artifacts, Expanding Earth highlights the movements of peoples, ideas, and goods across the world in their own words and in material objects.

To the Ends of the Earth
Thursday, March 2, 5:30 PM - Conference Keynote and Exhibition Reception
Friday, March 3-4, 8:30 AM-6:00 PM - Conference
Class of 1978 Orrery Pavilion, Van Pelt-Dietrich Library, sixth floor

Mon - Fri 10am - 5pm
Wed 10am - 8pm

Free & open to the public

Goldstein Family Gallery
Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Van Pelt Dietrich Library Center, sixth floor
3420 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 10 -
May 21, 2017
Volcanoes
From fire-belching mountains to blood-red waves of lava, volcanoes have captured the attention of scientists, artists and members of the public for centuries. In this exhibition, discover a spectacular selection of eye witness accounts, scientific observations and artwork charting how our understanding of volcanoes has evolved over the past two millennia.

Discover the impact of some of the world's most spectacular volcanoes including the 79 AD eruption of Vesuvius, one of the most catastrophic eruptions in European history, and the 19th-century eruptions of Krakatoa and Santorini, two of the first volcanic eruptions to be intensely studied by modern scientists.

Featuring fragments of 'burnt' papyrus scrolls which were buried during the 76 AD eruption of Vesuvius, the earliest known manuscript illustration of a volcano, and lava and rock samples and notes from 19th-century volcanologists and explorers, this spectacular exhibition brings together science and society, art and history.

Mon - Frid 10am - 5pm
Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 11am - 5pm

Free admission

ST Lee Gallery
Weston Library
Bodleian Library
Broad Street
Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
February 14 -
June 04, 2017
It’s Me, Eloise: The Voice of Kay Thompson and the Art of Hilary Knight
More than 60 years after her debut, Eloise remains a six-year-old star. What accounts for her enduring appeal? Perhaps it is her sly face transfigured with successful sin, that endearing potbelly, or the extravagant world in which she lives. Whatever her magic, Eloise’s charm comes down to two things: that audacious voice and those filigree illustrations. The voice was cabaret star Kay Thompson’s, a comic riff with which she amused her friends. The pictures came from the pen of a young artist, Hilary Knight. Their unlikely collaboration was the alchemical formula from which the successful Eloise series was born.

It’s Me, Eloise: The Voice of Kay Thompson and the Art of Hilary Knight includes more than 90 artworks from the Eloise collaborations—as well as art from the rest of Knight’s prodigious career as a children’s book artist, poster artist, magazine illustrator, and painter. Never before-seen artwork from Knight’s archive include his 1954 trial drawings for the first Eloise book, two Eloise In Paris sketchbooks, a Hollywood notebook with a double-page spread of Thompson belting out “Think Pink!” from Funny Face, a magnificent suite of final art from Eloise In Moscow, and the 1993 Eloise watercolor for New York Is Book Country. There’s a kicker, too: for the first time since its infamous disappearance from the Plaza Hotel in 1960, Knight’s original 1956 Eloise portrait will be on public display.

Tues. – Fri. 10am – 4pm
Saturday 10am – 5pm
Sunday 12pm – 5pm

The East Gallery
The Eric Carle Museum
of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
February 14 -
June 03, 2017
The 2017 Mark Samuels Lasner Symposium & Exhibition
EXHIBITION
“Victorian Passions: Stories from the Mark Samuels Lasner Collection”

The Mark Samuels Lasner Collection focuses on British literature and art of the period 1850 to 1900, with an emphasis on the Pre-Raphaelites and writers and illustrators of the 1890s. It boasts more than 9,000 books, letters, manuscripts, and artworks, including many items signed by such figures as Oscar Wilde, George Eliot, Max Beerbohm, William Morris, Christina and Dante Gabriel Rossetti, Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and Aubrey Beardsley. It provides a tremendous opportunity for students and scholars to enrich their academic pursuits through the historical, cultural and material value of the documents. (Please note that materials in the Mark Samuels Lasner Collection are not listed in DELCAT.)

In 2016, Mark Samuels Lasner generously gifted his collection, worth more than $10 million, to the University of Delaware. It is the largest and most valuable donation in the Library’s history.

Hours
Access is by appointment only.

SYMPOSIUM:
“Celebrating the Mark Samuels Lasner Collection: Rare Books and Manuscripts, Victorian Literature and Art”

March 17 – 18, 2017

Keynote Speaker: Elaine Showalter, Professor Emerita of English at Princeton University

Special Collections reading room
2nd floor, Morris Library

Special Collections Gallery
Morris Library
University of Delaware Library
181 South College Avenue
Newark, NJ
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 17 -
May 15, 2017
A Most Magnificent Sight
One hundred years ago, in towns across the country, circus day began with a parade that filled the everyday streets with hundreds of exotically costumed performers, some elephants, camels and zebras, and powerful teams of horses pulling beautifully carved wagons. The free show was just a taste of the wonders that could be seen under the big top and the whistling sounds of the calliope, which was at the end of the procession, beckoned audiences to come to the circus.

As early as the 1840s, circus impresarios understood the importance of the parade as a way to impress potential audiences. Shows invested in magnificent chariots and bandwagons with delicately carved and brilliantly gilded figures to create a stunning spectacle in the streets. As soon as there were circus parades, there was circus advertising to bill them. Enjoy a selection of posters dating from 1848 to 1920 and imagine the excitement of the “The Most Magnificent Street Spectacle Ever Seen,” the circus parade.

Open Daily 10am - 5pm
Thursdays until 8pm

FREE WITH MUSEUM ADMISSION

The Ringling
5401 Bay Shore Road
Sarasota, FL
Exhibit South
February 17 -
May 28, 2017
A Taste for Chocolate
The Morris-Jumel Mansion (MJM), Manhattan’s oldest house, will present a special exhibition exploring cacao and chocolate as a commodity and emerging breakfast tradition in colonial and post-colonial America. Stephen Jumel’s role as an importer and purveyor will be revealed in archival material from MJM’s collection. The exhibition focuses on how cocoa— typically sold in “cakes” and served as a hot drink flavored with vanilla, honey, and spices—became a popular beverage during Eliza Jumel’s lifetime (1775‒1865).

Known for its effect as a stimulant and easily transported, both British and American soldiers were supplied with cocoa cakes to mix with hot water for breakfast. Benjamin Franklin, who sold chocolate in his Philadelphia print shop, ensured that the Continental Army marching against General Braddock’s forces in 1775 were equipped with chocolate to boost their energy. In 1785, Thomas Jefferson predicted that cocoa would become American’s favorite after the Boston Tea Party and before coffee rose as the popular choice. Abigail Adams wrote to her husband about drinking breakfast chocolate during a trip to London, and Martha Washington made “cocoa tea.” George Washington and his officers used the Mansion as their headquarters in the fall of 1776. Despite its use in the military as a ration, when Stephen Jumel was importing cacao in the early nineteenth century (ca. 1820) it was enjoyed mostly by the upper and upper-middle classes. Eliza Jumel’s generation saw the democratization of chocolate as production techniques improved, the taste and texture became more palatable, and peoples’ taste for chocolate grew. A Taste for Chocolate will feature art objects from a private collection including rare books, antiquarian botanical prints, chocolate services and pots, and other decorative arts. Advertisements for Cadbury’s and Frye’s provide a window onto how cocoa was marketed in Europe and the U.S., and an original printed inventory from Stephen Jumel’s dry goods business lists a cacao shipment from the West Indies.

Adults $10
Seniors/Students $8
Children under 12 Free
Members Free

Mon Closed to general public, visitation by advanced appt. only
Tue - Fri 10am - 4pm
Sat & Sun 10am - 5pm

Morris-Jumel Mansion
65 Jumel Terrace
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 19 -
December 31, 2017
IMAGES OF INTERNMENT: THE INCARCERATION OF JAPANESE AMERICANS DURING WORLD WAR II
On February 19, 2017 -- the 75th anniversary of the signing of Executive Order 9066 -- the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum will open a new photographic exhibition entitled, IMAGES OF INTERNMENT: THE INCARCERATION OF JAPANESE AMERICANS DURING WORLD WAR II, with over 200 photographs including the work of Dorothea Lange and Ansel Adams. Signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Executive Order 9066 led to the incarceration of 120,000 people of Japanese descent -- including approximately 80,000 American citizens -- during World War II.

In the tense weeks after Japan's December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, many Americans -- particularly those on the Pacific Coast -- feared enemy attack and saw danger in every corner. Rumors and sensational media reports heightened the climate of fear. Under pressure from military and political leaders, President Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066 on February 19, 1942. It is widely viewed today as a serious violation of civil liberties.

IMAGES OF INTERNMENT begins with a small document-focused display that briefly introduces the context behind FDR's decision to issue Executive Order 9066. It includes the role of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, who disagreed with FDR's decision. In April 1943, the First Lady visited an internment camp. Shortly after that the Japanese American Citizens League presented her with a painting of the Topaz camp by Chiura Obata (1885-1975), a Japanese American artist who was confined there. Mrs. Roosevelt displayed the painting in her New York City home until her death in 1962. It is included in the exhibition.

Visitors then enter the exhibition's main gallery where they will encounter over 200 photographs (including some reproduced in dramatically large formats) that provide a visual record of the forced removal of Japanese Americans and their lives inside the restricted world of the remote government camps operated by the War Relocation Authority (WRA). Most of these images were shot by skilled photographers hired by the WRA. The WRA visual records (held at the National Archives and Records Administration in College Park, Maryland) include the work of Dorothea Lange, Clem Albers, Francis Stewart, and Hikaru Iwasaki. IMAGES OF INTERNMENT also features photographs taken by Ansel Adams at the Manzanar camp and a selection of photos shot by George and Frank Hirahara, who were held at the Heart Mountain camp in Wyoming.

The exhibit includes a short film that features excerpts from oral history accounts of Japanese Americans in which they describe their experiences. There is also a video presentation of President Ronald Reagan's remarks when he signed the 1988 bill that provided an official government apology and cash payment to each surviving person covered under Executive Order 9066.

9am - 5pm November - March
9am - 6pm April - October

Closed: Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's Day

William J. vanden Heuvel Gallery
FDR Library
4079 Albany Post Road
Hyde Park, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 22 -
April 29, 2017
Images of Value: The Artwork Behind U.S. Security Engraving 1830s-1980s
Paper money has been much in the news as discussions focused on which woman’s portrait should be the face of the $20 bill, with Harriet Tubman being the final choice. However, surprisingly, it should be noted that from 1886 to approximately 1900, the first named woman’s portrait, that of Martha Washington, appeared on two different examples of US federal paper money. The first lady’s engraved image (and its likely source) is included in the first exhibition to take a comprehensive look at the artwork for engravings that appeared on paper bank notes and securities produced by US bank note firms. The exhibition surveys 150 years of images in watercolor drawings, prints, photographs, and oil paintings that were used as engraving subjects by US bank note firms.

America became the world leader in security engraving by the 1860s, a result of the antebellum banking system. Picture engraving was the key defense against counterfeiting. From beautiful genre and Civil War watercolor drawings of the nineteenth century, to large allegorical oil paintings of the twentieth century, to a range of prints and photographs of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, the art that graced currency and securities can be seen, paired with the bank notes and securities on which the resulting engravings appeared. Original works by American artists such as F. O. C. Darley, Henry Inman, James D. Smillie, Walter Shirlaw, Alonzo E. Foringer and others are in the exhibition.

The exhibition is curated by and largely from the collection of Grolier member Mark D. Tomasko, a private collector and researcher who documents the engravers, artists, designers, and the bank note firms. He is the author of The Feel of Steel: the Art and History of Bank Note Engraving in the United States.

Mon – Sat 10am - 5pm

Free & open to the public

THE GROLIER CLUB
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic