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June 04, 2015 -
November 30, 2017
British Guiana One-Cent Magenta: The World’s Most Famous Stamp
The 1856 British Guiana One-Cent Magenta is displayed in the museum’s William H. Gross Stamp Gallery. This exhibition of the stamp is the longest and most publicly accessible showing ever.

Open daily 10am - 5:30pm
(except December 25)

Free admission

Smithsonian's National Postal Museum
2 Massachusetts Avenue NE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 20, 2016 -
July 31, 2017
Truman Capote’s Brooklyn: The Lost Photographs of David Attie
In the spring of 1958 a young photographer named David Attie was led through the streets of Brooklyn Heights and to the Brooklyn waterfront by an unexpected guide—33-year-old Truman Capote. The images Attie took that day were to illustrate Capote’s essay for Holiday magazine about his life in Brooklyn. Decades later, these largely unseen photographs are being exhibited for the first time.

Wed - Sun 12pm - 5pm

Suggested Admission
BHS Member: Free
Adults: $10
Seniors 62 and over: $6
Teachers: $6
Students (with I.D.): Free
Children under 12: Free

The Museum and Library are closed Thanksgiving Day, the day after Thanksgiving, Christmas Day, New Year's Day, Easter Sunday, and Independence Day.

Please note: the Othmer Library will be CLOSED to the public Monday, August 1 - Wednesday, August 31. We will reopen on Thursday, September 1.

Brooklyn Historical Society
128 Pierrepont Street
Brooklyn, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 01, 2016 -
July 01, 2017
Guerra Civil @ 80
Marking the 80th anniversary of the beginning of the Spanish Civil War, the exhibition Guerra Civil @ 80 features selections from The Bancroft Library's Veterans of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, Bay Area Post records and photographic collections, along with posters, books, pamphlets, and other ephemera. A visual and textual display of the struggle to defend the Second Spanish Republic, the exhibition documents the role of both the Republicans, who were defending the democratically elected government, and the Nationalists, the right-wing rebel forces led by General Francisco Franco. The exhibition also addresses how the war, which unfolded from 1936 to 1939, affected the lives of the people of Spain and American volunteers fighting on the front lines or assisting in the war effort, as well as how the conflict precipitated an intense creative response from within and outside Spain.

Mon - Fri 9am - 5pm

2nd floor corridor (between The Bancroft Library & Doe Library)
University of California
Berkeley, CA
Exhibit West
September 01, 2016 -
December 09, 2017
Making the English Book: The Takamiya Deposit
The most impressive collection of medieval English manuscripts in private hands will be on exhibition for the first time in the United States at the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library in 2017. Four unique Chaucer manuscripts, numerous devotional rolls, and works as varied as Boethius’ Consolation of Philosophy, Langland’s Piers the Plowman and a Middle English medical manuscript—all from the collection of Toshiyuki Takamiya—will be shown in the context of the Beinecke’s own rich holdings of English and Continental manuscripts.

With a rare combination of scholarly and antiquarian expertise, Professor Emeritus Takamiya of Keio University in Tokyo assembled an unrivaled collection of medieval manuscripts over four decades. Held privately in Japan, the collection has been relatively unstudied in the West, and Professor Takamiya’s generous deposit of these manuscripts at the Beinecke makes a significant contribution to medieval scholarship at Yale University and internationally.

Mon 10am - 7pm
Tue - Thu 9am - 7pm
Fri 9am - 5pm
Sat (Exhibitions only) 12pm - 5pm

Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library
121 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
September 01, 2016 -
July 01, 2017
Guerra Civil @ 80
Marking the 80th anniversary of the beginning of the Spanish Civil War, the exhibition Guerra Civil @ 80 features selections from The Bancroft Library's Veterans of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, Bay Area Post records and photographic collections, along with posters, books, pamphlets, and other ephemera. A visual and textual display of the struggle to defend the Second Spanish Republic, the exhibition documents the role of both the Republicans, who were defending the democratically elected government, and the Nationalists, the right-wing rebel forces led by General Francisco Franco. The exhibition also addresses how the war, which unfolded from 1936 to 1939, affected the lives of the people of Spain and American volunteers fighting on the front lines or assisting in the war effort, as well as how the conflict precipitated an intense creative response from within and outside Spain.

9am - 5pm, Monday - Friday

2nd floor corridor between The Bancroft Library and Doe Library
University of California
University Drive
Berkeley, CA
Exhibit West
September 16, 2016 -
September 11, 2017
Artists' Books and Africa
African artists are experimenting with the genre of artists’ books, while international artists are exploring African themes in theirs. Artists’ Books and Africa is the first exhibition to focus on African artists books from the Smithsonian Libraries’ Warren M. Robbins Library and the National Museum of African Art.

10am – 5:30pm

Free admission

Sublevel 3 (off the Ripley Center Concourse)
African Art Museum
950 Independence Avenue SW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 17, 2016 -
August 31, 2017
Broken Beauty: Ruins of the Ancient World
This compelling new exhibition focuses on the Library’s holdings of books devoted to historic sites in the Middle East and beyond. It was the 2015 bombing of the Temple of Baalshamin in the Syrian city of Palmyra that compelled us to examine our collection of books on the historic cities of Paestum, Petra, Persepolis, and Baalbek, among others.

The Library’s collection contains books written by eighteenth-, nineteenth-, and twentieth-century travelers to the Middle East from Cornelis de Bruyn and Sir Austen Henry Layard to Mark Twain and Vita Sackville-West. Les Ruines de Palmyra, Robert Wood’s documentation of Palmyra during his 1751 visit, became an instant classic for future travelers and today is consulted by archaelogists and historians seeking to reconstruct its legendary past. Accounts of ancient ruins were popular among early members, including John Jay and DeWitt Clinton. Two nineteenth-century Library members also ventured beyond Europe’s more comfortable boundaries. John Lloyd Stephens’ Incidents of Travel in Egypt, Arabia Petraea, and the Holy Land was published in 1838, George William Curtis’s The Howadji in Syria in 1852. One of the treasures of the Library is Giovanni Battista Piranesi’s 1778 folio Differentes vues de quelques restes de trois grands edifices qui subsistent encore dans le milieu de l’ancienne ville de Peste.

“Ruin-fever,” as one writer described it, runs like an electrical current through many of these early accounts. The travelers are nearly all struck with awe at what the past, however fractured and senselessly deconstructed, reveals. We believe that mounting an exhibition of this historic dimension will allow visitors to Broken Beauty to experience the beauty of these legendary ruins. In the end, words may outlive what has been lost.

Mon & Fri 9am - 5pm
Tue, Wed & Thu 9am - 8pm
Sat & Sun 11am - 5pm

THE NEW YORK SOCIETY LIBRARY
53 East 79th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 06 -
August 12, 2017
From the Desk of Simone de Beauvoir
Consider the influence and intellect of writer Simone de Beauvoir in an interpretation of her Paris studio alcove. This installation invites visitors to reflect on Beauvoir’s impact, not only in her time and not only as a feminist, but in our own time and in the areas of literature, philosophy, and popular culture. A zealous writer, speaker, and lover of all sensations life had to offer—what does Beauvoir say to you?

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

Adults: $10.00
Visitors 65 and over: $8.00
Students: $8.00
NMWA members: Free
Youth 18 and under: Free

4th Floor (in front of the Dix Gallery)
National Museum of Women in the Arts
1250 New York Avenue NW (corner of NY Avenue & 13th Street NW)
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 21 -
July 30, 2017
Toutes Les Nouvelles – All the News: Current Events in Nineteenth-Century French Prints
Beginning in the sixteenth century, prints became the primary medium for circulating and preserving images of current events, including public ceremonies and celebrations, battles, and other noteworthy incidents. Industrialization and rapid urbanization during the 1800s created not only the means to quickly print and publish text and images but the market for such news sources as well. Artists relished the opportunity to create original compositions based on recent happenings that would be widely circulated in illustrated weekly and monthly journals and inexpensive books in addition to being issued as independent prints.

The works in this exhibition present images of various Parisian news items from the mid- to late nineteenth century, ranging from mundane political intrigues to serious foreign affairs. Artists took different approaches to presenting such subject matter: the etchers Auguste Lançon and Félix Buhot created highly detailed, documentary scenes, while the caricaturists Cham and Charles Vernier focused on satirizing French government officials. Particularly remarkable are compositions, such as the one by Honoré Daumier, that portray current events in the guise of biblical or mythological subjects that would have been understood by a broad public. In this way, artists presented new ideas within familiar narratives while investing their subjects with historical significance. Near the end of the century, artists became more partisan in their depictions of current events and revealed their personal positions on sensational topics, which included France’s colonial ambitions and the false claim accusing a Jewish army officer of treason now known as the Dreyfus Affair. The works on view were selected from the Zimmerli Art Museum’s rich collection of nineteenth-century French prints and drawings.

Volpe Gallery
71 Hamilton Street (at George Street)
College Avenue Campus
Rutgers University
New Brunswick, NJ
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 01, 2017 -
January 01, 2018
BRONTË 200 - MANSIONS IN THE SKY
Who was Branwell Brontë? This new exhibition, curated by poet Simon Armitage, invites us inside the mind and world of the notorious Brontë brother in a search for answers to this question. Inspired by an early poem sent to William Wordsworth by the optimistic and precocious twenty-year old, Armitage explores Branwell’s colourful personal history through his writings, drawings and possessions, displayed at the Parsonage alongside newly created installations.

Highlights include a series of new poems by Armitage in response to Branwell’s belongings in the Museum collection, a dramatic recreation of Branwell’s studio designed in collaboration with the production team of the BBC’s To Walk Invisible, and the actual letter and poem posted to Wordsworth, loaned by the Wordsworth Trust especially for the bicentenary. In delving into the life and times of the infamous Branwell, Mansions in the Sky will provoke new insights into the charismatic and complicated brother of Charlotte, Emily and Anne.

10am - 5pm

Exhibition free with admission to the Museum.

Brontë Parsonage Museum
Church Street
Haworth
Keighley
West Yorkshire, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
February 01, 2017 -
January 01, 2018
TO WALK INVISIBLE: FROM PARSONAGE TO PRODUCTION
An exhibition of costumes, props and photography

An exclusive opportunity to see the costumes from To Walk Invisible, Sally Wainwright's acclaimed Brontë drama, in the historic setting of the Parsonage. Designer Tom Pye worked closely with academics and experts to create costumes which are authentic to the period and which evoke the separate personalities of each member of the Brontë family. Also on display in this arresting exhibition are props made especially for the drama and a selection of stills from photographer Michael Prince which give an enticing behind-the-scenes glimpse into the filmmaking process.

10am - 5pm

Exhibition free with admission to the Museum.

Brontë Parsonage Museum
Church Street
Haworth
Keighley
West Yorkshire, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
February 06 -
July 16, 2017
Stories to Tell: Selections from the Harry Ransom Center
Many stories can be told from the Ransom Center's extensive cultural collections—stories of inspiration, adaptation, innovation, confrontation, collaboration, and even frustration. By acquiring and preserving collections created by diverse individuals working in literature, art, and other humanities disciplines, the Ransom Center helps to tell these stories, unlocking and illuminating the profoundly human reach of archives.

This exhibition of more than 250 items includes, among many others, manuscripts of David Foster Wallace, Julia Alvarez, and Gabriel García Márquez, Henri Matisse's Jazz, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle's spirit photographs, and the hat that accompanied the green curtain dress worn by Vivien Leigh in Gone With The Wind.

This exhibition helps us better understand how the humanities affect our lives, connecting the past to the present in personal and meaningful ways.

Mon, Tue, Wed, & Fri 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 7pm
Sat & Sun Noon – 5pm

Closed: hanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day

Free admission

Harry Ransom Center
The University of Texas at Austin
21st and Guadalupe Streets
Austin, TX
Exhibit Southwest
February 19 -
December 31, 2017
IMAGES OF INTERNMENT: THE INCARCERATION OF JAPANESE AMERICANS DURING WORLD WAR II
On February 19, 2017 -- the 75th anniversary of the signing of Executive Order 9066 -- the Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum will open a new photographic exhibition entitled, IMAGES OF INTERNMENT: THE INCARCERATION OF JAPANESE AMERICANS DURING WORLD WAR II, with over 200 photographs including the work of Dorothea Lange and Ansel Adams. Signed by President Franklin D. Roosevelt, Executive Order 9066 led to the incarceration of 120,000 people of Japanese descent -- including approximately 80,000 American citizens -- during World War II.

In the tense weeks after Japan's December 7, 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor, many Americans -- particularly those on the Pacific Coast -- feared enemy attack and saw danger in every corner. Rumors and sensational media reports heightened the climate of fear. Under pressure from military and political leaders, President Roosevelt issued Executive Order 9066 on February 19, 1942. It is widely viewed today as a serious violation of civil liberties.

IMAGES OF INTERNMENT begins with a small document-focused display that briefly introduces the context behind FDR's decision to issue Executive Order 9066. It includes the role of First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt, who disagreed with FDR's decision. In April 1943, the First Lady visited an internment camp. Shortly after that the Japanese American Citizens League presented her with a painting of the Topaz camp by Chiura Obata (1885-1975), a Japanese American artist who was confined there. Mrs. Roosevelt displayed the painting in her New York City home until her death in 1962. It is included in the exhibition.

Visitors then enter the exhibition's main gallery where they will encounter over 200 photographs (including some reproduced in dramatically large formats) that provide a visual record of the forced removal of Japanese Americans and their lives inside the restricted world of the remote government camps operated by the War Relocation Authority (WRA). Most of these images were shot by skilled photographers hired by the WRA. The WRA visual records (held at the National Archives and Records Administration in College Park, Maryland) include the work of Dorothea Lange, Clem Albers, Francis Stewart, and Hikaru Iwasaki. IMAGES OF INTERNMENT also features photographs taken by Ansel Adams at the Manzanar camp and a selection of photos shot by George and Frank Hirahara, who were held at the Heart Mountain camp in Wyoming.

The exhibit includes a short film that features excerpts from oral history accounts of Japanese Americans in which they describe their experiences. There is also a video presentation of President Ronald Reagan's remarks when he signed the 1988 bill that provided an official government apology and cash payment to each surviving person covered under Executive Order 9066.

9am - 5pm November - March
9am - 6pm April - October

Closed: Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's Day

William J. vanden Heuvel Gallery
FDR Library
4079 Albany Post Road
Hyde Park, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 07 -
August 26, 2017
Love in Venice
This exhibition is part of Carnegie Hall’s citywide festival La Serenissima: Music and Arts from the Venetian Republic.

A tolerant and secular state, the Venetian Republic originated in the lagoon communities around Venice and existed for half a millennium, from 1297 until 1797. Dominated by a merchant capitalist elite who did business through sea trade, the Republic of Venice enjoyed an autonomy and freedom that was not typical of the rest of Italy, and which for centuries made it a destination for love and pleasure.

Titled “Love in Venice,” the exhibition at The New York Public Library will examine the literary, artistic, musical and cultural aspects of Venice’s seductiveness, including its beautiful courtesans, lavish festivals, lively carnivals and libertine counter-culture. On view will be works as diverse as the Hypnerotomachia Poliphili, one of the most iconic works produced in Venice to explore ideas of desire, to flap books showing the undergarments of Venetian prostitutes, etchings by Giovanni Battista Tiepolo, letters from Lord Byron’s paramours and examples of wedding poetry celebrating the unions of leading European families.

Sun 1pm – 5pm
Mon & Thu - Sat 10am – 6pm
Tues & Wed 10am – 8pm

Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
New York Public Library
476 Fifth Avenue (42nd St & 5th Ave)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 08 -
July 30, 2017
Saving Washington
First Lady Dolley Madison is often remembered as a hostess who saved the White House portrait of George Washington from British vandalism during the War of 1812. But in fact, she was the most influential woman in America during the nation’s formative years—a national, almost mythic figure. Even more, she was a powerful force during a time when women were excluded from affairs of state.

As the inaugural exhibition in the Joyce B. Cowin Women’s History Gallery, Saving Washington recasts the traditional Founding Fathers narrative to consider the less-examined contributions of women whose behind-the-scenes efforts helped implement the Constitution “on the ground.” In spite of laws restricting their broader participation, elite and non-elite women alike sought various avenues for empowerment, activism, and leadership.

Featuring more than 150 objects—such as artworks, books, documents, clothing, jewelry, and housewares—within immersive installations, Saving Washington evokes Dolley Madison’s famous “Wednesday night squeezes,” her popular social gatherings that drew a wide range of people to “squeeze” into the President’s mansion and encouraged informal diplomacy.

Tue - Thu & Sat 10am - 6pm
Fri 10am - 8pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West (at Richard Gilder Way / 77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 10 -
December 15, 2017
Jane Austen in 41 Objects
The story of Jane Austen's life and legacy, told using 41 Objects from the Jane Austen's House Museum collection.

200 years after her death, Jane Austen in 41 Objects is a celebration of Jane Austen’s life. Jane was only 41 years old when she died in 1817, and Jane Austen in 41 Objects tells the story of her life and legacy with reference to 41 different objects in the Jane Austen’s House Museum collection.

Jane Austen in 41 Objects takes the form of an evolving exhibition alongside a series of online posts by guest writers published weekly throughout this bicentenary year. Each object and accompanying text explores a different aspect of Jane Austen’s life and work.

Please note: due to the Museum's limited display space and loans to other museums, the exhibition of the 41 Objects is staggered throughout 2017, and not all objects will be on display at all times.


Walk in Jane Austen's Footsteps

Why not extend your trip to Chawton with a visit to Chawton House Library? A short stroll from the Museum, this route was regularly taken by Jane to visit her brother Edward and his family at the Great House. Save £1 on a visit to Chawton House Library by presenting your ticket to Jane Austen's House Museum.


Advance booking is not required, just buy your tickets on the day

Adults: £8.00
Seniors (65+): £7.30
Students*: £6.50
Registered Unemployed*: £6.50
Art Fund Members: £4.00
Disabled: £3.00
Accompanying Carer: Free entry
Children (6-16): £4.00
Children under 6: Free entry
Family Ticket: £20.00 (2 adults & up to 3 children)

Group (10+) Admissions: £7.30 each (paid together and pre-booked - for more information please visit our Group Visits page.)

*Valid ID/Proof of entitlement required.
VISIT US

Please note: Due to the historic nature of the Jane Austen's House Museum site you may find that some of the flooring is slightly uneven and some of the door frames may be lower than you are used to, please take care during your visit.

There may be occasions when open times change or the Museum closes at short notice; these will be advertised in advance on the website where possible.

Different visitors take different amounts of time to enjoy their visit. Some visitors spend all day with us, while others make a quick visit on their way elsewhere. We do not undertake guided tours so the length of your visit is entirely up to you. We do however suggest allowing one and a half hours to give you enough time to explore the house and all it has to offer as well as taking time to enjoy the garden.

​June to August: 10:00 - 17:00
September to December: 10:30 - 16:30

Please note: the Museum will be closed on the mornings of Wednesday 6 September, Monday 6 November and Monday 4 December, to allow for staff training. The Museum will open between 13:30-16:30.

Jane Austen's House Museum
Winchester Road
Chawton, Alton
Hampshire, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
March 12 -
July 16, 2017
East of the Mississippi: Nineteenth-Century American Landscape Photography
The first exhibition to focus exclusively on photographs made in the eastern half of the United States during the 19th century, East of the Mississippi showcases some 175 works—from daguerreotypes and stereographs to albumen prints and cyanotypes—as well as several photographers whose efforts have often gone unheralded. Celebrating natural wonders such as Niagara Falls and the White Mountains, as well as capturing a cultural landscape fundamentally altered by industrialization, the Civil War, and tourism, these photographs not only helped shape America’s national identity but also played a role in the emergence of environmentalism.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 11am – 6pm

Admission is always free and passes are not required

Other venues: New Orleans Museum of Art, New Orleans, October 5, 2017–January 7, 2018

West Building, Ground Floor, Inner Tier
National Gallery of Art
between 3rd & 9th Streets along Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 20 -
July 31, 2017
The Working Library: Clifford Burke and Fine Printing

The Book Club of California
312 Sutter Street, Suite 500
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
April 01 -
July 30, 2017
AUDUBON: DRAWN TO NATURE
Soar to the IMA to experience Audubon: Drawn to Nature, an exhibition featuring the lifelike drawings of John James Audubon. From stern owls to playful parakeets these beautiful drawings feature birds of North America carefully studied and documented by Audubon, a leader in ornithology and conservation.

Along with the artwork and accompanying descriptions of the bird’s habitat and characteristics, experience an immersive gallery where Audubon’s birds will come to life, giving the feeling of being outdoors in a forest. Learn about habitat conservation and test your wingspan against some of nature’s biggest birds. See one of the few remaining printing plates made for the original printing of Audubon’s The Birds of America book, lent to the IMA by the Smithsonian Museum of American History.

While visiting our campus, be sure to walk to the Virginia B. Fairbanks Art & Nature Park where you can see real life birds up close.

Tue, Wed, Fri, & Sat 11am - 5pm
Thu 11am - 9pm
Sun noon - 5pm

IMA Members: FREE
Adults: $18
Ages 5 & under: FREE
Youth ages 6-17: $10
Access Pass $2
Children 15 and under must be accompanied by an adult.

Indianapolis Museum of Art
4000 Michigan Road
Indianapolis, IN
Exhibit Midwest
April 07 -
July 06, 2017
Thomas Jefferson: The Private Man, from the Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society
One of American history’s protean figures, Thomas Jefferson’s role as a private citizen is as defining as his personae as founder, president, and political standard-bearer. A gifted writer and political philosopher, Jefferson was also an accomplished gardener, farmer, and architect. Thomas Jefferson: The Private Man provides a glimpse of his life outside the public sphere through the iconic documents he created.

Among the 36 documents and artifacts from the collection of the Massachusetts Historical Society on display in the exhibition are Jefferson’s garden book, his last letter to John Adams, manuscript leafs from his Notes on the State of Virginia, early drawings of Monticello, and a copy of the Declaration of Independence in Jefferson’s hand.

Tue - Thu & Sat 10am - 6pm
Fri 10am - 8pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West (at Richard Gilder Way / 77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 08 -
August 07, 2017
Octavia Butler: Telling My Stories
A new exhibition opening this spring examines the life and work of celebrated author Octavia E. Butler (1947-2006), the first science fiction writer to receive a prestigious MacArthur “genius” award and the first African American woman to win widespread recognition writing in that genre. Butler’s literary archive resides at The Huntington.

The exhibition follows a roughly chronological thread and includes approximately 100 items that reveal the writer’s early years and influences. It also highlights specific themes that repeatedly commanded her attention. Butler was born June 22, 1947, to a maid and a shoeshine man. Her father died when she was quite young. An only child, she discovered writing very early because it suited her shy nature. The exhibition will feature samples of her earliest stories.

The exhibition will include examples of journal entries, photographs, and first editions of her books, including Kindred, arguably her best-known work. The book is less science fiction and more fantasy, involving an African American woman who travels back in time to the horrors of plantation life in pre-Civil War Maryland. “I wanted to reach people emotionally in a way that history tends not to,” Butler said about the book. Published in 1979, Kindred continues to command widespread appeal and is regularly taught in high schools and at the university level, and is frequently chosen for community-wide reading programs and book clubs.

Mon 10am - 5pm
Tue Closed
Wed - Sun 10am - 5pm

The last ticketed entry time is 4 p.m. The library and art galleries close at 4:30 p.m

Library West Hall
The Huntington
1151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
April 08 -
September 01, 2017
Clever Criminals and Daring Detectives
Since the beginning of printing, readers have thrilled to true crime tales of highwaymen and murderers and the last words of executed criminals. These narratives provided a mix of lurid details, moral uplift, and reassurance of the workings of justice. While true crime attracted readers through the centuries, fictional crime stories came into their own with the advent of the modern detective novel in the 19th century. Edgar Allan Poe’s “Murders in the Rue Morgue” launched a new genre that blossomed through the century in works ranging from Charles Dickens’s Mystery of Edwin Drood to Arthur Conan Doyle’s Sherlock Holmes and even Bram Stokers’ Dracula.

This exhibition chases both criminal and detective characters across a wide historical landscape and offers the chance to test visitors’ own sleuthing skills. Objects on display include the earliest account of an American multiple murderer, the manuscript of “The Adventure of the Empty House” by Arthur Conan Doyle, and Ellery Queen’s thoughts on collecting detective fiction.

Hours

Mon Closed
Tue Noon — 5pm
Wed & Thu Noon — 8pm
Fri Noon — 5pm
Sat & Sun Noon — 6pm
*Closed on National Holidays

Adults: $10.00
Seniors (ages 65 & older): $8.00
Students & Children: $5.00
Children under 5: Free
Rosenbach Members: Free!
Members of AAM,ICOM, & the North American Reciprocal Museum (NARM) Program: Free

The Rosenbach
2008-2010 Delancey Place
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 21 -
July 01, 2017
EN MASSE: BOOKS ORCHESTRATED
Books, foremost agents of intellectual and visual stimuli, pose as objects of desire and forms of aesthetic due to their psychical precision that stems from their geometric formations and mysterious potential. When loosely arranged together through a conceptual or aesthetic vision–whether piled or adjoined– books adopt further narratives distinct in their structure, yet still original in their intellectual content. En Masse: Books Orchestrated, organized by Osman Can Yerebakan, contemplates various possibilities on intellectual thinking and collective culture, bringing together various artists that utilize book arrangement in their practice, while suggesting an alternative perspective on analyzing and interpreting materials beyond their physicality and content.

Complex and profound in their pristine forms, books endure as agents of both subjective specification and individualistic expression. Embedded with certain connotations, each book transfers an aura via its outer case. Authors, titles or artwork covering their layers convey the content of a book, while dictating assumptions on its subject matter. The exhibition aims to investigate cultural, historical, and emotional attributions on books as phenomenons while analyzing the dialogue between every individual edition with one another and their audience.

The artists include Louis Zoellar Bickett, Jordan Buschur, Emilio Chapela, Özgür Demirci, Donald Daedalus, Leor Grady, Katarina Jerinic, Nina Katchadourian, j.c. lenochan, Liz Linden, Michael Mandiberg, Phil Shaw, Ward Shelley & Douglas Paulson, Yinka Shonibare MBE, and Julia Weist.

Mon - Fri 11am - 6pm
Sat 10am - 5pm

Main Gallery
The Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 22 -
September 06, 2017
Witness: Reality and Imagination in the Prints of Francisco Goya
Visions of Spanish life from one of the greatest graphic artists of all time

Francisco Goya witnessed decades of political turmoil and social upheaval as court painter to four successive rulers of Spain. Among his greatest achievements were four series of etchings that chronicle the transformation of Spanish society and his own personal visions: Los Caprichos (The Caprices), Los Desastres de la Guerra (The Disasters of War), La Tauromaquia (Bullfighting), and Los Disparates (The Follies). Near the end of his life, Goya also produced a set of four grand lithographs known as the Bulls of Bordeaux. This exhibition highlights prints from each series, exploring the imagery and techniques that make Goya one of the greatest graphic artists of all time.

From the chaos of war to the spectacle of the bullfight, the prints in the exhibition show Goya’s remarkable ability to move between documentary realism and expressive invention. Unlike his commissioned paintings, his graphic works allowed him the freedom to explore provocative subjects such as prostitution, witchcraft, and political corruption. This exhibition also highlights how Goya pushed the limits of printmaking to heighten the expressive effect of his subjects.

Tue – Sun 10am – 5pm
Wed & Fri open until 8:45pm
Closed Monday

Korman Galleries 121–123
first floor, main building
Philadelphia Museum of Art
2600 Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 22 -
July 28, 2017
William Blake in Color
For the first time a massive volume of 2500+ rare plates from the Trianon Press Illuminated Book series enters the collector market. Additional proofs and personal archives from legendary Trianon producer, Arnold Fawcus are also made publicly available.

Tue - Sat 11am - 5pm

The William Blake Gallery
49 Geary Street, Suite 205
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
April 26 -
July 15, 2017
Mark Mothersbaugh: Myopia
A founding member of the trailblazing band DEVO, Mark Mothersbaugh (b. 1950) has been a visual artist since before the group’s formation. Beginning in the early 1970s, he has created a large body of work—paintings, prints, photographs, sculpture, decorative arts, video, film, and performance—which often originates from his visual diaries of over 30,000 postcard-sized drawings. Mothersbaugh’s fascination with obscure historical material and mass-culture consumerism pervades his diverse artistic output. Also key is his severe myopia, undiagnosed in his early childhood, which he employs as a springboard for celebrating outsiders and mutations. Since 1986, he has produced scores for films, television, and video games.

DEVO’s foundational concept of de-evolution—the belief that the world is falling apart—informs the band’s irreverent, polymorphous persona, first cultivated at Kent State University in Ohio. A studio-art major, Mothersbaugh helped develop the group’s iconoclastic identity less as a band and more as performance artists. Precedents such as Dada, Surrealism, and German Expressionism also inspired DEVO’s distinctive look: its eccentric costumes, inventive characters, and unconventional stage presence. The group’s original album artwork, production of some of the first-ever music videos, and interrogation of the peculiar relationship between industry and identity all play on notions of conformity and deviance. Known for the trademark “energy dome” headwear in their 1980 hit song “Whip It,” they also donned matching workers’ coveralls, hazmat suits, and garbage bags, and always appeared on stage with the man-child character Booji Boy, Mothersbaugh’s alter ego.

Indeed, central to Mothersbaugh’s ethos is this childlike perspective, which allows him to deflate the self-seriousness of music, art, and even society itself—to offer a juvenile subversion of adult imagery. Projecting a mordant, confrontational aesthetic and a critique of consumerism linked, but not limited, to punk, Mothersbaugh has long investigated the relationship between technology and individuality in our contemporary capitalist society—often through self-critical adoptions of some of its most recognizable forms.

Grey Art Gallery, New York University
100 Washington Square East
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 28 -
August 29, 2017
Russian Revolution: Hope, Tragedy, Myths
From the fall of Russia’s last Tsar to the rise of the first communist state, this definitive exhibition takes a fresh look at the Russian Revolution 100 years on.

With rarely seen items from both sides of the conflict – from a first edition of the Communist Manifesto to anti-Bolshevik propaganda – this is a unique chance to understand the lesser-known personal stories behind the events that changed the world.

Also on display for the first time, from the British Library’s own archive: Lenin’s handwritten application for a Reader Pass.

Uniting the political and the personal, explore the Russian Revolution’s central characters, most notably Lenin and Trotsky, alongside the tales of ordinary people living through extraordinary times. Did events in Russia in 1917 transform the international landscape forever? Did they shape the world we live in today?

Bringing to life the hope, tragedy and myths of this seismic revolution, discover Russia 1917 – the biggest flame in a world on fire.

PACCAR Gallery
The British Library
96 Euston Road
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
May 03 -
September 03, 2017
Why Draw? 500 Years of Drawings and Watercolors at Bowdoin College
North America’s First Public Drawing Collection Surveyed at Bowdoin College Museum of Art.

This is the first-ever survey exhibition of the Museum’s extensive collection of drawings, widely considered the oldest public collection of works on paper on the continent, illuminating the foundational and evolving role of drawing within Western artistic practice.

Exhibition spans 500 years, including more than 150 works by American and European artists across cultures, genres, and time periods; drawings by Peter Paul Rubens, Winslow Homer, John Singer Sargent, Michelle Stuart, and more to examine the significance of the medium to Western artistic practice and study.

Free admission & open to the public

Tue - Sat 10am - 5pm
Thu 10am - 8:30pm
Sun 1pm - 5pm

Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Walker Art Building
Bowdoin College
9400 College Station
Brunswick, ME
Exhibit New England
May 05 -
August 12, 2017
Happiness: The Writer in the Garden, with companion exhibition Bird Watching
Like a wandering vine, the subject of garden-making winds through the shelves of books and boxes of archives in the collection of the Beinecke Library. In the materials that make up this exhibition, one state of mind appears over and again: Happiness. Writers of all dispositions seem to agree that the work of shaping the natural world into manageable plots brings particularly rewarding forms of joy and satisfaction.

Many parts of the Beinecke’s collections are represented in this exhibition – from 17th century printed books to contemporary archives. Because of the history of the collections in the library, the selections are weighted towards English language materials, but they stand for versions of joy felt around the world when a writer looks into the face of a fresh blossom.

Special events:

Friday, May 5, 5 pm: Opening reception, with Douglas Crase, author of Both: A Portrait in Two Parts, speaking on "The Enduring Influence of a Painter's Garden"

Friday, June 16, 5 pm: Juliet Nicolson, author of A House Full of Daughters, on the role of gardens in her life and in the story of her grandmother, Vita Sackville-West, creator of the celebrated gardens at Sissinghurst; presented in conjunction with the International Festival of Arts and Ideas

About Bird Watching:

Part scientific endeavor, part leisurely pastime, the activity we call “bird watching” includes the careful work of devoted scholars and that of curious backyard observers. Seeing and identifying the birds around us gives many a sense of connection to our natural world, even as the very creatures we watch have long symbolized the untethered flight of the spirit. In games and children’s literature, personal notes and intimate correspondence, birds and their lives on the wing captivate the imagination.

Conjuring the observer in the field, the image of the bird watcher may seem far removed from libraries like the Beinecke. Although they may seem quite different at first glance, bird watching and archival research have a good deal in common. Like both ornithologist and amateur enthusiast, the archival scholar may be keenly focused on minute details, seeing and evaluating minor variation in seemingly similar things; she is patient—she sits quietly (sometimes for long stretches) waiting for something special to appear in a familiar place; she carefully records her findings in detailed—sometimes idiosyncratic—lists and descriptive narratives; she is, by turns, solitary in her contemplation and engaged in lively discourse with those who share her interests.

Bird Watching documents the real lives of birds—their forms, their songs, their behavior—in word and image; the exhibition honors, too, the birds of fantasy and wild imagination. Together these reflect an ongoing human fascination with the life of the skies.

Mon 10am - 7pm
Tue - Thu 9am - 7pm
Fri 9am - 5pm
Sat 12pm - 5pm

Free & open to all

Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library
Yale University
121 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
May 08 -
July 07, 2017
Collecting Mesoamerica: The Hemispheric Roots of U.S. Anthropology
In the second half of the nineteenth century, Penn Professor Daniel Garrison Brinton assembled an impressive collection of books, manuscripts, and artifacts related to Mesoamerica; at the same time, his published work helped to define the emerging discipline of anthropology in the United States. This exhibit explores the relationship between collecting and anthropology at Penn by bringing together materials drawn from Brinton's papers and his manuscript linguistic collection, as well as books from the Penn Museum Library, images of artifacts from the Penn Museum, and records drawn from the Museum Archives.

Mon - Fri 9am - 5pm

Free & open to the public

Snyder-Granader Alcove
Van Pelt-Dietrich Library, sixth floor
3420 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 09, 2017 -
January 05, 2018
The Living Book: New Perspectives on Form & Function
Books of all shapes and sizes are common objects in our lives. We use them for education, reflection, work, and fun. The Library Company's new exhibition, curated by the Conservation Department, will provide a new perspective on the material culture of the book. This multi-media presentation will highlight the evolution of books within our lives and history. We'll explore details, such as homemade repairs, handwritten notes, and sentimental tokens that bring the book to life. These details, which are often overlooked, convey a sense of each book's unique story. Also included are various materials and ephemera, including prints, photographs, broadsides, and advertisements. The Living Bookwill inspire you to think about the role of the book in our lives, and the value of its preservation for discovery and exploration in the future.

Collector's Discussion Featuring Michael Zinman & The Living Book: Exhibition Opening: Tue, May 9th
6:00pm - 7:00pm
Reception to follow

The Library Company welcomes you to an evening featuring special remarks from renowned book collector and Library Company Emeritus Trustee Michael Zinman for his talk Life and Loves: adventures with books and booksellers (highly enjoyable and often successful); with women (entertaining but a non-starter in this environment); and with my epiphanies du jour (invariably disastrous); in all, a merry dessert for a merry evening.

Annual Business Meeting
for Library Company Shareholders
Tue, May 9th 5:00pm - 6:00pm

Shareholders will approve current nominations to the Board of Trustees, celebrate past year's accomplishments, and catch a glimpse of future initiatives.
The Living Book Symposium: May 18th, 2017
1:00pm - 5:00pm
Free for Members/ $15 for Non-Members

Mon - Fri 9:00am - 4:45pm

The Library Company of Philadelphia
1314 Locust Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 09 -
October 29, 2017
Restless Shadow: Dickens the Campaigner
Charles Dickens was a novelist who addressed social ills in his fiction. He was also a journalist and activist who boldly and imaginatively campaigned to improve the lives of the most desperate and overlooked in Victorian society.

The exhibition Restless Shadow explores a largely unknown and under-rated body of Dickens’s work that speaks plainly to social justice with energy and relevance—both then and now. It reveals his keen interest in ‘street level’ problems along with other Victorian reformers such as Florence Nightingale and Angela Burdett-Coutts. It shows the practical, hands-on solutions which flowed from his campaigns.

Dickens was especially powerful in pioneering new forms of investigative reporting and satirical exposé. As a young journalist and shorthand-writer with the pen-name ‘Boz’, he honed a peerless style of urban description, combining humour, pathos and a heightened kind of graphic realism. In his artistic maturity as a journalist, editor and speech-maker, Dickens drew the attention of a huge and diverse international readership to an astonishingly broad range of campaigns.

Core Themes

Restless Shadow focuses in particular on Dickens’s campaigning on homelessness; workhouses for the poor; schools and schooling; conditions in the armed forces and for veterans; and prisons and punishment, including his fervent opposition to the death penalty. It also shows how Dickens’s investigative reporting informed his fiction, for example, in Fagin’s sentencing and Bill Sikes’s accidental hanging in Oliver Twist.

New Discovery

At the heart of this exhibition is the monthly journal, All The Year Round, which Dickens founded in 1859. It represents the pinnacle of his ability to turn magazine articles into activism and activism into literary art.

As editor, Dickens published others’ contributions to All The Year Round anonymously. For more than a century, researchers were unable to prove their authorship. Then, in 2014, Dr Jeremy Parrott discovered a unique set of volumes annotated with contributors’ names. This is the first time that Dr Parrott’s discovery has been on display to the public. It reveals the identities of the men and women whom Dickens gave a platform to write on the most vital and controversial issues of the day.

The exhibition also includes Dickens’s editorial chair, and his walking stick from the 1860s. He used the stick to walk huge distances exploring London’s streets by day and night. It’s a powerful symbol of his desire to go into every corner of society, to bring himself face-to-face with suffering, and expose what others couldn’t see.

Tue - Sun 10am - 5pm
Mon Closed (except for Bank Holidays)

Last admission is at 4pm.
Once a month we are open until 8pm with last admission at 7pm.

Free with general admission

Charles Dickens Museum
48 Doughty Street
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
May 17 -
July 29, 2017
The Revival of Calligraphy: 1906 to 2006
Calligraphy is an art with a long and noble history, going back many centuries and spanning cultures. No major museum exhibition of Persian art, or Asian art, or even Medieval Western art would be considered complete without examples of calligraphy from these cultures. Yet, curiously, modern Western calligraphy has been ignored by the art establishment. This show aims to correct that oversight, showing major calligraphic art by over 70 Western artists from 1906-2006, demonstrating how alive – even thriving – the art is in the West in the computer age. Lenders include Letterform Archive, San Francisco, CA, and several private collectors.

Mon – Sat 10am - 5pm

Free & open to the public

THE GROLIER CLUB
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 19 -
September 11, 2017
Amazing Acts of The Greatest Show on Earth
For 146 years some of the most astounding and exciting acts in circus history have performed for circuses bearing the title of the Greatest Show on Earth. From P.T. Barnum’s Great Traveling Museum, Menagerie, Caravan and Hippodrome, first put on the road in 1871, through his partnership with James Bailey and the later combination of American’s two largest shows by the Ringling brothers, up to the contemporary shows produced by Feld Entertainment, the title has become synonymous with the highest quality of circus performance. This exhibition features original posters spanning the history of this singular brand, giving us another opportunity to marvel at a few of the amazing talents that have performed for the Greatest Show on Earth.

Open Daily 10am - 5pm
Thusdays until 8pm

Circus Museum (The Ringling)
The John & Mable Ringling Museum of Art
5401 Bay Shore Road
Sarasota, FL
Exhibit South
May 20 -
August 13, 2017
A New Light on Bernard Berenson: Persian Paintings from Villa I Tatti
This focused exhibition features illustrated Persian manuscripts and detached folios that were collected in the early 20th century by Harvard alumnus Bernard Berenson (1865–1959), the famous American art historian and connoisseur of Italian Renaissance painting. Berenson prized these works at his home in Florence, Villa I Tatti, which he bequeathed to Harvard and which now serves as the Harvard University Center for Italian Renaissance Studies. The exhibition offers the first opportunity to see these works outside Villa I Tatti.

Works in the exhibition are grouped according to the style in which each was created between the 14th and 17th centuries in Iran and Central Asia. Berenson’s important 15th-century Timurid manuscript will be displayed in an unbound state as part of an ongoing conservation and rebinding process. The show will also include additional related works from the Harvard Art Museums, the Morgan Library and Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum. These works were collected by close associates of Berenson who shared his enthusiasm for Persian painting, at a time when this area of art was gaining considerable prestige among collectors.

The exhibition sheds important new light on Berenson’s little-known and understudied Persian collection, highlighting current research from various scholars on Berenson’s collecting interests and the artistic and cultural significance of the objects.

University Research Gallery
Harvard Art Museums
32 Quincy Street
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
May 22 -
September 02, 2017
Henry David Thoreau at 200
As scholars, teachers, politicians, and pundits debate what America is and means by reimagining or rewriting the America in which we live, it is worth recalling the America actually lived in and written about by the country’s first generation born after the American Revolution. The bicentenary of Henry David Thoreau, who was born in Concord, Massachusetts, on July 12, 1817 and died there on May 6, 1862, provides such an occasion.

A contemporary of Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, Margaret Fuller, Walt Whitman, and Frederick Douglass, Thoreau did not always share in the prominence they enjoyed. Although his story invariably opens with reference to Emerson, Emerson’s belief that American exceptionalism was synonymous with capitalism made for a stark distinction between the two, a distinction Thoreau underscored in 1853, writing, “I am a mystic—a transcendentalist—& a natural philosopher.” The dominant Thoreau who has emerged among recent generations of readers is an environmentalist who argued for the restoration of the landscape with which humankind was originally blessed, a humanitarian who read capitalism as the supreme threat to individualism and equal rights under the law, and a political thinker who critiqued the popular concept of exceptionalism as promoting destructive impulses such as the virtual eradication of Native American culture and the extension of slavery into the American West.

Henry David Thoreau at 200 invites you to examine the life and thought of the author of “Civil Disobedience” and Walden. Highlights of the exhibition include:

-First editions of his major works
-Drawings of Thoreau by his close friend, Daniel Ricketson
-Thoreau’s own copy of Ralph Waldo Emerson’s Nature
-One of his Harvard College examination papers
-Manuscripts of “Reform and the Reformers” and “Walking”
-The recently discovered notes on his search for Margaret Fuller after her shipwreck.

Lowell Room
Houghton Library
Harvard Yard
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
May 23 -
November 22, 2017
Collecting Inspiration: Contemporary Illustrators and Their Heroes
Picture books instill in children a sense of awe, magic, and wonderment, but who inspires the illustrators themselves—the people who bring incredibly imaginative worlds to life? Organized by two prominent figures in the field, Tony DiTerlizzi and Mo Willems, this exhibition gives visitors a peek into the minds and motivations of an array of talented artists working today. Visit The Carle to find out who inspires Tony and Mo, as well as Sophie Blackall, Sandra Boynton, Ashley Bryan, Eric Carle, Bryan Collier, Marla Frazee, Laurie Keller, Lauren Long, Patrick McDonnell, Yuyi Morales, Kadir Nelson, LeUyuen Pham, Jerry Pinkney, Robin Preiss Glasser, Judy Schachner, Lane Smith, and—with a special contribution from his foundation—the late Maurice Sendak.

Tue – Fri 10am – 4pm
Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

Central Gallery
The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
May 25 -
August 13, 2017
Hokusai beyond the Great Wave
Experience the beautiful and sublime work of one of Japan’s greatest artists.

Katsushika Hokusai (1760–1849) is widely regarded as one of Japan’s most famous and influential artists. He produced works of astonishing quality right up until his death at the age of 90. This new exhibition will lead you on an artistic journey through the last 30 years of Hokusai’s life – a time when he produced some of his most memorable masterpieces.

Throughout the exhibition, outstanding examples of Hokusai’s work will show the artist’s creative breadth and depth. A selection of superb landscapes is introduced with the iconic Great Wave – itself part of a print series of views of Mt Fuji. Intimate domestic scenes capture fleeting moments in private lives. Exquisite depictions of flora and fauna display an innate skill in representing the natural world. The artist’s imagination is given full rein in the portrayal of supernatural creatures such as ghosts and deities. Through all of these works, explore Hokusai’s personal beliefs and gain a fascinating insight into the artist’s spiritual and artistic quest in his later years.

The exhibition will include prints, paintings and illustrated books, many of which are on loan from Japan, Europe and the USA. This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see these extraordinary works together.

Please note for conservation reasons there will be a rotation of about half the artworks halfway through the exhibition run. Some works can only be displayed for a limited period of time due to their light sensitivity. The new works will substitute similar ones and will not affect the exhibition’s story. To facilitate the rotation, the exhibition will be closed between 3 and 6 July.

Adults £12
under 16 free

Room 35, British Museum
Great Russell Street
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
June 03 -
August 27, 2017
THE COVER SELLS THE BOOK: TRANSFORMATIONS IN COMMERCIAL BOOK PUBLISHING, 1860-1920
This exhibition will investigate the trans-Atlantic concept of the ‘complete book,’ which took place between 1860 and 1920. During this 60-year period, the conflation of advances in print technology and the philosophy of the Arts and Crafts Movement led to a new aesthetic in book design. The integration of the book from content to cover as promoted by private press initiatives including William Morris’ Kelmscott Press was adapted by commercial publishers. This exhibition will explore examples of collaborative commercial book projects, which emulate the concept of earlier arts and crafts principles.

Wed 10am – 4pm
Thu 10am – 8pm
Fri – Sun 10am – 4pm
Mon & Tue Closed

Museum Members: Free
Family (up to 2 adults & 4 children): $25
Adults: $12
Seniors (60+): $10
Students (w/valid ID): $6
Youth (ages 7 – 18): $6
Children 6 and under: Free

Parking is FREE at the Museum

Delaware Art Museum
2301 Kentmere Parkway
Wilmington, DE
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 03 -
September 03, 2017
The Polaroid Project: At the Intersection of Art and Technology
The Polaroid Project surveys the history of the innovative photographic company Polaroid and its intersection with art, science, and technology during the second-half of the twentieth century. Featuring a wide-ranging group of artists, the exhibition showcases the diversity of works produced over several decades.

The Polaroid Project displays a variety of image sizes and formats produced over the years and the rich legacy of technological and artistic experimentation that the company enabled prior to its obsolescence. This exhibition has been organized by the Foundation for the Exhibition of Photography, Minneapolis/New York/Paris/Lausanne, in collaboration with the MIT Museum, Cambridge, Mass., and the WestLicht Museum for Photography, Vienna.

Visitors of all ages can look for interactive cards that include interesting bits of information about the Polaroid Corporation’s cameras, film, history and more scattered throughout the exhibition.

Large print labels are available for use in the exhibition.

Free tours of this exhibition take place Thursday through Sunday at 3 p.m. and begin at the exhibition entrance on the second floor. No reservations are required.

Tue, Wed, Fri & Sat 11am - 5pm
Thu 10am - 8pm
Sun Noon – 5pm
Closed Mondays

Free admission

Amon Carter Museum of American Art
3501 Camp Bowie Blvd.
Fort Worth, TX
Exhibit Southwest
June 04 -
August 27, 2017
PICASSO: ENCOUNTERS
Picasso: Encounters explores Pablo Picasso’s (1881–1973) interest in and experimentation with large-scale printmaking throughout his career, challenging the notion of Picasso as an artist alone with his craft. The exhibition includes important paintings on loan from the Musée national Picasso–Paris. The exhibition addresses his expansive formal vocabulary, the narrative preoccupations that drove his creative process, the often-neglected issue of the collaboration inherent in print production, and the muses that inspired him, including Fernande Olivier, Olga Khokhlova, Dora Maar, Françoise Gilot, and Jacqueline Roque.

The exhibition begins with Picasso’s seminal Self-Portrait (1901) from his Blue Period as a representation of the artist’s mythic isolation. The painting, on loan from the Musée national Picasso–Paris, is followed by thirty-five of the artist’s most important graphic achievements, ranging from the Clark’s rare impression of The Frugal Repast (1904)—Picasso’s first major statement in printmaking—to Ecce Homo, after Rembrandt (1970), executed three years before his death.

Picasso continuously mined his personal life for subject matter. The exhibition includes the captivating 1923 drypoint portrait of his first wife Olga, the playful image of his daughter Paloma (1952), and the heartrending aquatint of his embittered second wife Françoise Gilot (1952).

The exhibition also explores the intertwined narrative threads of the Minotauromachia (1934), The Large Bullfight (1935), and Weeping Woman I (1937). Four Weeping Woman prints are accompanied by Portrait of Dora Maar (1937), the revered oil painting on loan from the Musée national Picasso–Paris. Maar was Picasso’s muse and served as his model for the paintings, drawings, and prints of weeping women produced in the 1930s. Picasso’s final years, during which he transformed the compositions of Old Masters from Rembrandt to Cranach to Manet, are represented by linocuts such as Portrait of a Young Girl, after Cranach the Younger, II (1958) and Luncheon on the Grass, after Manet (1968).

Tue - Sun 10am – 5pm
Open daily July-August

Admission $20
Always free for members, children under 18, and students with a valid ID.

Conforti Pavilion
The Clark Art Institute
225 South Street
Williamstown, MA
Exhibit New England
June 17, 2017 -
June 04, 2018
Double Take: Daguerreian Portrait Pairs
Highlighting the depth of the National Portrait Gallery’s early photography collection, this exhibition will showcase fourteen daguerreotypes—two portraits each—of seven subjects: George Bancroft, Jenny Lind, Zachary Taylor, Frederick Douglass, Jefferson Davis, Daniel Webster, and John Quincy Adams. Only one loan—a daguerreotype of John Quincy Adams from the National Museum of American History—will supplement the Gallery’s collection.

By featuring two portraits of each famous sitter, the exhibition will encourage visitors to consider the ways in which various daguerreotypists approached the same subject and how different the results could be. In addition to discussing the early history of portrait photography, the accompanying text will compare images made for public consumption with those produced as personal keepsakes. Ann Shumard, senior curator of photographs, curates this installation.

11:30am - 7pm daily
Closed December 25th

Free admission

First floor
National Portrait Gallery
8th & F Streets NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 23 -
October 29, 2017
Which Jane Austen?
To mark 200 years since the death of Jane Austen, a major new exhibition at Oxford University’s Bodleian Libraries will challenge the current public perception of one of England’s greatest literary heroes.

Which Jane Austen? presents Austen as an ambitious and risk-taking businesswoman and a wartime writer who was informed and inspired by the surprising international adventures of her family and relations. Through a spectacular selection of Austen materials displayed together for the first time, the Bodleian Libraries delve into the myriad influences on this great writer's work.

Mon - Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 11am - 5pm

Weston Library
Broad Street
Oxford, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
June 23 -
November 26, 2017
Dignity vs. Despair: Dorothea Lange and Depression-Era Photographers, 1933–1941
After the stock market crash in 1929, the United States experienced a deep and long lasting economic depression. Fortunes were lost and many found themselves jobless and homeless. Farms were destroyed due to drought and extreme soil erosion.

The Farm Security Administration (FSA), created in response to the Great Depression, provided loans to farmers, resettlement options for destitute families, and camps for migrant workers. Governmental agencies like the FSA saw photography as an effective way to document the disaster—to show the need for federal aid and to prompt legislative action.

Highlighting the work of five photographers— Dorothea Lange, Walker Evans, Arthur Rothstein, Marion Post Wolcott and Peter Sekaer, this exhibition features images of urban hardship, the plight of the migrant worker, and poverty in the South. The integration of images with the photographers’ own words—excerpted from captions, field notes, and interviews—gives a poignant look at one of the most difficult times in U.S. history.

Wed 10am - 5pm
Thu 10am - 9pm
Fri 10am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 10am - 5pm
Mon & Tue CLOSED

Free admission

The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
4525 Oak Street
Kansas City, MO
Exhibit Midwest
June 24 -
September 17, 2017
THE ORIGINAL MAD MAN: ILLUSTRATIONS BY MAC CONNER
This comprehensive and lively installation explores the work of one of America’s original “Mad Men.” McCauley (“Mac”) Conner (born 1913) created advertising campaigns for a variety of products during the decade when the advertising industry was at its height and centered on Madison Avenue. His illustrations for leading women’s magazines such as Redbook and McCall’s animated a wide range of popular literature, from romantic fiction and detective stories, to topics of import such as Cold War anxiety and juvenile delinquency. His work is a “time capsule” of an era when commercial artists helped to redefine American style and culture.

Wed 10am – 4pm
Thu 10am – 8pm
Fri – Sun 10am – 4pm
Mon & Tue Closed

Museum Members: Free
Family (up to 2 adults & 4 children): $25
Adults: $12
Seniors (60+): $10
Students (w/valid ID): $6
Youth (ages 7 – 18): $6
Children 6 and under: Free

Parking is FREE at the Museum

Delaware Art Museum
2301 Kentmere Parkway
Wilmington, DE
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 24 -
November 26, 2017
The Ivory Mirror: The Art of Mortality in Renaissance Europe
The exhibition reveals how, in an increasingly complex and uncertain world, Renaissance artists sought to address the critical human concern of acknowledging death while striving to create a personal legacy that might outlast it.

The Ivory Mirror brings together exceptional examples of memento mori, a genre of artistic and literary imagery that emerged in the early Renaissance to remind viewers of their inevitable death, to question how art historians have conventionally interpreted these objects and to propose new ways of considering their significance. In conjunction with the exhibition, a dynamic series of public programs throughout the summer and fall, ranging from film screenings to gallery talks to interdisciplinary programs with health care experts and scholars, will provide illuminating perspectives on death and the choices we make in life. An international symposium will convene distinguished scholars to address the intersection between a fascination with death, luxury, and new techniques of representation in Renaissance Europe.

The Ivory Mirror will bring together nearly seventy exquisite artworks, many of which have never been seen before in North America, from European and American institutions—among them the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York, and The Huntington Library in San Marino. New scholarship across the humanities features critical new discoveries, such as the attribution of several ivories, of previously uncertain authorship, to Chicart Bailly, a prosperous ivory carver active in Paris from at least the 1490s until 1533. The precious objects included in the exhibition—from ivory prayer beads and gem-encrusted jewelry to exquisitely carved small table sculptures—draw attention in spectacular fashion to the depictions of death, dying, and decay that proliferated in popular culture between the fifteenth and seventeenth centuries, when mortality rates were perilously high. The appeal of objects featuring macabre imagery urging us to “remember death”— and, by implication, to consider how best to take advantage of our time on earth—reached the apex of its popularity around 1500, when artists treated the theme in innovative and compelling ways.

Public opening: Sat, June 24th
With a keynote lecture by Stephen Perkinson at 4:00 pm, followed by a reception at the Museum of Art.
Kresge Auditorium
Visual Arts Center

Tue - Sat 10am - 5pm
Thu 10am - 8:30pm
Sun 1pm - 5pm

Open to the public free of charge

Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Walker Art Building
9400 College Station
Brunswick, ME
Exhibit New England
June 29 -
July 05, 2017
Masterpiece 2017 - London
'MASTERPIECE'S STAR IS RISING. THE EVENT IS FAST BECOMING THE MOST IMAGINATIVE AND GLAMOROUS ART AND ANTIQUES FAIR IN THE WORLD.'

PREVIEW DAY
28 JUNE 11.00−21.00

PUBLIC FAIR DAYS
29-30 JUNE 11.00−21.00
1-2 JULY 11.00-19.00
3-5 JULY 11.00-21.00

South Grounds
The Royal Hospital Chelsea
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
June 30, 2017 -
May 20, 2018
One Life: Sylvia Plath
“One Life: Sylvia Plath” is the first exploration of the poet and writer’s life in an art and history museum. The exhibition reveals how Plath shaped her identity visually as she came of age as a writer in the 1950s. Visitors will get a look into Plath’s personal life and her dualistic nature she explained as her “brown-haired” and “platinum” personalities. Through personal letters, her own artwork, family photographs and relevant objects, this exhibition highlights Plath’s struggle to understand her own self and to navigate the societal pressures placed on young women during her time. Her Smith College thesis, “The Magic Mirror: A Study of the Double in Two of Dostoevsky’s Novels,” suggests that she took an academic approach to studying her own dualities.

The exhibition features a carefully selected array of images and objects from the Plath archives at Smith College and the University of Indiana’s Lilly Library, two collections that have never been brought together before in a museum exhibition. Dorothy Moss, associate curator of painting and sculpture at the Portrait Gallery, is curator of this show, joined by guest co-curator Karen Kukil, associate curator of rare books and manuscripts at Smith College.

11:30am - 7pm daily
Closed Dec 25th

Free admission

First floor
National Portrait Gallery
8th and F Streets NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 30 -
October 09, 2017
Eloise at the Museum
The New-York Historical Society celebrates the feisty charm and audacious spirit of Eloise, who continues to be a picture book superstar more than 60 years after her debut. Eloise at the Museum reveals the creative collaboration between cabaret star Kay Thompson (1909–1998) and the young illustrator Hilary Knight (b. 1926) that brought the precocious character to life. The exhibition showcases more than 75 objects, ranging from original manuscript pages to sketchbooks, portraits, photographs, and vintage dolls. Organized by The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art in Amherst, MA, where it debuted earlier this year, New-York Historical’s presentation fully immerses visitors into Eloise’s world with evocations of the grand lobby of the Plaza Hotel, her bedroom―complete with a storytelling corner―and her bubbly “bawthroom,” where she often made mischief. A host of family activities bring the Plaza’s most famous resident to life throughout the exhibition's run, inviting young visitors to explore the exhibition in creative ways.

Tue -Thu & Sat 10am - 6pm
Fri 10am- 8pm
Sun 11am- 5pm
Mon CLOSED

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West
at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 01 -
September 24, 2017
NO RULES HELEN FRANKENTHALER WOODCUTS
In 1994, when being interviewed by printer/publisher Ken Tyler, Helen Frankenthaler stated, “There are no rules, that is one thing I say about every medium, every picture . . . that is how art is born, that is how breakthroughs happen. Go against the rules or ignore the rules, that is what invention is about.”

No Rules explores Helen Frankenthaler’s inventive and groundbreaking approach to the woodcut. The artist began creating woodcuts after experimenting with lithography, etching, and screen printing. She produced her first woodcuts, East and Beyond (1973) and her ethereal Savage Breeze (1974), by carving pieces of wood with a jigsaw, inking each block of wood separately and arranging the pieces of wood to print them on paper. In Essence Mulberry (1977) and Cameo (1980), she invented a new technique termed “guzzying,” working the wood’s surface to achieve specific results when printed. Throughout her career, the artist worked with a variety of print publishers to push the medium in new directions. In 1983 she traveled to Japan and worked in traditional methods of color woodblock printing with an expert carver and printers to produce Cedar Hill (1983), resulting in an entirely different, layered approach to color.

In the 1990s and 2000s, Frankenthaler continued to experiment with enthusiasm and daring. For Freefall and Radius (both 1992–93), the artist worked with dyed paper pulp to create the maquettes for the final woodcuts. In Tales of Genji (1998) and Madame Butterfly (2000), she worked with a dazzling array of blocks and papers, collaborating with an expert Japanese carver, printers, and paper-makers to create serial images acknowledged to be landmarks in the evolution of the medium. Her final three woodcuts, Snow Pines (2004), Japanese Maple (2005), and Weeping Crabapple (2009), pay homage to three different types of trees in strikingly divergent ways.

Tue - Sun 10am – 5pm
Open daily July-August

Admission $20
Always free for members, children under 18, and students with a valid ID.

Manton Research Center
The Clark Art Institute
225 South Street
Williamstown, MA
Exhibit New England
July 12 -
September 23, 2017
ANIMATION + PRINTING
This exhibition presents a selection of short animated films from around the US and the world, each created using techniques common in the book arts such as letterpress printing from moveable type, wood type, pressure printing, lino and wood cut, etching, silkscreen as well as animation in watermarked paper. These films represent a new territory for Book/Print artists and are interesting not only because of their technical production, but because we see printmakers trying their hand at animation, and animators trying their hand at print techniques and many for the first time.

Artists include Allison Bianco, Sarah McDermott & Martine Workman, Arron Foster, Bridget Henry, Catherine Cartwright, Catherine Michaelis, Christine Medley, Claire McLaughlin, Claire Baillie-Cloke & Angie Butler, Claire Fouquet & Patty Smith, David Wischer, Devon Damonte, Drew Christie, Elena Fowler, Eliza Evans, Emily Larned, Emily Martin, Emily Alden Foster & Amy Burek, Erin Paulson, H.R. Buechler, Wuon-Gean Ho, Izzy Liberti, Jennifer Linton, Jörg Petri, Judith Poirier, Karen Oremus, Kyle Durrie, Lilli Carré, Lynn Peterfreund, Mary Becker, Melissa Brown, Michael Walsh, Nicholas Price, Poli Marichal, Radha Pandey, Rob Bekuhrs, Ruth Hayes, Sarah Nicholls, Saskia Jetten, Travis Janssen, Troy Patterson, Vanessa Cruz & Sheila Goloborotko, Vera Sebert, Victoria Squire & Louise Evans, Vida Saçic, Vinicius de Aguiar Sanchez and Gini Wade.

Mon - Fri 11am - 6pm
Sat 10am - 5pm

The Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 12 -
September 23, 2017
PROTEST ≠ PROFEST: GLOBAL BURDENS
This annual Artist Members Exhibition presents artworks that deal with activism or passionate convictions toward current societal concerns, issues, desires and/or trends. Focusing on artists’ books and works that relate to the concept of book arts, the artists include Ioulia Akhmadeeva, Aileen Bassis, Elena Berriolo, Doug Beube, Eileen Boxer, Patty Bruce, Bonnie C. Epstein, Robin Holder, Jihae Kwon, Pierre Leichner, Anna Mavromatis, Richard Minsky, Melanie Mowinski, Maria Veronica San Martín, Diana Schmertz, Ilse Schreiber-Noll, Tennille Davis Shuster, Robbin Ami Silverberg in collaboration with Kim Berman, Carolyn Thompson, Sally Tosti, and Thomas Parker Williams.

Mon - Fri 11am - 6pm
Sat 10am - 5pm

The Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 13, 2017 -
January 04, 2018
Lisa Nilsson: Connective Tissue
In her Tissue Series, Lisa Nilsson creates ornate quilled paper constructions that explore the complex geography of the human anatomy. Working directly from images of transverse, coronal and sagittal cross sections from medical sources, she finds a delicate balance between art and anatomic accuracy, beauty and the grotesque. The forms, made from Japanese mulberry paper and the gilt edges of old books, are rendered in a technique of rolled and shaped paper called quilling or paper filigree. The technique, first practiced by Renaissance nuns and monks and later by aristocratic women in the 16th-18th centuries, finds a contemporary relevance in Nilsson’s work.

Mon - Sun 10am–5pm
We are closed on Thanksgiving, December 24, December 25 and January 1

The Mütter Museum
19 S 22nd Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 14 -
September 17, 2017
Other People’s Pictures: Snapshots from the Peter J. Cohen Gift
This exhibition includes a selection from a gift of more than 500 small black-and-white photographs, mostly from the early- and mid-twentieth century, donated by Peter J. Cohen. Mr. Cohen has amassed more than 35,000 amateur photographs culled from antique shops, flea markets, private dealers, and on-line sources. Most of the photographs are anonymous and capture moments in the lives of ordinary people, often depicting celebrations, vacations, and gatherings of family and friends. Individual images were chosen for their eclectic, idiosyncratic, sometimes humorous nature as well as for their subject matter, with a particular focus on the lives and activities of women.

Mon CLOSED
Tue, Wed, Fri, Sat 10am - 5pm
Thu 10am - 9pm
Sun 1pm - 5pm

Free admission & open to the public

The Frances Lehman Loeb Art Center
124 Raymond Avenue, Box 703
Poughkeepsie, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 31, 2017 -
January 07, 2018
World War I and the Visual Arts
Organized to commemorate the centennial of World War I, this exhibition will focus on the impact of the war on the visual arts. Moving chronologically from its outbreak to the decade after the armistice, World War I and the Visual Arts will highlight the diverse ways in which artists both reacted to and represented the horrors of modern warfare. The works on view will reflect a variety of responses, ranging from nationalist enthusiasm to more somber reflections on the carnage and mass devastation that resulted from the war. The exhibition is made possible by The Schiff Foundation.

Drawn mainly from the collection of The Met and supplemented with select loans, the exhibition will include prints, drawings, photographs, illustrated books, posters, periodicals, trading cards from the Museum’s celebrated Jefferson R. Burdick Collection, and other materials such as medals, examples of trench art, and helmets designed in the Department of Arms and Armor. World War I and the Visual Arts will reveal how artists—including Otto Dix, Fernand Léger, George Grosz, Käthe Kollwitz, C.R.W. Nevinson, Gino Severini, and Edward Steichen—reflected a myriad of styles, approaches, ideologies, and mediums in response to the war. Among the styles represented are Cubism, Dada, Futurism, Expressionism, Neue Sachlichkeit (“New Objectivity”), and Vorticism.

Sun – Thu 10am – 5:30pm*
Fri & Sat 10am – 9pm*

Closed Thanksgiving Day, December 25, January 1

* Galleries are cleared 15 minutes before closing

Galleries 691-693
The Charles Z. Offin Gallery
Karen B. Cohen Gallery
Harriette and Noel Levine Gallery
The Met Fifth Avenue
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic