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April 15, 2015 -
March 31, 2018
America in Circulation: A History of US Currency
Exhibit will feature the collection of Mark R. Shenkman

Visitors will have the opportunity to view hundreds of beautiful and rare examples of American paper money and to explore them in more depth through large interactive touch screen displays.

From Colonial times, American money has told a fascinating and detailed story of the country’s struggles and successes. Pivotal moments in history have led to changes in the nation’s money, as crises have brought about innovation. Often local and national currencies competed and coexisted with each other, while economic depression, war and counterfeiting drove constant advances in design.

“Today, there are only seven notes in circulation. Yet most Americans don’t realize that both the banks and the government were issuing many different types of currency for most of our nation’s first 150 years,” said Museum President David Cowen. “The notes in this exhibit tell the story of the development of America, and their striking beauty makes them pieces of art in and of themselves.”

The exhibition will feature approximately 250 notes spanning from the Colonial era to the present day. Highlights include rare examples of currency bearing the signatures of signers of the US Constitution and Declaration of Independence; a complete set of notes from the Educational Series of 1896, renowned for being the most beautiful paper money in American history; and rare examples of high denomination notes including $5,000 and $10,000 bills.

Tues–Sat 10am – 4pm

MUSEUM OF AMERICAN FINANCE
48 Wall Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 04, 2015 -
November 30, 2017
British Guiana One-Cent Magenta: The World’s Most Famous Stamp
The 1856 British Guiana One-Cent Magenta is displayed in the museum’s William H. Gross Stamp Gallery. This exhibition of the stamp is the longest and most publicly accessible showing ever.

Open daily 10am - 5:30pm
(except December 25)

Free admission

Smithsonian's National Postal Museum
2 Massachusetts Avenue NE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 01 -
December 31, 2016
Shakespeare by the Book: Four Centuries of Printing, Editing and Publishing
Mary and David Harrison Institute for American History, Literature, and Culture

This exhibition marks the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death by celebrating how his works have come to life through innovations in print technology, editorial practice, and graphic design. Books and printing artifacts drawn from Special Collections’ eclectic holdings will explain the technology of printed books in the 17th century, narrate the complex editorial history of the plays, and survey the myriad forms Shakespeare’s works have taken in print over the last two centuries. Visitors will see both our oldest and most radically modern Shakespeare volumes, learn about U.Va.’s special role in the history of Shakespeare scholarship, and encounter more than 100 miniature volumes dedicated to the playwright and his works.

From October 1-26, 2016, it will become the backdrop for the visiting Folger Shakespeare Library single-item exhibition “First Folio!: The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare.”

Tue - Thu 9am - 7pm
Fri 9am - 5pm
Sat 1pm - 5pm

Harrison North Gallery
Special Collections LIbrary
University of Virginia Library
160 McCormick Road
Charlottesville, VA
Exhibit South
February 10, 2016 -
May 14, 2017
Now and Forever: The Art of Medieval Time
What time is it? The question seems simple, and with a watch on your wrist or a cell phone in your hand, the answer is easy. In the Middle Ages, however, the concept of time could be approached in many different ways, with vastly different tools.

Drawing upon the rich holdings of the Morgan’s collection of medieval and Renaissance illuminated manuscripts, Now and Forever explores how people told time in the Middle Ages and what they thought about it. The manuscripts range in date from the eleventh to the sixteenth centuries and come from all the major countries of Europe.

The exhibition begins with the quirks of the medieval calendar, exploring sacred feasts, the mysteries of Golden Numbers, the utility of Dominical Letters, and how the Middle Ages inherited the Roman Calendar of Julius Caesar. Visitors will engage with the complexities of time as defined by liturgical celebrations and their two overlapping systems of temporale (feasts of time) and sanctorale (feasts of saints), systems that still influence the way we tell time today. Now and Forever also explores how time beyond the grave preoccupied medieval people for whom life on earth was a mere dress rehearsal for the main event—the afterlife.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 13, 2016 -
January 01, 2017
Shakespeare in the Royal Library
Marking the 400th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare, this display draws on material in the Royal Library, including works of Shakespeare collected by the royal family, accounts of performances at Windsor Castle, and art by members of the royal family inspired by Shakespeare's plays.

It will examine aspects of the playwright's life, work and influence, and celebrate his longstanding connection with Windsor and the royal court.

Shakespeare in the Royal Library is part of the Shakespeare400 series, marking the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death in 2016. Through a connected series of public performances, programmes, exhibitions and creative activities in the capital and beyond, partners will celebrate the legacy of Shakespeare during the quatercentenary year.

March - October
Open daily, 09:45-17:15

November - February
Open daily, 09:45-16:15

Adult £20.00
Concessions £18.20
Under 17/Disabled £11.70
Under 5 Free

Windsor Castle
Windsor, Berkshire, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
February 25, 2016 -
February 19, 2017
Bodleian Treasures: 24 pairs
An exhibition displaying a selection of the Bodleian Libraries most magnificent items. It features rare and renowned items including Tolkien's illustrations from The Hobbit, Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, the Bay Psalm Book, the 'most expensive' printed book in the world and the venerated Shikshapatri.

The exhibition presents some of the best of the 12 million items in the Bodleian's collections and uniquely displays these treasures in 24 pairs. Familiar icons of the Libraries' extraordinary holdings are shown alongside the less familiar, opening new avenues into the wealth of the Bodleian's famous collections. Rare books are joined together with manuscripts while modern ephemera sit alongside 400-year-old rolls, drawing out themes and unique stories that bring the pairs together.

Opening times:
Monday to Friday 10am-5pm
Saturday 10am-5pm
Sunday 11am-5pm

Free admission

Treasury
Weston Library
Broad Street
Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
February 26 -
December 31, 2016
Protecting the New Wonderland: The Origins of the National Park Service
Signed by President Woodrow Wilson in August 1916, the Organic Act created the National Park Service, the federal bureau that protects our national parks and monuments. Several UC Berkeley alumni with conservationist interests and the 1915 Panama-Pacific International Exposition in San Francisco played key roles in its development. This exhibition explores the origins of the NPS with materials drawn from the University Archives and The Bancroft Library collections.

Open during the operating hours of the Doe Library

The Bancroft Library Rowell Cases
The Bancroft Library
University of California
Berkeley, CA
Exhibit West
February 27, 2016 -
February 12, 2017
Natural Selections: Flora and the Arts
Natural Selections: Flora and the Arts explores through more than 20 objects how nature has inspired, impressed, and enlightened society long before the publication of Charles Darwin's On the Origin of Species in 1859. Using three themes, the exhibition explores the subject of flora and how it inspired the decorative arts. "Botanizing" looks at the movement to classify, study, and teach though a selection of educational books and prints detailing floral anatomy and stages of life. "Art in Nature" delves into the museum's rich collection of decorative arts to see how plants and flowers have influenced designers and craftspeople in fields as diverse as textiles, ceramics, furniture, and architecture. Finally, "Bringing the Outdoors In" showcases ceramic and glass vessels which literally brought colorful and fragrant flowers and plants indoors for personal enjoyment and study.

Daily 9:30am - 4:30pm

Lobby
Flynt Center of Early New England Life
Historic Deerfield Village
80 Old Main Street
Deerfield, MA
Exhibit New England
March 21, 2016 -
January 31, 2017
The Bull Moose and the China Cabinet: Theodore Roosevelt, the Progressive Party, and the Women’s Suffrage Movement
Following the Republican Party’s nomination of incumbent William Howard Taft for president in 1912, supporters of Theodore Roosevelt’s candidacy formed the Progressive Party, which centered upon returning power to the people and creating a more equitable country by the right treatment of its citizens. For nearly 100 years, women had been fighting for equal rights on every front—education; labor; and intellectual, moral, legal, and human rights. Roosevelt’s Progressive Party placed women’s suffrage in its official platform. It was the first major political party to do so. This exhibition examines Roosevelt’s evolving position on women’s suffrage, and includes a page from his Harvard senior paper on women’s rights, correspondence, contemporary newspaper accounts and political cartoons, and artifacts documenting the role and influence of the women in Roosevelt’s life.

Theodore Roosevelt Gallery
Pusey Library
Houghton Library
Harvard Yard
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
March 26, 2016 -
January 08, 2017
Made in the Americas: The New World Discovers Asia
Made in the Americas: The New World Discovers Asia examines the profound influence of Asia on the arts of the colonial Americas. Featuring some of the most extraordinary objects produced in the Americas, this scholarly exhibition is the first, Pan-American study to explore how craftsmen across North, Central, and South America adapted Asian styles in a range of media—from furniture to silverwork, textiles, ceramics, and painting. Exquisite objects from Mexico City, Lima, Quito, Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, dating from the 17th to the early 19th centuries, include folding screens made in Mexico in imitation of imported Japanese and Chinese screens, blue and white talavera ceramics copied from imported Chinese porcelains, and luxuriously woven textiles made to replicate fine silks and cottons imported from China and India.

Tues – Sun 10am – 5pm
Last house tour tickets sold at 3:15pm. Museum Store and Bookstore open Tue - Sun 10am – 5:30pm.
Library
Mon – Fri 8:30am – 4:30pm

Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library
5105 Kennett Pike (Route 52)
Winterthur, DE
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 11 -
December 31, 2016
Ernest Hemingway – Between Two Wars
The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum is proud to present a new landmark exhibition, Ernest Hemingway: Between Two Wars. Showcasing the JFK Library’s Hemingway Collection, this is the first ever major museum exhibition devoted to the work and life of Ernest Hemingway. The exhibit features a trove of rarely exhibited material, including multiple drafts of the writer’s major works, correspondence with a legendary circle of expatriate writers living in 1920s Paris, as well as photographs and a selection of Hemingway’s personal belongings. Created in partnership with the Morgan Library & Museum, the exhibition humanizes a man who was larger than life and documents the consummate craftsmanship and discipline at the heart of Hemingway’s literary genius.

Critically acclaimed during its three-month run at the Morgan Library & Museum in New York, Ernest Hemingway: Between Two Wars will be presented at the JFK Library through the end of the year.

Daily 9am - 5pm

- Adults $14
- Seniors 62+ $12
- College Students with ID $12
- Youth/Teens 13-17 $10
- US Armed Forces Veterans $10
- Members FREE
- Children 12 and under FREE
- US Armed Forces Active Duty Personnel with ID FREE

John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum
Columbia Point
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
April 23, 2016 -
March 19, 2017
REVEALING THE INVISIBLE: THE HISTORY OF GLASS AND THE MICROSCOPE
Glass made it possible for scientists and artists to see tiny living creatures once invisible to the human eye. Revealing the Invisible: The History of Glass and the Microscope tells the stories of scientists’ and artists’ exploration of the microscopic world between the 1600s and the late 1800s. Their discoveries fed people’s hunger to learn more about nature, increasing the popularity of microscopes and driving improvements in scientific glass. These advances culminated in the 19th century with the advent of modern scientific glassmaking and the perfection of the microscope. Unleash your sense of discovery as you explore the invisible through historic microscopes, rare books, and period illustrations.

9am – 5pm every day

Rakow Research Library
The Corning Museum of Glass
One Museum Way
Corning, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 17, 2016 -
June 04, 2017
Double Take: Daguerreian Portrait Pairs
Highlighting the depth of the National Portrait Gallery’s early photography collection, this exhibition will showcase fourteen daguerreotypes—two portraits each—of seven subjects: George Bancroft, Jenny Lind, Zachary Taylor, Frederick Douglass, Jefferson Davis, Daniel Webster, and John Quincy Adams. Only one loan—a daguerreotype of John Quincy Adams from the National Museum of American History—will supplement the Gallery’s collection.

By featuring two portraits of each famous sitter, the exhibition will encourage visitors to consider the ways in which various daguerreotypists approached the same subject and how different the results could be. In addition to discussing the early history of portrait photography, the accompanying text will compare images made for public consumption with those produced as personal keepsakes. Ann Shumard, senior curator of photographs, curates this installation.

11:30am - 7pm daily

Free admission

1st Floor
National Portrait Gallery
8th and F Streets NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 12 -
December 31, 2016
Alexander Hamilton: Striver, Statesman, Scoundrel
Alexander Hamilton, an orphaned immigrant from the Caribbean, acted as George Washington’s top aide in the American Revolution, created the American financial system, and waged ideological battles against Thomas Jefferson in the earliest days of American political parties. His vision, ambition, and voluminous writings inspired his admirers, enflamed his opponents, and continue to captivate contemporary audiences. In this exhibition, The New York Public Library presents a selection of its holdings to illuminate the many facets of Alexander Hamilton—a striver, statesman, and scoundrel.

Closed on Sundays in July and August starting Sunday, July 3. We will resume Sunday hours on September 11, 2016

Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
Fifth Avenue at 42nd Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 15 -
December 31, 2016
Wolves, Magic Mirrors & Spinning Wheels: The Anatomy of Fairy Tales

Fairy tales of wonder and magic abound in cultures throughout history and around the world. These stories weave identifiable elements, including special tests, objects, heroes and heroines, terrifying places, and magical creatures that are rich with symbolism and meaning to be used for unique social lessons for children of any age. This multi-disciplinary exhibit will highlight the Museum’s collection together with contemporary art to illustrate how fairy and folk tales are archetypal stories that allow for ongoing inspiration and interpretation in popular culture.

(February - December)
Mon, Thurs, & Fri, Noon to 4 pm
Saturday, 10 am to 5 pm
Sunday, Noon to 5 pm

Closed January for routine maintenance

Adults $7
Seniors & Students $5
Children ages 6 to 12 $3
Children under 5 and Members admitted free of charge

Maslow Galleries
Everhart Museum
1901 Mulberry Street
Scranton, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 20, 2016 -
July 31, 2017
Truman Capote’s Brooklyn: The Lost Photographs of David Attie
In the spring of 1958 a young photographer named David Attie was led through the streets of Brooklyn Heights and to the Brooklyn waterfront by an unexpected guide—33-year-old Truman Capote. The images Attie took that day were to illustrate Capote’s essay for Holiday magazine about his life in Brooklyn. Decades later, these largely unseen photographs are being exhibited for the first time.

Wed - Sun 12pm - 5pm

Suggested Admission
BHS Member: Free
Adults: $10
Seniors 62 and over: $6
Teachers: $6
Students (with I.D.): Free
Children under 12: Free

The Museum and Library are closed Thanksgiving Day, the day after Thanksgiving, Christmas Day, New Year's Day, Easter Sunday, and Independence Day.

Please note: the Othmer Library will be CLOSED to the public Monday, August 1 - Wednesday, August 31. We will reopen on Thursday, September 1.

Brooklyn Historical Society
128 Pierrepont Street
Brooklyn, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 20, 2016 -
July 30, 2017
Truman Capote’s Brooklyn: The Lost Photographs of David Attie
In the spring of 1958 a young photographer named David Attie was led through the streets of Brooklyn Heights and to the Brooklyn waterfront by an unexpected guide—33-year-old Truman Capote. The images Attie took that day were to illustrate Capote’s essay for Holiday magazine about his life in Brooklyn. Decades later, these largely unseen photographs are being exhibited for the first time.

Museum Hours: Wed - Sun 12pm - 5pm
Library Hours: Wed - Sat 1pm - 5pm

Students (with I.D.): Free
Children under 12: Free

Suggested admission:
Free - BHS Member
$10 - Adults
$6 - Seniors 62 & over
$6 - Teachers
Free - Students (with I.D.)
Free - Children under 12

Brooklyn Historical Society
128 Pierrepont Street
Brooklyn, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 29, 2016 -
January 15, 2017
Picturing English Pastimes: British Sporting Prints
The exhibition Picturing English Pastimes: British Sporting Prints at the NSLM features a selection of late 18th and 19th century prints from the NSLM permanent collection. Curated by John H. Daniels Fellow Jennifer Strotz, the exhibition focuses on the British print market and includes examples by some of the most popular publishers and well-known sporting artists of the era. The installation includes equestrian subjects, such as horse racing, hunting, and coaching, and highlights different types of printmaking techniques.

Wed - Sun 10am - 5pm

National Sporting Library & Museum
102 The Plains Road
Middleburg, VA
Exhibit South
July 30 -
December 30, 2016
COLOUR: The Art and Science of Illuminated Manuscripts
This exhibition celebrates the Fitzwilliam’s 2016 bicentenary with a stunning display of 150 illuminated manuscripts from its rich collections. They range from the prayerbooks of European royalty and merchants to local treasures like the Macclesfield Psalter, from an alchemical scroll and a duchess’ wedding gift to the ABC of a five-year old princess.

Manuscripts were at the heart of Viscount Fitzwilliam’s collection with which the Museum was established in 1816. Many of them are displayed here for the first time. They can only be seen at the Museum due to a clause in Fitzwilliam’s bequest which prevents them from leaving the building and reveals the anxieties of the Founder who had assembled his treasures in the aftermath of the French Revolution.

The hundreds of images sheltered in volumes that were cherished in princely and religious libraries for centuries constitute the largest and best preserved repositories of medieval and Renaissance painting. With most panel and wall paintings destroyed by war, greed, puritanical zeal or time, illuminated manuscripts are the richest resources for the study of European painting between the sixth and the sixteenth century - the main focus of this exhibition. Highlights of Byzantine, Armenian, Persian and Sanskrit manuscripts are also included. Travel from eighth-century Northumbria to seventeenth-century Nepal via Oxford, Paris, Bruges, Cologne, Florence, Venice, Constantinople, Jerusalem and Kashmir.

Discover the secrets of original masterpieces and modern forgeries. Find out what cutting-edge technologies reveal about their painting materials, and the images’ meaning and value to their owners.

COLOUR showcases advanced research undertaken by the Fitzwilliam’s curators, scientists and conservators involved in the Cambridge Illuminations and MINIARE projects. It celebrates modern-day discoveries inspired by collections assembled over 200 years.

Tue - Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun & Bank Holidays 12pm - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

Free admission

Galleries 12 & 13
The Fitzwilliam Museum
Trumpington Street
Cambridge, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
August 04 -
December 18, 2016
FROM TEASPOONS TO TITANIC: RECENT ACQUISITIONS
Since its founding in 1923, the Museum of the City of New York has celebrated and interpreted the city and educated the public about New York’s heritage and distinctive character. From Teaspoons to Titanic: Recent Acquisitions showcases a selection of new additions the museum’s collection, including a deck chair from RMS Titanic, souvenir spoons depicting New York scenes, works by several notable photographers, and Richard Haas’s preparatory paintings for New York street murals—all of which speak to the life of the city.

Admission to the Museum of the City of New York includes all exhibitions currently on view.

The Museum is open daily 10am - 6 pm

Museum of the City of New York
1220 5th Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
August 08 -
December 16, 2016
Inscribed Illuminations & Inspirations: Manuscripts at Bridwell Library
Surveying the wide range of manuscripts in Bridwell Library Special Collections representing the Christian, Judaic, and Islamic traditions, this exhibition includes items produced between the twelfth and nineteenth centuries in numerous locations throughout Europe, the Middle East, Africa, Asia, and the Americas. The array of texts, languages, letterforms, illuminations, and illustrations provides evidence of both known and unrecorded scribes, artists, readers, and owners as well as insights into the cultural, historical, bibliographical, and aesthetic contexts in which these manuscripts were created.

These works both complement and supplement printed holdings in significant collecting areas for Bridwell Library including scripture and worship, devotion, theology and church history, and religious instruction and study. Focusing on these genres, Bridwell Library continues to build a diverse and instructive collection of manuscripts, many of which demonstrate how handwritten books and documents remained essential facets of religious and intellectual life following the introduction of printing in Europe in the mid-fifteenth century.

The Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Galleries
Bridwell Library
Southern Methodist University
6005 Bishop Blvd.
Dallas, TX
Exhibit Southwest
August 15, 2016 -
January 01, 2017
Elliott Erwitt: Home Around the World
Balancing journalistic, commercial, and artistic work over a career spanning seven decades, Elliott Erwitt has created some of the most celebrated photographs of the past century. Elliott Erwitt: Home Around the World will present more than 200 of these remarkable images, including rarely exhibited examples of his early work in California, his intimate family portraits in New York, his major magazine assignments, and his work as a filmmaker, as well as his ongoing personal investigations of public spaces and their transitory inhabitants around the world. The exhibition will be accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog edited by Jessica S. McDonald and published by Aperture.

Mon, Tue, Wed, & Fri 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 7pm
Sat & Sun Noon – 5pm

Admission is free. Your donation supports the Ransom Center's exhibitions and public programs.

Harry Ransom Center
The University of Texas at Austin
300 West 21st Street
Austin, TX
Exhibit Southwest
August 15 -
December 09, 2016
Engraved Throughout
This exhibition explores religious works printed entirely with copperplates: the volumes were engraved throughout. These pages could be presented side-by-side, as in prayer books and guides to the mass. Alternatively each plate would be viewed individually, often as one print in a series. Such suites of plates proved conducive for illustrating narrative accounts including biblical episodes and the biographies of religious figures. Created with various intentions, the exhibited volumes published in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries provided an appealing and engaging format for instruction, documentation, worship, and devotion.

Entry Hall
Bridwell Library Perkins School of Theology
Southern Methodist University
6005 Bishop Blvd.
Dallas, TX
Exhibit Southwest
September 01, 2016 -
July 01, 2017
Guerra Civil @ 80
Marking the 80th anniversary of the beginning of the Spanish Civil War, the exhibition Guerra Civil @ 80 features selections from The Bancroft Library's Veterans of the Abraham Lincoln Brigade, Bay Area Post records and photographic collections, along with posters, books, pamphlets, and other ephemera. A visual and textual display of the struggle to defend the Second Spanish Republic, the exhibition documents the role of both the Republicans, who were defending the democratically elected government, and the Nationalists, the right-wing rebel forces led by General Francisco Franco. The exhibition also addresses how the war, which unfolded from 1936 to 1939, affected the lives of the people of Spain and American volunteers fighting on the front lines or assisting in the war effort, as well as how the conflict precipitated an intense creative response from within and outside Spain.

Mon - Fri 9am - 5pm

2nd floor corridor (between The Bancroft Library & Doe Library)
University of California
Berkeley, CA
Exhibit West
September 01, 2016 -
December 09, 2017
Making the English Book: The Takamiya Deposit
The most impressive collection of medieval English manuscripts in private hands will be on exhibition for the first time in the United States at the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library in 2017. Four unique Chaucer manuscripts, numerous devotional rolls, and works as varied as Boethius’ Consolation of Philosophy, Langland’s Piers the Plowman and a Middle English medical manuscript—all from the collection of Toshiyuki Takamiya—will be shown in the context of the Beinecke’s own rich holdings of English and Continental manuscripts.

With a rare combination of scholarly and antiquarian expertise, Professor Emeritus Takamiya of Keio University in Tokyo assembled an unrivaled collection of medieval manuscripts over four decades. Held privately in Japan, the collection has been relatively unstudied in the West, and Professor Takamiya’s generous deposit of these manuscripts at the Beinecke makes a significant contribution to medieval scholarship at Yale University and internationally.

Mon 10am - 7pm
Tue - Thu 9am - 7pm
Fri 9am - 5pm
Sat (Exhibitions only) 12pm - 5pm

Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library
121 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
September 02, 2016 -
February 26, 2017
Tour: Shakespeare’s World
William Shakespeare’s comedies, tragedies and histories were situated in a number of locations throughout Europe, Asia and Africa. These plays spanned the centuries, from classical times to the Renaissance. In this exhibition of forty maps, images and three-dimensional objects, visitors will learn about Britain in the time of Shakespeare, discover centuries-old maps illustrating where the plays were set, and understand the symbolic role that geography held to the dramas.

Kronborg Castle in Denmark, known as Elsinore in Hamlet, will be highlighted in the exhibition. A 1629 Dutch map depicting the Danish Kingdom, along with a vignette illustrating “Elsenor,” will be on display. Complementing this map will be an original print of “Cronenburg” from Samuel von Pufendorf’s 1696 historical atlas. Shakespeare’s World will complement a larger exhibition which will open at the Boston Public Library in October 2016, highlighting the Bard’s first folios.

Mon – Thu 10am - 7pm
Fri & Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 1pm - 5pm

Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library
Copley Square
700 Boylston Street
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
September 03, 2016 -
February 20, 2017
Lari Pittman: Mood Books
Los-Angeles based artist Lari Pittman (b. 1952) is known for his exuberant, colorful, and graphically complex works. Huntington visitors can see the artist at his hallucinogenic best in a new exhibition opening this fall. Six monumental illustrated books, each opening to more than four feet in width, contain 65 paintings by the artist. They draw from a variety of aesthetic traditions, ranging from decorative art and design to advertising and folk art. Combined with Pittman’s brilliant draftsmanship and acidic color, the images advance an astute and acerbic social commentary embedded in narratives rich with real and invented mythologies.

The impact of the books is further elevated by an installation conceived by award-winning Los Angeles architect Michael Maltzan. Grand, sculptural pedestals hold the books open so visitors can enjoy a direct, unimpeded experience. Page openings will be changed periodically during the run of the show, and a large touch screen will make it possible to view all the paintings and text in sequential order.

Scott Galleries
The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
September 09, 2016 -
January 02, 2017
Charlotte Brontë: An Independent Will
From the time Charlotte Brontë’s novel Jane Eyre was first published in 1847, readers have been drawn to the orphan protagonist who declared herself “a free human being with an independent will.” Like her most famous fictional creation, Brontë herself took bold steps throughout her life in pursuit of personal and professional fulfillment. This exhibition, presented on the occasion of the two hundredth anniversary of Brontë’s birth, traces her creative path from reluctant governess to published poet to commanding novelist. From her earliest literary works—written with a quill pen in a minuscule hand designed to mimic the printed page—to the manuscript of her explosive novel Jane Eyre, the exhibition presents an intimate portrait of one of England’s most compelling authors.

The exhibition is a historic collaboration between two of the world’s finest repositories of Brontëana. It brings together literary manuscripts, intimate letters, and rare printed books from the Morgan’s rich collection with personal artifacts, drawings, and photographs from the Brontë Parsonage Museum in Haworth, England. Highlights include Brontë’s earliest surviving miniature manuscript, her portable writing desk and paint box, one of her own dresses, and a pair of her ankle boots. Also on view—for the first time in North America—will be a portion of the manuscript of Jane Eyre, from the collection of the British Library, open to the unforgettable scene in which Jane tells Rochester, “I am no bird; and no net ensnares me: I am a free human being with an independent will; which I now exert to leave you.”

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

The Morgan closes at 4pm on Christmas Eve & at 5pm on New Year's Eve & the 4th of July.

Closed Monday, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, & New Year's Day.

$18 Adults
$12 Children (13–16)
$12 Seniors (65 and over)
$12 Students (with current ID)
Free to members and children 12 and under (must be accompanied by an adult)

Admission is free on Fridays from 7pm - 9pm
Admission to the McKim rooms only (Mr. Morgan's Library, Study, Rotunda, and Librarian's Office) is free during the following times:
Tue 3pm - 5pm
Fri 7pm - 9pm
Sun 4pm - 6pm

Admission is not required to visit the Morgan Shop, Morgan Dining Room, and Morgan Café.

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue at 36th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 10, 2016 -
June 18, 2017
Janet Taylor Pickett: The Matisse Series
Janet Taylor Pickett: The Matisse Series explores the dialogue between Taylor Pickett’s artwork and that of renowned French artist Henri Matisse. Held in the Museum’s Roberts and Rotunda galleries, the exhibition features 76 collages, as well as 4 hand-made books.

An additional highlight of the exhibition will be the installation of Sixty Six Dresses: An Odyssey, 2014-15. Referring to the artist’s age at the time of its ongoing creation, this work will be augmented by two additional collaged dresses to match her current age when the exhibition opens. The artist has observed that “the dress is the symbol that we address, redress, and dress with meaning. Historically, women are defined by how they dress—our dresses have our DNA in them, our memory.” In many of her dresses, Taylor Pickett juxtaposes images of African sculpture, textiles, and cultural elements, with details from Matisse’s work, typically procured from exhibition catalogue reproductions. This multi-cultural dialogue is at the heart of her complex, archetypal work, which often features portraits of the artist herself. The artist’s interest in light, color, and multiple perspectives is also pervasive in some of her recent works in which she combines elements of Matisse’s work with tripartite spaces evoking medieval altarpieces, unifying past and present times.

This is the second time the artist has been featured in a one-person show at MAM; the first More than One Way Home in 1997 was a 25-year mid-career survey. Furthermore, Janet taught classes in the Museum’s Yard School of Art and served on the Museum’s Board of Trustees, as well as its African American Cultural Committee, which she co-founded. Pickett will also be represented in two concurrent complementary exhibitions, Matisse and American Art and Inspired by Matisse: Selected Works from the Collection, opening February 2017.

Montclair Art Museum
3 South Mountain Avenue
Montclair, NJ
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 10, 2016 -
February 26, 2017
You Say You Want a Revolution? Records and Rebels 1966 - 1970
This major exhibition will explore the era-defining significance and impact of the late 1960s, expressed through some of the greatest music and performances of the 20th century alongside fashion, film, design and political activism. The exhibition considers how the finished and unfinished revolutions of the time changed the way we live today and think about the future.

Daily: 10.00 - 17.45
Friday: 10.00 - 22.00

Exhibitions close 15 minutes prior to Museum closing times.
Closed 24, 25 & 26 December.

Free admission

Temporary Exhibition Space
Cromwell Road
London, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
September 12 -
December 10, 2016
Beyond Words: Illuminated Manuscripts in Boston Collections
Harvard University’s Houghton Library joins The Gardner and Boston College’s McMullen Museum as one of three venues which will simultaneously display 260 outstanding painted and printed books selected by a team of local experts from 18 Boston-area institutions.

For Houghton Library’s portion of the exhibit, the emphasis is on the centrality of books to monastic life. Male and female monasticism revolved around religion, but at its heart was a cult of the book: not just the bible, all books. Monastic scriptoria guaranteed the survival and transmission of classical literature and learning. Reverence felt for texts and their authors is manifest in the beauty of the books that were crafted in monasteries and convents. Manuscripts on display at the Houghton Library highlight the scriptorium as both a space for the production of manuscripts and the human collective that produced them.

Mon, Fri, Sat 9am - 5pm
Tue, Wed, Thu 9am - 7pm
Sun Closed

Opening reception: September 12
5:30pm - 7pm
Edison & Newman Room (1st floor)

Houghton Library
Harvard Yard
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
September 12 -
December 11, 2016
Beyond Words: Illuminated Manuscripts in Boston Collections; Manuscripts for Pleasure & Piety
Beyond Words: Illuminated Manuscripts in Boston Collections is the inaugural exhibition at the McMullen Museum of Art’s new home. Beyond Words is a three-venue collaborative exhibition, held jointly at Harvard University’s Houghton Library (Manuscripts for Church & Cloister) and the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum (Italian Renaissance Books). Featuring illuminated manuscripts from nineteen Boston-area institutions, Beyond Words provides a sweeping overview of the history of the book in the Middle Ages and Renaissance, as well as a guide to its production, illumination, functions, and readership. With over 150 manuscripts on display, Manuscripts for Pleasure & Piety at the McMullen Museum focuses on lay readership and the place of books in medieval society. The High Middle Ages witnessed an affirmation of the visual and, with it, empirical experience. There was an explosion of illumination. Various types of images, whether in prayer or professional books, attest to the newfound importance of visual demonstration in matters of faith and science alike.

Mon 10am – 5pm
Tue 10am – 5pm
Wed 10am – 8pm
Thu 10am – 8pm
Fri 10am – 5pm
Sat 12pm – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

In the Daley Family & Monan Galleries
McMullen Museum of Art
Boston College
2101 Commonwealth Avenue
Brighton, MA
Exhibit New England
September 12, 2016 -
February 05, 2017
Faith and Photography: Auguste Salzmann in the Holy Land
This exhibition will be the first devoted exclusively to the career of Auguste Salzmann (1824–1872), the French academic painter, archaeologist, and photographer who, in 1853, embarked on the arduous journey from Paris to Jerusalem. Hoping to verify religious faith through the objective documentation of the city's holy sites, he turned to photography, creating one of the most enigmatic bodies of work of the 19th century.

Despite a high-caliber photographic oeuvre of great variation and creativity, Salzmann remains relatively unknown. Some three dozen rare salted paper prints from paper negatives have been selected from his influential 1856 album, Jerusalem: A Study and Photographic Reproduction of the Monuments of the Holy City. All the works are in the Gilman Collection of The Met's Department of Photographs.

Exhibitions are free with Museum admission.

Gallery 899
The Met Fifth Avenue
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 13, 2016 -
March 19, 2017
Brown Bear Turns 50
Published in 1967, Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See? had an immediate appeal to children and adults alike. Bill Martin Jr’s rhythmic call-and-response text builds anticipation at each turn of the page, while Eric Carle’s bold graphics and parade of animals encourage learning and imagination. Brown Bear has been translated into 31 languages—from Arabic to Vietnamese—and has sold 16 million copies. In addition to the original 1967 book, Carle re-illustrated editions in 1970, 1984, and 1992.

Artwork from every page of the famous book is on display, as well as a selection of Carle’s collages from additional collaborations with Martin. One of only two surviving collages from the 1967 edition—Brown Bear himself—has been faithfully restored and is on view for the first time.

Tue – Fri 10am – 4pm
Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

$9 Adult
$6 Youth (1-18), Student, Teacher, and Senior
$22.50 Family (2 adults and 2 youth)

The East Gallery
The Eric Carle Museum
of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
September 16, 2016 -
September 11, 2017
Artists' Books and Africa
African artists are experimenting with the genre of artists’ books, while international artists are exploring African themes in theirs. Artists’ Books and Africa is the first exhibition to focus on African artists books from the Smithsonian Libraries’ Warren M. Robbins Library and the National Museum of African Art.

10am – 5:30pm

Free admission

Sublevel 3 (off the Ripley Center Concourse)
African Art Museum
950 Independence Avenue SW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 16, 2016 -
January 09, 2017
Shaking Hands and Kissing Babies
Shaking Hands and Kissing Babies examines the history and power of visual advertising in political campaigns of American leaders from George Washington to Barack Obama. Featuring more than 40 campaign items such as buttons, flags, posters, and novelty items, the exhibition underlines the powerful role of mass-market campaign advertising in American elections. This diverse collection of objects reminds us that election messaging, mudslinging, and catchy slogans are as American as apple pie.

Sat & Sun 10am - 6pm
Mon 11am - 6pm
Wed, Thu, Fri 11am - 9pm
Tue Closed

General admission to Crystal Bridges is sponsored by Walmart. There is no cost to view Museum permanent collections. There may occasionally be a ticket fee to view special exhibitions.

Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art
600 Museum Way
Bentonville, AR
Exhibit South
September 16, 2016 -
January 29, 2017
Surveillance
Who is watching you? In the 21st century, it is hard to escape the camera’s all-seeing eye. With every movement recorded by cameras, it is difficult to remember that surveillance is not a modern construct. This exhibition examines photography’s role in secretive looking from the 1860s to today.

Dating from 1864 to 2014, the works in this exhibition fall under categories of spying/hidden camera, photography of the forbidden, military surveillance, areas of heavy surveillance, and mapping satellites and drones. Also included are examples of counter-surveillance that either prevent watching or surveille the watchers.

Wed 10am – 5pm
Thu & Fri 10am – 9pm
Sat & Sun 10am – 5pm
Mon - Tue CLOSED

Free admission

Exhibition Programs

Film Series
Art of Surveillance
Saturdays, October 1–15 | 2 p.m.
Tickets required.

October 1: Rear Window
October 8: Eye In The Sky
October 15: Blow Up

The Photography Society Presents: Tomas van Houtryve
Thursday, October 6 | 6–7 p.m.
Tickets

Belgian photographer Tomas van Houtryve discusses his work as it relates to contemporary warfare—especially the nearly “invisible” activities of drones and electronic surveillance.

The Curator is IN!
Friday, January 20 | 7–8 p.m. | Gallery L11

Weekend Family Activities
November 5, 2016–February 26, 2017
1–4 p.m. | Saturdays and Sundays

Gallery L11
The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
4525 Oak Street
Kansas City, MO
Exhibit Midwest
September 17, 2016 -
January 08, 2017
Lasting Impressions: The Artists of Currier & Ives
Discover the extraordinary art of Fanny Palmer and Arthur Tait, two of the most prolific artists of Currier & Ives. Explore how their collaboration with this iconic publisher of Christmas cards and Americana transformed how Americans made and viewed art.

Tue – Sun 10am – 5pm
Last house tour tickets sold at 3:15 pm.

Museum Store and Bookstore open Tue – Sun 10am – 5:30pm

Library
Mon – Fri 8:30am – 4:30pm

Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library
5105 Kennett Pike (Route 52)
Winterthur, DE
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 17, 2016 -
January 09, 2017
Chinese Woodblock Prints
Gardens, Art, and Commerce in Chinese Woodblock Prints

This major international loan exhibition explores the art, craft, and cultural significance of Chinese woodblock prints made during their golden age, from the late 16th through the 19th century. Bringing together 48 of the best examples gathered from the National Library of China, Beijing; the Nanjing Library; the Shanghai Museum; and institutional and private collections in the United States, “Gardens, Art, and Commerce in Chinese Woodblock Prints” features delicate works with painterly textures and subtle colors depicting plants, birds, and other garden elements alongside monumental accounts of sprawling, architecturally elaborate “scholar’s gardens.” A highlight of the exhibition is The Huntington’s rare edition of the Ten Bamboo Studio Manual of Calligraphy and Painting (ca. 1633–1703), acquired in 2014, and on public view for the first time. The exhibition unites several interests at The Huntington, the home of one of the most extensive collections of early printed books in the nation, various collections of prints by European and American artists, and one of the largest and most authentic Chinese scholar’s gardens outside of China. It tells the story of how, during the late Ming (1368–1644) and early Qing (1644 to 1912) dynasties, consumer demand for the printed word and image increased as merchants and scholars sought to display their taste in drama, poetry, literature, and art. Gardens also were central to a cultured life, appearing frequently in woodblock prints. Several centers of printing around the lower Yangzi River delta grew in reputation during the last decades of the Ming dynasty, and a golden age of Chinese pictorial printing began. The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog with curator essays.

Mon 10:30am - 4:30pm
Tue Closed
Wed 10:30am - 4:30pm
Thu 10:30am - 4:30pm
Fri 10:30am - 4:30pm
Sat 10:30am - 4:30pm
Sun 10:30am - 4:30pm

The Huntington is closed on Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, & Christmas Day

Boone Gallery
The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
September 17, 2016 -
January 08, 2017
Lasting Impressions: The Artists of Currier & Ives
Lasting Impressions investigates the role of Frances Bond Palmer and Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait (two of the most prolific artists of Currier & Ives) in the New York art world of the Victorian era—an art world where the artists and publisher invite us to reconsider our notions of artistic creation.

Trained as a lithographer in London, Palmer moved to New York in the 1840s. She became an influential artist-lithographer and the only woman to successfully build a career as a professional in this field. British-born Tait moved to New York in the 1850s. He was trained as a lithographer but established himself in America as a painter of animals and sporting scenes. His career depended heavily on lithographic reproduction and a collaborative approach to painting learned in the lithographic workshop.

In association with Currier & Ives, Palmer and Tait produced some of today’s most sought-after prints: the delicately colored Long Island sporting scenes drawn on stone by Palmer from her own sketches; Tait’s vibrant depictions of animals observed up-close in the Adirondacks of northern New York; and Palmer’s dramatic nocturne landscapes evocative of the era’s fascination with the power of steam on land and water.

On view in the East Gallery will be more than 40 works of art carefully selected from the museum collection as well as private collections. The exhibition will also feature several multimedia installations, including a video documenting the history of Currier & Ives and interactive touch-screens, encouraging the viewer to explore conservation findings and physical evidence of the artistic process. As visitors compare their reactions to the exhibition prints and the images on the touch-screens, they will be able to identify traces of the lithographic process and exercise their judgment as instant “connoisseurs” of Currier & Ives prints.

Tues – Sun 10am – 5pm
Last house tour tickets sold at 3:15pm

Museum Store & Bookstore open Tue – Sun 10am – 5:30pm

Closed Thanksgiving Day & Christmas Day

Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library
5105 Kennett Pike (Route 52)
Winterthur, DE
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 20, 2016 -
February 26, 2017
David Garrick: Book Collector
David Garrick was perhaps the most famous English actor before Laurence Oliver. Less well known is his passion for book collecting. Garrick assembled a private library of considerable range and distinction, which offers an entertaining if unconventional perspective on his professional and recreational interest. This display, which marks the 300th anniversary of Garrick's birth, showcases a selection of his books alongside manuscript and graphic materials to illuminate his complementary roles of performer and bibliophile.

Daily: 10.00 - 17.45
Friday: 10.00 - 22.00

Exhibitions close 15 minutes prior to museum closing times.

Free admission

NAL Library Landing
Victoria and Albert Museum
Cromwell Road
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
September 21, 2016 -
January 15, 2017
The Art of Ownership Bookplates and Book Collectors from 1480 to the Present
The primary function of a bookplate is very simple: to indicate the owner of a book. But these small works of art communicate many more implicit and explicit messages about their owners, including ancestry, occupation, interests, artistic tastes, and philosophy. They can also help modern readers trace the history of individual volumes. The Art of Ownership presents notable bookplates from five centuries in books from the Rosenbach’s collections and consider what they add to the objects’ stories. The exhibition will also look at the colorful characters who created and used the bookplates, and examine how book enthusiasts make and use them today. In addition to the detailed stories of the featured bookplates, the exhibition will present a wider range of digitized examples from the University of Delaware’s extensive William Augustus Brewer Bookplate Collection.

Tue Noon - 5pm
Wed Noon - 8pm
Thu Noon - 8pm
Fri Noon - 5pm
Sat Noon - 6pm
Sun Noon - 6pm
Mon Closed

Adults: $10.00
Seniors (ages 65 & older): $8.00
Students & Children: $5.00
Children under 5: Free
Members: Free

Rosenbach Museum & Library
2008-2010 Delancey Place
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 22, 2016 -
January 16, 2017
Beyond Words: Italian Renaissance Books
Rarely seen, exquisite Renaissance manuscripts and early printed books make this a once-in-a-lifetime exhibition. Beyond Words: Italian Renaissance Books showcases over 65 Renaissance paintings hidden between the covers of rare books in Boston’s libraries and museums.

At the heart of the show is a remarkable trove of illuminated manuscripts from celebrated Renaissance libraries. Written, illustrated, and bound by the hands of leading artists for popes, princes, and scions of Italian dynasties, they were produced as one-of-a-kind luxury items. Complementing the painted manuscripts are books from the dawn of printing including Isabella Stewart Gardner’s own rare, first Florentine edition of Dante’s Divine Comedy illustrated by Botticelli and the first copy of this edition to enter an American collection. All of the books in the exhibition shed new light on Renaissance patrons, artists, scribes, and printers from an era when the art of bookmaking reached its pinnacle.

The Gardner’s show is part of an ambitious city-wide collaborative project entitled Beyond Words: Illuminated Manuscripts in Boston Collections, which is the largest ever exhibition of medieval and Renaissance books held in North America. The Gardner joins Harvard University’s Houghton Library and Boston College’s McMullen Museum as one of three venues which will simultaneously display 260 outstanding painted and printed books selected by a team of local experts from 18 Boston-area institutions.

Mon 11am – 5pm
Tue Closed
Wed 11am – 5pm
Thu 11am – 9pm
Fri 11am – 5pm
Sat 11am – 5pm
Sun 11am – 5pm
Ticket sales end 30 minutes before close

$15 Adults
$12 Seniors 65 and up
$5 College Students with current ID

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum
25 Evans Way
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
September 22, 2016 -
February 05, 2017
The Tale of Kitty-in-Boots
See Quentin Blake's original drawings for Beatrix Potter's newly re-discovered story The Tale of Kitty-in-Boots

An exhibition of Quentin Blake's original illustrations for The Tale of Kitty-in-Boots, the recently re-discovered unpublished Beatrix Potter manuscript, to be published on 1 September by Penguin Random House.

The book about 'a well-behaved prime black Kitty cat, who leads rather a double life', features classic Potter characters including Mrs Tiggy-Winkle and Mr Tod re-drawn by Blake.

The exhibition will feature Blake’s 50 illustrations for the book, a sketchbook and reference material. It will also contain the original Beatrix Potter manuscript and one of Potter’s only two illustrations for the book, on loan from the V&A.

This will be the second exhibition to be held in the new Quentin Blake Gallery at House of Illustration, which opened in April. The Quentin Blake Gallery offers a continuous series of exhibitions of different aspects of Blake’s work, drawing on the unparalleled diversity of his personal archive of thousands of original illustrations, roughs and preparatory drawings.

Tue - Sun 10:00am - 6:00pm
Mon Closed

HOUSE OF ILLUSTRATION
2 Granary Square
King's Cross
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
September 23 -
December 31, 2016
Creating Shakespeare
Shakespeare spent most of his adult life creating, on page and on stage. And in the 400 years since his death, he has also been created again and again by generations of actors, writers, printers, artists, filmmakers, advertising executives—the list goes on! They have used the Bard and his work as a way to explore human society, ruminate on authorship, and, occasionally, sell canned meats. Creating Shakespeare is the story of Shakespeare’s prolific life and afterlife, from the sixteenth century through the twenty-first.

Throughout the run of Creating Shakespeare, the Newberry will offer curator-led tours and public programming to further explore the themes of the exhibition. Stay tuned as we announce these events in the weeks ahead and offer behind-the-scenes access leading up to the show’s opening.

Free & open to the public

The Newberry
60 West Walton Street
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
September 23, 2016 -
February 17, 2017
The Gift to Sing: Highlights of the Leon F. Litwack & Bancroft Library African American Collections
For decades professor emeritus of history Leon F. Litwack has been accumulating what is arguably the world’s finest private collection of books on African American history and culture. This exhibition displays highlights of the collection that will be coming to The Bancroft Library as a bequest. The Litwack collection is particularly noteworthy for its Harlem Renaissance first editions in strikingly illustrated dust jackets. The exhibition includes books with distinguished provenance such as a copy of Frederick Douglass’s Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, an American Slave with an inscription by the famous abolitionist William Lloyd Garrison. Complementing the Litwack books are treasures from Bancroft’s significant African American holdings, including the first book by an African American, Phyllis Wheatley’s Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral, published in 1773.

Mon - Fri 9am - 4pm

The Bancroft Library Gallery
The Bancroft Library
University of California
Berkeley, CA
Exhibit West
September 23, 2016 -
January 08, 2017
The Battle of Brooklyn
On August 27, 1776, on the marshy fields of Gowanus and Red Hook, George Washington and his rag-tag army of untrained soldiers fought the British Army, one of the most powerful military forces in the world. The rebels were ingloriously defeated. The first major armed campaign for the colonies after declaring independence from Great Britain, the Battle of Brooklyn stands as the largest single battle of the Revolutionary War, and one that would loom large in George Washington’s consciousness. Yet because it is a story of defeat and retreat, it does not occupy the same place in American history as the narratives of the more famous battles of Bunker Hill, Saratoga, or Yorktown. Through 90 objects and documents, including Hugh Gaine’s printing of the Declaration of Independence, a camp bed used by George Washington during the war, Thomas Paine’s Common Sense, and a rare hunting shirt that became the first ‘uniform’ of the Continental Army, The Battle of Brooklyn presents the dramatic story of the near-disaster that both threatened and abetted the outcome of the war for American independence.

Tue - Thu, & Sat - 10am - 6pm
Fri 10am - 8pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West
at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 24, 2016 -
January 22, 2017
Ardizzone: A Retrospective
The first major exhibition in 40 years of the work of Edward Ardizzone

‘The supreme contemporary example of the genuine illustrator’
Maurice Sendak on Edward Ardizzone, 1967

Edward Ardizzone is one of the most significant illustrators of the 20th century, whose wide-ranging output spanned children's books, literary classics, war illustration and much more.

Ardizzone’s lively line-and-wash drawings were based on constant observation of the world, disciplined by classical figure composition. He is best-known for his illustrated children’s books, in particular the ‘Little Tim’ series which he wrote and illustrated, starting in 1936 with Little Tim and the Brave Sea Captain, all of which are still in print today.

This will be the first major exhibition of Ardizzone's work in 40 years. From his relatively unknown early commissions to rarely seen original illustrations, the exhibition will feature over 100 pieces from public and private collections that reflect the incredible diversity of Ardizzone’s career. Highlights include a Little Tim manuscript, mural artwork for a P&O ocean liner, ceramic figurines and poster designs for Lyons, as well as sketchbooks and illustrated correspondence.

Tue - Sun 10:00am - 6:00pm
Mon Closed

HOUSE OF ILLUSTRATION
2 Granary Square
King's Cross
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
September 26, 2016 -
January 08, 2017
Jerusalem 1000–1400: Every People Under Heaven
This exhibition will illuminate the key role that the Holy City played in shaping the art of the period from 1000 to 1400. While Jerusalem is often described as a city of three faiths, that formulation underestimates its fascinating complexity. In fact, the city was home to multiple cultures, faiths, and languages. History records harmonious and dissonant voices of people from many lands, passing in the narrow streets of a city not much larger than midtown Manhattan. This will be the first exhibition to unravel the various cultural traditions and aesthetic strands that enriched and enlivened the medieval city.

Over 200 works of art will be gathered from some 60 lenders worldwide. Nearly a quarter of the objects will come from Jerusalem, including key loans from its religious communities, some of which have never before shared their treasures outside their walls. Jerusalem 1000–1400: Every People Under Heaven will bear witness to the crucial role that the city has played in shaping world culture, a lesson vital to our common history.

Exhibitions are free with Museum admission.

Gallery 899
The Met Fifth Avenue
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 26 -
December 20, 2016
The Lure of Italy
An exhibition of travel books and manuscripts from the Werner Gundersheimer Collection.

Fifty books which celebrate travel to Italy from the 18th through the 20th century are on display in Neilson Library at Smith College through December 20. They are part of a remarkable collection of nearly 600 books on Italian travel which Werner L. Gundersheimer, director emeritus of the Folger Shakespeare Library, donated to the Mortimer Rare Book Room in 2014. The collection is composed of accounts of mostly English and American travelers to all parts of Italy, including the Grand Tour, later American cultural tourism, and women travelers. Many of the books are illustrated with drawings, prints, and photographs, and some of the texts shed new light on early travelers’ motivations and interests. Many books have decorative, illustrative, and colorful book covers. According to Gundersheimer, he first visited Italy as a suburban teenager in 1953, and was smitten. Later, as a Renaissance scholar, he became curious about how others had experienced the lure of Italy. His gift to Smith College reflects his admiration for its ongoing commitment to Italian Studies across the curriculum.

LECTURE: Oct 6, 2016 4:30pm
Italia Mia: How English and American Travelers Made Italy their Own by Werner Gundersheimer, Neilson Library Browsing Room.

Book Arts Gallery
Neilson Library, level 3
Smith College Libraries
7 Neilson Drive
Northampton, MA
Exhibit New England
September 26 -
December 15, 2016
“Representing the Law in the Most Serene Republic”
Images of Authority from Renaissance Venice

The Venetian Republic, a prosperous and powerful state in Renaissance Europe, cultivated an image of stability and liberty. This image-making is on display in a new Yale Law Library exhibition, “Representing the Law in the Most Serene Republic: Images of Authority from Renaissance Venice.”

The exhibition draws on the outstanding collection of Italian law books in the Yale Law Library’s Rare Book Collection, along with drawings and medals from the Yale University Art Gallery and reproductions from the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library.

Lillian Goldman Law Library
127 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
October 01, 2016 -
March 31, 2017
Deep Cuts: The B-Side of Historical & Special Collections
Deep Cut: True gems that are found later in an album, a B-side. Rarely if ever played on the radio.
(Urban Dictionary)

B-Side: (the music recorded on) the supporting or less important side of a single-playing gramophone record.
(Oxford English Dictionary)

The Harvard Law School Library’s Historical & Special Collections (HSC) is home to one of the largest collections of rare legal materials in the world. You might expect to find rare books, illuminated manuscripts, collections of scholarly papers, portraits, photographs, and material documenting the history of HLS in our collections … and you would be right. This is the “A-side” of HSC – the popular items people expect to find when they visit HSC in person and online.

But this exhibit is about the B-side of HSC: the bizarre, the unusual, the hidden gems. Locks of hair, fabric flowers, books bound in wallpaper, recordings in nearly obsolete formats, long-forgotten student publications, and surprising items in otherwise traditional collections of faculty papers … it’s all here in the B-side of HSC.

Historical & Special Collections
Harvard Law School Library
Langdell Hall
1545 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
October 04, 2016 -
February 05, 2017
EDGAR ALLAN POE IN BALTIMORE
THE ENIGMATIC EDGAR A. POE IN BALTIMORE & BEYOND: SELECTIONS FROM THE SUSAN JAFFE TANE COLLECTION

What did Edgar Allan Poe’s tales and poems mean to readers in his own time? How did he master so many forms of literature—and invent exciting new varieties, from science fiction to the detective story? Why did he move so often between cities, calling Richmond, Boston, New York, Philadelphia, and Baltimore “home” at different points in his life? Meet the enigmatic Edgar A. Poe: a man who lived in the real world, but tried to write his way out of it.

This exhibition of rare materials gives viewers the chance to see Poe at work, up close: “The Raven” in Poe’s own handwriting… first editions of Poe’s writings in books, newspapers, and magazines from the 1800s… and examples of the translations, illustrations, comic books, and portraits that have helped extend Poe’s global popularity. The exhibition is free and open to the public.

Mon Closed
Tue – Thu 10am – 5pm
Fri – Sat 10am – 3pm
Sun 10am – 1pm

THE ENIGMATIC FILM SERIES
Calling all Poe fans, cinephiles, and popcorn enthusiasts: join us for a short series of films based on the works and life of Edgar Allan Poe.

THE RAVEN (2012)
Fri, Oct. 7, 2016, 7pm
Free & open to the public

EDGAR ALLAN POE: BURIED ALIVE (2016)
Invitation-only premiere of a brand-new documentary about Poe's life.

SPIRITS OF THE DEAD (HISTOIRES EXTRAORDINARES, 1968)
Sun, Feb. 5, 2017, 4pm
Free & open to the public

George Peabody Library
17 E. Mount Vernon Place
Baltimore, MD
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 06, 2016 -
January 08, 2017
Fragonard: Drawing Triumphant Works from New York Collections
Jean Honoré Fragonard (1732–1806)—one of the most forward-looking and inventive artists of the 18th century—was equally skilled in painting, drawing, and etching. Unlike many old masters for whom drawing was a preparatory tool, Fragonard explored the potential of chalk, ink, and wash to create sheets that were works of art in their own right. As displays of virtuosity and an imaginative spirit, his drawings have been prized highly from his own day to the present, and New York has long been a center for collecting these works.

This exhibition will celebrate the artist's achievements as a master draftsman. Among the 100 works on paper on view, nearly half are from private collections, some of which will be shown publicly for the first time. A similar brio and inventiveness mark the artist's etchings, and examples of these will also be featured in the selection. The exhibition will provide a rare opportunity to see well-loved masterpieces alongside new discoveries and works that have long been out of the public eye.

Sun – Thu 10am – 5:30pm*
Fri & Sat 10am – 9pm*

*Galleries are cleared fifteen minutes before closing.

Free with Museum admission

Galleries 691-693
The Met Fifth Avenue
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 07, 2016 -
January 22, 2017
Word and Image: Martin Luther's Reformation
Five hundred years ago a monk in a backwater town at the edge of Germany took on the most powerful men in Europe: the Holy Roman Emperor and the Pope…and he won. Martin Luther’s Reformation is one of the most successful media campaigns in history and an event that completely altered the course of western history. To celebrate the 500th anniversary of Luther posting the Ninety-Five Theses to the church door in Wittenberg, this exhibition explores how the Reformation was launched and propagated through Luther’s strategic use of media: printed books, prints, paintings, and music.

Luther’s thoughts on Scripture and man’s relationship to God were revolutionary, but the way that text and art were employed to disseminate his message was equally ground-breaking. The inception and development of the Reformation will be illustrated in Word and Image with over eighty artworks and objects, the majority of which are from museums in Germany which have never been seen before in North America. Exceptional highlights include one of the five existing printed copies of the Ninety-Five Theses, nearly twenty paintings, prints, and drawings by Lucas Cranach the Elder, Luther’s manuscript draft of his Old Testament translation, the pulpit from the church in Wittenberg where Luther preached, and over thirty of Luther’s most important publications and the ones that led the pope to excommunicate Luther and make him the most successful heretic in history.

Word and Image: Martin Luther’s Reformation is made possible with the support of the Foreign Office of the Federal Republic of Germany within the framework of the Luther Decade in cooperation with the Luther Memorials Foundation of Saxony-Anhalt, the Deutsches Historisches Museum, Berlin, and the Schloss Friedenstein Foundation, Gotha under the leadership of the State Museum of Prehistory, Halle and in coordination with the Morgan Library & Museum, New York.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

The Morgan closes at 4pm on Christmas Eve & at 5pm on New Year's Eve & the 4th of July.

Closed Monday, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, & New Year's Day.

$18 Adults
$12 Children (13–16)
$12 Seniors (65 and over)
$12 Students (with current ID)
Free to members and children 12 and under (must be accompanied by an adult)

Admission is free on Fridays from 7pm - 9pm
Admission to the McKim rooms only (Mr. Morgan's Library, Study, Rotunda, and Librarian's Office) is free during the following times:
Tue 3pm - 5pm
Fri 7pm - 9pm
Sun 4pm - 6pm

Admission is not required to visit the Morgan Shop, Morgan Dining Room, and Morgan Café.

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue at 36th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 07, 2016 -
February 19, 2017
DANIEL CHESTER FRENCH: THE FEMALE FORM REVEALED
For nearly half a century, from the late 1870s to the late 1920s, Daniel Chester French (1850-1931) was America’s foremost sculptor of public monuments. His outdoor masterpieces can be seen in the cosmopolitan centers of New York, Boston, Chicago, Detroit, and Washington, DC, as well as in smaller American towns such as Concord, Massachusetts, Saratoga Springs, New York, and Lincoln, Nebraska. French’s projects adorn civic spaces including New York’s Central Park, Boston’s Public Garden, and Washington’s Dupont Circle; are focal points on college and university campuses at Harvard, Columbia, Bowdoin, and Gallaudet; enhance the facades of grand Beaux-Arts structures such as the United States Custom House in New York, the Brooklyn Museum, and the Boston Public Library; and are focal points in some of this country’s great historic cemeteries such as Woodlawn in New York, Graceland in Chicago, and Forest Hills in Boston.

Many of French’s public works depict or otherwise commemorate historical figures. These range from his herioc allegory, The Minute Man, created in 1875 for the town of Concord, Massachusetts, to grand-manner portraits, such as the colossal figure of Abraham Lincoln, executed in 1922 for the Lincoln Memorial in Washington, DC. French’s fame for these male-oriented masterpieces is well deserved, but in fact he was equally proficient at modeling the female figure, especially in its classicizing, idealized form. This aspect of his career has been little studied and it is the goal of this exhibition to help fill that gap in French scholarship.

Characteristically, French’s female figures are allegorical. Often idealized, seductively posed, and classically draped, they typically memorialize great human actions, events, or emotions. They fulfill their purpose not through portraiture but by means of a more sensual, tactile, and cerebral narrative. As an American classicist who trained in Europe, French looked first to the visible world for inspiration; but he always improved on what nature provides in order to achieve an ideal beauty in three-dimensional form. This was especially true of his interpretations of the female face and body. In fact, feminine beauty in allegorical form was often at the forefront of French’s work, even the public ones. Daniel Chester French: The Female Form Revealed explores this aspect of French’s career by focusing on a selection of evocative preliminary models and studies that he made in preparation for some of his great public commissions as well as for a number of his more intimate and personal works.

Mon - Thu 9am - 8pm
Fri 9am - 5:30pm
Sat 9am - 4pm
Sun 12pm - 4pm

Members free
non-members $5.00

BOSTON ATHENÆUM
10½ Beacon Street
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
October 07 -
December 17, 2016
AMOS P. KENNEDY, JR.: I AM NEGRO
FEATURED ARTIST PROJECT

Known as a radical in the book arts world, our 2016 Faculty Fellow, Amos P. Kennedy, Jr., challenges notions of the preciousness of the books to deal with issues of class, economy, and race. I Am Negro features two new printing project installations.

Amos P. Kennedy, Jr.’s work embodies his passion for stirring up strong emotions and encouraging people to think in previously unexplored ways. In addition to his work as a bookmaker, he is an educator and journeyman printer who travels the globe teaching people how to print on traditional letterpresses with metal and wood type. He is featured in Laura Zinger’s documentary Proceed and Be Bold and hosting his Cash and Carry poster shows. He studied under master paper and print maker Walter Hamady at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Kennedy is also the 2015 USA Glasgow Fellow (Crafts).

Mon - Fri 11am - 6pm
Sat 10am - 5pm

The Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 08, 2016 -
January 09, 2017
​LIVE AND LIFE WILL GIVE YOU PICTURES: MASTERWORKS OF FRENCH PHOTOGRAPHY, 1890 – 1950​
Photography was invented in France in the 1820s, and many of its most innovative and influential practitioners developed in the milieu that produced the impressionist, post-impressionist, and early modern artists favored by Albert C. Barnes and featured in the collection of the Barnes Foundation.

In the second half of the 19th century and the first half of the 20th, photographers and painters traded aesthetic ideas and were interested in many of the same features of contemporary experience, particularly as it touched Paris. Sometimes referred to as the "capital of modernity," the city was radically transformed in this period of rapid industrialization, urbanization, and class stratification. As with the other visual arts, progressive photography came to be defined by the novel ways in which it was able to represent the more spectacular aspects of these and related developments that shaped all modern cities.

To illustrate these phenomena, this exhibition, titled after a remark by Henri Cartier-Bresson, presents vintage prints of nearly 200 classic images made between 1890 and 1950 by French photographers and photographers working extensively in France. The salon-style hang will be organized thematically. Subjects include Paris and Environs, Life on the Street, Labor and Leisure, Commerce, Personality and Publicity, Reportage, and Art for Art's Sake.

Drawn exclusively from the private collection of Michael Mattis and Judy Hochberg, Live and Life Will Give You Pictures resonates with the core of the Barnes collection and includes work by such masters as Berenice Abbott, Eugène Atget, Ilse Bing, Erwin Blumenfeld, Brassaï, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Edgar Degas, Eugène Druet, André Kertész, Francois Kollar, Jacque-Henri Lartigue, Dora Maar, Man Ray, Lisette Model, László Moholy-Nagy, and Félix Thiollier.

Wed – Mon 10am – 5pm
Tues Closed
Also open 6pm – 9pm every First Friday & select Friday evenings.

Exhibition access included with General Admission

Adult: $25
Senior: $23
Student/Youth: $10

Roberts Gallery
The Barnes Foundation
Philadelphia Campus
2025 Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 08, 2016 -
January 08, 2017
Samuel F.B. Morse's Gallery of the Louvre and the Art of Invention
Struggling to secure his reputation as a great American artist, Samuel F. B. Morse sailed to Europe in 1829, and embarked on a period of intense study and prodigious copying of great works of art that culminated in his grand painting Gallery of the Louvre (1831–33). Measuring approximately six by nine feet, the painting depicts an imagined installation of forty artworks in the Salon Carré at the Musée du Louvre in Paris. In the scene, individuals study, sketch and copy from great works of art, just as Morse did in order to complete the painting. With its emphasis on copying as a technology of transmission and creation, this ambitious work anticipates Morse’s later experiments with photography, the electromagnetic telegraph and the invention of Morse code. PEM’s presentation of Samuel F. B. Morse's Gallery of the Louvre and the Art of Invention is accompanied by an installation of over sixty-five works drawn from PEM’s collection of nineteenth- and twentieth-century American, Asian, and maritime photography. Inspired by Morse’s role as the “father of American photography,” the selection of these images reflects the strengths of PEM photographic holdings, while echoing the spirit of curation, storytelling, and cross-cultural affinities embodied in Gallery of the Louvre.

Tue - Sun 10am - 5pm
3rd Thu of every month 10am - 9pm
Closed Mondays (except holidays)

Special Exhibition Galleries
The Peabody Essex Museum, East India Square (161 Essex St)
Salem, MA
Exhibit New England
October 10, 2016 -
January 22, 2017
Character Mongers, or, Trading in People on Paper in the Long 18th Century
In the course of the long eighteenth century—the Age of Caricature, and of The Rise of the Novel—the British reading public perfected the pastime of savoring characters. In a flourishing print culture, buying and selling likenesses of people and types became a business—and arguably an art. Real and imaginary characters—actual and fictional people—were put on paper by writers and graphic artists, and performed onstage and off. The exigencies of narrative, performance, and indeed of community conspired to inform views of other people—friend and foe, fat and thin—as tellingly, characters. “For what do we live,” Jane Austen’s Mr. Bennet would ask rhetorically in 1813, “but to make sport for our neighbours and laugh at them in our turn?”

This exhibit will feature images by William Hogarth, James Gillray, Thomas Rowlandson, Thomas Patch, Edward Francis Burney, Francis Grose, and G.M. Woodward, excerpts from novels by Jane Austen, Frances Burney, Henry Fielding, and Laurence Sterne, and examples of graphic collections published by Matthew and Mary Darly and Thomas Tegg that marketed caricature as entertainment.

Lewis Walpole Library
154 Main Street
Farmington, CT
Exhibit New England
October 11, 2016 -
January 01, 2017
The Alchemy of Color in Medieval Manuscripts
Appreciated today for its aesthetic qualities, color during the Middle Ages was also understood for its material, scientific, and medicinal properties. The manufacture of colored pigments and inks was part of the science of alchemy, the forerunner of modern chemistry. Concerned with the transformation of matter, alchemy was closely tied to artistic practice.

Current research into the materials used to produce the sumptuous colors that enliven manuscript pages reveals a remarkably diverse “alchemical rainbow” of hues derived from plants, minerals, and metals.

Tue – Fri & Sun 10am – 5:30pm
Sat 10am – 9pm

Free admission
Closed Mondays

Getty Center, Museum Lecture Hall
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
October 11, 2016 -
January 08, 2017
The Shimmer of Gold: Giovanni di Paolo in Renaissance Siena
Manuscript illuminator and panel painter Giovanni di Paolo was one of the most distinctive and imaginative artists working in Siena, Italy, during the Renaissance. This exhibition reunites several panels from one of his most important commissions—an altarpiece for the Branchini family chapel in the church of San Domenico in Siena—for the first time since its dispersal, and presents illuminated manuscripts and paintings by Giovanni and his close collaborators and contemporaries. Through recent technical findings, the exhibition reveals his creative use of gold and paint to achieve remarkable luminous effects in both media.

The Branchini Altarpiece has been studied by conservators and curators at the Getty Museum as part of a conservation partnership with the Norton Simon Foundation and the Kröller-Müller Museum, Otterlo, the Netherlands. The Pinacoteca Nazionale in Siena, the Burke Family Collection, James E. and Elizabeth J. Ferrell, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Santa Barbara Museum of Art have generously lent related works of exceptional quality.

Tue – Fri & Sun 10am – 5:30pm
Sat 10am – 9pm

Free admission
Closed Mondays

Getty Center, Museum Lecture Hall
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
October 11, 2016 -
February 12, 2017
The Art of Alchemy
Long shrouded in secrecy, alchemy is now recognized as the ancestor of modern chemistry. Alchemists were notorious for attempting to make synthetic gold, but their goals were far more ambitious: to transform and bend nature to the will of an industrious human imagination. For scientists, philosophers, and artists alike, alchemy seemed to hold the key to unlocking the secrets of creation. Alchemists’ efforts to discover the way the world is made have had an enduring impact on artistic practice and expression around the globe. Inventions born from alchemical laboratories include metal alloys for sculpture and ornament, oil paints, effects in glassmaking, and even the chemical baths of photography. The mysterious art of alchemy transformed visual culture from antiquity to the Industrial Age, and its legacy still permeates the world we make today.

Tue – Fri & Sun 10am – 5:30pm
Sat 10am – 9pm

Free admission
Closed Mondays

Getty Research Institute
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
October 14, 2016 -
February 26, 2017
Wanderer/Wonderer: Pop-Ups by Colette Fu
Colette Fu is renowned for her immense, sculptural pop-up books. This focus exhibition presents works from her series “Haunted Philadelphia,” inspired by eerie historical sites in her hometown, and “We are Tiger Dragon People,” her visual explorations of the culture in China’s Yunnan Province—her ancestors’ homeland. Fu’s works combine images of landscapes she has explored with elements of fairy tales and folklore. Through engineering feats, she transforms her photographs into oversized pop-ups, some with kinetic elements and blinking lights. Gathered together, Fu’s books form a pop-up fantasy world.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

National Museum of Women in the Arts
1250 New York Ave NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 14, 2016 -
February 12, 2017
Victorian Entertainments: There Will Be Fun
Performing pigs, magic tricks and pantomime! Roll up to celebrate some of the most popular entertainments of Victorian times performed in a variety of venues from fairground tents to musical stages.

Focusing on five colourful characters, follow their stories as we bring the worlds they inhabited to life. These Victorian A-listers include Dan Leno, the original pantomime dame and ‘funniest man on earth’, John Nevil Maskelyne, magician and manager of ‘England’s Home of Mystery’, and the great circus showman ‘Lord’ George Sanger. Also hear of those whose fame has now faded such as Annie De Montford, a mill worker turned mesmerist, and Evanion the Royal conjuror.

Step back in time with wonderfully decorative original posters, handbills, advertisements and tickets – all glorious examples of rare ephemera – alongside contemporary film and sound recordings. Explore the Victorians’ influence on the world of entertainment today. Without them we might never have experienced the joys of panto, stand-up comedy and even Britain’s Got Talent.

Every Saturday (15 October – 17 December, 15.00 – 17.00), a company of actors and performers will present archive material from the exhibition through the prism of contemporary performance.

Free admission

Entrance Hall
The British Library
96 Euston Road
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
October 14, 2016 -
February 13, 2017
States of Mind: Picasso Lithographs 1945–1960
By the end of the Second World War, Pablo Picasso had reached what he called “the moment... when the movement of my thought interests me more than the thought itself.” This new interest in “movement”—the successive permutations of an artistic statement—found its most remarkable expression in Picasso’s practice as a printmaker. Whereas oil paintings inevitably covered their tracks, concealing the process of their making under layers of opaque color, prints—especially lithographs—promised to record their own development through sequential stages, charting the movement of their maker’s thoughts from state to state. Picasso could work up a design, print it (in a first state), rework it, and print it again (in a second state), repeating the process two or ten or twenty times to chart the metamorphoses of a particular compositional idea. Drawing on the Norton Simon Museum’s holdings of over 700 Picasso prints—among the deepest collections of its kind anywhere in the world—States of Mind traces the evolution of individual compositions from the 1940s and 1950s through multiple states, subtle adjustments, and radical revisions.

Norton Simon Museum
411 W. Colorado Blvd. (corner of Orange Grove & Colorado Blvd)
Pasadena, CA
Exhibit West
October 14, 2016 -
January 08, 2017
Staging History
Staging History explores how history was told on stage in Regency-era Britain. Exploration, revolution and patriotism take centre stage, as the exhibition examines the influence of history and historical events in the writing and staging of theatre, opera and drama from 1780-1840. The exhibition features beautiful set designs, theatrical documents and illustrations from collections held at the Bodleian and other institutions.

Monday to Friday 10am-5pm
Saturday 10am-5pm
Sunday 11am-5pm

Free admission

St Lee Gallery
Weston Library
Broad Street
Oxford, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
October 15, 2016 -
January 15, 2017
The Private Jefferson: From the Collections of the Massachusetts Historical Society
As author of the Declaration of Independence, architect of the Virginia State Capitol, founder of the University of Virginia, and third president of the United States, Thomas Jefferson is one of history’s best-known figures. Surprisingly, the largest collection of Jefferson’s private papers (more than 8,000 pieces) cannot be found in the Commonwealth, but is instead in the collection of the Massachusetts Historical Society.

For the first time since the late 1800s, the most significant pieces from the Coolidge Collection of Thomas Jefferson Manuscripts are returning to Virginia and will be on display. This exhibition offers a once in a lifetime opportunity to see these important American documents in one place.

Mon - Sat 10am - 5pm

Free admission for VHS members
$10 for nonmembers
$8 for groups of 10 or more
Free for children under the age of 12

Virginia Historical Society
428 North Blvd.
Richmond, VA
Exhibit South
October 15, 2016 -
January 08, 2017
Sacred Words: The Saint John's Bible and the Art of Illumination
The first illuminated, handwritten Bible of monumental size to be commissioned by a Benedictine monastery in the modern era will be on view at the Oklahoma City Museum of Art this fall. Sacred Words: The Saint John’s Bible and the Art of Illumination will open October 15 at OKCMOA and include seventy selected folios from The Saint John’s Bible as well as other historical illuminated manuscripts, such as a Book of Hours, Quran pages, and Torah scrolls. Sacred Words will include a selection of original, unbound illuminated manuscript folios on calfskin vellum from The Saint John’s Bible, as well as sketches, drawings, inks and tools used to create the manuscript.

The Saint John’s Bible was created by a team of 23 scribes, artists and assistants headquartered in a scriptorium in Wales under the artistic direction of Donald Jackson, one of the world’s foremost calligraphers and the scribe to Queen Elizabeth’s Crown office at the House of Lords. The theological aspects of the project were guided by a committee of theologians, artists and scholars at Saint John’s University in Collegeville, Minnesota. The Bible incorporates many of the characteristics of its medieval predecessors: it is written on vellum, using quills, natural inks, hand-ground pigments, and gold-leaf gilding. However, so this edition is relevant today, it employs a modern English translation as well as beautifully painted illuminations that interpret biblical passages in contemporary terms.

Sacred Words presents the concept, historical context, technical execution and significance of The Saint John’s Bible and illumination as an art form. This exhibition, open through Jan. 8, 2017, will examine the revival of a millennia-old tradition of meticulous handcraftsmanship that incorporates advances in modern technology.

Tue - Sat 10am - 5pm
Thu 10am - 9pm
Sun noon - 5pm
Mon & Major Holidays CLOSED

OKLAHOMA CITY MUSEUM OF ART
415 Couch Drive
Oklahoma City, OK
Exhibit Southwest
October 16, 2016 -
January 29, 2017
Warhol By the Book
The Blanton presents Warhol By the Book, the first museum exhibition in the United States to examine Andy Warhol’s career-long work in books—an overlooked and important aspect of the artist’s life and career. The exhibition presents nearly all of Warhol’s book projects from his early days as a student in Pittsburgh and commercial illustrator in New York to his years as a Pop art pioneer and superstar celebrity. Organized by The Andy Warhol Museum, Warhol By the Book at the Blanton will include more than 250 objects that span five decades, including original artist books, book jacket covers and ephemera, illustrations, screen prints, paintings, photographs, films, and several books authored and owned by Warhol. Featuring recent discoveries and many works on view to the public for the first time, the Blanton’s presentation of Warhol By the Book will feature holdings from the museum’s permanent collection, as well as additional late-career portraits from The Andy Warhol Museum collection.

In his life with books, Warhol (1928–1987) was an illustrator, designer, author, editor and publisher, and an admirer. His career-long commitment to making and appreciating books was matched by his interest in questioning and experimenting with the way in which a book is presented to its readers. From his collaborative artist books of the 1950s, which featured his mother’s calligraphic writing as well as drawings and poems from male love interests, to his celebrity-centric photo books and Diaries of the 1980s, Warhol chose “new ways to say old things and old ways to say new things,” as he said. Warhol embraced poetry, romantic fiction, cookbooks, instructional how-to pamphlets and sales catalogues, hand-detailed artist books, and authored best-selling mass-market memoirs. Children’s books were one of his lifelong interests, with examples spanning five decades, including books he wrote and illustrated, and others that served as source material for artworks.

Warhol’s early career in commercial design, reproduction, artist books, and storytelling profoundly inspired his art-making practice. Printing methods he used in his commercial designs led to his famous silk-screening technique, and resulting prints and paintings maintained the hand-detailed quality of his early artist books. Warhol was an experimenter and observer for whom authors served as celebrities. His lifelong relationship with books and the publishing world is presented for the first time in this career-spanning survey.

Tue - Fri: 10am to 5pm
Sat: 11am to 5pm
Sun: 1pm to 5pm
Closed Mon & major holidays

Blanton Museum of Art
200 E. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.
Austin, TX
Exhibit Southwest
October 17, 2016 -
February 11, 2017
Irish Women Rising: Gender and Politics in Revolutionary Ireland, 1900-1923
As they engaged in the national struggle for independence from British rule, Irish women had to break through cultural and social restraints. They organized politically and militarily. They fought alongside men, went to jail, and on hunger strikes. Kathleen Clarke, Maud Gonne, Constance Markievicz, Margaret Skinnider, and hundreds of other brave and determined women achieved their purpose and place in history. Featuring newly acquired, never-before-seen documents and artifacts, as well as an original 1916 Easter Rising Proclamation, this exhibition tells their stories.

Daily 9am - 5pm

The John J. Burns Library
Boston College
140 Commonwealth Avenue
Chestnut Hill, MA
Exhibit New England
October 20, 2016 -
January 20, 2017
50th ANNIVERSARY OF FLORENCE FLOOD INSPIRES EXHIBITION AT THE AMERICAN BOOKBINDERS MUSEUM
n November, 1966, the banks of the Arno River in Florence rose to record heights, breaking its embankments and flooding the city. Medieval and Renaissance-era cultural treasures stored in library and museum cellars steeped for days in water, mud, and sewage. In an unprecedented international effort, volunteers converged on the city to rescue these priceless works. “Books and Mud: the drowned libraries of Florence,” an exhibition at the American Bookbinders Museum, will celebrate these “Mud Angels” and the tools and techniques that were created to reclaim and restore hundred of thousands of books and documents devastated by the flood.

Through photos, historic book models, demonstrations, and the words of volunteers from Florence and around the world, the exhibit will communicate the nature and scope of the flood’s destruction. The challenges of retrieving books and documents from heavily flooded storage areas, and the techniques invented and improvised during salvage and recovery in Florence, will be made real for visitors. Many of these techniques and processes continue to be used and refined today in cultural institutions’ disaster preparedness and conservation programs throughout the world.

The exhibit also looks at the people who came to, and worked in, Florence after the flood. “The disaster and its aftermath brought together people from all over the world, working together in stress and discomfort with the common goal of saving books and art,” notes bookbinding historian and exhibit co-curator Tom Conroy. “Skilled specialists shared their knowledge and experience with professional rivals. They learned from, and taught, specialists from other fields. The experience was transformative: they took it away with them. It shaped the rest of their lives and their work and, through them, the care of cultural property through the rest of the world to the present day.”

Tue – Sat 10am – 4pm
Also open until 8pm every Third Thursday.

General admission is $10. Seniors and youth: $8. ABM members are free.

American Bookbinders Museum
355 Clementina Street
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
October 22, 2016 -
February 20, 2017
THE ART OF THE QUR’AN: TREASURES FROM THE MUSEUM OF TURKISH AND ISLAMIC ARTS
In recognition of one of the world’s extraordinary collections of Qur’ans, the Freer|Sackler is hosting a landmark exhibition, the first of its kind in the United States. Some fifty of the most sumptuous manuscripts from Herat to Istanbul will be featured in The Art of the Qur’an: Treasures from the Museum of Turkish and Islamic Arts, opening this fall. Celebrated for their superb calligraphy and lavish illumination, these manuscripts—which range in date from the early eighth to the seventeenth century—are critical to the history of the arts of the book. They were once the prized possessions of Ottoman sultans and the ruling elite, who donated their Qur’ans to various institutions to express their personal piety and secure political power. Each manuscript tells a unique story, which will be explored in this once-in-a-lifetime exhibition.

10am – 5:30pm

Free admission

Freer|Sackler, The Smithsonian's Museums of Asian Art
National Mall
1050 Independence Avenue SW

Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 22, 2016 -
March 20, 2017
Real American Places
A new exhibition opening this fall considers a rich dialogue between two iconic figures in American culture: the renowned photographer Edward Weston (1886–1958) and poet Walt Whitman (1819–1892). The 25 photographs included in the exhibition illuminate an understudied chapter of Weston’s career. In 1941, the Limited Editions Book Club approached Weston to collaborate on a deluxe edition of Whitman’s poetry collection, Leaves of Grass. The publisher’s ambitious plan was to capture “the real American faces and the real American places” that defined Whitman’s epic work. Weston eagerly accepted the assignment and set out with his wife, Charis Wilson, on a cross-country trip that yielded a group of images that mark the culmination of an extraordinarily creative period in his career. While Weston believed the photographs to be some of his best (he donated 90 pictures from the series to The Huntington in 1944, along with hundreds of other images), the resulting Limited Editions publication proved a failure on many fronts. As a result, the photographs from the Leaves of Grass project have been relegated to footnote status in Weston’s oeuvre. “Real American Places” seeks to give this unjustly overlooked body of work its due. In addition to selections from the series, the exhibition will include a number of original Whitman items from the Library’s holdings, allowing visitors to explore the creative response of one giant of American culture in conversation with another.

Scott Galleries, Chandler Wing
The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
October 22, 2016 -
April 09, 2017
Historic Futures: Artists Reinvent the Book
The lineage of the artist’s book descends from the common impulse to use pictures to tell stories. This connection has held constant from Paleolithic cave paintings onward, through the emergence of the artist’s book as a recognized creative medium in the twentieth century. Historically, artists have used the familiar elements of the book form—paper, printing, binding—as opportunities for expression and reinvention, sometimes challenging our notion of what a book can be. Historic Futures features examples documenting key moments in the evolution of the artist’s book from the late 1700s to today.

During the social and political upheavals of early twentieth-century Europe, avant-garde artists, poets, and designers re-imagined the book radically. This exhibition features Dlia Golosa (For the Voice), the 1923 collaboration by El Lissitzky and Vladimir Vladimirovich Mayakovsky that was groundbreaking in its compositional interpretations of poetry; Filippo Marinetti’s wild typographic transgressions, as exemplified by his Les mots en liberté futuristes (Futurist Words in Freedom, 1919); and LidantYU (1923), an early book by publisher and artist Ilia Zdanevich (Ilazd), with a text composed in Zaum, a Russian Futurist–invented language.

The exhibition continues with contemporary works, including Musashimaro (2013), by German artist Veronika Schaepers, whose treatment of a short story by Japanese author Choukitsu Kurumatani creates an immersive environment for reading. Examples such as this demonstrate how artists continue to approach the book as a medium still offering myriad possibilities for the creative imagination.

$15 Adults $15
$10 Seniors 65+
$6 Students with current ID
Free Members & youth 17 & under
Prices subject to change without notice.

Tues–Sun 9:30am – 5:15pm
Open select Mondays
Dec 26, 2016 9:30am – 5:15pm

Reva & David Logan Gallery of Illustrated Books
Legion of Honor
Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco
Lincoln Park
100 34th Avenue
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
October 30, 2016 -
January 15, 2017
Martin Luther: Art and the Reformation
Five hundred years ago, Martin Luther ripped the fabric of European life by standing in open opposition to the most powerful men of his age. “Martin Luther : Art and the Reformation” examines his life and influence through the lens of artistic creation. Spectacular objects from both Catholic and Protestant contexts will highlight the role of art in the service of spiritual and earthly power. Changes triggered by Luther’s actions prompted debate about the function of art. Art also played a central role in the hard-hitting battle of ideas that revealed the fragility of traditional notions of truth and order. In “Martin Luther and the Art of the Reformation,” this dramatic story plays out in rarely seen masterpieces from the heart of Germany, including extraordinary paintings, monumental sculpture, sumptuous embroideries, and fabulous objects wrought in silver and gold. Visitors will experience an unparalleled closeup of Luther’s life through a remarkable assembly of his personal possessions, accompanied by recent archaeological finds from his childhood and adult homes. Manuscripts, precious books, and biting satirical broadsides will reveal the era’s turbulent intellectual vitality, a freedom of inquiry that set the stage for our modern world.

Unprecedented in its scope, “Martin Luther: Art and the Reformation” features well over 100 objects that have never before traveled to America. Curators at the Minneapolis Institute of Art, the exhibition’s sole venue, are working closely with partners in the German state of Saxon-Anhalt and Berlin to gather, study, and present this once-in-a-lifetime opportunity, made possible due to the closing of the Luther House in Wittenberg in preparation for its Jubilee Year in 2017. The inventory of the Luther House, the world’s largest Reformation history museum, has never been lent in such a comprehensive manner. The German government has fully endorsed the project, in recognition of its importance, and with the certainty that visitors will come away with a tangible awareness of this pivotal moment in history—a moment when a man took a stand that turned the world upside-down.

Mon Closed
Tue & Wed 10am – 5pm
Thu & Fri 10am – 9pm
Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 11am – 5pm

The museum is closed Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve, & Christmas Day

Free admission

Minneapolis Institute of Art
2400 Third Avenue S.
Minneapolis, MN
Exhibit Midwest
November 01, 2016 -
January 08, 2017
Charles Dickens's A Christmas Carol
Every holiday season, the Morgan displays Charles Dickens's original manuscript of A Christmas Carol in Pierpont Morgan's historic library. Dickens wrote his iconic tale in a six-week flurry of activity beginning in October 1843 and ending in time for Christmas publication. He had the manuscript bound in red morocco as a gift for his solicitor, Thomas Mitton. The manuscript then passed through several owners before Pierpont Morgan acquired it in the 1890s.

This year the manuscript of A Christmas Carol is open to the powerfully dramatic ending of Stave I. As Scrooge looks out of his bedroom window at the end of his terrifying encounter with the ghost of Jacob Marley he is aware of “incoherent sounds of lamentation and regret.” Scrooge, “desperate in his curiosity,” witnesses a macabre scene—one of the most chilling in the entire ghost story—as Marley’s ghost drifts “out upon the bleak, dark night,” and the air is “filled with phantoms.” Scrooge personally recognizes some of the ghosts that he observes; they all “wore chains like Marley’s Ghost; some few (they might be guilty governments) were linked together; none were free.” By implicating individuals and governments alike, Dickens amplifies his condemnation of those who failed to ameliorate human wretchedness when they had an opportunity to do so, and have now “lost the power for ever.” Dickens brings the curtain down on the first chapter of his book with a harrowing vision of purgatorial suffering.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 02, 2016 -
February 26, 2017
A Curious Hand: The Prints of Henri-Charles Guérard (1846-1897)
Described by the influential nineteenth-century art critic Roger Marx as “the engraver of curiosity par excellence,” Henri-Charles Guérard was one of the most skilled and inventive French printmakers of his day. It was to Guérard that the Impressionist painter Édouard Manet turned whenever he needed help making etchings, no doubt owing to Guérard’s expertise as a professional printmaker as well as to his innovative approach to the medium. He reacted to a broad array of artistic styles and worked in a variety of print techniques, testing the boundaries of each. Particularly noteworthy in this regard are his works that respond to the nineteenth-century vogue for Japanese ukiyo-e woodcuts, which embody some of the artist’s most original expressions.

Thanks to a generous gift from the art collector and connoisseur Samuel Putnam Avery (1822–1904), The New York Public Library has the largest collection of Guérard’s work in the United States. The exhibition on the third floor of the Library will feature close to ninety of his prints, including many states and impressions that have only recently come to light and which reveal his range and virtuosity.

3rd floor
NY Public Library
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
476 Fifth Avenue (42nd St and Fifth Ave)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 03 -
December 10, 2016
SHADOWS AND DUST
An exhibition of prints, drawings, artist's books and boxes by Minneapolis artist Jody Williams

A solo exhibition of recent work by gallery member Jody Williams. Featuring mixed media prints, drawings, artist's books, and not empty boxes, the show will focus on the ephemeral aspects of dust and shadows as material, cosmic and metaphorical presences. Poetic references to shadows and dust date back to Horace's "We are dust and shadow," from Ode IV.7, and continue through T.S. Eliot's The Wasteland to the present. Inspired by these, and informed by other reading and research, many of the pieces in Shadows and Dust will include Williams' own writing.

Most of the works address either dust or shadows, rather than a combination of the two themes. Drawings of intensely lit natural objects depict intriguing shadows. Two digitally-produced artists' books include Williams' photographs of shadows taken over the past 30 years. A series of etchings combine thousands of dusty specks printed over layers of digital dots, atmospheric photographs and written phrases. Mixed media boxes, resembling miniature cabinets of curiosity, include containers of dust samples from near and far.

Thu - Sat 12pm - 6pm
and by appointment

Opening Reception
Sat, November 5, 2016, 6pm - 9pm

Additional Reception
River to Lakes Gallery Crawl: Thu, December 1, 2016, 3pm - 8m

All events are free and open to the public

Form+Content Gallery, Whitney Square Building
210 North 2nd Street, Suite 104
Minneapolis, MN
Exhibit Midwest
November 04, 2016 -
March 01, 2017
Maps and the 20th Century: Drawing the Line
Have you ever tried disappearing off the map? It’s harder than you think to be invisible nowadays.

That’s because 100 years of mapping technology – from the original sketch of today’s London Underground to the satellite imagery of the 1990s – has monitored and shaped the society we live in.

Two World Wars. The moon landings. The digital revolution. This exhibition of extraordinary maps looks at the important role they played during the 20th century. It sheds new light on familiar events and spans conflicts, creativity, the ocean floor and even outer space.

It includes exhibits ranging from the first map of the Hundred Acre Wood to secret spy maps, via the New York Subway. And, as technology advances further than we ever imagined possible, it questions what it really means to have your every move mapped.

Win an out-of-hours curator tour! Go behind the scenes of our exhibition and enjoy a show-and-tell session featuring rare cartographic treasures. Hosted by lead curator Tom Harper. Enter our ballot to be in with the chance of winning.

PACCAR Gallery
The British Library
96 Euston Road
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
November 05, 2016 -
January 07, 2017
Napoléon: General. Emperor. Legend.
The show will feature the best of Napoléonic art and design and highlight an opulent display of the artistic styles championed by the Emperor during his reign in France.

Brilliant soldier-statesmen and legendary conqueror, Napoléon Bonaparte was one of the Western world’s most powerful leaders, as well as one of its greatest patrons of the arts. Following his meteoric rise to power, a new age of decorative and fine arts was born that validated his reign.

Mon - Sat 9am - 5:15pm
Sun Closed

Open and free to the public

M.S. Rau Antiques
New Orleans’ Gallery
630 Royal Street
New Orleans, LA
Exhibit South
November 05, 2016 -
March 05, 2017
Travel Posters from the Lowry Collection
For a small country, the former Czechoslovakia produced a large number of posters, owing to a combination of the country’s rich artistic legacy and strong economic climate. Even Czech fine artists, in the addition to commercial designers, contributed work to the category. The travel posters showcase the beauty, intrigue, and architecture of the Czech lands, urging foreigners to travel to Czechoslovakia.

The Lowry family has built their collection of Czech posters over the past 25 years, amassing more than 1,000 pieces—making it the largest collection in the world outside the Czech Republic. Father and son, George S. and Nicholas D. Lowry, have selected over 30 striking travel posters for this exhibition. It is the first organized exhibition of Czech travel posters ever presented.

The collection grew out of the family’s Czech origins and George and Nicholas’s mutual passion for these images. Viewers of PBS’s Antiques Roadshow will recognize Nicholas Lowry as a regularly appearing expert.

Mon - Sat 9:30am - 4pm
Sun 12pm - 4pm

National Czech and Slovak Museum
1400 Inspiration Place SW
Cedar Rapids, IA
Exhibit Midwest
November 06, 2016 -
January 29, 2017
The Golden Age to the Modern Era: The Michael and Esther Droller Collection
It started when Michael Droller received a framed reproduction of a Maxfield Parrish painting as a graduation present from medical school. That gift ignited his passion for illustration, a passion that has long sustained Droller outside his career in medicine. Over 40 years, he and his wife Esther have amassed an enviable collection rich in literary history and artistic achievement. Artists from the Golden Age of Illustration—a period of extraordinary creative ferment from 1875 to World War I—include Randolph Caldecott, Walter Crane, and Kate Greenaway, as well as later but accomplished practitioners Frank Adams, L. Leslie Brooke, and W. Heath Robinson. The Droller’s modern holdings, spanning the last quarter of the 20th century, comprise such luminaries as Barbra Cooney, Alice and Martin Provensen, and Maurice Sendak. Thematic subjects bridge both epochs, allowing artistic comparisons between Arthur Rackham’s and Jerry Pinkney’s versions of Aesop’s Fables to Charles Robinson’s and Michael Hague’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.

Tue – Fri 10am – 4pm
Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

$9 Adult
$6 Youth (1-18), Student, Teacher, and Senior
$22.50 Family (2 adults and 2 youth)

The East Gallery
The Eric Carle Museum
of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
November 10, 2016 -
January 31, 2017
A Century of Fine Press Books
Celebrate the history and craftsmanship of fine press bookmaking as The Bryan Wildenthal Memorial Library debuts the “Van Robinson Fine Press Book Collection”.

Books from the Van Robinson Fine Press Collection are produced the finest book designers and printers in the United States and Europe. The 260-book collection represents an entire century of exquisitely crafted books from renowned printers such as Ashendene, Arion, Book Club of Texas, Doves, and others. They are printed on the finest paper, some handmade, illustrated with original drawings, etchings or engravings. Many are produced in limited editions, giving audiences a rare chance to see these volumes in person.

Free and open to the community!

Opening reception & presentation by the donor Mr. Van Robinson
with refreshments
Nov. 10th 6pm - 8pm

Entrance 3
Bryan Wildenthal Memorial Library
Sul Ross State University
East Highway 90
Alpine, TX
Exhibit Southwest
November 11, 2016 -
May 28, 2017
Cover Stories: What bindings say about books
A book cover can tell its own story. During the early history of book production, the manner in which a book was bound was unique. Each hand-crafted binding reveals information about the individuals who owned books, their social status, professions and how they valued the texts within. The type of covering also demonstrates the skill of the binder and the fashion of the times in which it was made.

This exhibition includes examples of the finest luxury coverings through to the purely utilitarian. It features a selection of books from the University of Aberdeen’s Special Collections that were bound for, or belonged to, persons of note: A fine leather volume with lions tooled in gold for Prince Henry Stuart; a mathematical text wrapped in waste manuscript for daily use by the Renaissance scholar Duncan Liddel; a work of fiction bound in an Arts and Crafts chintz designed by William Morris.

The exhibition also presents covers that illustrate the moment in the mid 1800s when the art of bookbinding changed from being the means of customising a text for an individual into a new graphic art of book design aimed at the mass market.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a series of talks and events.

Mon - Wed: 10am - 5pm
Thu 10am - 7pm
Fri - Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 11am - 4pm

Special Collections
Special Collections Centre
The Sir Duncan Rice Library
Bedford Road
Aberdeen, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
November 16, 2016 -
April 09, 2017
KAHBAHBLOOOM: The Art and Storytelling of Ed Emberley
Opening this fall at the Worcester Art Museum, KAHBAHBLOOOM: The Art and Storytelling of Ed Emberley is the first comprehensive retrospective for artist Ed Emberley, among the most prolific and respected illustrators of children's literature of the last 60 years. The author of classic books such as the Caldecott Honored One Wide River To Cross (1965), the Caldecott Medal-winning Drummer Hoff (1967), and the bestselling Go Away, Big Green Monster (1992), Emberley also developed one of the bestselling series of teaching books for young artists, beginning with Ed Emberley's Drawing Book of Animals (1970).

The exhibition draws on the Massachusetts-based artist's personal archive of original hand-drawn sketches, woodblock prints, final proofs, and first edition books to survey his career and examine his influence on generations of readers and nascent artists. KAHBAHBLOOOM will include interactive areas throughout the exhibition, including a stylized reproduction of the artist's drawing and light table from his home studio—where visitors of all ages can try their hand at his techniques—and a specially designed reading area.

Wed - Fri, Sun 11am - 5pm
Sat 10am - 5pm
3rd Thu of every month 11am - 8pm

CLOSED on Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Year's

Members FREE

Adults: $14
Seniors 65 and over: $12
College Students with ID: $12 / Free on the third Thursday of each month
Ages 4-17: $6
Ages 3 and under: FREE

Special Admission for EBT card holders $2 per person cash admission

FREE FIRST Saturday Mornings
The first Saturday of each month: 10am - noon

Worcester Art Museum
55 Salisbury Street
Worcester, MA
Exhibit New England
November 17, 2016 -
January 14, 2017
Groller Club Bookplates Past & Present
Drawing from the Grolier Club Library and the collections of current Club members, the exhibition highlights bookplates used by Grolier Club members past and present, explores personal stories behind the plates’ creation, and celebrates the artists who designed and printed the plates. Mark Samuels Lasner selected the bookplates and organized the presentation.

Mon – Sat 10am - 5pm

Free & open to the public

2nd Floor Gallery
THE GROLIER CLUB
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 17, 2016 -
February 17, 2017
Making and Breaking Medieval Manuscripts
Both before and after the advent of movable type in Europe, circa 1450, artists created hand-drawn and hand-embellished scrolls, books, and maps. In Western Europe during the Middle Ages, manuscript ornamentation became a flourishing art form, enriching secular and sacred items alike.

Making and Breaking Medieval Manuscripts brings together a selection of works that are owned in whole or in part by the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, including items in the Krannert Art Museum collection and items housed at the Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Spurlock Museum of World Cultures, and the Newberry Library in Chicago.

The exhibition showcases Western European manuscripts from the thirteenth to the sixteenth centuries and examines issues associated with the production of illuminations and other decorations, patronage, owner additions and modifications, the impact of printing technologies, the reuse of parchment, book breaking, and the legacy of the self-professed “biblioclast” Otto F. Ege.

Select programming for this exhibition:

Gallery Conversation | February 2, 2017 · 5:30 pm
Location: KAM Main Level, West Gallery

Medieval Studies Lecture | February 9, 2017 · 5:30 pm
Featuring Carol Symes, Lynn M. Martin Professorial Schollar and Associate Professor of History, Theatre, and Medieval Studies
Location: KAM Lower Level, Auditorium (room 62)

Mon – Sat 9am – 5pm
Thu "KAM After Hours" until 9pm (through Dec 8)
Sun Closed

Krannert Art Museum and Kinkead Pavilion
500 East Peabody Drive
Chapaign, IL
Exhibit Midwest
November 17 -
December 23, 2016
Amy Park Ed Ruscha’s “Every Building on the Sunset Strip”
The year 2016 marks the fiftieth anniversary of the publication of Ed Ruscha’s twenty-five-foot-long accordion book, which remains one of the most iconic artist’s books of the past century. Park’s undertaking, to scale up and recreate every single page of Sunset Strip in watercolor, is equal parts homage to Ruscha, conceptual deconstruction of a historical document, and musing on the nature of the photographic image.

Today, the Sunset Strip is much like Times Square: filled with bright lights, excessive advertising, and tourists. However, in 1966 this mile-and-a-half stretch of West Hollywood was far sparser and quieter, a subject well suited to Ruscha’s austere yet pop-inflected vision. Park maintains the monochromatic color tones of the original black and white photography and consciously plays with the deadpan frontality that Ruscha brought into focus. The photographic sequence is not seamless, resulting in distinct breaks between images and lending Park’s watercolors a truly abstract quality as the viewer moves from piece to piece within the gallery space. In this sense, the installed work extends the notion that the images cannot be taken in all at once but must be seen sequentially, mimicking the way one might really experience the architecture while driving along the Sunset Boulevard.

Ultimately, this project links back to Park’s main concerns in the studio: finding her muse in the photographic, proposing that the abstract does exist in various modes of representation both mechanical and handmade, and delighting in the fastidious labor of the translation from eye to hand, and hand to eye.

Tue - Sat 10am - 6pm

Amy Park at Gagosian Gallery
Morgan Lehman Gallery
534 West 24th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 18 -
December 03, 2016
RINGS AROUND THE WORLD
Accompanied by a publication by Drs. Sandra Hindman and Beatriz Chadour-Sampson “Rings Around the World” explores the eternal forms, inspirations, and aesthetics of finger rings across many cultures throughout history, with over forty rings deriving from China, the Middle East, Europe, and America. Covering over four millennia, from the Bronze Age to the present day, the exhibition will also feature pieces by celebrated contemporary jewelry artists Wallace Chan and Giovanni Corvaja.

Opening & Reception:
Thu, Nov. 17th 6pm - 8pm

7th Floor, Penthouse
Les Enluminures
23 East 73rd Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
December 07, 2016 -
February 04, 2017
A True Friend of the Cause: Lafayette and the Anti-Slavery Movement
Hailed as the “Hero of Two Worlds,” the Marquis de Lafayette (1757-1834) has received renewed attention for his multifaceted contributions in several areas, including international politics, diplomacy, the military, and the human rights movement. His sustained efforts deployed on both sides of the Atlantic on behalf of the abolition of slavery however are not widely known. This is the first public exhibition devoted to Lafayette’s role as an international anti-slavery advocate.

Co-curators Olga Anna Duhl, Oliver Edwin Williams Professor of Languages, and Diane Windham Shaw, Director of Special Collections and College Archivist, Skillman Library, Lafayette College, offer a comprehensive view of Lafayette’s activities in this ground breaking presentation.

Among the exhibition themes are the personal and intellectual origins of Lafayette’s interest in the welfare of enslaved people during the American War of Independence and the French Revolution; his continuing commitment to “the black part of mankind,” including his gradual emancipation experiment in French Guiana; his passionate correspondence with international political figures; as well as his enduring influence on the civil rights movement.

Drawn from Lafayette College’s rich collections of 18th and 19th century rare books, manuscripts, paintings, prints, and objects, some of which are on public view for the first time, the exhibition also includes loans from Cornell University, the New-York Historical Society, as well as supporting documents from French institutions such as the Fondation Josée et René de Chambrun, and the Le Puy-en-Velay Public Library.

Mon – Sat 10am - 5pm

Free & open to the public

THE GROLIER CLUB
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
December 12, 2016 -
January 09, 2017
The Father of the American Christmas Card: Louis Prang from the Collection of Keith S. Clark.
Louis Prang—artist, businessman, and educational reformer—was born in Prussia in 1824 and arrived in America in 1850 to pursue his vocation as printer and wood-engraver. He established his own printing firm in 1860 to produce what he termed “chromolithographs”—dazzling reproductions of paintings printed in dozens of colors from hand-drawn litho stones—along with the colorful album cards, children’s books, trade cards, and greeting cards so beloved in the Victorian era. In 1874 he produced America’s first pictorial Christmas cards, eventually employing noted artists to create elaborate designs, elegantly reproduced and often fringed in silk. By the 1880s Prang and Company had issued millions of Christmas cards, along with smaller numbers of Valentine’s and Easter greetings. Prang set an unsurpassed standard for quality and elegance, but cheaper imports undercut his greeting-card business and in 1890 he abandoned Christmas card printing altogether to concentrate on fine-art reproduction and his innovative art-education books. In 1897 Prang’s involvement with lithography ended, and he died in California in 1909. While his sentimental Victorian productions fell out of favor in the 20th century, his name is still recalled by the ever-popular “Prang” brand children’s crayons and water-color sets.

“The Father of the American Christmas Card: Louis Prang from the Collection of Keith S. Clark” includes a wealth of examples of Prang’s chromolithographed Christmas greetings, from his early productions to his celebrated “Prize Christmas Card” series. Examples of the stunning “American Chromo” landscapes and large-format lithographs that made Prang famous throughout the world will be on view. In addition, the show features rarely-seen Prang material including proof sheets, books, and personal memorabilia, along with examples of Thomas Moran’s important Yellowstone views, and Walters’ monumental “Oriental Ceramic Art”, Prang’s final chromolithographic masterpiece.

Mon - Fri 10am - 5pm*
*Except on evenings when we feature public programs from 5 - 7pm
Closed on National Holidays

The Book Club of California
312 Sutter Street, Suite 500
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
December 13, 2016 -
May 07, 2017
A Friend Among Us: The Art of Brinton Turkle
Step back in time with Brinton Turkle and his tales of American lore. Whether set on the island of Nantucket or in the mountains of Appalachia, his stories and poetic imagery capture both the history and nuances of place. Turkle follows the escapades of a young Quaker boy in his Obadiah series, offers a surprising twist on a favorite fairy tale in Deep in the Forest, and sprinkles magic realism throughout the pages of Sky Dog. All work is from the museum’s permanent collection, generously donated by the artist’s children. A highlight is surely Turkle’s watercolor illustrations from Thy Friend, Obadiah, awarded a 1970 Caldecott Honor.

Tue – Fri 10am – 4pm
Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

$9 Adult
$6 Youth (1-18), Student, Teacher, and Senior
$22.50 Family (2 adults and 2 youth)

The Central Gallery
The Eric Carle Museum
of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
December 16, 2016 -
March 12, 2017
Muhammad Ali, LeRoy Neiman, and the Art of Boxing
Who could "float like a butterfly and sting like a bee"? Muhammad Ali was The Greatest—he even said so himself. Born Cassius Clay in Louisville, Kentucky, he was a three-time heavyweight champion and an outspoken, popular, and often controversial public figure. In the early 1960s, Ali found friendship with renowned artist LeRoy Neiman, with whom he shared an affinity for boxing, the limelight, and breaking with convention. Neiman even taught and encouraged Ali to draw. Using works on loan from the LeRoy Neiman Foundation, Muhammad Ali, LeRoy Neiman, and the Art of Boxing celebrates one of America's greatest boxers and one of the most popular artists of the sport. Neiman’s vivid watercolors and intimate, on-the-spot sketches capture Ali both in and outside the ring. Highlights include portraits, sketches of Ali's critical matches such as the "Fight of the Century" and the "Thrilla in Manila," and some works created by Ali himself.

Tue - Thu & Sat 10am - 6pm
Fri 10am - 8pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

New York Historical Society Museum & Library
170 Central Park West
at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic