Alex Johnson

Modern British graphic design owes a significant debt to the work of German-born Marie Neurath, an excellent display of which finishes early next month at the House of Illustration in London.

Marie Neurath: Picturing Science showcases the work she did from the

While most museums aim to attract visitors by filling their rooms with the authentic possessions and works of their literary owners, staff at Dove Cottage & the Wordsworth Museum – the former home of William and Dorothy Wordsworth in the UK’s Lake District – are hoping to pull in the crowds by displaying it entirely empty.
 
The museum

A special program of Renaissance Book Discovery Days will encourage the public to handle and find out more about rare books during October and November this year.

The Unlocking the Archive project was set up in 2015 by the School of Literature, Drama and Creative Writing at the University of East Anglia in England. Led by Dr. Tom Roebuck

Newstead Abbey in Nottinghamshire, England, the now publicly owned ancestral home of Lord Byron, has just opened a new exhibition of objects on loan from the Brontë Parsonage Museum in Haworth showing the influence that Byron had on the Brontë family who grew up in the years after his death in 1824.

On display is a first edition of

Richard Booth, who died on August 19 aged 80, established the small market town of Hay-on-Wye (Y Gelli Gandryll) in Wales as the world’s first book town.

Booth was born in Devon in the southwest of England but grew up in Hay and was educated at the historic school Rugby before going to Oxford to study history where he became interested in book collecting. After a short-lived stint as

As sales of audiobooks rise, so there are also increasing numbers of literary podcasts to cater for readers interested in listening to book discussions. In the UK, there is a particular dearth of radio programs about books, especially those not recently published, so both Backlisted and the Slightly Foxed podcast are very welcome.

The new exhibition Writing in Times of Conflict at the Senate House Library, University of London, in Bloomsbury, looks at how writers have worked towards peace in their work over the last 100 years. Using examples from the library’s own collection, the works are divided into

Last month, the York Civic Trust in York, England, erected a plaque celebrating the life of Elizabeth Montagu (1718-1800), who co-founded the Bluestocking movement and whose home in London became the must-attend literary salon of the day. The Blue Plaque --

Jane Austen’s House Museum in England is hoping a crowdsourcing appeal will safeguard one of the author’s letters from being sold into private hands.

The call for public donations is for part of a letter written by Jane to her niece Anna on November 29, 1814 during a visit to her brother Henry in London. It mentions her

The National Trust holds around 400,000 titles in their 160 historic properties in the UK. Rarities includes William Caxton’s 1487 Lyme Missal at Lyme Park in Cheshire and the first edition of Virginia Woolf’s Orlando, given by the author to Eddy Sackville-West while he was living at Knole. The charity is also increasingly putting its