Exhibits

Museum closed temporarily until further notice

“By choosing to use ‘choreograph,’ drawing with space, as a noun, I am noting its similarity to ‘photograph,’ drawing with light.” — James Welling

James Welling’s recent body of work integrates several strands of his artistic exploration over the past forty years. Each Choreograph is a large inkjet print combining images of dance,

Museum closed temporarily until further notice

We have the sky always before us, therefore we do not recognise how beautiful it is. It is very rare to see anybody go into raptures over the wonders of the sky, yet of all that goes on in the whole world there is nothing to approach it for variety, beauty, grandeur, and serenity.

—H. P. Robinson, The Elements of a Pictorial

Ralston Crawford’s art underwent a dramatic evolution in the 1940s influenced by aviation—from his personal experiences in flight, to his exposure to the construction of airplanes and the destruction they wrought in the war.

Crawford served in the Weather Division of the Army Air Force and continued working as an artist through the War—receiving a commission to paint the Curtiss-Wright

The largest exhibition of his drawings for 50 years

Aubrey Beardsley shocked and delighted late-Victorian London with his sinuous black and white drawings. He explored the erotic and the elegant, the humorous and grotesque, winning admirers around the world with his distinctive style.

Spanning seven years, this exhibition will cover Beardsley’s intense and prolific career as a

"Precedents So Scrawl'd and Blurr'd" is the latest in a series of exhibitions that examine law books as physical artifacts, and the relationships between their forms and content. 

Books are the lawyer's tools and the law student's laboratory, and nothing brings this home better than the marks that they leave in their books. Over 30 such annotated and inscribed books from the Lillian

Leila Abdelrazaq is a Palestinian author and artist born in Chicago and currently living in Detroit, Michigan. Her creative work primarily explores issues related to diaspora, refugees, history, memory, and borders. Nothing is set in stone (narrative intifada) examines history as a series of stories that are either lost or solidified in time through repetition, power, and oppression.  In

Since photography’s inception in the mid-nineteenth century, women have stood among its artistic and technological pioneers. Modern Women: Modern Vision features 100 works from the Bank of America Collection by leading artists of the twentieth and early twenty-first centuries. The exhibition is organized in six thematic sections: Modernist Innovators, Documentary Photography and the New Deal,

From the Great Depression to the Vietnam War, the vast majority of the photographs printed and consumed in the United States appeared on the pages of illustrated magazines. Offering an in-depth look at the photography featured in Life magazine throughout its weekly run from 1936 to 1972, this exhibition examines how the magazine’s use of images fundamentally shaped the modern idea of

John James Audubon’s lifelong obsession to record the natural world resulted in two inspired projects—Birds of America (1827–1838) and The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America (1843–1848). These multi-volume publications wedded art and science but also incorporated a strong moral narrative that generated empathy and recognition in the viewer. A Telling Instinct juxtaposes Audubon prints with

This exhibition is the first of its kind to delve into the events, people, and themes of the civil rights movement, both celebrated and forgotten, through one of the most compelling forms of visual expression, the children’s picture book.

Organized in collaboration with The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, the presentation will include more than eighty artworks, ranging from