Exhibits

Master Printer Robert Blackburn (1920–2003) made a tremendous impact on printmaking in the United States. Over a career that spanned six decades, his avant-garde ideas propelled American modernism forward and affirmed printmaking as fine art.

An heir to the Harlem Renaissance, an influential teacher, celebrated collaborator, and pioneering artist, Blackburn embraced democracy in terms

From England’s first attempts to colonize America, artists and mapmakers created impressions of the New World that fueled European imagination. Maps served as powerful propaganda tools for colonial expansionists eager to convey the richness and abundance of the land and its inhabitants, often representing America as a latter-day Garden of Eden. Initially, mapmakers incorporated iconographic

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The signature exhibition of The Met's 150th-anniversary year takes visitors on an immersive, thought-provoking journey through the history of one of the world's preeminent cultural institutions. Making The Met, 1870–2020 features more than 250 superlative works of art of nearly every type, from visitor favorites to fragile treasures that can only be


PAN: Prints of Avant-Garde Europe, 1895-1900 documents a new era of printmaking for the turn of the century, as well as the desire of the arts and literary journal’s founders to elevate graphic arts to the same level as the academic fine art of its day. PAN, published in Berlin, attracted an international selection of some of the most important painters and graphic artists of the time

Acting Out: Cabinet Cards and the Making of Modern Photography offers the first-ever in-depth examination of the photographic phenomenon of cabinet cards. Cabinet cards were America’s main format for photographic portraiture through the last three decades of the nineteenth century. Inexpensive and sold by the dozen, they transformed getting one’s portrait made from a formal event taken up once

“America’s most famous nature photographer is given a new context.” - The Wall Street Journal

For more than 50 years, Ansel Adams captured the breathtaking beauty of the United States in stunning black-and-white photographs, many of which have been frozen in a time gone by. 

In Ansel Adams in Our Time, discover more than 100 of Adams’ most iconic works like never before,

This exhibition features recent picture books by Black artists and writers that empower the reader to reflect on and celebrate the complexity of their identities. In addition to bringing joy and discovery, these books encourage honest discussion of race and racism. They honor a range of Black lives and experiences and advocate for solidarity in the struggle for social justice and equity. 

This exhibition is the first of its kind to delve into the events, people, and themes of the civil rights movement as told through picture books. More than 80 artworks evoke the power of the era that shaped American history and continues to reverberate today. Picture the Dream presents three thematic sections exploring the forces that sparked the civil rights movement, its key players and

An orange elephant, a fish in a birdcage, a snake entwined in spaghetti—Eric Carle’s sense of humor shines through in his picture books. This exhibition features comical collages from The Mixed-Up Chameleon (1975), The Grouchy Ladybug (1977), The Greedy Python (1985), and The Nonsense Show (2015). On view for the first time are four of Carle’s amusing illustrations from the 1971 book The

Frog and Toad, Stuart Little, Peter Rabbit, and Noisy Nora are some of the beloved picture book characters visitors will meet in Let’s Talk! Animals from the Collection. The exhibition examines the longstanding tradition of anthropomorphism—giving human characteristics to animals—in children’s literature. Let’s Talk! features art from The Carle’s world-class holdings. Included are E. H.