Midwest

Leila Abdelrazaq is a Palestinian author and artist born in Chicago and currently living in Detroit, Michigan. Her creative work primarily explores issues related to diaspora, refugees, history, memory, and borders. Nothing is set in stone (narrative intifada) examines history as a series of stories that are either lost or solidified in time through repetition, power, and oppression.  In

You can’t judge a book by its cover, unless the cover is 300 years old, worm-devoured, or from a remote archive in the Mediterranean Sea. Then, an archival expert can conclude a lot—not just about the individual book, but about the culture and society that produced it. 

The public will have the opportunity to learn about this and more from HMML archival experts at three lectures taking

You can’t judge a book by its cover, unless the cover is 300 years old, worm-devoured, or from a remote archive in the Mediterranean Sea. Then, an archival expert can conclude a lot—not just about the individual book, but about the culture and society that produced it. 

The public will have the opportunity to learn about this and more from HMML archival experts at three lectures taking

You can’t judge a book by its cover, unless the cover is 300 years old, worm-devoured, or from a remote archive in the Mediterranean Sea. Then, an archival expert can conclude a lot—not just about the individual book, but about the culture and society that produced it. 

The public will have the opportunity to learn about this and more from HMML archival experts at three lectures taking

Speaking of Book Arts: Oral Histories from UW-Madison is a first-time collaboration between the Chazen, Kohler Art Library, and UW Archives presenting fifty years of book arts at UW–Madison. Interviews with 21 students and teachers (past and present) recorded by the UW–Madison Archives Oral History Program are presented alongside examples of their works from the Kohler Art Library’s Artists’

The Road West: The Steve Turner Collection of African Americana, Part I

Comprised of over 300 lots, this remarkable collection tells the history of African Americans, especially their role in settling the western frontier in 19th and early 20th century. Items include photographs, broadsides, rare books, manuscript collections, pinbacks, and more. The subjects range from civil leaders

During a time of globalization, colonization, and warfare, Europeans in the Renaissance embraced new technology even as they lamented its destabilizing consequences.

Renaissance Invention, explores the conception of novelty and technology through an unprecedented study of Nova Reperta, a late 16th-century print series that celebrated the marvels of the age, including the stirrup, the

Winter Fine Art Auction

Featuring the Robert Allan Haas Collection of Alphonse Mucha Graphics, subject of major traveling museum exhibitions.

American Paintings ? European Paintings ? Pencil Signed Prints ? Midwest Regionalist Paintings ? Thomas Hart Benton Studies and Lithos ? Works by Students of Benton ? Works by Kansas Artists ? Bronze Sculpture ? Watercolors

2pm

Inspired by the work of scholar and antiquarian book dealer William S. Reese (1955-2018), this exhibition highlights Western Americana in the Clements Library collections. Featuring narratives of travel, settlement, and Native American relations, and including works in Spanish, German, and French, the selections represent some of the rarest and most significant 18th and 19th century sources on

With generous funding from the Jerome Foundation, guidance from their selected mentors, workshops, and critical support from MCBA, the Mentorship recipients spent one year developing skills in book arts through contemporary and traditional techniques. This exhibition features new work from the following artists:

Rebekah Crisanta de Ybarra a.k.a. Lady Xok (enrolled Maya-Lenca Nation) is