Barbara Basbanes Richter

Originally founded in 1694 as a private bank to the British government, today the Bank of England serves as the central bank for the United Kingdom, and much has changed in the past 325 years in the world of monetary policy. To recognize the milestone, the world’s second-oldest central bank recently opened an exhibition at its adjoining museum that explores three centuries of money and its handlers.

This past June Manhattan welcomed a new museum whose goal is to bring outdoor advertising indoors. Dubbed Poster House, it’s the first in the United States entirely devoted to exploring the enduring history and influence of posters. The museum’s 7,000-piece collection highlights 150 years of outdoor advertising, and now it’s adding to that total with the acquisition of 55 posters from the personal archive of graphic designer Paula Scher.

We're a few years late to the game on this story, but better than never, right? But perhaps we're not the only ones who didn't know that the celebrated film director/producer Francis Ford Coppola has been publishing a print magazine entirely dedicated to short fiction, plays, and film essays since the Clinton administration. In fact, his publication, Zoetrope: All-Story, won the 2018 National Magazine Award for Fiction and regularly attracts superstar talent like David Mamet, Margaret Atwood, and Haruki Murakami.

Victor Hugo was exiled from France in 1851 after unsuccessfully blocking Louis Napoleon Bonaparte’s coup d’etat, which left him bumping around Europe for a few years until finding sanctuary on the island of Guernsey, located off the Normandy coast. Of Hugo’s nineteen years spent in banishment, fifteen of those were at Hauteville House, a majestic property built in the hills of Saint Peter Port.