Fine Books Editors

Feature
Earlier this year, we invited hundreds of antiquarian and rare book dealers to tell us about a unique or noteworthy recent sale. Here’s an illustrated sampling of their submissions.
Autumn 2019
Earlier this year, we invited hundreds of antiquarian and rare book dealers to tell us about a unique or noteworthy recent sale. Here’s an illustrated sampling of their submissions.
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The University of North Carolina campus in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, was abuzz Thursday evening.  There were standing room only crowds and press milling about.  But none of this had to do with the Duke-Carolina basketball game about to

That old saw that book collectors like to recite that "anything can be anywhere," can, quite honestly, waste a lot of your time.  I think that's one reason that sites like AbeBooks and Biblio.com have become so popular -- they are, if nothing else, efficient.

I have also noticed -- and I don't know if it is just me -- that flea market books are decidedly less interesting.  It has been awhile since I've found anything of note in such a place.  I think the access to price data on used books has greatly reduced the chances of finding something noteworthy.
I must confess that parts of the Fine Books web site are a bit hard to use.  I learned this myself tonight when I went looking for anything on our site written by Joel Silver.  Joel, who is director of special collections at Indiana University, you might recall, wrote a column called Beyond the Basics for Fine Books & Collections during our heyday (if you can call it that). 
The Fine Books & Collections Compendium is mailing in about 10 days, and following a practice we began some time ago, I contacted the American Library Association in an effort to include special collections librarians who may not be subscribing to our magazine.

In 2007, when we first began doing this, the special collections librarian list totaled 875 names.  You could certainly argue that this list doesn't represent all special collections librarians, but it certainly represents a benchmark.

For the past few years, the editors of Fine Books have been working with AbeBooks to help them answer their "Ask the Experts" questions for their e-letter.  The original plan was to field questions from readers, pass them along to AbeBooks booksellers, and build readership.  But this plan started going south almost from the beginning.