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Portrait-1-.jpgThe Library of Congress has acquired and made available online the Omar Ibn Said Collection, which includes the only known surviving slave narrative written in Arabic in the United States. In 1831, Omar Ibn Said, a wealthy and highly educated man who was captured in West Africa and brought to the United States as a slave, wrote a 15-page autobiography describing his experiences.

This manuscript is important not only because it tells the personal story of a slave written by himself, but also because it documents an aspect of the early history of Islam and Muslims in the United States.

The Omar Ibn Said Collection consists of 42 original documents in both English and Arabic, including the manuscript in Arabic of “The Life of Omar Ibn Said” - the centerpiece of this unique collection of texts. Other manuscripts include texts in Arabic by another West African slave in Panama and from individuals located in West Africa.

The collection was digitally preserved and made available online for the first time by the Library of Congress at loc.gov/collections/omar-ibn-said-collection/about-this-collection/.

“Although the Omar Ibn Said Collection is recognizable, it has been moved between different private owners and even disappeared for almost half a century,” said Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden. “To have it preserved at the Library of Congress and made available to everyday people and researchers across the world will make this collection an irreplaceable tool for research on Africa in the 18th and 19th centuries and will shed light on the history of American slavery.”

“This rare collection is extremely important because Omar Ibn Said's autobiography is the only known existent autobiography of a slave written in Arabic in America,” said Mary-Jane Deeb, chief of the African and Middle Eastern Division at the Library of Congress. “The significance of this lies in the fact that such a biography was not edited by Said's owner, as those of other slaves written in English were, and is therefore more candid and more authentic.”

“It is an important documentation that attests to the high level of education and the long tradition of a written culture that existed in Africa at the time,” added Deeb. “It also reveals that many Africans who were brought to the United States as slaves were followers of Islam, an Abrahamic and monotheistic faith. Such documentation counteracts prior assumptions of African life and culture.”

According to his autobiography, and to articles written about him in the American press while he was still alive, Said was a member of the Fula ethnic group of West Africa who today number over 40 million people in the region extending from Senegal to Nigeria.

Omar Ibn Said, son of a wealthy father, spent over 25 years as a prolific scholar and Muslim in West Africa. When Said was about 37 years old, however, an army came to his home, killed many people, captured him and sold him into slavery.

Conservators at the Library of Congress performed treatment to physically stabilize the Said manuscript, mending and reinforcing its fragile pages. Following multiple owners and the ravages of time, the pages were weak, exhibiting holes, heavy creases and torn edges.

“Paper and ink are resilient and long-lasting, though they can be battered and damaged. Our aim was to strengthen and preserve the manuscript, while still allowing its previous history and life to remain evident,” said Shelly Smith, head of the Book Conservation Section.

The original collection of Omar Ibn Said was purchased by the Library of Congress in 2017. The Omar Ibn Said Collection reflects advancement toward a goal in the Library’s new user-centered strategic plan to expand access, making unique collections, experts and services available when, where and how users need them. Learn more about the Library’s five-year plan at loc.gov/strategic-plan/.

In celebration of African American History Month, on Feb. 5, 2019, the Library will host a special public program and discussion focusing on this unique historical collection:

Conversation on the Omar Ibn Said Collection at the Library of Congress
February 5, 2019, at 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Thomas Jefferson Building, first floor, LJ-119
10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C.  

The Omar Ibn Said half-day event features scholars whose work focuses on the autobiography of Omar Ibn Said and related diaries of enslaved people. To date, this is the only known autobiography by a slave written in Arabic in the United States. It is a historically unique and important primary source for those trying to understand the connections between the Muslim communities in Western Africa and the slaves who continued to practice Islamic faith after being captured during the Atlantic slave trade.

For more information about the event, visit loc.gov/item/event-394446/conversation-on-the-omar-ibn-said-collection/2019-02-05/

Image: A portrait of Omar Ibn Said around the 1850s. Photo courtesy of Yale University Library.

Minnesota Center for Book Arts (MCBA) announced today that Elysa Voshell will be its next Executive Director. Elysa Voshell will lead a new era of community engagement and sustainability for the internationally-recognized book arts organization. Voshell joins MCBA from Venice Arts, a nonprofit media arts organization in Venice, CA, dedicated to igniting, expanding, and transforming the lives of Los Angeles’ low-income youth through photography and film education. As Venice Arts’ Associate Director, Voshell provided broad leadership and managed day-to-day operations of the organization. She has been with Venice Arts since 2009. Additional career highlights include her role as Associate Editor at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, Staff Writer at the Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania, and Artist in Residence in Book Arts at the Oregon College of Art and Craft.

KC Foley, MCBA Board Chair, speaking on behalf of the board and search committee, stated, “We are delighted to have attracted someone of Elysa Voshell’s talent and accomplishment. She brings all the key skills that MCBA needs to be successful at this stage in its history. As a graduate of the Arts Innovation & Management program from the DeVos Institute of Arts Management, Elysa not only understands the value of successful education and community programs, but also the importance of strong fiscal management and integrated marketing and development. Her track record of working with diverse communities, broadening funding sources,and building stable financial foundations are exactly what MCBA needs going forward.”

Voshell will assume the directorship of MCBA in late January 2019. She states, “Coming to MCBA feels like a synthesis of my key passions: creating and stewarding accessible nonprofit arts spaces that foster the creativity of others, and my own artistic practice in book arts and letterpress. My passion for the arts and their ability to transform individuals and communities goes beyond my career; it is an essential part of my character. I am humbled to be named MCBA’s new Executive Director, and to have the opportunity to lead this incredible organization into its next phase of development.”

“Elysa has been an extraordinary leader at Venice Arts. She’s a creative and strategic thinker, an excellent designer and communicator, and a caring and thoughtful leader. While I’m sad to see her leave, I can’t think of a better position for her, marrying her nonprofit experience with her artistic practice. MCBA is so lucky to have her and, I am certain, she will be instrumental in MCBA’s future success,” comments Venice Arts’ founder and Executive Director, Lynn Warshafsky.

Voshell notes the similarities between Venice Arts and MCBA as hubs for creative practice, education, and community: “Venice Arts serves as a vibrant center for photographic and film education, creation, and presentation in Los Angeles, much as MCBA does for the fields of letterpress printing and book arts not only in Minneapolis but also around the country and around the world. I’m so impressed with the scope and vitality of MCBA’s programs, and with the creative community that is fostered here. MCBA’s world-class printing facilities not only preserve an incredible array of printing, papermaking, and binding equipment, but also make these beautiful, specialized tools available to community members of all ages. I am looking forward to working with MCBA’s Board, staff, and community stakeholders to grow MCBA’s programs and support, and expand the communities it serves.”

MCBA’s search committee—which consisted of board members Ronnie Brooks, KC Foley, Mary Pat Ladner, Monica Edwards Larson, Diane Merrifield, and Deborah Ultan, as well community representative Cathy Ryan—began the national search in July, ultimately interviewing 10 finalists from around the country for the position. “The search committee was impressed by the depth and breadth of the pool of candidates. But Elysa, with her strong background in arts management and leadership, as well as her commitment to the arts community and the role of book arts in the contemporary art world, stood out as someone with the vision to lead MCBA forward,” commented Cathy Ryan.

For the past year and a half, Amanda Kaler has served as Interim Executive Director, as well as Director of Development. “We were fortunate during this time that our Development Director, Amanda Kaler, was able to fill the Interim Executive Director role, as we clarified our organizational needs and conducted a national search for our next Executive Director,” said Diane Merrifield, past Board Chair. Kaler, who has been with the organization since 2013, will become Director of Development and Operations and will continue to work with Voshell on MCBA’s strategic vision.

A native of the Philadelphia area, Voshell has nearly two decades of experience as an artist, curator, and arts executive, and a deep commitment to fostering creativity and expanding cultural equity, diversity, and inclusion, as well as to the book arts form. As Venice Arts’ Associate Director, Voshell led initiatives that enabled the organization to grow both its visibility and community support, leading public programming, strategic planning, development, and communications. As the organization’s first Gallery & Public Programs Director, launched in 2010, Voshell built this new programmatic initiative from the ground up, forging community partnerships and organizing dozens of exhibitions and over 100 public programs. 

Before joining Venice Arts in 2009, Voshell worked as the Staff Writer at the Institute of Contemporary Art, University of Pennsylvania, served as the Exhibitions and Events Board Chair of the Philadelphia Center for the Book, and was an Artist in Residence in Book Arts at the Oregon College of Art & Craft, as well as a Fellow at the Center for Book Arts in New York. She started her career as an Associate Editor at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. 

Voshell holds an MA in Book Arts from Camberwell College of Arts, University of the Arts London, and a BA in English/Creative Writing and MLA in Visual and Curatorial Studies from the University of Pennsylvania. Her masters’ thesis exhibition, Reading in Installments: Book Arts Meets Installation, was selected as the Visiting Curator exhibition by Philadelphia’s Center for Emerging Visual Artists, and Voshell’s work and writing has appeared in Paperback LA, The Blue Notebook, and the Lark Books’ 500 Artists Books series.

New York — Doyle to the role of Chief Executive Officer (CEO) and Joanne Porrino Mournet to the role of President. The appointments mark a new generation of leadership at one of the world’s premier auction houses. Kathleen M. Doyle, who has served as the company’s CEO for the past twenty-five years, will continue as Chairman, and Kenneth McKenna will continue as Chief Financial Officer (CFO).

Established in New York in 1962, Doyle is recognized worldwide for its commitment to providing professional auction and appraisal services of the highest standard. A vital player in the global auction market, Doyle combines vast scholarship and in-depth knowledge of industry trends with the latest digital strategies and technological capabilities. This winning strategy attracts thousands of seasoned buyers and newly affluent collectors from over ninety countries around the world, setting world auction records across all sale categories.

“Laura Doyle and Joanne Mournet are experienced and accomplished business professionals who will continue to advance the expansion of Doyle while adhering to our core values of Integrity, Expertise and Service,” said Kathleen Doyle. “I am delighted to be working alongside this dynamic team leading us into the future!”

“I am passionate about the auction business. We are so fortunate to work with beautiful objects and fascinating people,” said Laura Doyle. “New generations of buyers are continually entering the auction market globally, creating new trends in collecting. Never has there been a more exciting time in our industry!”

“Doyle is privileged to bring to auction property from distinguished collections and prominent estates throughout the year,” said Joanne Mournet. “Together with our team of specialists and regional representatives, I look forward to expanding our relationships with the national trusts and estates community while maintaining the level of excellence that our clients rely on.”

The youngest daughter of company founder William Doyle, Laura Doyle quite literally grew up in the auction business. During her almost twenty years at Doyle, she has spearheaded digital strategies and continues to implement new technological capabilities with an eye toward the future. An accomplished and articulate spokesperson for the industry, she, together with Kathleen Doyle, discussed technology and the future of the auction industry in a televised program on Yahoo Finance with Andy Serwer.

In 2016, Laura Doyle was the founder of Doyle’s online-only Hayloft Auctions division in the burgeoning and artistically vibrant South Bronx. A successful Internet start-up, and a valued member of the neighborhood, Hayloft Auctions was honored by the Bronx Overall Economic Development Corporation (BOEDC) for its work and commitment to Bronx residents and the community. Laura Doyle and Hayloft Auctions were also recognized by Crain’s New York Business in a feature on Bronx business and real estate trends.

Ms. Doyle was educated at Deerfield Academy and earned a BA in the History of Art from the University of Pennsylvania, during which time she spent a year studying at the Courtauld Institute in London. She began her career at Doyle in Client Services, later serving as Director of the Jewelry Department. As Vice-Chairman, she expanded Doyle’s network of regional representatives while focusing on strategies for global growth in collaboration with Doyle’s luxury, digital and real estate marketing partners. She recently oversaw a major renovation of the company’s Manhattan headquarters and the acquisition of a new warehouse in the Bronx.

Joanne Porrino Mournet has held senior positions at Doyle for over twenty-five years, most recently as Executive Vice President and Executive Director of Estate and Appraisal Services. In her new role as President, she will continue serving as Doyle’s senior liaison with prominent banks and law firms in providing Doyle’s comprehensive range of professional appraisal and auction services.

Highly regarded in the field of Trusts and Estates, Ms. Mournet is frequently invited by law firms and banks to speak as an expert on estate appraisals and the auction industry. She regularly represents Doyle at professional estate planning conferences, among them the New York State Bar Association, The Estate Planning Council of New York, The American College of Trust and Estate Counsel (ACTEC), UJA law conferences, and The University of Miami Philip Heckerling Law Institute. A graduate of Douglass College, Ms. Mournet is a member of the Professional Advisory Council of The Metropolitan Museum of Art and the American Heart Association Trust and Estates Advisory Council.

An accomplished auctioneer, Ms. Mournet has sold collections totaling well over one billion dollars over the course of her career. She has presided over the landmark auctions of countless estates of celebrities and prominent figures of society and commerce, as well as property from our nation’s most distinguished public and private institutions.

“At Doyle, we believe that every estate and collection is unique,” Ms. Mournet is fond of saying. “We excel at tailoring our services to meet the individual needs of each client.”

Continuing that thought, Laura Doyle stated, “Our goal in this digital age is to ensure that every client, whether a buyer or seller, whether in New York or across the world, receives the personal attention that has always been a hallmark of Doyle.”

Hindman LLC announces today that it has acquired auction houses Leslie Hindman Auctioneers and Cowan's Auctions. The new venture brings together two of America's defining auction firms, uniting a nationwide network of specialists and resources. Born to serve and grow the industry landscape through digital transformation and customer service, Hindman LLC reflects the shared vision of Leslie Hindman and Wes Cowan, the respective founders of each firm.

“We're thrilled to join forces with Cowan's who shares many of our core values, including our vision for a national client-centric auction house,” said Leslie Hindman, Co-Chair of the newly formed Hindman LLC. “We’ve both grown by connecting local communities to the global art market and by providing excellent service across all categories, sales channels and price points. And now we can further accelerate our vision through this combined effort.”

Leslie Hindman founded Leslie Hindman Auctioneers in 1982 in Chicago. Wes Cowan founded Cowan's Auctions in 1995 in Cincinnati. Both will remain intimately involved in developing the strategy and vision of Hindman LLC where Leslie Hindman will serve on the Board as Co-Chair and Wes Cowan as Vice Chair.

“Leslie and I have known each other for many years, so this shouldn't be a surprise to anyone who knows us,” said Wes Cowan. “We decided to partner because we both recognized that the new digital landscape and growing auction customer base provides the best opportunity to realize our vision of creating a national client-centric auction house. This means we are locally available to serve the complete needs of our clients and give them access to international buyers. This is an exciting continuation of our vision but with more resources and thought leadership backing it up.”

Hindman LLC will create one of the largest auction firms in America with its combined expertise and footprint. It will be led by CEO Thomas Galbraith, who will work closely with senior leadership at both companies to oversee the collaboration. 

“Leslie and Wes have a history of making bold moves. They've each built companies from the ground up by responding to the needs of clients and taking them along on their journeys to innovate,” said Thomas Galbraith, CEO of Hindman LLC. “This next chapter holds that theme as we build new tools and expand our expertise to be as diverse and dedicated as the clients we serve.” 

Leslie Hindman Auctioneers and Cowan's Auctions will continue to operate under their respective brands and with uninterrupted service. Both auction firms will retain current locations: Atlanta, Chicago, Denver, Milwaukee, Naples, Palm Beach, Scottsdale and St. Louis for Leslie Hindman Auctioneers and Cincinnati, Cleveland and Denver for Cowan's Auctions. 

About Leslie Hindman Auctioneers

Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, one of the world's foremost fine art auction houses, has been providing exceptional service and achieving record prices since 1982. With more salerooms in the United States than any other auction house, Leslie Hindman Auctioneers conducts over 60 auctions annually in categories such as fine jewelry and timepieces, contemporary art, 20th century design, rare books, furniture, decorative arts and more. The firm has salerooms and business offices in Chicago, Atlanta, Denver, Milwaukee, Naples, Palm Beach, Scottsdale and St. Louis but serves a global client base through its position at the forefront of technology. Visit www.lesliehindman.com for more information.

 About Cowan’s Auctions

A full-service auction house, Cowan's Auctions is a leader in the industry, having disrupted the marketplace since its founding in 1995. From its Cincinnati and Cleveland salesrooms, Cowan's holds over 60 auctions a year in the categories of historic firearms and militaria, American Indian art, American history, Americana, folk art, fine art, furniture, Asian art, coins and currency, rare books, fine jewelry and more. Cowan's has always been at the forefront of the digital revolution in the auction industry as one of the earliest auction houses to launch a website and to auctions items online. For more information, visit www.cowans.com.

Dallas, TX - Heritage Auctions’ Make Offer to Owner (MOtO) program, through which clients can make anonymous offers on lots previously sold at auction, has added an extremely useful new feature showing the amount and status of every resale offer ever made via HA.com.

Any Heritage member who sees a previously auctioned item of interest with a Make Offer to Owner button has the option of submitting an offer, after which the item’s owner can accept or decline the offer, or submit a counter-offer to the potential buyer. The new Make Offer to Owner Archive is sortable by Category as well as by Accepted, Rejected and Pending status. The Archive includes every MOtO offer made via HA.com since the feature was introduced first in 2009, with the most recent offers appearing first.

“This new, permanent archive increases our already market-leading transparency,” said Heritage Auctions Co-Chairman Jim Halperin, “and we hope it will encourage more MOtO competition on previously auctioned items by showing pending offers in one convenient place. Just type ‘HA.com/moto’ into your browser to access the main MOtO Archive page anytime, then pick a category and refine the list to see Pending, Rejected, Accepted or All offers. Our members will be amazed at how much information they can glean by accessing their favorite categories on a daily basis. Every listing includes a link to the entire item page. Members are encouraged to outbid any and all pending MOtO offers if they would pay more for that item than the pending high offer.”

Heritage’s MOtO program has become increasingly popular with both sellers and buyers. Most members who have made a purchase through the program have bought, or at least made offers, again. Using the program offers clients an added measure of security and comfort about the authenticity of a lot that cannot be replicated through a secondary outside seller.

The program has enjoyed tremendous growth, with combined sales in 2017 and 2018 - the program’s two most successful years - of more than $16 million. The MOtO program has been particularly popular among Sports and Comics collectors.

Oxford, England — The Bodleian Libraries will present novelist Sir Kazuo Ishiguro with the Bodley Medal, the Libraries’ highest honour. Sir Kazuo will receive the award at the FT Weekend Oxford Literary Festival on 3 April 2019, when he will deliver the annual Bodley Lecture.

Sir Kazuo is an award-winning British novelist, screenwriter, short story writer and songwriter. He is widely considered one of the greatest contemporary fiction authors in the English-speaking world.

He was born in Nagasaki, Japan, in 1954 and moved to Britain at the age of five. His eight works of fiction have earned him many awards and honours around the world, including the Nobel Prize in Literature (2017) and the Booker Prize (1989). His work has been translated into more than 50 languages. His novels The Remains of the Day and Never Let Me Go were made into acclaimed films. Sir Kazuo was given a Knighthood for Services to Literature in 2018, and also holds the French decoration, Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres, and the Japanese decoration, Order of the Rising Sun, Gold and Silver Star.

The Bodley Medal is awarded by the University of Oxford’s Bodleian Libraries to individuals who have made outstanding contributions to the worlds in which the Bodleian is active including literature, culture, science and communication. Past winners include biographer Claire Tomalin, novelist and screenwriter William Boyd, classicist Mary Beard, physicist Stephen Hawking, film director Nicholas Hytner, novelist Hilary Mantel, the late poet Seamus Heaney, writer and actor Alan Bennett and inventor of the World Wide Web Sir Tim Berners-Lee.

Sir Kazuo will appear in conversation with Richard Ovenden, Bodley’s Librarian, at 6 p.m. on 3 April in the University of Oxford’s Sheldonian Theatre as part of the FT Weekend Oxford Literary Festival. Following the event, Ovenden will present him with the Bodley Medal.

The Bodleian Libraries is a cultural partner of the FT Weekend Oxford Literary Festival, which runs from Saturday, 30 March to Sunday, 7 April 2019. Events will take place at the Bodleian’s Weston Library and Divinity School as well as at venues across the city. For more information, and to book tickets for the Bodley Lecture, visit the FT Weekend Oxford Literary Festival website at: http://oxfordliteraryfestival.org/

bbb1a82f6edb5977588103f0_880x682.jpgNew York — The Morgan Library & Museum is proud to announce the recent acquisition of a large-scale study of two figures for Pierre-Auguste Renoir’s celebrated canvas, The Great Bathers of 1884-87, in the collection of the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Beginning December 18, 2018, visitors will have the chance to see the monumental drawing in the Gilder Lehrman Hall lobby at the Morgan. The drawing has never been exhibited or reproduced in color. A gift from the estate of prominent philanthropist and long-time Morgan Trustee Drue Heinz (1915-2018), Bathers is the first major compositional study by the artist to enter the Morgan’s collection, enriching the holdings of drawings by artists associated with the Impressionist movement.

As Renoir (1841-1919) sought a new direction in his work during the 1880s, he experimented with the classical subject of female bathers. He turned to a seventeenthcentury relief sculpture at Versailles, the Bain des nymphes by François Girardon (1628- 1715), as inspiration for the contemporary scene of three women bathing. Beginning in 1884, Renoir spent nearly three years developing the composition, producing numerous preparatory studies, ranging from small scale sketches to full-scale drawings.

In this study for his painting of modern naiads, the artist explored the pose of the bather in the left foreground of the painting, recoiling as one of her companions splashes her. While the figure appears almost identical in the painted version, Renoir replaced her passive companion by the river bank with a more animated bather, wrapping herself in a sheet.

Among the at least twenty studies for The Great Bathers, the Morgan sheet stands out for being one of two full-scale model drawings for the final composition. Executed on paper mounted to canvas, the drawing’s condition is remarkable. The surface itself is striking: it retains the original powdery white chalk used for the flesh of the figures and to outline their forms.

“The bold, sensuous lines of this expressive drawing present a different side to the Renoir we know through his paintings,” said director of the museum, Colin B. Bailey. “The Morgan’s Drawings Department is renowned for its collection of works that illustrate the creative process, and this drawing gives us a glimpse into the mind of a master. We are delighted to share it with visitors soon.”

Image: Pierre-Auguste Renoir (1841-1919), Bathers, 1884-85, red and white chalk, with smudging and blending on wove paper lined to canvas. The Morgan Library & Museum, Bequest of Drue Heinz, 2018.71. Photography by Graham S. Haber. 

 

Boston - The acclaimed North Bennet Street School (NBSS) has selected Sarah Turner as the institution’s next President, effective December 1. Turner will spearhead expansion of the School’s public programs and community partnerships within the craft-education world, while continuing the School’s 137-year legacy of training students for careers in traditional trades and fine crafts.

From its beginnings as a settlement house offering vocational training, NBSS has become a unique, professional craft school, recognized internationally for its excellence as a learning institution. The School offers nine full-time programs—Bookbinding, Carpentry, Cabinet & Furniture Making, Jewelry Making & Repair, Locksmithing & Security Technology, Piano Technology, Preservation Carpentry, and Violin Making & Repair—in addition to dozens of continuing education classes. Since 1881, America’s first trade school remains committed to fostering individual growth, attention to detail, and technical mastery.

Turner brings more than 20 years of experience in contemporary craft and design, as an educational leader, instructor, and artist at a number of celebrated institutions, including Cranbrook Academy of Art, Rhode Island School of Design, Oregon College of Art and Craft, and the State University of New York at New Paltz. Notably, at Cranbrook, Turner redesigned the Academic Programs and implemented an international Teaching fellowship to bring art and design thinkers to studio practice. Turner also launched a new public lecture series, instituted regular symposia on changing topics, and developed new community and institutional partnerships.

“My heart lies in leadership work; helping studio-craft institutions draw together the contributions of all members to make something unique, useful, and forward-looking,” says Turner. “The strong sense of this, past and present, at North Bennet Street School drew me to the position. I am excited to get started on bringing about new connections and ideas.”

Turner has unique perspective on an educating artisans. She earned a BA in Sociology from Smith College, a Certificate in Metalsmithing from the Oregon College of Art & Craft, and an MFA from Cranbrook Academy of Art.

According to Marc Margulies, Chair of the School’s Board of Directors, the nationwide search for a new President resulted in dozens of well-qualified candidates before Turner's selection. “Sarah has the training, experience, and passion necessary to lead the institution,” he says. ”We are thrilled to have her as our next president. She understands the context of teaching in a workshop, knows first-hand the details of running a postsecondary school, and appreciates the significance of a career in craft and the trades.”

Turner succeeds Miguel Gómez-Ibáñez, the School’s first leader to also be a graduate, who will retire in December. Among other accomplishments, during his successful 12-year tenure Gómez-Ibáñez secured and led the renovation of the School’s new 64,000 sf facility, established multiple strategic partnerships, and oversaw the School’s recent $20 million fundraising campaign, which will help to fund $1 million in student scholarships annually.

“This transition is coming at an ideal moment,” adds Margulies. “Sarah inherits an institution with a tremendous legacy and bright future, supported by a dedicated community of alumni, donors, and friends. The Board looks forward to working with her to enhance the School’s presence, reputation, and impact in the world.”

About North Bennet Street School

North Bennet Street School (NBSS) trains students for careers in traditional trades that use hand skills in concert with evolving technology, to preserve craft traditions and promote a greater appreciation of craftsmanship. Since 1881, America’s first trade school remains committed to teaching the whole person while fostering individual growth, attention to detail, and technical mastery. The private vocational school’s programs and experienced faculty draw students worldwide who graduate with the skills, tools, and practical understanding needed to build self-sufficient, meaningful, and productive lives. For more information, visit: www.nbss.edu.

 

San Francisco — Letterform Archive, the nonprofit library and museum dedicated to the history, preservation of and education in graphic design and letterform arts, announces its new membership program and the launch of the Online Archive. Beginning on November 29, 2018, charter participants in Letterform Archive’s membership program will receive access to the online Archive, a digital repository of highlights from the non-profit center’s collection of over 50,000 items related to lettering, typography, calligraphy, and graphic design. While the physical Archive is located in San Francisco, it is connected to an international community, and the new membership program and online Archive will serve designers and students around the world as a resource for serendipitous discovery and creative inspiration. 

The online Archive launches with 1,000 items spanning two centuries and captured by the Archive’s state-of-the-art photography, allowing users to explore the collection at exceptional resolution. A digital tool to discover the unexpected, the online Archive’s intuitive search and browse methods employ metadata developed specifically for graphic design. After the site opens to the general public, Archive members will have exclusive access to special upcoming features, such as the ability to create their own custom sets, or “tables”, a term that references the physical table at Letterform Archive around which 

bespoke collections are curated for guests. It’s the perfect metaphor for the community and connection inspired by each visitor’s experience. 

Highlights from Letterform Archive’s distinguished collection include Zuzana Licko’s and Rudy VanderLans’ work as Emigre, Inc. As early adopters of digital tools, Emigre were design pioneers, and their Emigre magazine represents a critical turning point in the history of the craft. Soon after Letterform Archive was founded, Emigre donated a major collection with the goal of making it as accessible as possible. The first 11 issues of Emigre magazine are now available in the online Archive, marking the first occasion these full issues have been available in digital form. The quality of the images allows users to zoom into each tabloid-size page to see all the graphic detail and read the text of every article. 

“During my days of editing Emigre, I often wished something like Letterform Archive had existed,” VanderLans said. “If it lives up to expectations, and I’m sure it will, this new website will be a boon to editors, researchers, curators, and design aficionados alike.” 

The online Archive contains sketches and inkings by LA-based designer and illustrator Michael Doret, who is behind some of the most recognizable artwork in recorded music and professional sports, as well as the logos and title graphics for many Disney and Pixar films, including Inside Out , Moana , and Zootopia. Because pencil-on-paper sketches are unique, these images represent the only copy of these objects in the world, and, because many concepts end up on the cutting room floor, this is the first time they’ve been seen outside Doret’s studio. 

Also in the online Archive is work by Jacob Jongert, an under-appreciated Dutch modernist who perfected the branding power of lettering and color. Letterform Archive’s collection of his work is the most complete in the U.S., with hundreds of items created in the 1920s and 1930s for Van Nelle, a Rotterdam-based manufacturer of coffee, tea, and tobacco. Together, the collection is a tremendous resource to learn about designing a cohesive brand. Letterform Archive offers the best view of Jongert’s work on the web, with hi-res images of labels, boxes, tins, in-store displays, posters, advertising, and other collateral, like pocket notebooks and calendars. 

These three highlights represent just a sampling of the 1,000 imaged items in the online Archive at launch. The growing collection also includes advertising design, book jackets, calligraphy, corporate identity manuals, experimental design, packaging, posters, typeface specimens, and more. 

Since Letterform Archive opened its doors in 2015, its mission has been to democratize design. Members help take accessibility to the next level, and their gift helps provide resources for students, educators, designers, and a global community of those who love letters. Letterform Archive offers members tremendous benefits, including the opportunity to access its Salon Series both in-person and online and the ability to experience lectures and materials related to specific topics of interest. Membership options are outlined below, and the packages are outlined at the link here

About Letterform Archive 

Letterform Archive is a nonprofit center for education, inspiration, and community, with a collection of over 50,000 items related to lettering, typography, calligraphy, and graphic design, spanning 2,000 years of history. Since opening to the public in early 2015, we’ve welcomed nearly 5,000 lovers of letters through our doors in San Francisco. We also share the collection through educational programs, original publications, social media, and - now - an online Archive. 

The University of Puerto Rico Graduate School of Information Sciences and the Library Sciences and Informatics Library will establish the first Puerto Rico Center for the Book in 2019 as the 53rd affiliate center of the Library of Congress, the two institutions announced today. The Library’s Center for the Book is a network of U.S. sites promoting an interest in reading and literacy.

The newest affiliate center will be housed at the University’s Rio Piedras Campus in San Juan. It will be based in the Library Sciences and Informatics Library, with an online presence to highlight Puerto Rican books and authors.

A launch event for the new center is planned for Jan. 25, featuring a reading and program with U.S. Poet Laureate Tracy K. Smith. Smith has been visiting several states across the nation to engage Americans in conversations about poetry.

The Puerto Rican Center will celebrate books and work to develop literacy skills, cultivate lifetime reading habits among young people and stimulate research into the history and culture of books and Puerto Rican literary heritage. The Center will also seek to enhance the role of libraries and information professionals to promote a culture of reading, writing, creativity and innovation.

“The Center for the Book in the Library of Congress welcomes the Puerto Rico Center for the Book into our family of affiliated centers,” said John Van Oudenaren, director of the Library’s Center for the Book. “We look forward to co-sponsoring events and other activities with our new center as they promote the rich literary heritage of Puerto Rico.”

Preliminary activities include guided walking tours of literary sites in Old San Juan, mini book fairs showcasing Puerto Rican books, writers and publishers, and other special events.

“The Graduate School of Information Sciences and the Library Science and Informatics Library at the University of Puerto Rico are highly honored to have the Puerto Rico Center for the Book included as the 53rd affiliate of the Library of Congress’ Center for the Book,” said Luisa Vigo-Cepeda, the Puerto Rico Center’s project director. “Efforts will be geared to develop a wide range of events, such as authors colloquia, workshops, reading festivals and contests to explore the making and writing of books. A makerspace is being developed at the site as well as in the virtual space to stimulate creativity and innovation in reading and writing.”

About the Poet Laureate

As poet laureate, Smith has traveled the country to connect with rural communities and engage Americans in conversations about poetry with her project “American Conversations: Celebrating Poems in Rural Communities.” This year she also unveiled a new anthology, “American Journal: Fifty Poems for Our Time,” featuring the works of 50 living American poets of different ages and backgrounds. She is also launching a new weekday podcast and public radio feature titled “The Slowdown.” Smith is the author of four books of poetry published by Graywolf Press, including “Wade in the Water” in April 2018; “Life on Mars” (2011), winner of the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry; “Duende” (2007), winner of the 2006 James Laughlin Award and the 2008 Essence Literary Award; and “The Body’s Question” (2003), winner of the Cave Canem Poetry Prize. Smith is also the author of a memoir, “Ordinary Light” (2015), a finalist for the 2015 National Book Award in nonfiction.

Born in Falmouth, Massachusetts, in 1972 and raised in Fairfield, California, Smith earned a B.A. in English and American literature and Afro-American studies from Harvard University and an M.F.A. in creative writing from Columbia University. From 1997 to 1999, she was a Stegner Fellow in poetry at Stanford University. Smith has taught at Medgar Evers College of the City University of New York, at the University of Pittsburgh and at Columbia University. She is currently the Roger S. Berlind ’52 Professor in the Humanities and director of the creative writing program at Princeton University.

About the Center for the Book at the Library of Congress

Congress created the Library’s Center for the Book in 1977 to stimulate public interest in books and reading. It has become a national force for reading and literacy promotion with affiliates in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The affiliates meet every spring at the Library of Congress to exchange ideas. For more information, visit read.gov.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States - and extensive materials from around the world - both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

Getty Pic.jpgLos Angeles - The Getty Research Institute announced the acquisition of a collection of hundreds of rare books, prints, and manuscripts related to the culinary arts from the 15th to the 19th centuries assembled by culinary authority Anne Willan and her husband Mark Cherniavsky - the Anne Willan and Mark Cherniavsky Gastronomy Collection. Additionally, a donation from Willan will support ongoing research grants known as the Cherniavsky Library Research Grants.

“Mark had a talent for finding great examples of rare prints and early cookbooks and books about food and has built an exceptional collection,” said Getty Research Institute Chief Curator Marcia Reed. “Over the years Mark and Anne have been wonderful contributors and friends to the GRI, donating important rare books, lending works to our exhibitions, and hosting educational programs. We are grateful to Anne for her generous gift of this collection as well as her support of related scholarship in honor of her late husband, and our friend, Mark.”

Named in honor of Mark Cherniavsky and in celebration of the Anne Willan and Mark Cherniavsky Gastronomy Collection, the Cherniavsky GRI Library Research Grants will support and encourage research relating to antiquarian books, culinary research and other related topics. These grants will be awarded to up to two scholars a year and are made possible by a gift from Anne Willan.  Willan is a celebrated author, cooking educator and founder of the prestigious Ecole de Cuisine La Varenne, which operated in Paris and Burgundy, France, from 1975 until 2007.

This extraordinary collection of rare books and prints on gastronomy from the 15th through the 19th century offers unique insight into the visual culture of food. The elaborate art of culinary preparation, consumption, and display reveals food's status as a symbol of political and social power. Amassed by antiquarian cookbook collectors Anne Willan and Mark Cherniavsky over a period of 50 years, the collection comprises nearly 200 books published before 1830 and hundreds from the 19th and 20th centuries.

Highlights include Johannes Cassianus's De institutis coenobiorum, Collationes partum (Venice, 1491), which describes fasting and feasting within a monastic order; M. Emy's L'art de bien faire les glaces d'office (Paris, 1768), which opens with an evocation of cupids making ice cream; and Antonin Carême's Le Maître d'hôtel francais (Paris, 1823), which contains recipes for dinners given for, among others, Tsar Nicholas I, George IV, and Prince Charles-Maurice de Talleyrand.

The collection's many early modern books, which illustrate elaborate feasts, celebrations, and processions, complement the Getty Research Institute's unparalleled festival collection. Also included is Willan's working library of cookbooks, her professional archives, and the archives of Ecole de Cuisine La Varenne, which she founded. 

Image: Costume of the Boilermaker, Nicolas I de Larmessin, ca. 1690s. The Getty Research Institute, 2018.M.15. Gift of Anne Willan and Mark Cherniavsky

 

 

Folio LP.JPGThe Folio Society is delighted to announce that their edition of The Little Prince, written and illustrated by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, has won the Literature category at the British Book Design & Production Awards 2018. 

The Folio Society’s Production Director, Kate Grimwade said: ‘Our stunning edition of The Little Prince was a worthy winner in the Literature category at last night’s prestigious British Book Production and Design awards. 

‘Working from the 1943 first edition, enormous care was taken in restoring the quality and colours of Saint-Exupéry’s original illustrations. This, along with careful selection of the typeface and a binding on the commentary volume which incorporates a design from a mid-century French edition, make this Folio edition of The Little Prince a truly unique publication. 

‘Folio constantly strives to raise the bar when it comes to ambition in design, use of materials and technical expertise, and winning this award reflects Folio’s continued commitment to production and design excellence.’ 

The two volume set consists of the novel with an introduction by Stacy Schiff and a companion volume of commentary by Christine Nelson, Curator of Literary and Historical Manuscripts at the Morgan Library and Museum in New York, which showcases additional illustrations by the author that were not included in the original publication. 

The Folio Society edition of The Little Prince is available exclusively from www.foliosociety.com

Product information 

Bound in blocked cloth. Set in Bembo Infant. 112 pages. 40 integrated colour illustrations. Printed endpapers. 83⁄4 ̋x 61⁄4 ̋. Blocked slipcase.
Commentary Volume: Bound in blocked paper. 80 pages.
36 integrated colour illustrations. 83⁄4 ̋x 61⁄4 ̋.
UK £49.95 US $73.95 Can $99.95 Aus $99.95 

 

611d543652f40c80b5faa2bb_880x550.jpgNew York—The Morgan is excited to announce that it is expanding its collection—one of the most important collections of drawings in the United States—to include eleven drawings by five major twentieth-century African-American artists from the South. Largely self-taught, these artists—Thornton Dial, Nellie Mae Rowe, Henry Speller, Luster Willis, and Purvis Young—use drawing to express their personal and cultural identity, finding inspiration in their own lives as well as in common experiences and folk imagery. The Morgan acquired the drawings through a gift-purchase agreement from the Souls Grown Deep Foundation, whose mission is to preserve and disseminate the works of African-American artists from the Southern United States. 

This acquisition supports the Morgan’s goal to expand the scope and depth of its collection of modern and contemporary drawings by including works from the vernacular, nonacademic traditions of the visual arts. It recognizes the important contribution made to the history of drawing by artists working outside the conventional channels and expands the reflection on the role and significance of the medium of drawing as a vehicle to express a particular identity. 

In addition, this acquisition encourages more in-depth study of the dialogue between vernacular, nonacademic traditions in the visual arts and the production of mainstream artists. Canonical twentieth century artists from Pablo Picasso and Jean Dubuffet, to Jasper Johns and Rosemarie Trockel found inspiration in the creations of the non-academically trained to infuse their work with a new energy. The major retrospective Dubuffet Drawings, held at the Morgan in 2016, made clear the importance of the dialogue between the mainstream and alternative traditions in twentieth-century art. 

“We are working toward building a more representative collection,” said Colin B. Bailey, Director of the Morgan Library & Museum. “These drawings are an invaluable contribution to the study of  modern and contemporary drawing, and we are proud to expand the body of works that the Morgan exhibits to the general public and makes available to researchers of all types in the Morgan’s Drawing Study Center.”

Dr. Maxwell L. Anderson, President of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation adds, “Our core mission is to advocate for artists of the African American South represented in our collection. We could not be happier to announce that the Morgan Library & Museum will now have significant holdings of these artists in their permanent collection. These acquisitions will broaden the exposure of drawings by these important American artists among audiences around the country and provide new opportunities for exhibition, research, and other partnerships.”

These works also complement objects in other collecting areas at the Morgan, notably African-American folk songs in the Printed Music Department, and African-American poetry and first editions of Harlem Renaissance writers such as LangstonHughes, abundantly represented in the Carter Burden Collection of modern American literature in the Printed Books Department. The Morgan is planning to feature these new acquisitions in an exhibition in 2021. 

Image: Purvis Young, (1943-2010), Sometimes I Get Emotion from the Game, early 1980s, ballpoint pen and marker, on paper glued to found book Gift of the Souls Grown Deep Foundation from the William S. Arnett Collection and purchased on the Manley Family Fund, The Morgan Library & Museum, 2018.106. © Larry T. Clemons / Gallery 712 / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Photography Stephen Pitkin/Pitkin Studio

 

On Nov. 19, 1863, Abraham Lincoln delivered the Gettysburg Address in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. The Library of Congress will recognize the 155th anniversary of this historic speech with a one-day celebration, including work stations for a hands-on experience transcribing Lincoln documents using the Library’s new crowdsourcing tool.

Visitors will have the opportunity to view the earliest known draft of the Gettysburg Address and participate in a live interactive crowdsourcing challenge of Lincoln’s manuscripts Monday, Nov. 19, beginning at 10 a.m. in the Library’s Thomas Jefferson Building Great Hall, 10 First Street, Washington, D.C. The event will begin with an introduction by Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden. She will be followed by historian and manuscript specialist Michelle Krowl, who will talk about Lincoln and the Gettysburg Address. A portion of this program will be livestreamed at Youtube.com/LibraryofCongressand Facebook.com/LibraryofCongress. Lincoln county schools across the country and the general public are invited to virtually participate via the livestream and our new crowdsourcing website at crowd.loc.gov.

The Gettysburg Address is considered one of Lincoln’s most prominent speeches. Lincoln had been invited to give a "few appropriate remarks" during a ceremony to dedicate a cemetery for Union soldiers killed at the Battle of Gettysburg. The Library holds two original drafts of the Gettysburg Address that reveal the ways in which Abraham Lincoln prepared his now-famous comments.

These drafts are part of the Abraham Lincoln Collection. The papers of the lawyer, representative from Illinois and 16th president of the United States, contain approximately 40,550 documents dating from 1774 to 1948. Roughly half of the collection, more than 20,000 documents, comprising 62,000 images, as well as transcriptions of approximately 10,000 documents, is available online. Between 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. visitors will engage with the primary sources of this collection and decipher Lincoln’s handwriting using the crowd.loc.gov website.

The excitement can be followed and shared on Twitter @LibraryCongress and #LetterstoLincoln. 

Crowd.loc.gov is a crowdsourcing program that invites virtual volunteers to transcribe text in digitized images from the Library’s historic collections. This program enables anyone with access to a computer to experience first-handaccounts in history while contributing to the Library’s ability to make these treasures more searchable and readable. The program launched in October with the Letters to Lincoln Challenge, inviting the public to transcribe 10,000 items from the Abraham Lincoln papers by the end of 2018.

Crowd.loc.gov and this event reflects advancement toward a goal in the Library’s new user-centered strategic plan: to expand access by making unique collections, experts and services available when, where and how users need them. Learn more about the Library’s five-year plan at loc.gov/strategic-plan/ and the digital strategy at loc.gov/digital-strategy/.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States— and extensive materials from around the world— both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

p.jpegNew York — The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture at The New York Public Library has acquired the full archive of actors and activists Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee. The extensive archive includes more than 178.85 linear feet of material spanning eight decades of the couple’s careers in theater, film and television; their near 60-year relationship and marriage; and their social, civic, and political activities between 1932 and 2014.

Correspondence between Davis and Dee included in the archive provides an intimate look into the couple’s influence as partners in love and life. Handwritten letters between the two capture the affectionate moments of their courtship, proposal, and marriage. Exchanges with friends such as Malcolm X, James Baldwin, Langston Hughes, and Lena Horne reflect the breadth of their close relationships with some of America’s leading cultural and political figures of the 20th century.

Both Dee and Davis spent their early careers in Harlem theater companies at the New York Public Library. Dee performed at the American Negro Theatre, then located at the 135th Street Branch, now the Schomburg Center. Davis performed as a member of the Rose McClendon Players at the 124th Street Branch, now the Harlem Library. Over their 50-year careers, the couple would go on to star in, develop, and produce projects across the world, creating new opportunities for Blacks in the performing arts, and influencing the ways narratives centered on Black life were told.

As activists, Davis and Dee publicly and privately advocated for many civil rights and social justice issues of their time, including speaking against the executions of Julius and Ethel Rosenberg, helping to restore Paul Robeson’s passport after it had been revoked, organizing artists and entertainers for the 1963 March on Washington, and demonstrating against the Vietnam War. The Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee archive captures this rich history and the couple’s role in it through letters, diaries, news clippings, notebooks, scripts, photographs, and audio and moving image recordings. The archive is currently being processed and will be available to the public for research with a New York Public Library card in spring 2019.

“Ruby Dee and Ossie Davis were pillars of creativity, friendship, and support during the greatest artistic and political movements of our time,” said Kevin Young, Director of the Schomburg Center. “Their love for each other and for their closest friends, as well as their commitment to advancing social progress through the arts and advocacy, is reflected in the vastness of this archive. Having their archive home to Harlem will help scholars and researchers tell an even more comprehensive story of the cultural and political evolution of the 20th century. We are privileged to be stewards of the Dee and Davis legacies, and to make them available to the public for study and exploration.”

“The Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee archive is crucial for the study of black theater and film history, African Americans in television, the work of black playwrights and filmmakers, and of artists as activists,” said Mary Yearwood, Director of Collections and Information Services at the Schomburg Center. “The archive complements a number of Schomburg Center manuscript, photograph, and audio moving image collections including those of the American Negro Theater, the papers of actors Frederick O’Neal, Hilda Sims, Canada Lee, Alice Childress, and the New World A-Coming radio series. The Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee archive not only documents their history and contributions to the performing arts and to the civil rights struggle, but to African American history, Harlem history and the history of the Schomburg Center. Those studying these topics will find this archive to be an important primary resource.”

Highlights of the Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee archive include:

  • 50 years of correspondence between Davis and Dee, dating back to their courtship, offering an intimate window into their relationship and in some instances, their perspectives concerning their craft
  • An array of never-before-seen materials devoted to Davis and Dee’s relationship with Malcolm X, including 15 postcards and three letters from Malcolm X during his foundational Hajj in Mecca and his 1964 trip to Africa
  • Ruby Dee’s original bound script of "A Raisin in the Sun" with autographed text changes and notes, and printed notation that the title was pending approval from Langston Hughes
  • A note to Ruby Dee from Lorraine Hansberry on the opening night of "A Raisin in the Sun"
  • A Western Union telegram from Langston Hughes to Ruby Dee expressing appreciation for her performance of his poem at the A. Philip Randolph testimonial
  • Handwritten greeting card from Coretta Scott King to Davis and Dee
  • Material related to the couple’s years of political and social work, including the March on Washington and the couple’s activities with union Local 1199
  • A large number of Davis and Dee’s television interviews, speeches and appearances over the decades, as well as master copies of their television show "With Ossie & Ruby"
  • A rare copy of an independent film “Countdown at Kusini” that Davis directed and that the couple starred in
  • An extensive reference archive of poetry, folk songs, tales, and sayings, many directly related to the African American experience

This acquisition is the latest within the Schomburg’s Home to Harlem initiative, following those of James Baldwin, Sonny Rollins, Ann Petry, and annotated manuscripts of the "The Autobiography of Malcolm X." Home to Harlem is centered on bringing the archives of Harlem’s most influential social and cultural figures to the Schomburg for research and study, on Arturo Schomburg’s legacy of Black librarianship, and on exploring the historical and contemporary role of Harlem as the Black cultural capital of the world.

Scholars interested in accessing the Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee archive must make an appointment with the Schomburg Center’s Manuscripts, Archives, and Rare Books Division. For more information, visit SchomburgCenter.org.

Image: Courtesy of the Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture/NYPL.

Paris—Paris Photo and Aperture Foundation are pleased to announce the winners of the 2018 edition of the Paris Photo-Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Awards. The selection for Photography Catalogue of the Year is The Land in Between by Ursula Schulz-Dornburg. On Abortion by Laia Abril is the winner of PhotoBook of the Year. One Wall a Web by Stanley Wolukau-Wanambwa is the winner of $10,000 in the First PhotoBook category. A Jurors’ Special Mention is also given to Experimental Relationship Vol. 1 by Pixy Liao.

A final jury at Paris Photo selected this year’s winners. The jury included: Federica Chiocchetti, curator and founder of the Photocaptionist; Hervé Digne, president of Manifesto and the Odeon Circle; Kevin Moore, curator; Azu Nwagbogu, director of African Artists’ Foundation (AAF) and LagosPhoto Festival; and Batia Suter, artist. 

Regarding the jury’s selection this year, Hervé Digne said, “The choices we made reflect the chaotic and changing world in which we are living—I think both the shortlist selection and the final award winners offer a window on the world at large and on the world of photography and photographic books today.”

Kevin Moore remarked on the First PhotoBook winner, “It’s a serious moment in history, and it felt urgent amongst the jury that we choose books that have gravity to them but also maybe a glimmer of hope, as in the selection of Stanley Wolukau-Wanambwa’s One Wall a Web. This is a book that has complexity and embeds race in a larger narrative and a larger system—it demonstrates, if not a solution, at least a direction for further dialo­gue.”

Ursula Schulz-Dornburg’s The Land in Between was selected as the Photography Catalogue of the Year for providing a strong platform for interviews, portfolios, and essays about an artist less well-known outside of her native country. The minimalist, elegant design and form are well matched to the content, emphasizing what Batia Suter describes as “the artist’s sharp vision.” 

Azu Nwagbogu spoke to the PhotoBook of the Year: “In choosing Laia Abril’s On Abortion, the jury felt it was important to recognize a well-crafted statement on a topical and timely issue. The book offers a strong commentary on women’s reproductive choices, and uniquely visualizes the topic using archival imagery, contemporary photographs, and text.” 

Finally, Federica Chiocchetti explained the draw of Jurors’ Special Mention recipient Pixy Liao’s work: “In this current situation of post-#MeToo, and the ongoing debate around the binary opposition between the male and female gaze, Pixy Liao’s Experimental Relationship Vol. 1 is a very refreshing and blissful vision of intimacy, complicity, and collaboration between the sexes.”

This year’s Shortlist selection was made by a jury comprising Lucy Gallun (associate curator in the Department of Photography, Museum of Modern Art, New York), Kristen Lubben (executive director, Magnum Foundation, New York), Yasufumi Nakamori (incoming senior curator of international art [photography], Tate Modern, London), Lesley A. Martin (creative director, Aperture Foundation, and publisher of The PhotoBook Review), and Christoph Wiesner (artistic director, Paris Photo). 

Since the announcement of the previous winners in November 2017, last year’s shortlisted titles have been exhibited in multiple venues internationally, including in Lithuania, Germany, Russia, Switzerland, and Italy.

Following Paris Photo, the exhibition of the 2018 Shortlist will travel to Aperture Gallery, New York, from December 2018 to February 2019, and then to Scotiabank CONTACT Photography Festival, Toronto, in May 2019.

Minnesota Center for Book Arts (MCBA) is pleased to announce the recipients of our seventh series of the MCBA/Jerome Foundation Book Arts Mentorships program:

  • Rebekah Crisanta de Ybarra, inter/anti-disciplinary artist and musician
  • Daniel McCarthy Clifford, artist
  • Chaun Webster, poet and sound artist

Three jurors, reflecting diverse perspectives and considerable expertise, reviewed the 37 applications received. They were: Ruthann Godollei, artist and educator; Emmett Ramstad, sculptor, participatory artist, and educator; and Christina Schmid, critical arts writer and educator.

Mentorship recipients will now embark on a year-long study of new artistic disciplines and one-on-one work with master artist mentors to develop their individual projects. The mentorship program will culminate in an exhibition in MCBA's main gallery in November 2019.

Meet the new recipients and learn about their work at the Mentorship Recipient Artist Talks on Tuesday, April 2nd, 2019 at 6pm in MCBA's studios.

Since 1985, the Jerome Foundation has helped artists push the boundaries of contemporary book arts by supporting the creation of new book works. Through fourteen series of fellowships and six series of mentorships, Minnesota artists of extremely diverse disciplines -- including printers, papermakers, binders, painters, sculptors, poets, photographers, choreographers, filmmakers and others - have created projects ranging from exquisitely crafted fine press volumes to documented performances to one-of-a-kind installations that "break the bindings" and redefine conventional notions of book form and content.

Minnesota Center for Book Arts celebrates the book as a vibrant contemporary art form that takes many shapes. From the traditional crafts of papermaking, letterpress printing and hand bookbinding to experimental artmaking and self-publishing techniques, MCBA supports the limitless creative evolution of book arts through book arts workshops and programming for adults, youth, families, K-12 students and teachers. MCBA is located in the Open Book building in downtown Minneapolis, alongside partner organizations The Loft Literary Center and Milkweed Editions. To learn more, visit www.mnbookarts.org.

7cfeccbb-958f-4674-940f-2961665a709d.jpgThe Antiquarian Booksellers' Association is delighted to announce that the winner of the third ABA National Book Collecting Prize goes to London University student Musa Igrek, for his collection of propaganda in the 1950s and 1960s.

The £1,000 Annual Prize for student book-collectors, sponsored by the Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association, will be awarded to the winner at the ABA Chelsea Rare Book Fair, on Friday 2 November, at Chelsea Town Old Hall. Half of the prize money is for the winner to expand his collection and half is to donate volumes for the University Library.

The quality of all of the entrants was once again extremely high, with the submissions prompting quite a debate. Musa’s passion and originality for his collection ‘‘Divine Power - the Red Shelf’ shone through, however, with the judges deeming it to have great potential for the future.

As Musa noted in his entrance essay: ‘I have for years been fascinated with the secret funding of books; in the Cold War era, governments saw books as a powerful means to win hearts and minds & minds… A clandestine unit of the British Foreign Office, the ‘IRD’ (Information Research Department) attracted my keen interest… The bright red covers of these books give them a character all of their own… I hope to publish a book that will reveal the full scale of the British government’s undercover publishing activities during the Cold War.’

The IRD was tasked with promoting Western Democracy and the ‘British Way of Life’ - Orwell’s Animal Farm and 1984 were translated into Eastern European languages with the support of the IRD. In Britain, more than a hundred titles were published by seemingly independent publishers such as Ampersand, Batchworth Press, Phoenix House and Bodley Head.

This, perhaps timely, collection won against high quality entries from students at Aberdeen (‘Pursuit of Knowledge 1790-1850’ focusing upon books read by the Bronte sisters); Oxford (‘One Very Nonsensical Collection’ - Russian and Slavic translation of Edward Lear and other ‘nonsense’ literature); St Andrews (‘Staging and Stories: Twentieth-Century Pageants’) and Edinburgh (’Vintage American Cookbooks, Recipe Booklets, and Pamphlets’).

Two entries were highly commended this year: Cambridge ('Protests and Experiments in Revolution-Era Russian Poetry'), and York (‘Treacherous Tigers, Devoted Dogs: Animals in Print, c. 1700-1900’). Both extremely sophisticated collections.

All the entries displayed great enthusiasm, passion, and bibliographical knowledge, and it is so inspiring to see the upcoming generation of young collectors creating unusual collections, with limited means, yet revelling from the thrill of finding hidden treasures. We feel confident that all will remain collectors for life, and that the wider book world will be hearing more for one or two of the class of 2018.

Some books from the collection of Musa Igrek are now on display in Senate House Library, University of London (Seng Tee Lee area, 4th Floor), together with some from the collection of Lucy Vinten-Mattach, co-winner of the University of London's Anthony Davis book collecting prize. The display will run until 23 November.

Preparations for the 2018-19 Collecting Prize is already underway, with the winners from all partaking universities being considered for the ABA National Prize in September 2019. The Judges are: Deborah Coltham, Justin Croft and Brian Lake (booksellers), Ed Potten (independent researcher formerly of Cambridge University Library) and Lisa Baskin, (collector).

 

Magdalen College, Oxford have acquired a major collection of books, manuscripts, and iconography on the Arabist, soldier, and writer T.E. Lawrence (‘Lawrence of Arabia’, 1888-1935), assembled over fifty years by Jeremy Wilson, Lawrence’s authorised biographer, whose publications dispelled many of the myths surrounding Lawrence and re-defined the modern perception of him. Daryl Green, College Librarian, commented: 

‘Magdalen is delighted to acquire this important research collection relating to Lawrence, one of the most celebrated twentieth-century figures associated with the college, through the generosity of our alumni and other patrons. This acquisition significantly enlarges our Lawrence holdings and will provide future scholars with access to Wilson’s manuscripts and typescripts, his library of books by and about Lawrence (many inscribed to him or annotated), and his remarkable collection of iconographic materials relating to Lawrence. With this acquisition, Magdalen’s collections now include volumes from Lawrence’s own library at Cloud’s Hill, first and limited editions of books by Lawrence, artefacts and archives which illustrate Lawrence’s time as a Senior Demy at Magdalen (1911-1914), and rare portraits which have previously been exhibited at the National Portrait Gallery and the Imperial War Museum. A selection of these items will be on display, together with important loans for private and public collections in our forthcoming exhibition “Lawrence of Oxford” (7 November 2018-1 May 2019).’ 

T.E. Lawrence graduated from Jesus College, Oxford in 1910 with first class honours and he was awarded a four-year’s Senior Demyship by Magdalen College, Oxford at the instigation of the distinguished archaeologist D.G. Hogarth, himself an alumnus and sometime fellow and tutor of Magdalen, and Keeper of the Ashmolean Museum. This award, worth £100 a year, enabled Lawrence to participate in the British Museum’s excavations at Carchemish organised by Hogarth, who would be the Director of the Arab Bureau during World War I (working closely with Lawrence during the Arab Revolt), and whose friendship was one of the most important in Lawrence’s life. 

Jeremy Wilson (1944-2017) first became interested in Lawrence as an undergraduate at Balliol College, Oxford in the early 1960s. Some years later Wilson met T.E. Lawrence’s younger brother and literary executor, the archaeologist A.W. Lawrence, and, at his behest, Wilson edited T.E. Lawrence’s Minorities (1971) for Jonathan Cape. In 1975 Wilson was appointed T.E. Lawrence’s authorised biographer and he began assembling a research collection of printed, manuscript, and graphic works to support his work on Lawrence, publishing introductions to the Penguin Modern Classics edition of Lawrence’s The Mint (1978) and the Limited Editions Club edition of Lawrence’s translation of The Odyssey in 1981, editing the Whittington Press edition of Lawrence’s Letters to E.T. Leeds (1988), and writing the catalogue of the National Portrait Gallery’s landmark exhibition Lawrence of Arabia

In 1989 Wilson published his magisterial Lawrence of Arabia; The Authorised Biography of T.E. Lawrence, which was widely praised for its meticulous scholarship, comprehensive research, and painstaking, almost archaeological, removal of the palimpsest of myth, rumour, and misinformation which had obscured Lawrence’s life. Reviewing it for The New York Times Review of Books Nigel Nicolson wrote that, ‘this biography will endure beside Seven Pillars as [Lawrence’s] monument, and any future book about T.E. Lawrence will be but a commentary on it’. Lawrence of Arabia consolidated Wilson’s position as the pre- eminent authority on Lawrence and in the following decades he contributed to numerous journals, lectured on Lawrence internationally, and, with his wife Nicole, established the Castle Hill Press to publish finely-printed, scholarly editions of Lawrence’s letters and works. 

Magdalen College’s acquisition of Wilson’s research collection was handled on behalf of Nicole Wilson by Mark James of antiquarian booksellers Type & Forme, who said, ‘we are very pleased to have assisted Magdalen with the successfully acquisition of this remarkable collection’, while Nicole Wilson commented, ‘I am delighted that Jeremy’s working library and archive are now with Magdalen, an institution that he had a particular affection for and where he gave one of his last lectures, “T.E. Lawrence: A Fascination with Portraits”, in 2015’. 

 

New York —The Morgan Library & Museum announced today the appointment of Maria L. Fredericks as the Sherman Fairchild Head of the Thaw Conservation Center. Founded in 2002 with the support of Eugene Thaw, a longtime Morgan Trustee, the Thaw Conservation Center is a world-renowned  laboratory facility for the study and conservation of works on paper and parchment, including drawings, illuminated manuscripts, rare books, fine bindings, prints, photographs, and literary, historical, and music manuscripts. Ms. Fredericks’s new role is the first full-time leadership position for the center and was made possible by an endowment from the Sherman Fairchild Foundation.

In her new role, Fredericks will lead the staff of the Thaw Center, oversee the long-term conservation of the collection, and broaden the Morgan’s conservation-related programs. She succeeds Peggy Ellis, who was Director of the center from its inception in 2002 through 2016. Prior to this appointment, Fredericks was the Drue Heinz Book Conservator at the Morgan, a position she held for thirteen years during which she oversaw the preservation of rare manuscripts and books, enabling the Morgan to present these works to the public under the right conditions and in the best light. She has mentored numerous graduate interns and post-graduate fellows, while also carrying out technical research and conservation treatment on treasures of the Morgan’s collection, such as the Hours of Catherine of Cleves, the Golden Gospels of Henry VIII,and an illuminated Pontifical made for Pope Leo X.

“The Sherman Fairchild Foundation has been very generous in endowing this leadership position in the Thaw Conservation Center,” said Colin B. Bailey, Director of the Morgan. “The TCC helps preserve irreplaceable works of art and works on paper, in addition to training talented conservators, many of whom go on to lead conservation efforts at other institutions both nationally and internationally. Ms. Fredericks has contributed greatly to the Center, and we are delighted to continue supporting her work at the Morgan.” 

Before coming to the Morgan in 2005, Fredericks was Head of Conservation at Columbia University Libraries, where she managed the conservation program for twenty campus libraries including Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, the C.V. Starr East Asian Library and the Rare Book and Manuscript Library. She has also held positions at the Library of Congress, the Newberry Library in Chicago, the Huntington Library in San Marino, California, and the Winterthur Museum in Winterthur, Delaware. At the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Coptic Museum Archives in Cairo, she contributed to conservation and preservation efforts on rare manuscripts.

A graduate of Swarthmore College with a B.A. in art history, Ms. Fredericks has lectured, taught and published extensively on book conservation and historical bindings.Since 2010, she has been a Visiting Lecturer at the NYU Institute of Fine Arts Conservation Center, where she has taught graduate students specializing in rare book conservation and participated in curriculum development for a Mellon-funded initiative in Library and Archives Conservation Education (LACE).

“The Thaw Conservation Center, with its stellar staff of conservators and preparators has a well-established track record of maintaining the highest professional standards in teaching, conservation treatment and collections care,” said Fredericks. “I am excited and honored to be continuing this work in the company of such wonderful colleagues.”

Frank Trujillo has been promoted to replace Ms. Fredericks as the Drue Heinz Book Conservator. Mr. Trujillo has been at the Morgan since 2006, most recently as Associate Book Conservator. He will continue to evaluate, treat, and research the bound collections from all curatorial departments at the Morgan. His previously published research has focused on technical aspects of the Hours of Catherine of Cleves, the Hours of Claude de France, French Romanesque bindings, and the Coptic Binding Collection at the Morgan Library & Museum.

Teddy-Roosevelt-Laughing-1910-e1539722671345.jpgThe largest collection of the papers of President Theodore Roosevelt, documenting his extraordinary career in the White House and as vice president, governor of New York, and as a naturalist, writer and reformer, has been digitized and is now available online from the Library of Congress.

The digitization of the massive collection comes just before the 160th anniversary of Roosevelt’s birthday. The nation’s 26th president was born Oct. 27, 1858, and died nearly 100 years ago on Jan. 6, 1919.

The Roosevelt collection is online at: loc.gov/collections/theodore-roosevelt-papers/about-this-collection/.

The Roosevelt papers are one of the largest presidential collections held by the Library, consisting of about 276,000 documents and comprising about 461,000 images. It includes letters, speeches, executive orders, scrapbooks, diaries, White House reception records and press releases of his administration, as well as family records.

The collection provides a closer look at Roosevelt as an individual and as a powerful president from 1901 to 1909 who established a tradition of using his position as a “bully pulpit” by appealing to the broader public through the media. Roosevelt strengthened the presidency by seeking to centralize power after a time when Congress and the Supreme Court had dominated government, and he survived an attempted assassination during his unsuccessful run for the presidency in 1912.

Roosevelt was a prolific writer, offering readers a glimpse at the power of his personality and family life. In public service, he was known for confronting such major issues as the regulation of corporations, conservation of natural resources, construction of the Panama Canal and mediation during the Russo-Japanese War (for which he won the Nobel Peace Prize). Beyond the presidency, he was also an influential naturalist. Animal specimens he brought back from a safari in Africa remain part of the collection at the Smithsonian Institution. Roosevelt also nearly died while exploring an uncharted river in Brazil. The river was later named in his honor.

The papers also document his service as vice president before the assassination of President William McKinley, his time as governor of New York, as police commissioner of New York City, as a cavalry officer in the Spanish-American War, his founding of the Progressive Party and his unsuccessful run for president in 1912.

Highlights of the Roosevelt papers include:

  • A personal diary from Feb. 14, 1884, where Roosevelt records his reaction to the death of his first wife and mother on the same day. “The light has gone out of my life,” he wrote;
  • An 1897 letter signaling Roosevelt’s support for annexing Hawaii and building a canal in Central America while he was assistant secretary of the Navy;
  • A listing of “Rough Rider” officers serving with Roosevelt in the Spanish-American War;
  • Roosevelt’s letter from 1900 with his first documented use of the phrase “speak softly and carry a big stick;”
  • A 1905 letter on the conservation of Yosemite Valley as a national park;
  • Roosevelt’s 1912 campaign speech in Connecticut while seeking another term as president on the Progressive Party ticket;
  • A 1915 letter criticizing President Woodrow Wilson’s policy toward World War I.

The Roosevelt papers have been at the Library of Congress since Roosevelt sent the first shipment of his papers from his Oyster Bay, New York, home to the Library for safekeeping in 1917. His deposits were made a permanent gift in 1919. Additional contributions to the collection were made by Roosevelt’s family members and his literary executor.

The Harvard University Library also holds a major archival collection documenting Roosevelt’s life and career. The Theodore Roosevelt Center at Dickinson State University in North Dakota is building a digital library of Roosevelt materials in partnership with the Library of Congress and other organizations.

Previously, much of the Library’s Roosevelt collection was available on microfilm, which helped facilitate the digitization process. More recent additions to the collection were scanned and digitized for the first time during this project.

The Roosevelt project reflects advancement toward a goal in the Library’s new user-centered strategic plan to expand access, making unique collections, experts and services available when, where and how users need them. Learn more about the Library’s five-year plan at loc.gov/strategic-plan/.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States - and extensive materials from around the world - both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

Image: President Theodore Roosevelt is shown in 1910 after he had left the White House. (Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division)

The Library of Congress appointed Suzanne Schadl, academic expert in Latin American studies, as chief of the Hispanic Division. Schadl has more than 16 years of teaching and library experience.

Schadl was curator of the Latin American collections at the University of New Mexico (2008-2018), where she managed Latin American, Iberian and U.S. Latino acquisitions, related library instruction and community outreach.

Prior to this work, Schadl was director of the Gerald and Betty Ford Library at The Bosque School, assistant professor of history at Roanoke College and lecturer in history at the University of Texas in Austin.

 “Given her many accomplishments, I am excited about the vision and energy Suzanne will bring to enhancing the public’s discovery and use of the Library’s collections, programs and services in the areas of Latin American, Iberian, Caribbean and U.S. Hispanic and Latino studies,” said Eugene Flanagan, director of the General and International Collections.  

Schadl’s interest in communication networks led her from historical research on obstetric and naturalist publications in 19th century Brazil to grant-funded library projects.

These range from capturing Latin American tweets and translating electronic metadata to engaging diverse communities from the United States and Mexico with print, visual and tactile sources in Spanish, English and Indigenous languages.

Schadl holds a doctorate in Latin American Studies from the University of New Mexico. She is active in the Seminar on the Acquisition of Latin American Library Materials, serving most recently as president. Also notable is her board participation at the National Hispanic Cultural Center (2014-2018) and the New Mexico Humanities Council (2016-2018).

Schadl’s collaborative publications include two books, “Scholarship in the Sandbox: Academic Libraries as Laboratories, Forums and Archives for Student Work” (forthcoming) and “Getting Up for the People: The Visual Revolution of ASAR-Oaxaca” (2014). She has also published articles in several journals on community engagement, including “Tomes! Enhancing Community and Embracing Diversity Through Book Arts” (forthcoming); “Uncommons: Transforming Dusty Reading Rooms into Artefactual,” “Third Space’ Library Learning Labs” (2015); “Cite Globally, Analyze Locally: Citation Analysis from a Local Latin American Studies Perspective” (2015) and “Reference as Outreach: Meeting Users Where They Are (2011).”

 The Hispanic Reading Room, established in 1936, is the first international reading room of the Library of Congress and the center for Latin American, Iberian, Caribbean and US Hispanic and Latino Studies and related areas. The Division prepares the annual research tool “The Handbook of Latin American Studies,” available in print form and online. The Division also houses the Archived of Hispanic Literature. For more information, visit loc.gov/rr/hispanic/.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States - and extensive materials from around the world - both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

New York - The Howard Greenberg Collection, comprising 447 photographs by 191 artists, has been acquired by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Spanning the years 1900 to 1980, the collection includes rare prints of modernist masterpieces and 20th-century classics. The acquisition is funded by a major gift from the Phillip Leonian and Edith Rosenbaum Leonian Charitable Trust. 

The Howard Greenberg Collection, amassed over three decades, includes many of the most important artists to work in the field of photography including Berenice Abbott, Diane Arbus, Manuel Álvarez Bravo, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Bruce Davidson, Walker Evans, Margaret Bourke-White, Robert Frank, Consuelo Kanaga, André Kertész, Dorothea Lange, Helen Levitt, Ralph Eugene Meatyard, Gordon Parks, Eugene Smith, Edward Steichen, Weegee, Edward Weston, and Garry Winogrand, and numerous others. 

One of the most notable aspects of the collection is the rare nature of so many of the prints - whether it is the earliest or first print ever made of the image, the only print ever made, the best existing print, or a uniquely unusual example. Social history and the human experience form an important thread of the collection presented though documentary photography and photojournalism. Major works from between the wars in Europe, among others, also trace the evolution of photography as an art form.

“The acquisition of these extraordinary works enriches a collection of art across time and cultures, at the highest level,” said Matthew Teitelbaum, Ann and Graham Gund Director, MFA, Boston. “Howard is a visionary collector, we will be proud to display these transformative images throughout the Museum’s galleries.” 

“I am truly thrilled and delighted to have the MFA as the recipient of my personal collection of photographs,” said Howard Greenberg. “Reflecting the unique access I’ve had to so many treasures of 20th-century photography, the MFA will be a perfect resting place for the collection. Especially gratifying are the MFA’s plans for exhibition, publication and programming around the collection. This will enable me to continue a lifelong mission of education and allowing for a deeper comprehension of photography as art and a special medium.”

An exhibition of works from the Howard Greenberg Collection be on view at the MFA August 11, 2019 - December 16, 2019. An accompanying publication will include essays by Anne Havinga, Estrellita and Yousuf Karsh Chair, Department of Photography, and Kristen Gresh, Estrellita and Yousuf Karsh Curator of Photographs, along with an interview with Howard Greenberg.

 

Betye Saar.pngLos Angeles - Today, the Getty Research Institute (GRI) announced the establishment of the African American Art History Initiative with the acquisition of the archive of world-renowned artist Betye Saar (American, b. 1926).

The African American Art History Initiative is an ambitious program to establish the Getty Research Institute as a major center for the study of African American art history. In addition to acquiring archives and related original sources, the initiative will establish a dedicated curatorship in African American Art History, a bibliographer with a specialty in the subject, annual research graduate and post-graduate fellowships, a program to conduct oral histories of notable African American artists, scholars, critics, collectors and art dealers, and partnerships with other institutions to digitize existing archival collections and collaborate on joint conferences, publications, and research projects. The Getty is starting the project with an initial $5M allocation and will be raising additional funds as the project develops.

“The Getty is making a strong, long-term commitment of unprecedented breadth to the field of African American art history,” said James Cuno, president and CEO of the J. Paul Getty Trust. “The study of African American art history is fundamental to a comprehensive understanding of American art history. We aim to bring our resources, talents, and relationships together to promote advanced research in an area of American art that has been underfunded and under researched.”

Acquisitions and exhibitions

Archives play a central role at the GRI, which collects archives of artists, scholars, curators, and other cultural figures and makes them accessible to researchers all over the world. The GRI’s unique collecting strategies and holdings allow researchers to make connections across disciplines and eras. Archives at the GRI are extensively catalogued and digitized, and archival research at the Getty often leads to or supports publications and exhibitions at the Getty and elsewhere.

Currently, the GRI is seeking a curator of modern and contemporary collections, specializing in postwar African American collections, a newly created position. Once hired, this curator will work with a dedicated bibliographer to acquire and digitize key collections and develop research projects, publications, and exhibitions about African American art.

While Betye Saar is not the first African American artist represented in the GRI’s holdings - others include Adrian Piper, Kara Walker, Ed Bereal, Benjamin Patterson, Melvin Edwards, Lorna Simpson, Harry Drinkwater, and Mark Bradford - the purchase of her complete archive represents the first major acquisition related to the African American Art History initiative.

Betye Saar is one of the most innovative and visionary artists of our era. She has also, in many ways, been the conscience of the art world for over fifty years and we are so honored that she has trusted us to preserve her powerful legacy,” said Andrew Perchuk, acting director of the Getty Research Institute. “She played a large role in our exploration of postwar Los Angeles art that became Pacific Standard Time: Art in LA 1945-1980, and this acquisition is a particularly meaningful way for us to launch the African American Art History Initiative.”

Betye Saar’s pioneering assemblages and large-scale installations, grounded in unique materials and African American history, have had a profound and positive impact on artists and audiences nationally and internationally.

Saar began creating assemblages in the 1960s, combining her own drawings, prints, and etchings with found materials sourced from family albums as well as flea markets and swap meets. Like many of her artist peers working in Los Angeles at the time, Saar was profoundly affected by the Watts rebellion in 1965 and the death of Martin Luther King, Jr. in 1968. She addressed the personal and societal effects of race in early assemblages like Black Girl’s Window (1969) and introduced innovative materials such as leather, fur, yarn, plastics skulls, and poker chips in works like Ten Mojo Secrets (1972). Saar’s deep inte rest in mysticism and cross-cultural spiritual practice can be seen in dozens of her large-scale assemblages such as the shrine-like Mti (1973) and Spiritcatcher (1977). She works from a vast collection of found objects and images, some of which include derogatory and racist images of African Americans. In one of her most politically potent and groundbreaking works, The Liberation of Aunt Jemima (1972), she recast the stereotypical figure of the Mammie, the Southern black nanny and domestic servant, as an empowered woman by combining this persistent symbol of black female servitude (including the eponymous Aunt Jemima from the pancake mix box) with a Black Power fist and a toy rifle.

Saar was at the center of an animated Los Angeles art scene in the 1970s, collaborating and exhibiting with established artists like Charles White (American, 1918-1979) as well as with younger, experimental artists who coalesced around nascent galleries like Suzanne Jackson’s Gallery 32 and Dale and Alonzo Davis’s Brockman Gallery. Saar organized exhibitions of black women artists including Black Mirror (1973) and became active in the feminist art movement, serving on the board of the non-profit organization Womanspace with artist Judy Chicago (American, b. 1939). She was the subject of major exhibitions at the Whitney Museum of American Art and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art in 1975, the Studio Museum in Harlem in 1980, and the MOCA Geffen in 1990 and, in recent years, Saar’s stature has only continued to grow. Her work is in the collections of important museums around the world. Following a major exhibition at the Fondazione Prada in 2016, in October 2018 an exhibition of her work will open at the National Gallery of Scotland.  In 2019 she will have an exhibition organized by LACMA, which will travel to the Morgan Library in 2020.

The archive, The Betye Saar Papers, ranges from 1926 to the present covering her entire career and her life as an artist. The archive includes documentation of Saar’s prolific artistic production and her notable works in diverse media: sketchbooks of ideas, concepts, and Saar’s travels; prints and drawings; book illustrations and commercial graphics, as well as profuse documentation of her assemblages and installations. The archive features annual files on all aspects of Saar’s projects: exhibitions, catalogues, brochures and posters; ledgers of works created with records of exhibitions, galleries, museums, and collectors; letters, artist’s statements, and documentation on the circle of artists with whom Saar worked and collaborated.  The archive comes with an important gift: a vintage photograph album depicting Saar’s family and friends: the 1918 Beatrice Parson Family Photo Album.  

“As a child of the Depression, I learned at an early age the importance of saving things.  ‘Use it up, wear it out, make it do, or do without’ was a common saying during my childhood,” said Saar. “As time went on, my saving turned into collecting, and collecting then evolved into the medium I use to create my art.  Little did I know back then that my frugal roots would develop into a profession with such a creative outlet. I’ve taken great pride in preserving these items for some 80 plus years. Items such as my early childhood drawings all the way through to the art ledgers that I continue to use on a daily basis. I am very pleased that the Getty Research Institute shares my desire for ‘saving things’ and that they will be providing a home for many of my collections so that they will be accessible by scholars, the arts community and the generally curious alike.”

Collaborations and Partnerships

Collaboration is an important part of the African American Art History Initiative and the Getty is consulting with the world’s leading scholars as it builds the program. Dr. Kellie Jones, Professor in Art History and Archaeology and the Institute for Research in African American Studies (IRAAS) at Columbia University, has been hired by the Getty as a senior consultant. Jones is a MacArthur Fellow who has curated several landmark exhibitions of African American Art and published extensively, including the recently published South of Pico: African American Artists in Los Angeles in the 1960s and 1970s and Now Dig This: Art and Black Los Angeles 1960-1980 published to accompany the exhibition of the same title that was part of the Getty-funded “Pacific Standard Time: Los Angeles Art 1945-1980” in 2011. In her role as a consultant for the initiative she will help shape the strategic and intellectual directions of the project.

“The Getty is telling the world, through its actions, that American art has many facets,” said Jones. “The Getty has set out to create benchmarks and expand the field of art history. This initiative and its focus on archives is another approach to embracing a bigger idea of what art history is, by creating an important repository that will greatly impact the field and peer institutions. And in partnering with other institutions, including historically black colleges, we are also creating community through scholarship. I’m especially excited to think about the educational possibilities, at all levels, that will come out of this work.”

Additionally, the GRI has convened an advisory committee of leading scholars, artists, and curators for the African American Art History Initiative. With insights from their own scholarship and connections, the committee will advise on how the initiative can best serve the field and on a collecting strategy focused on growing the GRI’s holdings related to African American art and cultural history. Currently, the members of the growing advisory board include Jones, Getty Trustee Pamela Joyner, Director of the Spelman College Museum of Fine Art Andrea Barnwell Brownlee, Curator of International Art at the Tate Modern in London Mark Godfrey, Hammer Museum Assistant Curator Erin Christovale, Bridget Cooks, Associate Professor of African American Studies and Art History at University of California, Irvine, and others.

Partnerships with other institutions are another crucial part of the initiative. The GRI has partnered with the UC Berkeley Oral History Center to conduct oral histories that are already underway in California, New York, and other parts of the country to record stories of African American artists in their 70s, 80s, and 90s. These one-on-one interviews address an urgent need to capture the first-person accounts of artists who have not been properly documented to date.

The GRI is also partnering with historically black colleges and universities to help those institutions maximize the research potential of their holdings through digitization and increased scholarly access.   

“The Getty Trust’s decision to develop a digital archive will provide scholars, researchers, teachers, students, curators and collectors—anyone passionate about the study of African American artists—easy access to primary reference material in some of the world’s great artists. Spelman College has just launched the Atlanta University Center collective for the Study of Art History and Curatorial Studies, thanks to the generosity of the Walton Family Foundation.  We look forward to partnering with the Getty Trust in the course of establishing the collective, as our students become familiar with some of the country’s leading archival resources in the field of African American Art History,” said Mary Schmidt Campbell, president of Spelman College.

Other partnerships include museums and exhibition spaces such as the California African American Museum and Art + Practice in Los Angeles and The Studio Museum in Harlem.

The Getty’s commitment to African American art history also extends to the J. Paul Getty Museum, which recently acquired twenty-one photographs from Gordon Parks’s photo essay chronicling the life of a young Brazilian boy named Flavio da Silvia.  On assignment for Life, Parks worked in Brazil in 1961 and again in 1977 documenting the plight of Latin Americans living in extreme poverty. The Getty Museum’s acquisition includes seventeen photographs from Parks’s original visit to Brazil and four from his subsequent trips.  At the Getty Museum, the department of photography is unique in actively collecting American art of the 20th and 21st century.

“The Museum is proud of this significant acquisition,” remarked Getty Museum Director Timothy Potts. “We are committed to building a collection of photographs by African American photographers as part of this important initiative.”

Research Fellowships, Bibliographer, and Visiting Scholars

Building collections of African American art history includes growing library materials and facilitating on-site research. A full-time bibliographer will be hired by the GRI to help trace written histories and create resources for researchers.

Two fellowships will be offered every year bringing scholars to the Getty specifically to research African American art history. This is in addition to the existing Getty Scholars Program, which will continue to include scholars working on African American art history. Currently there are two scholars in residence at the Getty who have made significant contributions to African American art history: Darby English, Professor, University of Chicago and Consulting Curator MoMA, and Renee Ater, Associate Professor Emirata, University of Maryland. This year, the Getty Scholars Program artist-in-residence is Theaster Gates (American, b. 1973) who is using his research time at the Getty to explore radical philanthropy through the built environment.

“Similar to the commitment we made to expand research into Latin American and Latino art over the last several years, the Getty is seeking to once again focus attention on an under-researched area of art history,” said Cuno.  “I particularly want to thank the Getty’s Board of Trustees for their enthusiastic support and endorsement of this exciting new initiative.”

Clearing Winter Storm copy.jpgYosemite National Park—A rare collection of 45 photographs by acclaimed 20th century photographer Ansel Adams (1902-1984) has been donated to the Yosemite Museum in Yosemite National Park.

The Museum Sets were originally created in three size groups of 25, 45 and 75 prints. It is estimated that about half of the original edition of 100 sets were completed before Adams passed away. This 45-print set is a gift by Don and Susan Fuhrer, who are residents of Montecito, Calif. and Foresta, Calif. (within Yosemite National Park) and Yosemite Conservancy council members. The set will be shown at the Yosemite Museum Sept. 21-Nov. 25 thanks to a grant by donors to Yosemite Conservancy.

“I’ve always felt a Museum Set belonged in Yosemite given Adams’ love for the park,” said Don Fuhrer, who purchased the set in 2003. “There’s an entire generation that is unaware of Adams, a true American icon, that will be able to see his work as he wanted it presented.”

Adams began producing what he called “The Museum Set” in 1979 to represent his artistic achievements and to ensure that a representative body of his work would enter public collections. Each set could be purchased on the condition that the buyer would eventually donate their set to an art or educational institution.

“Ansel and his advisors developed a plan to ensure that his work would be accessible for future generations. He created the Museum Set edition, sets of prints of his photographs, mostly the classic, iconic images that people have come to know and love, but also works that, while not as popular, he felt were important to his legacy,” said Matthew Adams, president of The Ansel Adams Gallery in Yosemite National Park and grandson of Ansel Adams.

From more than 2,500 of his negatives, Ansel Adams selected 75 images, which included photographs from as early as 1923 to 1968. A Museum Set contains a core of ten of Adams’ most famous images, including Clearing Winter Storm, Yosemite National Park and Moonrise, Hernandez. New Mexico. Buyers could then choose additional photographs from the list of 75, which makes every Museum Set unique. The Fuhrers’ gifted set also includes Yosemite photographs Bridalveil Fall, El Capitan Falls and Sequoia Gigantea Roots, as well as images from national parks such as Mr. Rainier, Yellowstone, Death Valley, Big Bend and more.

“This is an inspiring and generous gift,” said Yosemite Conservancy President Frank Dean. “Few artists had the foresight to prepare for how their legacy was portrayed and to create a way to ensure that future generations are able to learn and appreciate it. It’s exciting that this collection of photographs will be shown at the Yosemite Museum.”

Adams’ career is inextricably linked to Yosemite, as he was introduced to photography on his first trip to the park, and spent many years exploring, living and working in the park. His work continues to be some of the most iconic images of Yosemite decades after his death.

Other museums and organizations with an Ansel Adams “Museum Set” include The National Gallery of Art, J. Paul Getty Museum, Cantor Arts Center, Stanford University, M. H. Memorial de Young Museum, Los Angeles Museum of Contemporary Art, Cornell University, Princeton University, Scripps College and The Wilderness Society.  

Image: Courtesy of The Ansel Adams Publishing Rights Trust © 2018

 

On Friday, September 21, Paris Photo and Aperture Foundation announced the Shortlist for the 2018 Paris Photo-Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Awards, celebrating the photobook’s contribution to the evolving narrative of photography, with three major categories: First PhotoBook, PhotoBook of the Year, and Photography Catalogue of the Year.

First PhotoBook: A $10,000 prize will be awarded to the photographer(s)/artist(s) whose first finished, publicly available photobook is judged to be the best of the year. Twenty books from this category have been selected for the Shortlist, and will be presented to the jury for the final selection and exhibited during Paris Photo.

PhotoBook of the Year: This prize will be awarded to the photographer(s)/artist(s) and publisher responsible for the photobook judged to be the best of the year. Ten books from this category have been selected for the Shortlist, and will be presented to the jury for the final selection and exhibited during Paris Photo.

Photography Catalogue of the Year: This prize will be awarded to the publication, publisher, and/or organizing institution responsible for the exhibition catalogue or museum publication judged to be the best of the year. Seven books from this category have been selected for the Shortlist, and will be presented to the jury for the final selection and exhibited during Paris Photo.

This year’s Shortlist selection was made by a jury comprising: Lucy Gallun (associate curator in the Department of Photography, Museum of Modern Art, New York), Kristen Lubben (executive director, Magnum Foundation, New York), Yasufumi Nakamori (incoming senior curator of international art [photography], Tate Modern, London), Lesley A. Martin (creative director, Aperture Foundation, and publisher of The PhotoBook Review) and Christoph Wiesner (artistic director, Paris Photo).

The jurying of the Awards takes place in two stages. The first part took place from September 19 to September 21, a three-day-process that involved reviewing more than 980 submissions to select the shortlisted books in all categories. “The varied approaches and high level of experience that each of the jury members bring to the table leads to a process of selection that is very intense; a rigorous exchange of ideas about the many incredible books being made today,” says Christoph Wiesner. “The best photobooks can offer a more in-depth, heightened experience of an artist’s work, augmenting and expanding how we encounter that work in exhibitions or online.” 

A final jury in Paris—comprising Hervé Digne (president of Manifesto and the Odeon Circle), Martha Kirszenbaum (curator), Kevin Moore (curator), Azu Nwagbogu (director of African Artists’ Foundation and LagosPhoto Festival, Nigeria) and Batia Suter (artist)—will select the winners for all three prizes, which will be revealed at Paris Photo on November 9, 2018. All shortlisted and winning titles will then be profiled in the fall 2018 issue of The PhotoBook Review, a biannual publication that accompanies Aperture magazine, and exhibited at Paris Photo and Aperture Gallery in New York, touring thereafter.

 Since the announcement of the 2017 winners last November, last year’s shortlisted titles have been exhibited in multiple venues internationally, including Lithuania, Germany, Moscow, Switzerland, and Italy.

The PhotoBook Awards 2018 Shortlist

Photography Catalogue of the Year

Blind Date Exhibition

Lieko Shiga

T&M Projects, Tokyo

   

Body Against Body: The Battle of Images, from Photography to Live Streaming 

Thyago Nogueira, ed., Bárbara Wagner, Garapa Collective, Jonathas de Andrade, Letícia Ramos, Mídia Ninja, and Sofia Borges

Instituto Moreira Salles, São Paulo, Brazil

   

The Land in Between

Ursula Schulz-Dornburg

MACK, London

   

Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings

Sarah Greenough and Sarah Kennel

National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC, in association with Abrams, New York

   

A View of a Room

Susan Meiselas

Here Press, London

     

PhotoBook of the Year

Laia Abril

On Abortion

Dewi Lewis Publishing, Stockport, England

 

Nina Berman and Kimberly Stevens

An autobiography of Miss Wish

Kehrer Verlag, Heidelberg, Germany

 

Dawoud Bey

Seeing Deeply

University of Texas Press, Austin

 

Sophie Calle

Parce que

Éditions Xavier Barral, Paris

 

Alexandra Catiere

Behind the Glass

Chose Commune, Paris

 

Masahisa Fukase, Simon Baker, and Tomo Kosuga

Masahisa Fukase

Éditions Xavier Barral, Paris

 

Sohrab Hura

Look It’s Getting Sunny Outside!!!

Ugly Dog (Self-published), Delhi, India

 

Raymond Meeks

Halfstory Halflife

Chose Commune, Paris

 

Carmen Winant

My Birth

Self Publish, Be Happy Editions, London

 

Daisuke Yokota

Inversion

Akio Nagasawa Publishing, Tokyo

   

Jurors’ Special Mention

Roy DeCarava and Langston Hughes

The Sweet Flypaper of Life

Originally published 1955; reissue in paperback

First Print Press, New York

   

First PhotoBook

Edén Bernal

Exilios (Exiles)

Inframundo, Mexico City

   

Nacho Caravia

Mamá

Self-published, Barcelona, Spain

   

M L Casteel

American Interiors

Dewi Lewis Publishing, Stockport, England

   

John Edmonds

Higher

Capricious Publishing, New York

    

Matthew Genitempo

Jasper

Twin Palms Publishing, Santa Fe

   

Julie Glassberg

Due to unforeseen circumstances, this book has no title (Bike Kill)

Ceiba Editions, Siena, Italy

   

Soham Gupta

Angst

AKINA Books, London

   

Yann Haeberlin

Tina(?)

Self-published, Geneva, Switzerland

   

Esther Hovers

False Positives

Fw:Books, Amsterdam

   

Maria Kapajeva

You can call him another man

Kaunas Photography Gallery, Kaunas, Lithuania

    

Mariken Kramer

The Eyes That Fix You in a Formulated Phrase

Multipress, Oslo, Norway

   

Pixy Liao

Experimental Relationship Vol. 1

Jiazazhi Press, Ningbo, China

    

Margo Ovcharenko

Country of Women

Empty Stretch, Moscow

   

Nicolas Polli

Ferox, The Forgotten Archives (1976-2010)

Ciao Press, Lausanne, Switzerland, and Skinnerboox, Jesi, Italy

   

Laurence Rasti

There Are No Homosexuals in Iran

Edition Patrick Frey, Zürich, Switzerland

   

Nick Sethi

Khichdi (Kitchari)

Dashwood Books, New York

   

Clara de Tezanos

Piedra-Padre, Universo

Self-published, Guatemala City

   

Jo Ann Walters

Wood River Blue Pool and Blue Pool Cecilia

Image Text Ithaca, New York

   

Stanley Wolukau-Wanambwa

One Wall a Web

Roma Publications, Amsterdam

   

Masaki Yamamoto

GUTS

Zen Foto Gallery, Tokyo

Dayton, OH - Salt Houses, Hala Alyan's debut novel about a displaced Palestinian family, and We Were Eight Years in Power, Ta-Nehisi Coates's exploration of race and identity through the lens of the Obama presidency, today were named the winners of the 2018 Dayton Literary Peace Prize for fiction and nonfiction, respectively.

Pachinko, Min Jin Lee's debut novel following four generations of a Korean-Japanese family, was named runner-up for fiction, while Reading with Patrick, Michelle Kuo's memoir of mentoring a teenager from one of the poorest counties in the U.S, was named the nonfiction runner-up.  

Inspired by the 1995 Dayton Peace Accords that ended the war in Bosnia, The Dayton Literary Peace Prize is the only international literary peace prize awarded in the United States. The Prize celebrates the power of literature to promote peace, social justice, and global understanding. This year's winners will be honored at a gala ceremony hosted by journalist and author Wil Haygood (The Butler and Showdown. a 2016 finalist for the Dayton Literary Peace Prize in nonfiction) in Dayton on October 28th. Winners receive a $10,000 honorarium and runners-up receive $5,000. 

"This year's winners and runners-up remind us just how much individual lives are shaped by broader political circumstances - and how abruptly those circumstances can change," said Sharon Rab, founder and chair of the Dayton Literary Peace Prize Foundation. "From Alyan's portrait of characters repeatedly displaced by an age-old conflict to Coates's incisive analysis of the modern US presidency, these books help us view politics through both an emotional and an intellectual lens, strengthening our empathy while sharpening our powers of political perception."

The 2018 Dayton Literary Peace Prize in Fiction:

Hala Alyan's heartbreaking debut novel, Salt Houses (Houghton, Mifflin, Harcourt), follows three generations of a Palestinian family as they are uprooted by one military clash after another, giving up their home, their land, and their story as they know it and scattering throughout the world. A lyrical examination of displacement, belonging, and family, the book humanizes an age-old conflict, illuminating the experiences of all refugees and challenging readers to confront that most devastating of all truths: you can’t go home again.

On receiving the prize, Alyan said: “One of my earliest memories is watching my father’s face light up as I chatted excitedly about the first book I read on my own. It’s taken me years to truly understand that moment—that, in that instant, my father witnessed my foray into the sacred world of fiction, of perspective-taking and erasing borders, of understanding the complexity of others. He watched me untangle from the confines of immigration, the Gulf War we’d just fled from, and the ensuing otherness, and when I began to write my own stories, that sense of freedom magnified. Writing has taught me to pay homage to my ancestors and envision the world after I am long gone; it has empowered me to tell stories of oppression and restoration, to envision peace as something tangible. I am my most human when I am writing, my most alert and engaged and compassionate. To have my novel seen as a conduit for peace-building is remarkably humbling. Thank you for the honor of the Dayton Literary Peace Prize.”  

The 2018 Dayton Literary Peace Prize in Nonfiction:

We Were Eight Years in Power (One World PRH) is a collection of essays by Ta-Nehisi Coates, one of America’s most influential voices. Revisiting each year of the Obama administration through Coates's own experiences, observations, and intellectual development, the book offers a vital account of eight years that began with great hope of black progress and ended with an election and  vicious backlash that fully illuminated the tragedy of the Obama era. 

The 2018 Dayton Literary Peace Prize Runner-Up in Fiction:

In Pachinko (Grand Central), Min Jin Lee brings the historical sweep of Dickens and Tolstoy to the saga of four generations of a poor Korean immigrant family who, exiled from a homeland they never knew, fight to control their destinies in 20th-century Japan. As they encounter both catastrophes and great joy, the novel's exceptional protagonists confront enduring questions of faith, family, and identity.

Lee said: “The world is broken because we do not love enough. War, peace, and art require at least three elements: imagination, will, and action - and ironically, all three are enacted because men and women feel love. This is the central paradox - we love - the other, self, family, faith, or nation - and we use that love - of something, or someone, for anything - to justify our violence, compromises, and creation. We know that peace is far more difficult than war or art, because peace requires both forgiveness and restraint; so somehow, we must learn to love peace far more than war. If literature bears witness to true narrative and if it awakens compassion, reconciliation may indeed be possible. Where men and women have failed to love, literature may inspire greater love for all those we'd once thought we feared or hated. I write fiction because I believe that our love can refine our worse nature. I am deeply honored to join the Dayton Literary Peace Prize family of writers as we pursue our collective call toward global peace."

The 2018 Dayton Literary Peace Prize Runner-Up in Nonfiction:

In her stirring memoir Reading with Patrick (Random House), Michelle Kuo, the child of Taiwanese immigrants, shares the story of her complicated but rewarding mentorship of Patrick Browning, a teenaged student from one of the poorest counties in the U.S., and his remarkable literary and personal awakening.

Kuo said: “By telling the story of an incarcerated person learning to read and write, I hoped to show how books can charge an inner life with imagination and beauty. I sought to grapple openly with the question: What do we owe each other in a world of inequality, and how can we do the hard work of coming to know one another? Reading together is one way to create a shared world. I am deeply grateful to be recognized by the Dayton Literary Peace Prize. In honoring my book, it honors the idea that there can be no peace without economic and racial equality, and no freedom without literacy.”

Organizers previously announced that writer John Irving, whose novels champion outsiders and often explore the bigotry, intolerance, and hatred directed at sexual minorities, will receive the 2018 Ambassador Richard C. Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award, named in honor of the noted U.S. diplomat who helped negotiate the Dayton Peace Accords.

To be eligible for the 2018 awards, English-language books must have been published or translated into English in 2017 and address the theme of peace on a variety of levels, such as between individuals, among families and communities, or among nations, religions, or ethnic groups.

judging panel of prominent writers selected the winners and runners-up, including Lesley Nneka Arimah (What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky), Robin Hemley (Reply All: Stories; Nola: A Memoir of Faith, Art, and Madness; Invented Eden: The Elusive, Disputed History of the Tasaday), Susan Southard (Nagasaki: Life After Nuclear War), and Alan Taylor (William Cooper’s Town; The Internal Enemy).

Timothy Rub, the George D. Widener Director and Chief Executive Officer at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, announced today that Louis Marchesano will become the Museum’s new Audrey and William H. Helfand Senior Curator of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs, succeeding Innis Shoemaker who retired earlier this year. The appointment of this new department head concludes a national search that yielded an exceptional group of candidates.

Dr. Marchesano has served as Curator of Prints and Drawings at the Getty Research Institute (GRI) in Los Angeles since 2002. In this capacity he has organized a robust schedule of exhibitions and programs on a broad range of subjects. He has also played a central role in the development of the GRI’s collection of prints and drawings, substantially increasing the number of works on paper ranging from the fifteenth through twentieth centuries.

After completing a BA with honors in the Visual Arts from the University of Western Ontario in 1987, Marchesano received an MA (1990) and PhD (2001) in the History of Art from Cornell University. Dr. Marchesano has written and lectured on topics ranging from antiquarianism in the Renaissance and Baroque and French prints from the period of the Revolution to the end of the Bourbon Restoration to the graphic work of the German artist Käthe Kollwitz. Much of his scholarship has focused on the history of printmaking in France from the seventeenth through the nineteenth centuries, and for these contributions the French government this year bestowed upon him the honor of Chevalier de l’Ordre des Arts et des Lettres (Knight of the Order of Arts and Letters).

Timothy Rub remarked, “Louis will bring a wealth of experience to his new position and has proven himself to be an exceptional leader, a capable administrator, and a valued colleague. He has a strong track record, having worked effectively across the Getty, playing an important role in numerous important initiatives, among them its Collection Development Council at the GRI and the Getty Trust’s digital humanities working groups. It was not only the breadth of his experience but also the breadth of his interests across the field that made Louis such a compelling candidate for this position.”

Louis Marchesano commented: “I am absolutely thrilled to take on such an important position, overseeing a distinguished collection and department, which has recently generated ground-breaking exhibitions and publications on Paul Strand, modern Mexican printmaking, German romantic prints, and self-taught art from the Bonovitz collection. With holdings of such extraordinary breadth and depth, I am also looking forward to strategically expanding the collection. And I’m especially excited about working with colleagues across the museum and thinking creatively about new exhibitions and research projects. This is a great moment to be joining the PMA given its ambitious campaign to transform and renew the institution.”

Dr. Marchesano is expected to begin his duties in January of 2019. His appointment follows the tenure of the distinguished curator Innis Shoemaker who served the institution for more than 30 years, overseeing a period of substantial growth, particularly in works on paper by African American artists, Mexican modernist prints, Italian drawings, and most notably, the Julian Levy collection of photographs and the Paul Strand collection.

About the Department of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs
The Department of Prints, Drawings, and Photographs is responsible for the largest group of objects in the Museum’s collections. It constitutes a collection of collections, developed through large en-bloc acquisitions, some of them bearing the imprint of successive major collectors, ranging from A. E. Gallatin and Louise and Walter Arensberg to Muriel and Philip Berman. They comprise remarkable records of taste, erudition, and philanthropy, and play an active role in shaping and illuminating both the history of art and the history of museum development in the late 19th and early 20th century.

The print collection is among the most significant in the United States, including over 110,000 European, Latin and North American, and Japanese prints. It encompasses a full range of print techniques and includes a collection of technical materials, such as plates, blocks, stones, screens, and tools, which are regularly used to help visitors understand the printmaking process. The photography collection includes over 28,000 examples from the medium’s infancy in the 19th century to the very present. The collection of drawings—numbering almost 12,000—contains many individual masterpieces as well as groups that strengthen, support, and increase the didactic potential of works of art in other curatorial departments in the Museum. Also noteworthy are maps, illuminated manuscripts, and artists’ books that add to the breadth of the collection.

 

The Northern & Southern California Chapters of the Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association of America would like to announce the California Young Book Collector's Prize

Most great collectors started when they were young, and most great collections started with a passion for a particular object or subject. When these objects are books and manuscripts, the collectors are called bibliophiles, or lovers of the book. 

Curiously, the love of books continues unabated today, despite their increasing rarity and the rapid growth of digital media. Some might even argue that the printed page has taken on a new meaning and cultural resonance in our era of computers and electronic texts.  

In recognition of the next generation of bibliophiles, we have created The California Young Book Collector’s Prize. The competition is open to collectors aged 35 and under who are living in California. All collections of books, manuscripts, and ephemera are welcome, no matter their monetary value or subject. The collections will be judged on their thoroughness, the approach to their subject, and the seriousness which with the collector has catalogued his or her material. 

The winner of the competition will be awarded:

     1. A gift certificate of $500 to spend at the 2019 California International Antiquarian Book Fair

    2. An exhibition of the winner’s collection to be presented in a showcase at the book fair

    3. A stipend of $250 towards exhibition expenses (to help cover travel costs, showcase labels, and insurance)

    4. And a year’s membership to the Book Club of California

The deadline for submission is December 1st, 2018, and the winner will be notified by January 5th, 2019. The exhibit will be at the 52nd California International Antiquarian Book Fair held in Oakland, CA, from 8-10 February, 2019; the winner will be responsible for insuring his or her collection and for setting-up the exhibition on February 7th and taking it down on the evening of February 10th. The showcase will be for exhibition only; no parts of the collection can be offered for sale during the fair. 

To participate in the competition you need to submit the following materials as a .pdf file:

    1. Your age and contact information, including mailing address, telephone number, and email.

    2. A statement of no more than 1000 words concerning your collection. This should include a summary of your collection; your reason for forming the collection; a description of one or two of your most prized items (supported by photographs); and a description of a few desiderata, those works that you lack, but hope to find one day to add to your collection. All items in the collection must be owned by you, the collector.

Submissions should be sent as a .pdf file to Ben Kinmont, Chair of the Northern California Chapter of the ABAA, at bkinmont@gmail.com no later than December 1st, 2018."

 

San Marino, CA— The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens announced today plans to mark its centennial with a year-long series of exhibitions and programs celebrating the impact of the research and educational institution’s incomparable collections while exploring the interdisciplinary ideas that will shape the next 100 years.

To punctuate the announcement, a new variety of rose, ‘Huntington’s Hundredth’, will be unveiled on Saturday at this year’s annual Huntington Ball. The pastel yellow and orchid pink floribunda was hybridized in 2009 by Tom Carruth, The Huntington’s E. L. and Ruth B. Shannon Curator of the Rose Collection and will become available for sale for the first time in January 2019.

“From the tens of thousands of researchers who have studied The Huntington’s collections over the past century and the countless people their research has touched, to the millions of visitors who have explored the galleries and gardens here, this institution’s reach is immeasurable,” said Huntington President Karen R. Lawrence. “We are seizing this moment not only to reflect on the legacy of our past, but also to explore unexpected synergies across the library, art, and botanical collections; to steward and grow those collections; and to welcome new audiences of scholars, artists, and the public whom they will inspire. We want to encourage creative exploration of the relationship among the humanities, the arts, and nature.”

It was in August 1919 that railroad and real estate businessman Henry Edwards Huntington (1850-1927) and his wife Arabella (1851-1924) drafted the trust indenture document that established The Huntington as a collections-based research and educational institution for the public’s benefit. Twelve miles from downtown Los Angeles, their Gilded Age estate— one of the first cultural centers in Southern California—opened to the public in 1928. Since that time, the collections have grown exponentially, and the institution has become a premier research center and a world leader in the promotion and preservation of the humanities, and its galleries and botanical gardens have become beloved destinations to some 750,000 visitors each year. With its extensive historical and literary archives, signature holdings of European and American art, and 120 acres of astonishingly varied botanical collections, “The Huntington has, in its first 100 years, by all estimates, established itself as a vital cultural treasure,” Lawrence said. 

Exhibitions, Events, Outreach, and Collaborations
The Huntington’s Centennial year opens in September 2019 with “Nineteen Nineteen,” a major exhibition in the MaryLou and George Boone Gallery that draws from the library, art, and botanical collections to examine that historic year across the globe and the founding of The Huntington in the context of international events. In October 2019, “What Now: Collecting for the Library” opens in the Library’s West Hall, the first exhibition of a two-part series highlighting a wide variety of recent acquisitions of rare books and manuscripts. Also opening in the fall of 2019 is the fourth installment of The Huntington’s /five initiative, a collaboration in which contemporary artists respond to a theme drawn from The Huntington’s collections, culminating in an exhibition.

Throughout the celebration year, The Huntington will offer a special series of programs that look at the collections in new ways and explore their potential impact into the future. The Huntington’s audiences will have the opportunity to experience Centennial-oriented content through a dedicated website inviting visitors to share their memories and impressions of The Huntington through text and images. New displays in the Mapel Orientation Gallery are planned as well. 

The Huntington’s education division—which engages some 15,000 school children and their teachers each year—will continue its partnerships and outreach with Southern California schools by adding a special Centennial-themed tour to its list of programs. And to encourage the next generation of life-long learners, 100 free Huntington memberships will be offered to students attending Southern California colleges and universities.

“During our Centennial celebration, we want to engage people in The Huntington as an unparalleled repository of our history and, at the same time, as a site of increasing relevance to the way we think, create, and live our lives today” said Lawrence. “It may seem that our botanical gardens are the only organic parts of our collections, but in fact, our library and art collections are organic as well, growing and changing their physical and interpretive shape. With ‘Nineteen Nineteen,’ our curators have the chance to identify objects from across the library, art, and botanical collections to tell fascinating stories about intellectual, aesthetic, and natural history, and suggest new directions for thought. Why did Henry Huntington, a wealthy industrialist, collect rare books, manuscripts, and fine art? Why did he develop among the first avocado orchards and desert gardens in Southern California? We believe it is because the arts, humanities, and the natural world added both pleasure and meaning to his existence. The Huntington is a wondrous enterprise that never ceases to delight its visitors in the same existential way.”

Details about all The Huntington’s Centennial celebration exhibitions and programming will unfurl over the coming year. 

‘Huntington’s Hundredth’ Rose - Available beginning January 2019
The ‘Huntington’s Hundredth’ rose will be available for sale at The Huntington beginning in January (as bare-root plants at the monthly Second Thursday Garden Talk and Sale on Jan. 10), and at the Spring Plant Sale from April 26th through 28th. “This could easily be one of the top 10 roses from my 40-year rose breeding career,” said Carruth, who enjoyed a long career as an award-winning hybridizer before joining The Huntington’s staff in 2012 as curator of the rose collection. The rose is a cross between one of Carruth’s most popular roses, ‘Julia Child’, with the French variety, ‘Stormy Weather’.

“As it blooms, the flowers open a soft yellow color, and then gradually blush to shades of orchid, pink, and cream,” Carruth said. “Beautiful colors aside, what really makes this variety stand out is the intense fragrance of lemon blossom with a hint of fruit.” The rose has been planted in The Huntington’s historic Rose Garden and will anchor a new Centennial garden display, situated between the Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art and the Rose Hills Foundation Conservatory for Botanical Science.

 

Corina.jpgNew York — The Center for Book Arts Board of Directors is pleased to announce the appointment of Corina Reynolds as Interim Executive Director. Beginning in September, Corina will oversee the operation of the organization, including exhibitions, classes, artists’ residencies and literary programs.

Corina comes to the Center from Small Editions, an independent artists' book publisher, exhibition space, and bindery in Brooklyn which she co-founded and has directed since 2012. Small Editions has worked with over 50 artists to produce more than 35 editions and 20 exhibitions. During this time, she has been an active member of the Center.

Of her new role, Corina says, "I am honored to lead the Center for Book Arts during this period of transition, and grateful to Alex Campos, the Board, and our members and funders, whose hard work and support have helped CBA grow into a vital resource for the book art community. I look forward to working with the staff and board to encourage innovation and excellence as the Center prepares to commemorate its 50-year anniversary."

Board Chair Stephen Bury said of the appointment, “We are thrilled to have someone as passionate for and knowledgeable about the book arts as Corina Reynolds to carry forward the work of the Center during this exciting time. We are committed to our mission of promoting books as a contemporary art form and the Board looks forward to working with Corina as we plan for a promising new chapter.

Please join us in welcoming Corina Reynolds to the Center for Book Arts!”

Image: Corina Reynolds, Interim Executive Director of The Center for Book Arts. Courtesy of the CBA. 

 

The Folio Society is delighted to announce that eight of their titles have been selected as finalists in three categories of the prestigious British Book Design & Production Awards. This is a record number for Folio and the most from an independent publisher this year. In the Literature category, five of the six shortlisted titles are Folio editions. 

The shortlisted titles are: 

The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana (illustrated by Victo Ngai) and The Wanderer and Other Old-English Poems (illustrated by Alan Lee) in the Limited Edition and Fine Binding category 

The Anglo-Saxons (a two-volume set) in Scholarly, Academic and Reference Books category. 

I Am Legend (illustrated by Dave McKean), We (illustrated by Kit Russell), Japanese Tales (illustrated by Yuko Shimizu), The Hundred and One Dalmatians (illustrated by Sara Ogilvie) and The Little Prince (illustrated by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry) in the Literature category 

Kate Grimwade, Production Director at The Folio Society said: ‘The Folio Society is delighted that a record number of our books have been shortlisted for the BBDPA this year. This is a recognition of Folio’s continued commitment to design and production excellence.’ 

The British Book Design & Production Awards is one of the most prestigious literary events in the world of publishing. The awards recognise and promote the excellence of the British book design and production industry by celebrating the best books of the year. The judges look for exceptional production and design, free of typographical errors, with particular emphasis given to excellent layout and standards of typography. The winners will be announced in London on 22nd November. 

Three organizations working to expand literacy and promote reading in the United States and worldwide were awarded the 2018 Library of Congress Literacy Awards at the National Book Festival gala, Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced tonight.

Hayden and philanthropist David M. Rubenstein awarded the top prizes to: Reading Is Fundamental of Washington, D.C.; East Side Community School of New York City; and Instituto Pedagógico para Problemas del Lenguaje of Mexico City.

The Literacy Awards, originated by Rubenstein in 2013, honor organizations doing exemplary, innovative and replicable work, and they spotlight the need for the global community to unite in working for universal literacy.

“Literacy empowers people around the world, giving them the chance for learning, fulfillment and participation in civic life,” said Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden. “Thanks to the generosity of David Rubenstein, the Library of Congress is proud to honor these innovative and exemplary organizations working to raise reading levels. We look forward to their ongoing progress in building a culture of reading.”

Prizes and Recipients

David M. Rubenstein Prize ($150,000)

Reading Is Fundamental, Washington, D.C.

Reading Is Fundamental (RIF) works to create a literate America by inspiring a passion for reading among all children, by providing quality content and engaging communities in the solution to give every child the fundamentals for success. Founded in 1966, RIF is a national nonprofit focused on children’s literacy and, in partnership with a grassroots network of volunteers in schools and communities nationwide, has distributed more than 415 million books and affected the lives of more than 40 million children. Signature programs and resources include: Books for Ownership, enabling children to select age-appropriate books to own; Read for Success, an intervention program addressing literacy backslide during the summer months; Literacy Central, a free digital site for supplemental learning resources aligned with favorite children’s books; Literacy Network, a portal for local literacy partners; and the Reading Log App, used to track and share time spent reading.

American Prize ($50,000)

East Side Community School, New York City

East Side Community School is a 6-12th-grade Title I public school in New York City. During a time when the national focus on high-stakes standardized tests has caused many schools to focus on test prep and quick fixes that may affect students’ interest in reading, East Side has responded differently by creating and sustaining an independent reading program where students read on average over 40 books each year, improve literacy skills, address their social-emotional and political needs through literature, and fall in love with reading. Strong reading instruction, daily extended time to read inside and outside of school, exposure to appealing books and choice, book clubs, author visits, constant conversations around books and a full commitment from all stakeholders has made East Side a national model for the capacity of schools to create a powerful culture of reading.

International Prize ($50,000

Instituto Pedagógico para Problemas del Lenguaje, Mexico City

Instituto Pedagógico para Problemas del Lenguaje (IPPLIAP) is a nonprofit organization founded 50 years ago that is dedicated to supporting deaf children and children with language and learning disabilities, primarily from impoverished families, through educational programs and after-school support. IPPLIAP carries out its mission through specialized programs that guarantee full access to education for these children with literacy at their core, by holding continual reading and writing workshops with children and striving for them to learn the joys of reading, writing and how to become lifelong learners. IPPLIAP believes that literacy is the vehicle to guide any child, to build rational and critical thinking, and to reach a better understanding of themselves and of the complex world in which they live.

The Library of Congress Literacy Awards program also is honoring 15 organizations for their implementation of best practices in literacy promotion. These organizations are:

  • America SCORES, New York City
  • Fundación A Mano Manaba, Jama, Ecuador
  • Learning Ally, Princeton, New Jersey
  • Mango Tree Literacy Lab, Lira, Uganda
  • Minnesota Literacy Council, St. Paul, Minnesota
  • Philadelphia Office of Adult Education, Philadelphia
  • Project Read, Provo, Utah
  • ProLiteracy Worldwide, Syracuse, New York
  • Reach Education, Inc., Washington, D.C.
  • Resources for the Blind, Quezon City, Philippines
  • Sesame Workshop India Trust, New Delhi, India
  • Transformemos Fundación Para El Desarrollo Social, Cundinamarca, Colombia
  • Umuhuza, Kigali, Rwanda
  • Visual Language and Visual Learning (VL2), Washington, D.C.
  • World Possible, Irvine, California

Rubenstein is the co-founder and co-executive chairman of The Carlyle Group. He is a major benefactor of the Library of Congress and the chairman of the Library’s lead donor group, the James Madison Council.

The Library of Congress Literacy Awards are administered by the Library’s Center for the Book, which was created in 1977 by Congress to “stimulate public interest in books and reading.” A public-private partnership, the center sponsors educational programs that reach readers of all ages, nationally and internationally. The center provides leadership for affiliated state centers for the book and nonprofit reading-promotion partners and plays a key role in the Library’s annual National Book Festival. More information on the awards is available at: read.gov/literacyawards.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States - and extensive materials from around the world -both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

Book lovers of all ages came together by the tens of thousands to celebrate reading and meet their favorite authors Saturday at the 18th annual Library of Congress National Book Festival, held at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center. Thousands more watched the festival’s Main Stage streamed live on the Library’s Facebook page.

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden interviewed U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, who launched a children’s book on the festival’s 2,500-seat Main Stage. Hayden also interviewed Jacqueline Woodson, the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, who is debuting two new books this fall.

Hayden announced the 19th National Book Festival will be held Aug. 31, 2019.

“The National Book Festival is a thrilling, immersive experience that gives so many readers a unique opportunity to reflect on great books all day long,” Hayden said. “We are so proud to feature a diverse lineup of more than 100 authors who give visitors a new reading list for the year ahead.”

In total, 13 authors launched new books at the festival - the most new books in the festival’s history - including Sotomayor’s “Turning Pages: My Life Story,” Doris Kearns Goodwin’s “Leadership: In Turbulent Times;” Girl Scouts of the USA CEO Sylvia Acevedo’s “Path to the Stars: My Journey from Girl Scout to Rocket Scientist;” Kate DiCamillo and Harry Bliss’ “Good Rosie!” Meg Medina’s “Merci Suárez Changes Gears;” Jennifer Nielsen’s “Resistance;” David Shannon’s “Grow Up David!” Suzanne Slade’s “Countdown: 2979 Days to the Moon;” David Ezra Stein’s “Interrupting Chicken and the Elephant of Surprise;” Woodson’s “The Day You Begin” and “Harbor Me;” Ellen Hopkins’ “People Kill People;” Hank Phillippi Ryan’s “Trust Me;” and U.S. Poet Laureate Tracy K. Smith’s selections for “American Journal: Fifty Poems for Our Time.”

On the festival’s Fiction Stage, Hayden awarded the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction to acclaimed writer Annie Proulx, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel “The Shipping News” and the short story “Brokeback Mountain.” The prize, one of the Library’s most prestigious awards, honors an American literary writer whose body of work is distinguished for its mastery of the art, originality and imagination.

Proulx urged the crowd to make literacy a top priority for children.

"You can never introduce your child to reading too early," Proulx told the crowd, adding that they should start reading to babies before they're born and as often as possible. "If you repeat this recipe every day ... you will have a smart, intelligent, involved person in your life."

On Friday, Hayden also announced the winners of the 2018 Library of Congress Literacy Awards, honoring organizations for their exemplary, innovative work to confront illiteracy, raise reading levels and promote reading. The top prizes were awarded to: Reading Is Fundamental of Washington, D.C.; East Side Community School of New York City; and Instituto Pedagógico para Problemas del Lenguaje of Mexico City.

The festival’s celebration of reading and writing kicked off earlier in the week with a pinning ceremony for the 2018 National Student Poets, who represent five regions of the country and presented their work on the festival’s Parade of the States Stage.

The National Book Festival is made possible by the generous support of private- and public-sector sponsors who share the Library’s commitment to reading and literacy, led by National Book Festival Co-Chairman David M. Rubenstein. Charter sponsors are the Institute of Museum and Library Services, The Washington Post and Wells Fargo; Patron sponsors are The James Madison Council, the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities; the Champion-level sponsor is PBS; Contributor-level sponsors are National Geographic and Scholastic Inc.; and, in the Friends category, AARP, Booklovers Circle members, Bookshare - a Benetech initiative, Buffy Cafritz, Marshall B. Coyne Foundation Inc., Joseph and Lynn Deutsch, Dollar General Literacy Foundation, Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction administered by The University of Alabama School of Law, The Hay-Adams, The Junior League of Washington, Leon Levy Center for Biography (CUNY), Library of Congress Federal Credit Union, J.J. Medveckis Foundation, Mensa Foundation, Lissa Muscatine and Bradley Graham, Timothy and Diane Naughton, Pizza Hut BOOK IT! Program, Reading Is Fundamental, Small Press Expo (SPX), Split This Rock and the Whittle School & Studios. Media Partners are C-SPAN2’s Book TV, The New York Times, NPR and PBS Books. Those interested in supporting the National Book Festival can contact the Library at devofc@loc.gov.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States - and extensive materials from around the world -both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

The Library of Congress today announced the winners of its “A Book That Shaped Me”: Summer Writing Contest, a program that asks rising fifth- and sixth-graders to reflect on a book that has made a personal impact in their lives.

More than 300 young readers submitted essays to participating public libraries in the Mid-Atlantic region in this seventh year of the contest. Launched in 2012 with the DC Public Library, “A Book That Shaped Me” expanded with the help of public libraries in Washington, D.C., Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. The local libraries offered the contest as part of their summer-reading programs.

Thirty finalists total, from the states that received entries, were chosen in an initial round of judging. The finalists each will receive a $50 gift-card prize.

Judging was conducted by members of the American Association of School Librarians (AASL), a division of the American Library Association (ALA). The AASL works to ensure all elementary- and secondary-school librarians participate as collaborative partners in the teaching and learning process.

The grand-prize judging round, which selected state and grand-prize winners from the pool of state finalists, was conducted by a panel assembled by the Library of Congress that included educators, children’s authors and Library of Congress staff.

Each state winner will receive another $50 gift-card prize. The first-, second- and third-place grand-prize winners will be awarded additional gift-card prizes in the amounts of $200, $150 and $100 respectively.

Grand-prize winners will read their essays during the “A Book That Shaped Me” awards presentation at the Library of Congress National Book Festival. The contest presentation will take place at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, Sept. 1, 2018 at 11:50 a.m. at the Children’s Green Stage and will be emceed by Eun Yang, NBC4 Washington television anchor. 

Grand Prize & State Winners

1st Place Grand Prize & Pennsylvania State Winner
Tyler Williams, Spring City Free Library - Chester County Library System, who wrote about the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling.

2nd Place Grand Prize Winner & Virginia State Winner
Aria Patnaik, Reston Regional Library - Fairfax County Public Library, who wrote about “One for the Murphys” by Lynda Mullay Hunt.

3rd Place Grand Prize & Washington, D.C. Winner
Zuri Kenyatte, Anacostia Neighborhood Library - DC Public Library, who wrote about “Lucky Broken Girl” by Ruth Behar.

Delaware State Winner
Sarah Jane McMann, Hockessin Library - New Castle County Libraries, who wrote about “Harry Potter and The Chamber of Secrets” by J.K. Rowling.

Maryland State Winner
Alyssa Yu, Germantown Library - Montgomery County Public Libraries, who wrote about “Amina’s Voice” by Hena Kahn.

State Finalists (winners indicated by asterisks)

District of Columbia Finalists
Safya Biswal, Chevy Chase Neighborhood Library - DC Public Library
Raphael Fox, Tenley-Friendship Neighborhood Library - DC Public Library
*Zuri Kenyatte, Anacostia Neighborhood Library - DC Public Library
Ben Smith, Chevy Chase Neighborhood Library - DC Public Library
Brooke Talbott, Shaw (Watha T. Daniel) Neighborhood Library - DC Public Library
Miles Walters, Chevy Chase Neighborhood Library - DC Public Library

Maryland Finalists
Brea Ampaw, Montgomery County Public Libraries
Ellyce Butuyan, Connie Morella (Bethesda) Library - Montgomery County Public Libraries
Grace Hollenbach, White Oak Library - Montgomery County Public Libraries
Julliette Mamalian, Potomac Library - Montgomery County Public Libraries
Joseph K. Mathew, Germantown Library - Montgomery County Public Libraries
*Alyssa Yu, Germantown Library - Montgomery County Public Libraries

Virginia Finalists
Bella DeFilippi, Central Library - Arlington Public Library
Deven Hagen, Arlington Public Library
Eleanor G. Hoopengardner, Central Library - Arlington Public Library
Julienne Lim, Montclair Community Library - Prince William County Public Library
*Aria Patnaik, Reston Regional Library - Fairfax County Public Library
Landon Pollard, Bedford Central Library - Bedford Public Library

Delaware Finalists
Maggie Clarke-Fields, Brandywine Hundred Library - New Castle County
Reese Corbett, Dover Public Library
Tianyu Mao, Hockessin Library - New Castle County Libraries
*Sarah Jane McMann, Hockessin Library - New Castle County Libraries
Amrita Rai, Kirkwood Library - New Castle County Libraries
Michelle Ratanraj, Hockessin Library - New Castle County Libraries

Pennsylvania Finalists
Sienna Camlin, Perkasie Branch Library - Bucks County Free Library
Michaela Clement-St. Louis
Brayden Samuelsen, Oley Valley Community Library - Berks County Public Library
Hannah Strawhecker, Avon Grove Library - Chester County Library
Annabelle Troup, Quakertown Library - Bucks County Free Library
*Tyler Williams, Spring City Free Library - Chester County Library

The detailed list of current and previous winners, along with more information about the "A Book That Shaped Me" program, is available at loc.gov/bookfest/kids-teachers/booksthatshape/. For further details, contact booksshapecontest@loc.gov.

The 18th National Book Festival will be held Saturday, Sept. 1 from 9 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. (doors open at 8:30 a.m.) at the Washington Convention Center. The event is free and open to everyone.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States - and extensive materials from around the world -both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

New York - LiveAuctioneers, the world’s leading online marketplace for exceptional fine art, antiques and vintage collectibles, has released its Mid-Year 2018 Report confirming record results and a year-over-year pattern of growth unrivaled in the industry.

“In the first six months of 2018, LiveAuctioneers delivered winning bidders on more than 300,000 items and processed billions of dollars in winning bids and underbids,” said LiveAuctioneers CEO, Phil Michaelson. “We dramatically outperformed the competition, and our accelerating growth and Internet best practices continue to drive the highest-quality consignments to auction houses that are on the LiveAuctioneers platform. It has been a source of great pride for our team to be the lowest-cost provider of premium services and yet drive the best results in the industry.”

The first half of the year comparisons on a year-over-year basis include:

  • An increase of 37% more bids
  • An industry-leading average sell-through rate of 24.7%
  • An increase of more than 50,000 new bidders, on average, every month
  • Web and mobile traffic of over 23 million visits, up 34%
  • Over 133,000 consignments directed, an increase of more than 27%
  • Record online-auction results for Lucio Fontana art ($210,000), blockchain art ($140,000), Atsuko Tanaka art ($88,000), Finn Juhl furniture ($60,000) and more 

LiveAuctioneers has continued to invest in new solutions for growing its auction house partners’ sales and increasing the flow of their respective consignments. Customer-driven innovations like Custom Auction Software, Auction Previews, Timed Auctions, and payment by cryptocurrency are converting traditional ecommerce shoppers to live-auction winners through LiveAuctioneers. “We out-execute the competition, and auction houses on our platform are enjoying an increase of up to 40% in the number of items sold as compared to the first half of 2017,” Michaelson said. LiveAuctioneers’ free auction price results database, with over 21 million listings, is now faster to search and continues to be the leading resource for appraisers and consignors seeking auctioneers with whom to place consignments.

“Many other exciting improvements are in the pipeline for later this year,” Michaelson said. “The incredible results LiveAuctioneers achieved in the first half of 2018 are just the beginning. Our goal is to empower auction-house partners with tools and marketing products that take their sales to the next level. Our business model ensures alignment. We focus all of our energy on enabling partners to grow their respective businesses. If we do that effectively, our success takes care of itself.”

Click to view LiveAuctioneers’ 2018 mid-year results.

In an effort to aid in the recovery of materials missing as a result of the Carnegie Library theft, the ABAA requests the assistance of the public in bringing its attention to the list of items believed stolen. A downloadable pdf of same can be found here:

<https://www.abaa.org/blog/post/carnegie-library-theft>

Should any member of the public identify having purchased or otherwise having knowledge of the disposition or current location of any items from the Carnegie Library—whether on this list or not—please contact one of the following detectives from Allegheny County District Attorney’s Office:

· Det. Fran Laquatra 

  (412) 388-5305 

  flaquatra@alleghenycountyda.us

· Det. Perann Tansmore                   

  (412) 388-5307                           

  ptansmore@alleghenycountyda.us         `

· Det. Lyle Graber                           

  (412) 388-5316                           

  lgraber@alleghenycountyda.us

Please note, the detectives do not have reason to believe that anyone who may have purchased any of these items was necessarily aware that the material had been reported stolen.

The ABAA appreciates your attention and assistance with respect to this grave matter. Please check our post from March for further details, including additional information on collection markings: https://www.abaa.org/blog/post/pittsburgh-area-thefts.

Sincerely,

Vic Zoschak

President, ABAA

Brad Johnson

Chair, ABAA Security Committee

Susan Benne

Executive Director, ABAA

 

Dayton, Ohio - Recognizing the power of literature to promote peace and reconciliation, the Dayton Literary Peace Prize Foundation today announced the finalists for the 2018 Dayton Literary Peace Prize in fiction and nonfiction.

Inspired by the 1995 Dayton Peace Accords that ended the war in Bosnia, The Dayton Literary Peace Prize is the only international literary peace prize awarded in the United States. The Prize celebrates the power of literature to promote peace, justice, and global understanding. This year's winners will be honored at a gala ceremony in Dayton on October 28th.

Writer John Irving, whose novels champion outsiders and often explore the bigotry, intolerance, and hatred directed at sexual minorities, will receive the 2018 The Ambassador Richard C. Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award, named in honor of the noted U.S. diplomat who helped negotiate the Dayton Peace Accords.

The full list of finalists can be found below and at www.daytonliterarypeaceprize.org.

"Many of this year's finalists explore the concept of 'home' at a time when more and more people find themselves forced to leave theirs, whether because of war, poverty, political turmoil, or dreams of new opportunities," said Sharon Rab, Chair of the Dayton Literary Peace Prize Foundation. "These books help the reader cultivate their ability to understand and empathize with people from very different backgrounds than their own - an ability that is becoming increasingly vital in today's turbulent world." 

The 2018 Dayton Literary Peace Prize fiction finalists are

  • Exit West by Mohsin Hamid (Riverhead): An astonishingly timely love story that brilliantly imagines the forces that transform ordinary people into refugees and the impossible choices that follow.
  • Go, Went, Gone by Jenny Erpenbeck (New Directions): A scathing indictment of Western policy toward the European refugee crisis, but also a touching portrait of a Berlin man who finds he has more in common with his city’s African refugees than he realizes.
  • Pachinko by Min Jin Lee (Grand Central): Exiled from a homeland they never knew, four generations of a poor Korean immigrant family fight to control their destinies. 
  • Salt Houses by Hala Alyan (Houghton, Mifflin, Harcourt): A heartbreaking story that follows three generations of a Palestinian family and asks us to confront that most devastating of all truths: you can’t go home again.
  • Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward (Scribner): A family makes the trip from their Gulf Coast town to the Mississippi State Penitentiary, testing the strength of their emotional bonds and the pull of a collective history.
  • Spaceman of Bohemia by Jaroslav Kalfař (Little, Brown): Raised in the Czech countryside by his doting grandparents, Jakub Procházka has risen from small-time scientist to become the country's first astronaut. A dangerous solo mission to Venus offers him the chance at heroism he's always dreamed of -- and a way to atone for his father's sins as a Communist informer.   

The 2018 Dayton Literary Peace Prize nonfiction finalists are

  • Enduring Vietnam by James Wright (St. Martin’s Press): A recounting of the experiences of the young Americans who fought in Vietnam and of the families who mourned those who did not return.
  • Ghost of the Innocent Man by Benjamin Rachlin (Little, Brown): This gripping account of one man's long road to freedom provides a picture of wrongful conviction and of the opportunity for meaningful reform, forever altering how we understand our criminal justice system.
  • Lolas’ House by M. Erdina Galang (Northwestern U. Press): The stories of sixteen Filipino “comfort women” are told in unprecedented detail in what is not only testimony and documentation, but a book of witness, of survival, and of the female body. 
  • Reading with Patrick by Michelle Kuo (Random House): In this stirring memoir, Kuo, the child of Taiwanese immigrants, shares the story of her complicated but rewarding mentorship of Patrick Browning, a teenaged student from one of the poorest counties in the U.S., and his remarkable literary and personal awakening.
  • The Newcomers by Helen Thorpe (Scribner): Helen Thorpe’s intensive, year-long reporting puts a human face on the U.S. refugee population through an intimate look at the lives of 22 teenagers enrolled in a beginner-level English Language Acquisition class at South High School in Denver, Colorado. 
  • We Were Eight Years in Power by Ta-Nehisi Coates (One World PRH): “Biting cultural and political analysis... reflects on race, Barack Obama’s presidency and its jarring aftermath, and [Coates’s] own evolution as a writer in eight stunningly incisive essays.” Kirkus Reviews (starred review) 

A winner and runner-up in fiction and nonfiction will be announced on September 18. Winners receive a $10,000 honorarium and runners-up receive $2,500. Finalists will be reviewed by a judging panel of prominent writers including Lesley Nneka Arimah (What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky), Robin Hemley (Reply All: Stories, Nola: A Memoir of Faith, Art, and Madness, Invented Eden: The Elusive, Disputed History of the Tasaday), Susan Southard (Nagasaki: Life After Nuclear War), and Alan Taylor (William Cooper’s Town, The Internal Enemy).

To be eligible for the 2018 awards, English-language books had to be published or translated into English in 2017 and address the theme of peace on a variety of levels, such as between individuals, among families and communities, or between nations, religions, or ethnic groups.

 

Pathe.jpgNew York - Poster Auctions International, Inc., has unveiled its all-new Poster Price Guide, an expanded and revamped version of its poster-dedicated database, consolidating a full pricing history of over 40,000 of the rarest vintage posters sold in 75 proprietary auctions over the past 33 years. It’s a must-have reference tool for poster collectors and dealers worldwide.

The new Poster Price Guide includes a new, mobile-responsive database, larger images and links to auction listings, with all relevant details (to include references, sizes and printer and historical details). Poster Auctions International, Inc., has also redone the user interface, allowing for easier browsing and searching. Even the technologically challenged will find it very simple to navigate.

Access is competitively priced, at just $4.99 per week, $14.99 per month or $149.99 for a year. “It’s an essential tool for collectors, auctioneers, and scholars,” company president Jack Rennert said. “Since you have a full history - every poster, estimated price and final sale - you can learn about sales trends for individual posters, artists or the artistic movements, such as Art Nouveau.”

Since the late 1980s, Poster Auctions International, Inc., has held 3-4 auctions a year. Poster aficionados, enthusiasts, collectors, galleries, and leading art museums around the world value it as one of their most trusted venues for successful consignments, unique buying opportunities, an unequaled experience in the field, and an impeccable source for top quality in original poster art.

Poster Auctions International, Inc.’s gallery, located at 26 West 17th Street in New York City, hosts rotating exhibitions of original poster art. Additionally, it offers for sale a wide catalogue of “Contemporary Classics” poster originals from the 1960s to the 1980s, with specialties in local New York topics, plus late 20th-century Polish, Japanese, and Israeli designers and more.

The gallery is also a veritable bookstore of research and coffee-table volumes on poster art, as well as an extensive research archive, open to the public by appointment. Poster Auctions International, Inc., regrets that it can sell, and accept for consignment, only poster originals.

Jack Rennert is regarded as one of the world’s foremost authorities on rare vintage posters. He’s authored (either solo or in collaboration,) two dozen books on poster art, including catalogue raisonnés for Leonetto Cappiello and Alphonse Mucha; studies on bicycle and circus posters; and Buffalo Bill’s Wild West. His book Posters of the Belle Epoque has sold over 30,000 copies.

Rennert is currently at work on the definitive catalogue of Edward Penfield’s graphic art. He was a consultant at Time-Life Books for the poster section of the Collectibles Encyclopedia and has organized poster exhibitions around the country, including the Lincoln Center Museum for the Performing Arts, Radio City Music Hall, the French Embassy and banks and corporate buildings. 

To learn more about Poster Auctions International, Inc., visit www.posterauctions.com. To schedule a gallery appointment, call (212) 787-4000, or e-mail to info@postersplease.com.

Image: Pathe (1932), a vinyl-record poster by the French illustrator A.M. Cassandre (Alphonse Mouron, 1901-1968), sold for $96,000 at Poster Auctions International, Inc., on March 12, 2017.

Furthermore grants in publishing, a program of the J. M. Kaplan Fund, is pleased to announce the Short List for the 2018 Alice Award. This year, the sixth year of the Alice, $25,000 will be given for the Alice Award and $5,000 to each of the shortlisted books. 

Debi Cornwall: Welcome to Camp America, Inside Guantánamo Bay

Radius Books

Santa Fe, New Mexico 

“O’er the Wide and Tractless Sea:” Original Art of the Yankee Whale Hunt

New Bedford Whaling Museum

New Bedford, Massachusetts

Visual Voyages: Images of Latin American Nature from Columbus to Darwin

Yale University Press

London, United Kingdom; New Haven, Connecticut

Furthermore received over 100 submissions for the 2018 Alice, including books that have received funding from Furthermore and are automatically considered for the Award. The Alice 2018 shortlisted books are geographically diverse and all three have been recognized for focusing attention on subjects that are culturally significant in their various fields and not considered of broad general interest by mainstream publishers.  The books meet the criteria of the Alice as being “well-made illustrated books, that afford a special sense of intimacy.”

In addition to taking us inside Guantanámo Bay and raising questions for the reader to ponder through photographs and text, the design of Debi Cornwall:  Welcome to Camp America has an exposed binding and individual sheets that are not stitched into the binding.  The book, published by Radius Books a non-profit publisher located in Santa Fe, New Mexico, accompanied an exhibition that opened at the Steven Kasher Gallery in New York City and was then exhibited at the Fotofest Biennial, Houston, Texas and the Philadelphia Photo Art Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

The subject of American whaling is outlined with text, drawings, paintings, journal pages, posters, and other ephemera in a beautifully designed book written by Michael P. Dyer and entitled: “O’er the Wide and Tractless Sea:” Original Art of the Yankee Whale Hunt.  The book was published by the New Bedford Whaling Museum, New Bedford, Massachusetts. 

Visual Voyages: Images of Latin American Nature from Columbus to Darwin, published by Yale University Press in New Haven, Connecticut and London, United Kingdom, positions Latin America as a source of artistic and scientific study and connects this history with what was happening in Europe during the same time period. Visual Voyages was published in collaboration with the Huntington Library, San Marino, California to accompany the exhibition with the same title. 

ALICE JURY:

R.O. Blechman, Illustrator

Paula Cooper, Director, Paula Cooper Gallery

David Godine, Publisher

Sharon Helgason Gallagher, President & Publisher, Artbook/D.A.P.

Ian Wardropper, Director, the Frick Collection

Chair: Jock Reynolds, Former Director, Yale University Art Gallery  

THE ALICE AWARD

The $25,000 Alice award, inaugurated in 2013 and administered by Furthermore grants in publishing, is given to a book that represents excellence in all aspects of the work—from idea to design to quality of production. This is the sixth Alice Award and $160,000 will have been contributed to institutions in support of illustrated publications when the Alice is presented in October. The book receiving the Alice will be announced on the Furthermore website (furthermore.org) on Monday, 8 October at 12:00 noon. 

Every book receiving a grant from Furthermore is eligible for the Alice.  Books not receiving funding from Furthermore may be submitted for consideration for the Alice if they are a 501(c)3 organization and have acted as a partner in the book’s production.  The submission process opens on 1 January and closes on 1 April.  Books published in the calendar year prior and up to the submission deadline will be considered. 

The Alice Award will be presented on Monday, 29 October 2018 at the Strand Book Store.  

ALICE M. KAPLAN:

The Alice honors Alice M. Kaplan, who was the co-founder of the J. M. Kaplan Fund. Mrs. Kaplan energetically encouraged the Kaplan Fund to support music, dance, libraries, and the visual arts. Joan K. Davidson, Ms. Kaplan's daughter, who is the founder and president of Furthermore and president emeritus of the Kaplan Fund, said, "My mother loved and collected the handsome illustrated book as itself a work of art, and since that kind of book depends upon the efforts of many creators—writer, designer, editor, and publisher—it is a commitment to that joint effort that the Alice will acknowledge and celebrate.”

Furthermore, founded in 1995, is a unique form of philanthropic support for nonfiction publishing that has given grants to nearly 1,200 publication projects—for writing, research, illustrations, editing, indexing, printing and binding, and more—totaling over $5 million. In establishing the Alice, Furthermore celebrates the program’s history of honoring outstanding book publishing and furthering its goal to provide significant support for the continuing creation of timeless and beautiful books. Furthermore is a program of the J. M. Kaplan Fund which was founded in 1945 by Jacob M. Kaplan.

New York - The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem acquired several important manuscripts related to the landmark work The Autobiography of Malcolm X - manuscripts that will now be available to the public for the first time.

The internationally-renowned New York Public Library research center acquired the items at auction, including:

  • The full 241-page manuscript of The Autobiography of Malcolm X with handwritten corrections and notes from both Malcolm X and collaborator Alex Haley.
  • A previously unpublished chapter from the book, believed to be omitted from publication after Malcolm X’s assassination. The 25-page typewritten chapter - titled “The Negro” - is thought to be one of three unpublished chapters in existence. It is as yet unclear why the chapters were removed.
  • A series of literal and literary “fragments,” or short notes and drafts by Malcolm X written or typed on small pieces of paper.

All three important acquisitions related to the Nation of Islam minister and civil rights leader will soon be accessible at the Schomburg Center - marking the first time that members of the public will be able to see them. The items were previously held by a private collector, who acquired them at the sale of Alex Haley’s estate in 1992.

“These materials are extremely significant, as they can provide researchers with extensive new insights into the writing process and thoughts of one of the most important and influential figures and books of the 20th Century,” said Schomburg Center Director Kevin Young. “The Autobiography of Malcolm X is a monumental work; to actually see how that book took shape through Malcolm X’s handwritten corrections and notes is very powerful. Additionally, the omitted chapter, believed to be removed after Malcolm X’s death, places the work in a new context, and provide an understanding as to why it was excluded from the book in the first place. The possibilities for new revelations are nearly endless, and we are so proud that the Schomburg Center can bring this material to light for the first time.”

The materials will arrive at the Schomburg Center in the coming weeks. Scholars interested in using the materials must make an appointment with the Schomburg Center’s Manuscripts, Archives, and Rare Books Division. More information can be found at Schomburg.org.

The Schomburg Center already holds and makes accessible to scholars over 16 linear feet of Malcolm X manuscript material, including a diary, letters, speeches, photographs, and journals. Those items are on long-term loan at the Schomburg Center from Malcolm X’s family.

 

Screen Shot 2018-07-24 at 10.26.11 AM.pngLondon—Monday 30th July is the 200th anniversary of the birth of Emily Brontë who wrote Wuthering Heights. Peter Harrington, the UK’s largest rare bookseller, is delighted to offer a first American edition of Wuthering Heights; an exceedingly rare collection of poems published by Emily, Charlotte and Anne Brontë and library sets of the Brontë sisters’ novels, for sale.

Wuthering Heights was published in 1847 under the pseudonym Ellis Bell and shocked readers with its ill-fated and unconventional relationship between Heathcliff and Cathy. Emily Brontë’s name didn’t appear in the first edition and she died in 1848 just a year after it was published, at the age of 30, without knowing how famous her and her novel would become.

This year also marks the 40th anniversary of the song ‘Wuthering Heights’ by Kate Bush. It was released in 1978 and was inspired by Emily Brontë’s novel and the fact that Kate Bush shares a birthday with Emily Brontë. Kate Bush will be 60 on Monday 30th July.

As Pom Harrington the owner of Peter Harrington says “Emily Brontë only wrote one novel which became a literary classic after her death. The first and second English editions of Wuthering Heights are extremely rare, so we are pleased to be able to offer this first American edition of her famous novel for sale. Emily along with Charlotte and Anne also published ‘Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell’, (their pseudonyms), in 1846 which was the Brontë sisters first publication and we are delighted to have one of the first 1,000 copies of this very rare book for sale too.”  

This is an excellent copy of the first American edition, second overall edition of Wuthering Heights, published in New York in April 1848 by Harpers and Brothers and priced at 75 cents. The book does not contain Emily Brontë’s name and the publisher on the title page misattributed the book to Charlotte Brontë saying ‘By the author of Jane Eyre’.

The first English edition of Wuthering Heights was published in 1847 and the second English edition in December 1850, after the American edition. The first edition was rushed out by the publisher Thomas Cautley Newby in December 1847 to try and capitalize on the unexpected success of Jane Eyre, which was published by one of Newby’s rivals. Newby then embarked on an advertising campaign to confuse the identity of the three Bell “brothers”, suggesting that all the novels were the work of one person which led to the mistaken attribution on the title page of this edition.

Peter Harrington is a member of the Antiquarian Booksellers' Association and offers an unconditional guarantee of every item’s authenticity and completeness as described.

Image: Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë, 1848 ($11,300) 

51f97461d64d50eb3c0f907f_1100x660.jpgNew York—The Morgan Library & Museum is proud to announce the gift of Wall Drawing 552D by the LeWitt Family, in honor of Richard and Ronay Menschel. This large-scale drawing will be on view at the Morgan beginning summer 2018.  As one of the pioneers of Conceptual art, LeWitt first became famous for his three-dimensional structures based on variations on the square and the cube. Turning to drawing shortly after, LeWitt radically transformed the medium through innovative approaches such as drawing directly on the wall.

In celebration of his legacy, Wall Drawing 552D will be presented in Gilbert Court for at least two years. LeWitt’s tilted cube playfully complements Renzo Piano’s geometric architecture, notably the nearby Clare Eddy Thaw Gallery, informally referred to as “the cube.”

In a radical gesture, LeWitt made his first wall drawing by drawing directly on the wall in pencil, for an exhibition at Paula Cooper Gallery in 1968. “In conceptual art the idea or concept is the most important aspect of the work,” wrote LeWitt in 1967, “All of the planning and decisions are made beforehand and the execution is a perfunctory affair.” Consistent with his groundbreaking writings on the subject, each wall drawing exists primarily as a set of detailed written instructions, which are then executed by draftspersons. At the end of exhibition, the drawing is painted over, challenging conventional notions of artistic authorship and status. Visitors will be able to witness the installation process for Wall Drawing 552D between June 29 and August 22, 2018. 

LeWitt conceived over a thousand such wall drawings using graphite, colored pencil, crayon, ink, ink wash, and acrylic. Many of LeWitt’s wall drawings from the 1980s feature the cube and its derivative forms, but with a heightened interest in color and perception. To achieve rich and luminous surfaces—inspired by his visits to Italian Renaissance frescoes—LeWitt devised a specific system of superimposing pigments, layer upon wet layer, with ink-soaked rags

Several wall drawings are visible today in public spaces in Manhattan, such as the lobby of the Museum of Modern Art, the Jewish Museum, the lobby of 26 Federal Plaza, and the 59th Street-Columbus Circle subway station. However, Wall Drawing 552D is a rare example of LeWitt’s use of ink washes. First conceived and created in 1987 at the Royal Scottish Academy in Edinburgh, Scotland, it will be approximately 20 feet high and 30 feet wide. 

“Sol LeWitt’s work has not only transformed the world of art, but has also enlivened and enriched the atmosphere of numerous public spaces,” said Colin B. Bailey, director of the Morgan. “Since 2010, the Gilbert Court has been the site of exciting public installations of contemporary art. We are grateful to the LeWitt Family for this generous gift and delighted to pay tribute to the twentieth century master.”

The Morgan will celebrate the wall drawing during Free Friday hours on Friday, September 7, 7-9 PM, with a screening of the documentary Sol LeWitt: Wall Drawings (2010), directed by Edgar B. Howard and Tom Piper and a special “pop-up” bar.

Image: Sol LeWitt (1928-2007), Wall Drawing 552D, A tilted form with color ink washes superimposed. The walls are bordered by 8" (20 cm) black bands. Color ink wash, dimensions variable. First Drawn by:  David Higginbotham, Linda Taylor, Jo Watanabe. First Installation: Royal Scottish Academy, Edinburgh, Scotland, December 1987.Gift of the LeWitt Family in Honor of Richard and Ronay Menschel. © 2018 The LeWitt Estate / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

The Book Club of California is delighted to announce that John Windle and Chris Loker have funded an annual lecture series titled, “The Windle - Loker Lecture Series on the History of the Illustrated Book.” The lecture series is scheduled through 2022, and will bring to Book Club venues important national and international experts who will speak on the illustrated book within these five eras: 

·      Medieval and renaissance manuscript illustration (11th to 15th century)

·      Early woodcut illustration in printed books (16th to 18th century)

·      Pre-Raphaelite / Art Nouveau book illustration (19th century)

·      Artist book illustration (20th and 21st century)

·      The Future of the illustrated book (21st century and beyond)

This lecture series will occur once a year as a Monday evening presentation, offered to Club members and their guests. It will explore the beauty, scholarship, and stunning craftsmanship of illustrated books from medieval times to today. The final lecture in the series will furnish intriguing insights into the possible future of the illustrated book in our hypertext world, a fascinating and timely topic. The five lectures will be presented either in San Francisco, Los Angeles or San Diego, to allow Club members throughout California the opportunity over time to participate in this enjoyable evening program in different locations.

The Windle - Loker Lecture Series will focus on presenting some of the most distinguished subject matter experts in their fields. They will hale from across the US and from the UK, and will present us with tales of alluring books and full-color images of the best the illustrated codex has offered over the centuries. The first lecture will occur on August 6, 2018 with the academic (and entertaining) team of famed book collector Mark Samuels Lasner and Margaret D. Stetz from the University of Delaware, speaking on Pre-Raphaelite and Art Nouveau book illustration. The second lecture, in 2019, will feature speaker Dan De Simone, whose special collections career has included tenures at the Library of Congress and the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C.—Dan will speak on the topic of early woodcut illustration in printed books.

John Windle, an antiquarian bookseller for fifty years and a Club member for much of that time, has served on the BCC board several times, most recently as Vice President and as chair of the Publications Committee. His well-known bookshop, John Windle Antiquarian Bookseller, is located just a few blocks from our Club. John is a constant supporter of all aspects of the BCC, also serves on the board of the Bancroft Library, and is a long-standing member of the Grolier Club. Chris Loker, John’s wife, has worked with him in the antiquarian book business for fifteen years, specializing in antiquarian children’s books. She recently curated the successful Grolier Club exhibition One Hundred Books Famous in Children’s Literature, and will publish in May 2019 the academic volume A Shimmer of Joy: Children’s Picture Books in America, 1900-2015. Chris currently serves on the Grolier Club Council and is the chair of their Publications Committee. She also serves on the board of Rare Book School in Charlottesville, VA. John and Chris are delighted to support the Book Club with the Windle - Loker Lecture Series, and look forward to seeing Club members at those lecture events.

overstreet48.jpgDallas, TX - Collectors and fans of comics and comic art can download a copy of the 48th edition of The Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide 2018-19 through Heritage Auctions, at HA.com.

Clients who bought the 47th edition are eligible to receive a discounted download of the newest version, and those who ordered last year’s version within the last 30 days qualify for a free upgrade to the newest version - a $30 value.

Regarded as the definitive resource in the hobby, the guide, which is available for $30, covers more than a century of comic book history. Among the most important and useful features is users’ ability to search lots through the use of keywords, including the title of a book, the name of the lead character, the company that produced the book or the artist and/or writer.

Considered a must-have tool among collectors of all levels, the Overstreet guide is a thoroughly researched volume that is alphabetically indexed and includes extensive pricing, historical information and insights in the comics and comic art marketplace.

The 48th edition of the Overstreet guide is available in formats that support both PC and Mac operating systems.

“The best collectors are those armed with the most information, and this guide is the ultimate resource of all kinds of valuable information that comics collectors need,” Heritage Auctions grader and consignment director Aaron White said. “One of the goals of all departments at Heritage Auctions is to make sure our clients have the information needed to be confident and comfortable with the decisions they make, and the Overstreet guide provides that.”

The newest Overstreet Price Guide cover features images of the Green Lantern and the Flash by artist Ethan Van Sciver. Also included are a movie poster-styled tribute to the 50th anniversary of the Planet of the Apes. The Hall of Fame limited edition features new American Flagg artwork by creator Howard Chaykin.

The Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide can be downloaded here for just $30, offering collectors access to an unmatched cache of information in a new format that is one of the best investments available in the hobby. Those who ordered the 2017-18 version of The Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide within the last month may request a free digital upgrade by sending an e-mail to Webmaster@HA.com.

Irving copy.jpgDayton, OH - Writer John Irving (The World According to Garp, The Cider House Rules, A Prayer for Owen Meany), whose novels champion outsiders and often explore the bigotry, intolerance, and hatred directed at sexual minorities, will receive the 2018 Ambassador Richard C. Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award, organizers of the Dayton Literary Peace Prize announced today.

Named in honor of the celebrated U.S. diplomat who played an instrumental role in negotiating the 1995 Dayton Peace Accords that ended the war in Bosnia, the award will be presented to Irving at the Dayton Literary Peace Prize Gala on October 28, 2018. Founded in 2006, The Dayton Literary Peace Prize is the only international literary peace prize awarded in the United States. It honors writers whose works use the power of literature to foster peace, social justice, and global understanding. The Ambassador Richard C. Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award recognizes authors for their complete body of work.

Born in 1942, Irving published his first novel, Setting Free the Bears, in 1968 when he was twenty-six. He has been nominated for a National Book Award three times — winning once, in 1980, for his novel The World According to Garp, the story of T.S. Garp, a man born out of wedlock to a feminist leader. He received an O. Henry Award in 1981 for his short story “Interior Space.” In 2000, Irving won the Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay for his novel The Cider House Rules, which explores the complex issues of abortion, racism, and addiction. In 2012, Irving won a Lambda Literary Award for his novel In One Person, the coming of age story of a bisexual man grappling with his sexual identity. His novels have been translated into more than thirty-five languages and his all-time best-selling novel, in every language, is A Prayer for Owen Meany, which deals with matters of faith, spirituality, and social justice. Irving, who lives in Toronto, is currently at work on his fifteenth novel — a ghost story called Darkness as a Bride

“John Irving’s body of work creates worlds that allow the reader to explore the contradictions of twisted morality, the consequences of suspicions of the other, the absurdities of pride and ignorance, and the tragedy of a lack of sympathy and empathy for our fellow humans: characteristics that make peace unreachable,” said Sharon Rab, the founder and chair of the Dayton Literary Peace Prize Foundation. “Through books—especially Irving’s books—readers learn to understand and identify with people who are different from themselves.” 

On winning the Ambassador Richard C. Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award, Irving said: “Novels and stories invite people into a writer’s worldview. For forty years and counting, I’ve written about sexual difference and sexual minorities — at times, when the prevailing literary culture labeled it bizarre or niche. I’ve written with the hope that the bigotry, hatred, and flat-out violence perpetrated on sexual minorities would become a relic of the past. In that sense I’ve written in protest — I’ve written protest novels. And yet, if I’ve written characters whose stories give them access to the breadth of human experience and emotion, I’ve done my job as a writer. Novels are my platform; if a prize helps bring attention to my subject matter, then I welcome it.”

Irving will join the ranks of past winners of the Ambassador Richard C. Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award, formerly called the Lifetime Achievement Award, including Studs Terkel (2006), Elie Wiesel (2007), Taylor Branch (2008), Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn (2009), Geraldine Brooks (2010), Barbara Kingsolver (2011), Tim O'Brien (2012), Wendell Berry (2013), Louise Erdrich (2014), Gloria Steinem (2015), Marilynne Robinson (2016), and Colm Tóibín (2017).  

Finalists for the 2018 Dayton Literary Peace Prize will be announced on August 14, 2018.

About the Dayton Literary Peace Prize

The Dayton Literary Peace Prize honors writers whose work uses the power of literature to foster peace, social justice, and global understanding. Launched in 2006, it has established itself as one of the world’s most prestigious literary honors, and is the only literary peace prize awarded in the United States. As an offshoot of the Dayton Peace Prize, the Dayton Literary Peace Prize awards a $10,000 cash prize each year to one fiction and one nonfiction author whose work advances peace as a solution to conflict, and leads readers to a better understanding of other cultures, peoples, religions, and political points of view. Additionally, the Ambassador Richard C. Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award is bestowed upon a writer whose body of work reflects the Prize's mission; previous honorees include Wendell Berry, Taylor Branch, Geraldine Brooks, Louise Erdrich, Barbara Kingsolver, Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn, Tim O'Brien, Marilynne Robinson, Gloria Steinem, Studs Terkel, Colm Tóibín and Elie Wiesel. For more information visit the Dayton Literary Peace Prize media center at http://daytonliterarypeaceprize.org/press.htm.

L_2017_146_226v copy.jpgLos Angeles - The J. Paul Getty Museum announced today the acquisition of the Rothschild Pentateuch, the most spectacular medieval Hebrew manuscript to become available in more than a century. The acquisition was made possible with the generous support of Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder.

“The Rothschild Pentateuch will be the greatest High Medieval Hebrew manuscript in the United States, and one of the most important illuminated Hebrew Bibles of any period,” says Timothy Potts, director of the J. Paul Getty Museum. “Its richly illuminated pages - a great rarity in the thirteenth century - make it a work of outstanding quality and importance that represents the pinnacle of artistic achievement of its day. It will be one of the most signal treasures of the Department of Manuscripts and indeed of the Getty Museum overall.”

Potts adds: “It is especially gratifying that this landmark acquisition was generously supported by our Trustee Ronald S. Lauder and his wife, Jo Carole.”

Created by an unknown artist and dated 1296, the manuscript’s pages are filled with lively decorative motifs, hybrid animals and humanoid figures, and astonishing examples of micrography--virtuosic displays of tiny calligraphy in elaborate patterns and designs. The vibrant colors and gleaming gold distinguish this manuscript from most medieval Hebrew book production, which followed a largely textual tradition. It stands apart from other medieval examples through the appeal and extent of its illustrated program. The text contains features that indicate it may have been written in France for Jewish emigres who had been expelled from England in 1290. The illumination was likely completed in France or Germany.

The Pentateuch contains the central sacred text of Judaism--the Torah in the strictest sense--comprising the Five Books of Moses: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. The manuscript’s lavish illumination divides the text into sections to be read weekly so that the entire Torah would be read over the course of a year. The opening of each of the five books is celebrated with monumental Hebrew initials intertwined with lively marginal figures and, in one case, a full-page illumination.

With its seemingly endless variety of illuminated motifs ranging from the imposing to the whimsical, the Rothschild Pentateuch is a prime example of the heights of originality and magnificence that Hebrew illumination achieved and stands as the most extensive illuminated program of any northern European Hebrew Bible to survive from the Middle Ages.

In a rare deviation from the rest of the manuscript’s aniconic approach, there is one illumination featuring full human figures that was added at a later date. In the second half of the fifteenth century one page was replaced with a new insertion, carefully replicating the text and commentaries. The folio can be identified as the work of Joel ben Simeon, one of the most celebrated Jewish artists known from the period. The replacement miniature represents the sole figural narrative in the Rothschild Pentateuch, but was inspired with the same kind of ingenuity that characterizes the rest of the manuscript.

“This acquisition allows us to represent the three Abrahamic religions of the period, and for the first time brings a medieval Hebrew illuminated manuscript to the Los Angeles area,” says Elizabeth Morrison, senior curator in the Manuscripts Department. “The cohesiveness of the visual program combined with its unbounded ingenuity shows how medieval artisans approached the complex problem of page design and tackled a project as ambitious as the Rothschild Pentateuch.”

The Rothschild Pentateuch was created in 1296 perhaps for a patron originally from England. It was carried through the centuries from France or Germany to Italy and Poland, and was eventually acquired by Baroness Edmond de Rothschild at some point before 1920, and then given after World War II to a German-Jewish family, who later settled in Israel, as a part of an exchange agreement.

Adds Morrison, “The storied voyage of this manuscript follows the history of the Jewish diaspora across time and space. This newest addition to our collection will allow us to present a more inclusive story of the Middle Ages at a time when the Getty is increasingly looking to a global approach in the visual arts.”

The Rothschild Pentateuch will make its debut at the Getty Center in Art of Three Faiths: A Torah, a Bible, and a Qur’an on view August 7, 2018 to February 3, 2019, an exhibition showcasing for the first time the sacred texts of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The practitioners of these three faiths have been called people of the book for their shared belief in the importance of divine word, rendered in medieval manuscripts in glowing gold and luminous colors on parchment. Three spectacular examples from the Getty’s permanent collection, including a Christian Bible and a Qur’an together with the newly acquired Torah, will be featured in this spotlight show.

Image: Menorah of the Tabernacle (Book of Leviticus) from the Rothschild Pentateuch, France and/or Germany, 1296. Leaf: 10 7/8 x 8 1/4 in. (27.5 x 21 cm). Ms. 116 (2018.43), fol. 226v

DT1.jpgNew York—When Ralph Baione and Anthony Giammona were looking to donate their extensive collection of book binding tools and equipment, they learned of the Center for Book Arts and sought out the space. Baione paid a visit to the Center to see what it is all about. “It is important for me that these tools stay in use. If you send them to a museum, people can look at them, but they can’t use them,” Baione shared.

He spoke with Emilie Ahern, Audience Development Coordinator at the Center for Book Arts, to learn more about the programming offered at the Center. As soon as he saw the thriving community of students, instructors, residents, and renters, he knew the Center was “the perfect fit.”

The collection includes over 900 hand tools and over 120 brass wheels used for gold tooling and embossing. A book binder who rents studio space at the Center said, “Most book binders have maybe 10 to 15 of these tools in their collection over their lifetime. To have access to over 900 is just incredible.”

The Center for Book Arts will ensure that these tools go to good use. Through their educative and studio rental programs, the Center will include these tools in their classes and will also allow renters to use the tools for their own projects. “This equipment will not sit in a corner. We have created sample books of the patterns and designs and have already had renters start using the tools in their own work. We are excited to expand our offerings with this collection,” said Ahern.

In addition to the hand tools and brass wheels, the collection includes brass type to be used for foil stamping and embossing, a Kensol heat stamping machine, board shears to cut oversized paper and book board, and a leather skiving machine. “We are incredibly humbled and grateful to receive this generous donation,” Ahern shares, “It is not every day that a collection this large and in ready-to-use condition is bequeathed with the intent to be accessible to all.”

The Center for Book Arts offers studio rental programs, residency programs, book binding and letterpress education, book arts exhibitions and much more. Anyone interested in using these tools or learning how to use these tools can come by the Center during open hours or can call for more information.

Polyglot copy.jpgLondon - Christie’s is pleased to offer discerning collectors the opportunity to view and acquire the Plantin Polyglot Bible during its summer auction of Books and Manuscripts on 11 July in London (estimate: £400,000 - £600,000). Produced by the Plantin Printing workshop in Antwerp almost 450 years ago for King Philip II, this monument of biblical scholarship is now returning from where it originated and will be on public view at the Plantin Museum on 21 and 22 June*. 

Also known as the Biblia Regia, this is considered the greatest achievements of the Plantin printing press. Printed in its original languages and the Latin Vulgate, this polyglot Bible features beautiful and exotic types and exemplifies an epitome of typographical design. 

King Philip II of Spain had originally commissioned 13 copies on vellum for his personal use, and only 11 of these sets survive today. Sent to him by Plantin in 1572, it remained in royal ownership until c.1788 when Charles III gave it to his son, which then followed on by descent to the present owner. This is the only copy in private hands as all other copies are owned by institutions. Seven are located in Spain, while the others reside in London, Turin and the Vatican. 

Meg Ford, International Director Books and Manuscripts comments - “The Renaissance press of Christopher Plantin set out to produce the finest Bible in all Christendom, and Christie’s is exceptionally pleased to bring back for the first time in almost 450 years, a deluxe vellum copy of this masterpiece to its place of origin and the very presses that printed it. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity for collectors and bibliophiles to view the deluxe Biblia Regia at the Plantin Museum on 21 and 22 June and Christie’s look forward to offering this set with royal provenance in its auction in London on 11 July.” 

Museum Director Iris Kockelbergh says - “The return of the Biblia Regia in its original home is an emotional moment. Seeing this masterpiece on paper is extremely moving and the version on parchment, on show now, surpasses this experience. We look forward to welcoming local and international viewers on 21 and 22 June to the Plantin Museum, a Unesco World Heritage site, where they can explore the world of the influential Plantin and Moretus family. 

Senior Curator Dirk Imhof, Plantin Museum, Comments - “Language can scarcely do justice to its extraordinary beauty and perfection of condition” a quote of Thomas Dibdin when he saw a version of the Biblia regia on parchment, The Bibliographical Decameron, Londen, 1817 

*The Plantin Polyglot Bible will be on view at the Plantin Museum on 21 June from 10.00am to 17.00pm and on 22 June from 10.00am to 12.00pm. 

 

Southern New England Antiquarian Booksellers (SNEAB) held our inaugural meeting of 2018 on April 2 at Historic Deerfield’s Memorial Libraries. Librarian David Bosse spoke on the history of the organization and collections, and gave members a tour of Historic Deerfield’s Henry N. Flynt Library and the Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association Library. Lunch and business followed at New England Book Auctions in South Deerfield. Incumbent officers began new terms: Betty Ann Sharp, Bearly Read Books, Sudbury, Clerk; Eileen Corbeil, White Square Fine Books & Art, Easthampton, Treasurer; Peter L. Masi, Montague, Vice-president; Duane Stevens, Wiggins Fine Books, Shelburne Falls, President. 

SNEAB currently has 135 members. Our 2018 directory is published and available through members, brochure racks, and our website: www.sneab.com

On Sunday of Patriots day weekend, we sponsored Boston West Book & Ephemera Fair at Minuteman High School in Lexington managed by Marvin Getman, Impact Events Group. 

On Sunday, October 14, 2018, we will sponsor the 14th Annual Pioneer Valley Book & Ephemera Fair at Smith Vocational School, Northampton. www.pioneervalleybookfair.com promoted by John and Tina Bruno, Flamingoeventz. 

We are delighted to announce two new sponsorships. SNEAB will sponsor Book & Paper Row section of the Boston Antiques and Design Show, Shriners Auditorium, Wilmington, December 8, 2018 by agreement with Marvin Getman. By agreement with Flamingoevents, SNEAB will sponsor the Spring Paper Town - The Vintage Book, Paper & Advertising Show, Saturday, April 6, 2019 at Boxborough Regency Hotel & Conference Center. SNEAB is honored to add these popular and well-established shows to our calendar, and continue to collaborate with these dedicated and experienced promoters. We hope you will visit our website, member shops, and shows!

--Duane A. Stevens, President, Southern New England Antiquarian Booksellers (SNEAB)

e3321f07224129b9dfc50fbd_880x744.jpgNew York, NY— The Morgan Library & Museum has received an important collection of annotated scripts, notebooks, and correspondence from prominent American film director, producer, and screenwriter James Ivory (b. 1928). This collection, comprised of material representing thirty-two films, offers an illuminating record of Ivory’s work as a director and the history of Merchant Ivory Productions (ca. 1963-2010). In honor of this generous gift, the Morgan will display a selection of these remarkable items in the installation A Merchant Ivory Production from June 26 to October 28, 2018.

Over the course of nearly four and a half decades, Ivory collaborated with Indian-born film producer Ismail Merchant and German-born novelist Ruth Prawer Jhabvala. Merchant and Ivory worked on dozens of films together, twenty-two of which were written by Jhabvala. Well-known for their exquisite adaptations of the literature of Henry James (1843-1916), E. M. Forster (1879-1970), and Kazuo Ishiguro (b. 1954), the trio also collaborated on many original screenplays. 

Two of their films have won multiple Academy Awards. Most recently, Ivory won both an Oscar and BAFTA for Call Me by Your Name (2017), making him the oldest-ever winner in any category for both awards. Their extraordinary partnership is documented in more than 1,500 letters and telegrams that form part of this collection. Their correspondence reveals the collaborative origins, the artistic developments, and the logistical feats that went into the films of Merchant Ivory Productions. Ivory has called one 10-page letter from Jhabvala about their film Shakespeare Wallah (1965) “the most important letter [she] ever wrote to [him] concerning [their] collaborative work as screenwriters.” Many letters also include script fragments, press clippings, and other ephemera, which remain with the collection. 

Beginning June 26, visitors will be able to view the collection’s many highlights in the Lower Level of the Morgan, including the script materials for Call Me by Your Name and Ivory’s annotated copy of André Aciman’s 2007 novel of the same title that he used while writing the screenplay. Ivory’s added notes, changes, sketches, and inserts transform the scripts into an important research collection. 

The installation also features James Ivory’s annotated shooting scripts for the adaptations of Henry James’ The Bostonians (1984), E.M. Forster’s Maurice (1987), Kazuo Ishiguro’s The Remains of the Day (1993), and scripts of the production company’s films set in India such as Shakespeare Wallah (1965). Other exceptional items on view will be Ivory’s editing notebooks and the annotated “small scripts” that the director would use as quick reference on set and in the editing room.

“For a long time I’ve wanted to find a safe place nearby in New York for all the scripts I carried on to the sets of my films, a page or two each day, folded up in my back pocket, with things scribbled on them,” Mr. Ivory said. “I could never have imagined—dared not think—that they might someday end up in close proximity to the working papers of Albert Einstein and Galileo in the Morgan Library! But so it has happened, for which I’m very grateful to the Morgan for this honor and to its enthusiastic custodians for putting this installation together.”

“In addition to James Ivory’s achievements as a director and a screenwriter over the course of his sixty-year career, he was an innovator of filmmaking strategies,” said museum director Colin B. Bailey. “These materials will be the first of their kind in the Morgan’s collection, and will complement our Carter Burden Collection of American Literature, which includes strong holdings of screenplays and continuity scripts. We are enormously thankful for this extraordinary gift that will serve future generations of film scholars and historians.”

Image: André Aciman (b. 1951), Call Me by Your Name, New York: Picador, 2007, James Ivory’s copy. The Morgan Library & Museum, New York; gift of James Ivory, 2018. © Merchant Ivory Productions. Photography by Graham  S. Haber.

Seattle, WA — ThriftBooks, the largest used bookseller in North America, is now open in India! The new storefront on the Amazon.in Marketplace makes it possible for customers in India to browse and shop over 6 million books that can be shipped to every province within the country.

ThriftBooks India offers an unparalleled selection of English language books (with free shipping) to the estimated 125 million English readers in India.

In coordination with Amazon.in, ThriftBooks offers a “Pay on Delivery” payment method to make shopping and buying more convenient for Indian customers.

“Our launch with Amazon.in is a part of our global initiative to put quality, affordable books into the hands of readers.” said Lance Pettit, Merchandising Manager for ThriftBooks.com and Marketplaces. “Indian customers have been asking for a way to easily find and shop for a greater selection of books. With Amazon.in and Easy Ship, we made this happen.”

Shopping is simple. Customers can go straight to the ThriftBooks India storefront, which lists the top 1 million titles ThriftBooks offers. Customers can also shop for any book on Amazon.in. If ThriftBooks India has the book for sale, it will show up on the Offers page for used copies.

About ThriftBooks

Based in Seattle, WA, ThriftBooks is the largest online seller of used books in the world, having sold more than 100 million books since its inception. Founded in 2003 and backed by KCB Management, ThriftBooks employs more than 700 people and operates 8 fulfillment centers in the US that purchase, grade, and distribute used and collectible books. ThriftBooks relies on proprietary software to identify and list books, as well as a sophisticated pricing model that dynamically prices books across a variety of online platforms, including ThriftBooks.com, ThriftBooks mobile app, ThriftBooks offers their selection on Amazon North America, Amazon Europe, eBay, Barnes & Noble, AbeBooks, and Alibris marketplaces.

Middleburg, Virginia - The National Sporting Library & Museum (NSLM) received a major grant from the Ohrstrom Foundation. The grant was made in May 2018 and will support the NSLM’s project to digitize its collections and share them online. The grant will make it possible for NSLM to purchase scanning equipment designed to take high-resolution images of pages of rare books. Once digital images have been made, they will be added to an online site where readers and researchers can access them from anywhere in the world.

“We are incredibly grateful to the Ohrstrom Foundation for their investment in this project,” said NSLM’s Executive Director Melanie Mathewes. “The NSLM has a superb book collection and we cannot wait to make it available to a wider audience.”

NSLM currently reaches an online audience of over 13,000 annually through its blog, Drawing Covert, and thousands more through social media. The addition of a digital collection will meet the needs of researchers across the globe who wish to access the unique materials in the Library’s collections.

John Connolly, NSLM’s George L. Ohrstrom, Jr. Head Librarian offers presentations and tours of the Library’s rare book holdings with a special focus on the antiquarian titles to be digitized in the project. The NSLM will continue to raise funds toward the project to grow it for future years. To schedule a Library tour or to donate to this exciting new project, contact John Connolly at JConnolly@NationalSporting.org or 540-687-6542 x18

The National Sporting Library & Museum (NSLM) is located in Middleburg, V.A., the heart of beautiful hunt country. Founded in 1954, the renowned research Library, and fine art Museum highlight the rich heritage and tradition of country pursuits. Angling, horsemanship, shooting, steeplechasing, foxhunting, flat racing, polo, coaching, and wildlife are among the subjects one can explore in the organization’s general stacks, rare book holdings, archives, and art collection. The NSLM offers a wide variety of educational programs, exhibitions, and family activities throughout the year, and is open to researchers and the general public. While there is no admission fee to the Library, the Museum charges $10 for adults, $8 for youths (age 13-18), and $8 for seniors. NSLM members and children age 12 and under are free. Library & Museum hours are Wednesday - Sunday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

 

Leslie Hindman Auctioneers announced today that the firm has appointed Thomas Galbraith as Chief Executive Officer, effective June 4, 2018. He succeeds Leslie Hindman who founded the firm in 1982. The appointment follows a private equity investment that positions the firm for aggressive growth.
 
Galbraith co-founded The Petraeus Group in 2010. The consulting firm has provided growth and start-up strategies to Steven Murphy & Partners, Art Dubai, Paddle8, Arthena and numerous other luxury brands and VC firms. During this time, Galbraith also served as Managing Director of Paddle8 and prior to that as Director of Global Strategy for Artnet. He was most recently appointed interim CEO by the board of Twyla, a Google Ventures backed startup, tasked with repositioning the company towards a more profitable future.
 
Note from Founder + Chair, Leslie Hindman
 
“We are extremely excited to have Thomas join us as CEO. With his experience at the cross section of technology and art, and his reputation as a thought leader in the industry, we are poised for future expansion."
 
Note from CEO, Thomas Galbraith

"I am humbled and excited to join Leslie Hindman Auctioneers as CEO and lead the company into the next chapter. Leslie has built a formidable organization and I very much look forward to working with the talented team and bringing a new level of innovation to the industry. Our business is built on trust, customer service and expertise. I’m excited to bring in new technology to aid in these areas, helping us expand to new regions and markets and continue building an excellent team."

NBF18-Poster_May copy.jpgU.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor will launch her first children’s book, along with a young readers adaptation of her memoir, as part of the Main Stage lineup of authors at the 2018 National Book Festival, the Library of Congress announced today. Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden will interview Sotomayor about her new book, “Turning Pages: My Life Story,” which tells about her childhood and her lifelong love of books.

This year’s festival will be held Saturday, Sept. 1, with doors opening at 8:30 a.m. and presentations beginning at 9 a.m. and ending at 7:30 p.m., at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C. The festival will include presentations on a wide range of books, including fiction, mysteries and fantasy, graphic novels, history and biography, contemporary subjects and science, poetry and prose, and books for children and teens.

The 2018 festival also will offer visitors a chance to engage with the new PBS series “The Great American Read,” an initiative that celebrates the joy of reading and the most beloved books. The series, which premiered May 22, will introduce viewers to America’s 100 favorite novels and will culminate in a national vote to choose “America’s Best-Loved Novel.” Visitors will be able to cast their votes at the National Book Festival, as well as online and through social media.

This year’s Main Stage lineup includes a mix of authors and genres.

Main Stage Presenters

  • U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor will discuss her new book, “Turning Pages: My Life Story,” written for children ages 4 to 8 and illustrated by artist Lulu Delacre. In the book, the first Latina Supreme Court justice tells her own story for young readers for the first time, including how books inspired her and helped her connect with family in New York and in Puerto Rico, to cope with her father’s death and to dream of a brighter future. Sotomayor also will launch “The Beloved World of Sonia Sotomayor,” the young readers adaptation of her memoir “My Beloved World,” in conversation with Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden.
  • Former Secretary of State Madeleine Albright will present her new book, “Fascism: A Warning,” a history of fascism in the 20th century and how its legacy shapes the world.
  • Author Isabel Allende will discuss her novel “In the Midst of Winter.” The story is about an academic who rear-ends a car driven by an undocumented immigrant and the adventure that unfolds.
  • Presenting his new book, “The Monk of Mokha,” novelist Dave Eggers will tell the true story of a young Yemeni American who set out to resurrect the ancient art of Yemeni coffee but was trapped in a raging civil war. Eggers will appear with Mokhtar Alkhanshali, the hero of the book.
  • Presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin will launch her new book, “Leadership: In Turbulent Times,” an examination of the art of leadership based on four presidents she has studied most closely.
  • Historian Jon Meacham will present his latest book, “The Soul of America,” about critical times in our history when hope overcame fear and division.
  • Best-selling author Amy Tan will discuss her new memoir, “Where the Past Begins,” delving into memories of her traumatic childhood, the inspiration behind her fiction and the way she thinks as a writer.

Additional authors will be announced in the coming months. More information and updates will be available on the National Book Festival website at loc.gov/bookfest/.

The Library also recently unveiled the 2018 National Book Festival poster with original art by Gaby D’Alessandro, a Dominican illustrator based in New York City. The poster depicts a whimsical hot air balloon carrying a young reader into space.

The National Book Festival is made possible by the generous support of private- and public-sector sponsors who share the Library’s commitment to reading and literacy, led by National Book Festival Co-Chairman David M. Rubenstein. Sponsors include Charter sponsors the Institute of Museum and Library Services, The Washington Post and Wells Fargo; Patron sponsors the James Madison Council, the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities; Champion-level sponsor PBS; Contributor-level sponsors National Geographic and Scholastic Inc.; and, in the Friends category, AARP, Booklovers Circle members, Bookshare - a Benetech initiative, Marshall B. Coyne Foundation Inc., Dollar General Literacy Foundation, Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction administered by The University of Alabama School of Law, The Hay-Adams, The Junior League of Washington, Library of Congress Federal Credit Union, J.J. Medveckis Foundation, Timothy and Diane Naughton, Reading Is Fundamental, Small Press Expo (SPX) and the Whittle School & Studios. Those interested in supporting the National Book Festival can contact the Library at devofc@loc.gov.

Later this summer, the National Book Festival app will be updated with complete presenter, schedule and wayfinding information for iOS or Android smartphones. Follow the festival on Twitter @librarycongress with hashtag #NatBookFest.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov, and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

Image: Original art for the 2018 National Book Festival poster was created by Gaby D’Alessandro, a Dominican illustrator based in New York City.

 

Letters About Literature, a Library of Congress national writing competition, has announced its winners for 2018. The national program, now in its 26th year, asks young people in grades 4-12 to write to an author about how his or her work affected their lives.

More than 46,800 young readers from across the country participated in the annual initiative, which aims to instill a lifelong love of reading in the nation’s youth and to engage and nurture their passion for literature. The contest is promoted by the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress through its affiliated state centers, state libraries, state humanities councils and other organizations.

“Letters About Literature provides an authentic writing experience for students to reflect on their own reading and connect with an author,” said Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden. “As a librarian, I know first-hand how important the link is between reading and writing. Children who read will write better and children who write will read more.”

This year, more than 1,500 educators and 1,200 schools implemented the Letters About Literature program in their classrooms. The contest reached students in 70 percent of U.S. congressional districts.

This year’s winners come from all parts of the country. They wrote to authors as diverse as Margot Lee Shetterly, Rick Riordan, Helen Keller, Tim Howard and Kurt Vonnegut Jr.

Top letter-writers are chosen for each state and in each of three levels: Level 1 (grades 4-6), Level 2 (grades 7-8) and Level 3 (grades 9-12). For each level, a National Prize winner and two National Honor winners are chosen.

Following are this year’s winners:

Level 1 National Prize

Akosua Haynes of Chicago, Illinois, wrote to Margot Lee Shetterly, author of “Hidden Figures: The Story of the African-American Women Who Helped Win the Space Race.”

Level 1 National Honor Award

Ainsley Carr of Parker, Colorado, wrote to Gill Lewis, author of “White Dolphin.”

Adam Kesselman of Addison, Texas, wrote to Tim Howard, author of “The Keeper: The Unguarded Story of Tim Howard.”

Level 2 National Prize

Rylee Paige Johnson of Hoffman Estates, Illinois, wrote to Gabrielle Zevin, author of “Elsewhere.”

Level 2 National Honor Award

Riya Sharma of Redmond, Washington, wrote to Katty Kay and Claire Shipman, authors of “The Confidence Code for Girls.”

Baxter Lowrimore of Austin, Texas, wrote to Rick Riordan, author of “Percy Jackson and the Olympians.”

Level 3 National Prize

Malavika Kannan of Oviedo, Florida, wrote to Kurt Vonnegut Jr., author of “Slaughter-House Five.”

Level 3 National Honor Award

Maya Mau of Plainsboro, New Jersey, wrote to Helen Keller, author of “The Story of My Life.”

Sukanya Barman of Memphis, Tennessee, wrote to Laurie Halse Anderson, author of “Catalyst.”

The national program is made possible by a generous grant from the Dollar General Literacy Foundation, with additional support from gifts to the Center for the Book.

Letters About Literature is a dynamic educational program that promotes lifelong readers and helps develop successful writers. It is the Library’s signature national outreach program to young people. More than 1 million students have participated in the writing contest since it began a quarter of a century ago.

An online teaching guide uses proven strategies for improving reading and writing proficiency and is aligned with the learning objectives recommended by the National Council of Teachers of English and the International Literacy Association. Learn more about the contest and read current and past winning letters at read.gov/letters/.

The Library’s Center for the Book, established by Congress in 1977 to stimulate public interest in books and reading, is a national force for reading and literacy promotion. A public-private partnership, it sponsors educational programs that reach readers of all ages through its affiliated state centers, collaborations with nonprofit reading-promotion partners and through its Poetry and Literature Center at the Library of Congress. For more information, visit read.gov.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs. Plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

Geppi.jpgWashington--The Library of Congress announced today that collector and entrepreneur Stephen A. Geppi has donated to the nation’s library more than 3,000 items from his phenomenal and vast personal collection of comic books and popular art, including the original storyboards that document the creation of Mickey Mouse.  This multimillion-dollar gift includes comic books, original art, photos, posters, newspapers, buttons, pins, badges and related materials, and select items will be on display beginning this summer.  

The Stephen A. Geppi Collection of Comics and Graphic Arts has been on public display in Baltimore, Maryland, for the past decade and is a remarkable and comprehensive assemblage of popular art.  It includes a wide range of rare comics and represents the best of the Golden (1938-1956), Silver (1956-1970) and Bronze (1970-1985) ages of comic books.  The mint-condition collection is also noted for its racially and socially diverse content as well as the distinctive creative styles of each era.  

The collection also includes motion picture posters and objects showcasing how music, comic book characters, cultural icons and politicians were popularized in the consumer marketplace.  Among these are Beatles memorabilia, a collection of flicker rings popularizing comic book characters and political figures such as Martin Luther King Jr., Richard Outcault’s The Yellow Kid printing blocks and the No. 2 Brownie camera model F from Eastman Kodak Company.

One signature item in the collection represents the birth of one of animation’s most iconic characters. Six rare storyboards detail the story layout and action for Walt Disney’s 1928 animated film, “Plane Crazy.”  It was the first Mickey Mouse cartoon produced, but the third to be released, after sound was added, in 1929.  “Steamboat Willie” was the first Mickey Mouse cartoon to be theatrically released, on Nov. 18, 1928, which marks its 90th anniversary this year. 

“The Library of Congress is home to the nation’s largest collection of comic books, cartoon art and related ephemera and we celebrate this generous donation to the American people that greatly enhances our existing holdings,” said Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden. “The appeal of comic books is universal, and we are thrilled that this new addition to the collections will make them even more accessible to people worldwide.” 

“When I began collecting comic books as a young boy and then in earnest in 1972, I would have never dreamed that a major portion of my collection would find a home at the Library of Congress, alongside the papers of 23 presidents, the Gutenberg Bible and Thomas Jefferson’s library,” said Geppi.  “This gift will help celebrate the history of comics and pop culture and their role in promoting literacy.”

Geppi is the owner and CEO of Diamond Comic Distributors, based in Baltimore.  A fan of comic books as a child, he later began seriously collecting them and turned his passion into a series of pop culture businesses.  Over the years, Geppi amassed one of the largest individual collections of vintage comic books and pop culture artifacts in the world.    

Geppi will continue to be an active collector and will be considering other donations to the Library of Congress in the future.  “I view this newly established connection to the Library of Congress as the beginning of a long-term relationship,” said Geppi.   

The Library holds more than 140,000 issues of about 13,000 comic book titles, dating back to the 1930s.  The collection includes many firsts and some of the most important comics in history, including the first comic book sold on newsstands; the first series featuring Batman and other iconic characters; and All Star Comics #8, which introduced fans to Wonder Woman.  The Library also holds a copy of Amazing Fantasy #15, which tells the origin story of Spider-Man, and the original artwork that Steve Ditko created for that issue. The Geppi Collection expands and enriches this strong foundation and fills gaps in specific issues. 

The Serial and Government Publications Division maintains one of the most extensive newspaper collections in the world. It is exceptionally strong in United States newspapers, with 9,000 titles covering the past three centuries. With more than 25,000 non-U.S. titles, it is the largest collection of international newspapers in the world. Beyond its newspaper holdings, the division also has extensive collections of current periodicals (40,000 titles), comic books (13,000 titles) and government publications (1 million items). The collection of comic books is available for research use by scholars, collectors and other researchers in the Newspaper and Current Periodical Reading Room.  More information can be found at http://www.loc.gov/rr/news/coll/049.html.

The Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division holds more than 15 million photographs, drawings and prints from the 15th century to the present day.  International in scope, these visual collections represent a rich array of human experience, knowledge, creativity and achievement, touching on almost every realm of endeavor—science, art, invention, government and political struggle, and the recording of history.  More information can be found at loc.gov/rr/print/.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office.  Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

Image: Entrepreneur Stephen A. Geppi with some of his most treasured comic books, including (front, far left) Action Comics No. 1 featuring the first appearance of Superman. Courtesy of The Library of Congress

 

p1ceo8uv6n35a1gg41krm9kdlc15.002.jpegWomen artists, photography, prints and vintage posters are all potential growth areas in the art market to watch, according to Barnebys, the worlds largest auction search engine, as it launches its 2018 Art Market Report today.

Titled Tomorrow - the view from today, the search engine’s report mines data from over 65 million lots sold at auction by more than 3,000 auction houses globally, as well as almost 16.4 million user sessions relating to nearly 5 million items coming up for sale.

Barnebys’ co-founder and head of content Pontus Silfverstolpe - a leading authority on the art and antiques market in his native Sweden - made the predictions after noting significant growth in auction sales within certain price ranges, combined with demographic profiles of the search engine’s users, which point to new audiences joining what has largely been an art, antiques and collectibles market until now.

“We observe the rising importance of women artists”, says Silfverstolpe. “History offered fewer opportunities for women to dedicate their lives to careers in art and design, so there is simply less art by recognised female talent around, with the result that the market for art by women has traditionally been far less developed than that by men.” But this is changing now.

He identifies the following women artists to keep track of - Jenny Saville, Cecily Brown, Georgia O’Keeffe, Joan Mitchell, Nathalie Djurberg, Petra Cortright, Cady Noland, Agnes Martin, Laura Owens, Yayoi Kusama,  Njideka Akunyili Crosby and Barbara Kreuger.

“Much more focus is now rightly being given to female talent that has either been unsung or overshadowed for political and social reasons in the past. Just look at the profile now being given to the likes of Frida Kahlo in London and Mary Cassatt in Paris in major retrospectives; this attention will filter through to the market and sales online will flourish as buyers try to snap up the best art by women before prices rocket.”

Silfverstolpe also identifies photography, prints and vintage posters as the front-runner for growing interest and investment. Images like the ones below of Bowie, Marilyn Monroe and Faye Dunaway are increasingly collectable.

“All of these fields have growing prices, but still offer a lot of bang for your money at the lower end, with starting prices at under €100 - the level that these buyers are already spending at. Visually, these types of collectibles have instant appeal and also crossover appeal, attracting everyone from home decorators to those with an interest in graphic design, as well as specialist areas like history, entertainment and travel.

“This exactly matches the profile of many of our typical users across the various markets we focus on. All these factors point to powerful growth potential.”

”We see that many people want art from names such as Picasso, Koons and Banksy, three of the most common keywords in Barnebys´s search engine. These are artists whom they know and whose art they have seen, but whose original paintings they cannot afford. Yet.”

Silfverstolpe also sees these collecting fields as paths to greater investment in art and collectibles as buyers grow in confidence and are prepared to commit more money to each purchase.

“As that interest and commitment grows, so theystart to look around further and notice more expensive items that attract their interest, such as drawings, paintings and designer furniture. This is how markets develop. If the skill, artistic inspiration and accomplished craftsmanship is there, you will attract buyers.”

Image: Cecily Brown - The Girl Who Had Everything - Sold for £1.2m.

 

NYTimes-FREEDOMS-sm-400x400.jpgDallas, Texas - Heritage Auctions (HA.com), the largest auction house founded in the United States, announced this week it is has committed to a two-year major sponsorship of the Norman Rockwell Museum’s traveling exhibition Enduring Ideals: Rockwell, Roosevelt & the Four Freedoms. It is the first comprehensive exhibition of the artist’s iconic 1943 depictions of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s wartime defense of humanity’s fundamental human rights.

Considered among the most indelible images in the history of American art, Rockwell’s Freedom of Speech, Freedom from Want, Freedom from Fear and Freedom of Worship will embark on a seven-city tour across the United States and to Normandy, France. The two-year, international exhibition opens May 25 in New York City at the New York Historical Society, with a companion presentation, Reimagining the Four Freedoms, on view concurrently across town at Roosevelt House.

“Sponsoring this groundbreaking, educational exhibition means supporting the ideals that people of all nations deserve universal human rights,” said Greg Rohan, President of Heritage Auctions. “Rockwell’s artistic interpretation of these rights sparked a national movement in America and abroad, inspiring generations for the last 75 years” 

Enduring Ideals: Rockwell, Roosevelt & the Four Freedoms includes a range of artwork in addition to Rockwell’s celebrated images of the Four Freedoms. These include paintings, illustrations, prints and more by both Rockwell and a broad range of his contemporaries, from J.C. Leyendecker and Mead Schaeffer to Arthur Szyk, Ben Shahn and Dorothea Lange, among others. The era is brought to life through a number of channels, including historical documents, photographs, videos, interactive digital displays, immersive settings and artifacts. 

“The exhibition will show how Rockwell’s aspirational paintings shifted American attitudes towards engagement in World War II in defense of the free world, and, ultimately, helped to make the case for universal human rights,” said Norman Rockwell Museum Director Laurie Norton Moffatt. “In highlighting Rockwell’s and his generation’s response to the call for unity in support of these fundamental freedoms, the exhibition resonates powerfully with our own time.” 

To date, the 2018 exhibition tour comprises The New-York Historical Society, New York City, New York, May 25-Sept. 2, 2018 and The Henry Ford, Dearborn, Michigan, Oct. 13, 2018-Jan. 13, 2019. The exhibition is on display at The George Washington University Museum and The Textile Museum, Washington, D.C., Feb. 9-May 6, 2019, Mémorial de Caen, Normandy, France, June 4-Oct. 27, 2019. It returns to the United States through 2020, beginning at the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, Texas, Dec. 15, 2019-March 22, 2020; and Norman Rockwell Museum, Stockbridge, Massachusetts, in fall 2020.

 

1d77b20634864131bd8c6ebd_1220x686.jpgNew York—The Morgan Library & Museum is proud to announce that curators John Marciari and Jennifer Tonkovich of the Drawings and Prints Department will lead a ten-day traveling seminar aimed at training a new generation of drawings scholars and curators. From June 26 to July 4, 2018, participants will visit collections in London, Oxford, Windsor, and elsewhere to learn the skills of connoisseurship and the workings of the art market for old master and 19th-century drawings.

The seminar is supported by a major grant from the Getty Foundation’s new initiative The Paper Project: Prints and Drawings Curatorship in the 21st Century, created to address the lack of informal and formal training for curators entering the field. The seminar includes visits to some of the major collections of drawings in England, including the Ashmolean Museum, the British Museum, and the Royal Collection. 

Drs. Marciari and Tonkovich, together with host curators at those institutions, will conduct sessions exploring questions of attribution, condition, quality, and authenticity of works of art. Chosen from a competitive search process, the participants for the seminar include assistant curators and curatorial fellows from museums across the United States and from institutions in Belgium, France, and the Netherlands.  

“The Drawing Institute was founded in 2011 to deepen the understanding and appreciation of the role of drawing in the history of art,” said Colin B. Bailey, director of the Morgan. “Today’s curators working in drawings and prints are required to learn an enormous amount of information and must possess significant expertise in order to navigate the art market, generate scholarship, and develop innovative exhibitions. We are delighted to provide an opportunity to mentor and support the promising curators in this field.”

“The Paper Project is a response to the need for more training and professional development opportunities to serve a rising generation of curators of prints and drawings,” says Deborah Marrow, director of the Getty Foundation. “The museums involved in these inaugural projects are widely recognized for their excellent collections, influential scholarship, and commitment to training. The Morgan’s seminar will not only provide the practical knowledge needed to succeed as drawings and prints curators, but it will also help ensure their future leadership in the field.”

Grants have also been awarded to the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford; the British Museum in London; the Courtauld Gallery in London; the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam; and the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden.

Image: John Marciari, Charles W. Engelhard Curator and Department Head, leading a Morgan Drawing Institute seminar on Italian Renaissance Drawings, 2016. Drawings Study Center, The Morgan Library & Museum © The Morgan Library & Museum. Photography by Jennifer Tonkovich, 2016.

 

d1952rw_low.jpgLos Angeles - The Getty Foundation announced today the launch of The Paper Project: Prints and Drawings Curatorship in the 21st Century, a new initiative to strengthen curatorial practice in the graphic arts field internationally. The launch includes the announcement of six inaugural grants awarded to the Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology at the University of Oxford; the British Museum in London; the Courtauld Gallery in London; the Morgan Library & Museum in New York; the Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen in Rotterdam; and the Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden.

“The Paper Project is a response to the need for more training and professional development opportunities to serve a rising generation of curators of prints and drawings,” says Deborah Marrow, director of the Getty Foundation. “Assisting curators at early points in their careers will help ensure that museum departments of prints and drawings continue to have strong leadership and independent voices well into the future. The museums involved in these inaugural projects are widely recognized for their excellent collections, influential scholarship, and commitment to training.”

While preparing this initiative, the Getty Foundation consulted broadly with curators internationally who voiced concerns over the steady erosion of the formal and informal training practices that have historically sustained the prints and drawings field. As a result, leading museums face a shortage of well-qualified specialists ready to move into more senior curatorial positions. Curators entering the field today must command a wide variety of skills, ranging from traditional approaches to the object, such as connoisseurship, to newer proficiencies such as audience engagement, both in the galleries and online. Yet the opportunities for curators to develop and hone these skills are limited.

To address these issues, The Paper Project grants will support traveling seminars for early and mid-career curators of drawings and prints; curatorial fellowships; professional workshops and symposia; collection-based research projects that present significant training opportunities for young professionals; and exhibitions and publishing projects led by emerging leaders in the field of prints and drawings.

“Museums are changing rapidly in the 21st century, as are the demands on curators,” says Heather MacDonald, senior program officer at the Getty Foundation. “The Paper Project supports training and professional development designed by and for prints and drawings specialists, with an aim of not only preserving the skills that have long been at the center of their discipline, but also responding to the present-day and emerging needs of museums.”

Descriptions of New Grant Projects

The Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology, University of Oxford

The Ashmolean Museum of Art and Archaeology, founded in 1683, is Britain’s first public museum and the world’s first university museum. The Ashmolean’s magnificent Western Art collections contain around 25,000 drawings and over 250,000 prints by artists from the 15th century to the present day, with the Italian drawings collection renowned for its quality and range. The grant will support curatorial training in drawings scholarship and connoisseurship by funding two 18-month research fellowships for early career art historians to equip them to become leading drawings curators in the future. Their activities, including research travel and consultation with distinguished drawings specialists nationally and internationally, will focus on research and writing in preparation for a scholarly collection catalogue of the Italian drawings, with an online resource produced as a direct result of this project.

The British Museum, London

The British Museum has one of the world’s greatest collections of works on paper, with around 50,000 drawings and over two million prints that chart the development of Western graphic arts from the early 1400s to the present. The collection includes large holdings of important artists such as Dürer, Michelangelo, Raphael, Rembrandt, and Goya. As part of The Paper Project, the Museum received a grant to support two curatorial fellowships in its Department of Prints and Drawings. The 18-month fellowships will provide broad-based curatorial training in areas such as cataloguing, collections management, research, exhibitions, acquisitions, and interacting with the public and researchers. Fellows will also have the opportunity to pursue their own focused research projects related to the collection, leading to a public project at the Museum.

The Courtauld Gallery, London

Founded in 1932, the Courtauld Institute of Art is an independent college of the University of London with a center for the study of art history and conservation. The Institute also houses an internationally renowned Gallery that includes a preeminent collection of drawings featuring works by such masters as Rembrandt, Guercino, Tiepolo, Turner, and Cézanne. The Paper Project grant will allow the Courtauld Gallery to offer a two-year curatorial fellowship in the Prints and Drawings Department. The fellow will be involved in every aspect of the Department’s activities, including exhibition planning and assisting in preparations for the collection’s reinstallation following gallery renovations. The fellow will be offered the opportunity to organize a focus exhibition with an accompanying publication, as well as to contribute to the Department’s exhibitions, publications, and digital projects.

The Morgan Library & Museum, New York

The Morgan Library & Museum is an internationally renowned museum and research center dedicated to fostering public knowledge, understanding, and appreciation of the art, music, and literature of the Western world. Founded in 1924, the Morgan holds one of the preeminent collections of drawings in the United States, including 25,000 works spanning from the 14th to 21st centuries. The Morgan’s commitment to the study of drawings is manifest in its Drawing Institute, founded in 2010 to deepen the understanding and appreciation of the role of drawing in the history of art. The Paper Project grant is supporting a ten-day traveling seminar in and around London in June that will bring early-career professionals together with senior curators to foster connoisseurship and an understanding of the art market for old master and 19th century drawings.

Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen, Rotterdam

Founded in the 19th century, Rotterdam’s Museum Boijmans Van Beuningen is one of the oldest museums in the Netherlands and the only Dutch museum that offers a comprehensive overview of Western art from the Middle Ages to the present day. Its celebrated works on paper collection includes approximately 17,000 drawings and 65,000 prints. Boijmans’ collection of Italian drawings is one of the most comprehensive and art historically important in the world, but it is also understudied and underpublished. The Paper Project grant includes funding for curatorial training in the preparation of a scholarly collection catalogue of the museum’s 15th- and 16th-century Italian drawings.

Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden

The Staatliche Kunstsammlungen Dresden (SKD) consist of fifteen museums, including the Dresden Kupferstich-Kabinett, or Museum of Prints, Drawings, and Photography, the oldest museum of graphic arts in the German-speaking world. Located in the Royal Palace in the city center, the Kupferstich-Kabinett occupies restored spaces that feature exhibition galleries, a study room, storage facilities, and a paper conservation center. The Paper Project grant is supporting a multi-part traveling seminar organized by the SKD and focused on 16th-century Italian drawings that will help to develop the connoisseurship skills of the participating curators. In addition to Dresden, participants will visit important prints and drawings collections in northeast Germany, Central Europe, and Switzerland.

For more information about The Paper Project or to submit inquiries for support, please visit http://www.getty.edu/foundation/initiatives/current/paperproject/paperprojectindex.html

Image: Charles Joseph Natoire (1700-1777), Life class at the Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpture, 1746, © The Samuel Courtauld Trust, The Courtauld Gallery, London

 

MoMA_Berman_Rodchenko.122537.jpgNew York—The Museum of Modern Art has acquired more than 300 masterworks of The Merrill C. Berman Collection, one of the most significant collections of early 20th-century works on paper in private hands. The Museum’s acquisition focuses on the core of Mr. Berman’s collection—works that vividly demonstrate the wide-ranging experimentation and political and social engagement of artists in this period. The selected works offer an overview of the major avant-garde movements of the era—Dada, the Bauhaus, de Stijl, Futurism, and Russian Constructivism—and include unparalleled and pioneering works by renowned figures such as Aleksandr Rodchenko, Lyubov Popova, John Heartfield, and Hannah Höch. Its graphic design includes exceptional examples of the period’s new typography and dynamic combinations of word and image in posters and books, while its extensive representation of photomontage proves that strategy’s dominance in the early 20th century. The acquisition is made possible by trustees and supporters of The Museum of Modern Art in recognition of the Museum’s 90th anniversary in 2019.

“Long admired by our curators across the Museum for its outstanding representation of the avant-garde activities of the first decades of the 20th century, the Merrill C. Berman Collection is a transformative addition to the Museum’s holdings,” said Glenn D. Lowry, Director, The Museum of Modern Art. “In bringing this private collection to the public, this acquisition offers the possibility of sharing new and complex stories of the period with our visitors while making rare historical materials available to scholars.”

“By representing crucial figures—often women and artists from lesser-known geographies—missing or underrepresented in our collection, this extraordinary body of work is especially welcome as the Museum continues its commitment to diversifying modernism’s narratives with its forthcoming expansion in 2019,” said Christophe Cherix, the Robert Lehman Chief Curator of Drawings and Prints. “The practices, strategies, and languages of artists involved in Futurism, Constructivism, and Dada continue to challenge contemporary artists, scholars, and audiences, allowing opportunities to make links between the radical experimentation of the early 20th century and contemporary art.”

The Berman Collection, which has been a key source of loans to MoMA exhibitions on the early 20th century—from the 1998 Rodchenko monograph to the 2009 Bauhaus, 1919-1933: Workshops for Modernity to the 2016 Dadaglobe Reconstructed, among many others—showcases avant-garde movements including: the Bauhaus, with a mix of unparalleled, unique works that fill gaps in the Museum’s collection and a wealth of rare graphic material that demonstrates the activities of the school; Dada, with a focus on standout Berlin examples by such artists as Raoul Hausmann, whose radical photomontage practice was not previously represented in MoMA’s collection, Hannah Höch, and Johannes Baader; and the Soviet avant-garde, with unique works and graphic material that present the fundamental contribution of Soviet artists to modernism. 

The newly acquired works powerfully demonstrate the links between art and politics, especially in moments of war and revolution and social and economic change. To immerse oneself in this collection is to experience the far-reaching and profound impact of the early 20th century’s momentous events—World War I, the Russian Revolution, the rise of fascism—and to see wholesale shifts in industry, technology, and labor.

Lydia Naumova, for example, used photomontage to tell a history of international trade unions and the Communist Party, while Lyubov Popova designed sets, costumes, and posters for a new revolutionary workers’ theater, transforming the stage for ideological ends.

One of the key narratives of the Berman Collection is the history of photomontage, a groundbreaking artistic language of the 1910s, 1920s, and 1930s, and one that remains essential today. Artists took advantage of the proliferation of what was then new media,  cutting and pasting together bits of printed photographic and widely circulated images. The results were works that were distinctly connected to the world and captured the spirit of the new age: in their bold collisions and juxtapositions, in their deployment of photographs of crowds and striding leaders, and in their presentations of laborers, cities, and factories. Innovators of this cut-and-paste strategy well represented in the Berman Collection include John Heartfield, who protested Nazism and fascism by combining found images to create charged meanings, and Valentina Kulagina in the Soviet Union, who used photomontage in posters and broadsides to demand participation in new forms of labor. A major strength of this collection is the way Berman collected maquettes along with their final products, which will allow viewers to better understand process and technique. 

Containing 96 works by women artists, the Berman Collection illuminates the essential roles they played in this period, enabling the Museum to present expanded, complex, and diverse stories of the practitioners, strategies, and subjects of the early 20th century. Many of these artists—including Elena Semenova and Fré Cohen—are represented in depth in the Berman Collection, making possible overviews of entire careers. Iconic works further deepen understandings of key artists, including those by Lyubov Popova and Vavara Stepanova, while others, Maria Bri-Bein and Franceska Clausen, are entirely new to the collection, introducing new histories, forms, and ideas. 

The Berman Collection is particularly strong in the art of Central and Eastern Europe, keenly demonstrating the importance of Budapest, Warsaw, and Prague as modern centers and hotbeds of avant-garde experimentation, and revealing the networks of activities in the region and communication with the West. Henryk Berlewi of Poland, whose drawings are a standout in Berman’s collection, called for an art that was equivalent to the new industry; Lajos Kassák established activist journals in Budapest and Vienna; and Czech designer Ladislav Sutnar pioneered information graphics.

The Museum will make this material available through exhibitions, gallery displays, and publications, encouraging collaborative study, research, dialogues, and debate by MoMA curators and outside scholars. As a start, the Museum will organize and present a major exhibition of works drawn from The Merrill C. Berman Collection within the next few years, and will publish an accompanying scholarly catalogue. 

Image: Aleksandr Rodchenko (Russian, 1891-1956). Have Sun at Night! (Daite solntse noch’iun). 1923. Gouache, ink, and pencil on gelatin silver print, 4 3/8 × 11 3/16″ (11.1 × 28.4 cm). The Museum of Modern Art, New York. The Merrill C. Berman Collection

 

NES.gifNew York—The NES Book Awards are made in four categories: Art & Photography, Fiction, Nonfiction, and Specialty and are presented annually to authors of books published in the previous twelve months. The winners were celebrated at events on June 13 & 14 in New York. And, the winners are: 

ART:

Cartoon County: My Father and his Friends in the Golden Age of Make-Believe by Cullen Murphy (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

PHOTOGRAPHY: 

East of the Mississippi: Nineteenth-Century American Landscape Photography by Diane Waggoner; With Russell Lord and Jennifer Raab (Yale University Press in association with the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.)

FICTION: 

A Piece of the World by Christina Baker Kline (William Morrow)

NONFICTION: 

Darkness Falls on the Land of Light: Experiencing Religious Awakenings in Eighteenth-Century New England by Douglas L. Winiarski (Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and the University of North Carolina Press)

SPECIALTY: 

Moon New England Road Tripby Jen Rose Smith (Hachette Book Group)

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden today announced that Mark Sweeney will serve as Principal Deputy Librarian of Congress.

Sweeney has served as Acting Deputy Librarian of Congress since September 2017.

“Mark has been a dedicated public servant and leader at the Library for three decades,” Hayden said. “He brings an in-depth understanding of the institution and our staff to this office, and I am so pleased he has agreed to accept this permanent appointment. We have such exciting things in store for our users in the coming years and Mark will play a central role.”

The role of Principal Deputy Librarian is to assist with managing the Librarian’s priorities and function in a strategic role, working closely with senior leadership internally and high-level individuals externally. The Principal Deputy Librarian provides executive leadership and broad oversight to the heads of the U.S. Copyright Office, the Congressional Research Service, the Office of the General Counsel and the Deputy Librarian of Library Collections and Services Group. 

Before his appointment as Acting Deputy Librarian, Sweeney served as Associate Librarian since August 2014 - first on an Acting basis then as permanent appointee beginning in February 2015. Previously, Sweeney served as the Library’s Director of Preservation beginning in April 2012. Prior to that, he served for nearly five years as the Chief of the Serial and Government Publications Division, followed by seven months as Chief of the Library’s Humanities and Social Services Division.

During his 30 years with the Library of Congress, Sweeney has also served as Program Manager for the Library’s highly successful National Digital Newspaper Program, as Chief of the Preservation Reformatting Division, as Head of the Newspaper Section, as a Reference Specialist and as a Supervisory Library Technician.

He has presented at numerous professional meetings and served on national and international boards and committees.

Sweeney holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in history from McGill University and a master’s in library and information science from the Catholic University of America. 

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States - and extensive materials from around the world - both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office.  Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

Breslauer - all 3 sideways 750 wide.jpgThe winner of the 17th ILAB Breslauer Prize for Bibliography, sponsored by the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers with the generous support of the B.H. Breslauer Foundation, is now officially announced!

Winner 2018:
Dutch scholar and author Ina Kok will receive the 2018 award for her outstanding work: Woodcuts in Incunabula Printed in the Low Countries, Brill, April 2013, (4 Vols.)

Honourable Mentions were given to two further publications:
Dirk Imhof, Jan Moretus and the Continuation of the Plantin Press, Brill, October 2014 (2 Vols.);

Staffan Fogelmark, The Kallierges Pindar. A Study in Renaissance Greek Scholarship and Printing, Dinter, 2015 (2 Vols.)

Over 50 publications from publishers and academic institutions across the globe were submitted and had to be reviewed for the 2018 award.

Daniel de Simone (previously Folger Library and Library of Congress), member of the 2018 Prize Jury describes the process: “It was established very quickly that the quality of the bibliographical work submitted was a testament to the vibrancy of the field of bibliographical research. The subject areas covered and the methodologies used by the authors tested the skills of the reviewers who had to make judgments based on the intent of the authors, the presentation of the bibliographical information, and the usefulness of the research that was published.  Discussions among the reviewers often focused on the production values of the publications and the quality of the design and presentation.”

Fabrizio Govi, ILAB Vice President and Prize Secretary: "​The author has spent decades working on this book compiling an incredible census of illustrations used in editions printed in the 15th Century Netherlands. We cannot compare Ina Kok’s book to any other publication submitted for the 2018 Prize. Woodcut illustrations were often reused during the first period of printing, they were fragile and were easily worn down after a few impressions. As a result, they were sometimes repaired with a few minor changes or completely recut, trying to recreate the original block as closely as possible. This work, published in four volumes and​ based on the study of almost four thousand illustrations, is remarkable.”

Awards Ceremony 2018 - ABA RARE BOOK FAIR LONDON, MAY 2018

The 17th ILAB Breslauer Prize for Bibliography will be awarded during the ABA Rare Book Fair London on 25th May 2018, one of the world’s leading events of the antiquarian book trade. This prestigious prize in the field of bibliographical studies, worth US$ 10,000 is awarded every fourth year to the most significant reference work within a selection of scholarly books on bibliography, published in the previous years and submitted to the Prize jury.

The B.H. Breslauer Foundation who have provided an endowment since 2010, was set up by Dr. B.H. Breslauer, one of the most recognized antiquarian booksellers in the 20th century with a keen interest in bibliography and bibliophily.

The jury considers publications relating to bibliography in a very broad sense from textual bibliography to history of the book, bookbinding, papermaking, type-founding, library catalogues, short-title catalogues of a single author or typographer and further afield.

Jury Members 2018:
Bettina Wagner (Bavarian State Library, Munich)
Daniel de Simone (prev. Folger Shakespeare Library, Washington DC)
Yann Sordet (Bibliothèque Mazarine, Paris)
Fabrizio Govi (Italy)
Winfried Kuhn (Germany)
Justin Croft (United Kingdom) 

The Book

Ina Kok: Woodcuts in Incunabula Printed in the Low Countries
Published by Brill, April 2013, (4 Vols.)

The purpose of the book is to provide a survey and an understanding of book woodcuts of the 15th century.

Firstly, the book gives a complete census of woodcuts in Dutch and Flemish incunabula, and a record of all places in which they appear. Both the book in which the woodcut (or series of woodcuts) appears for the first time and all repetitions of that woodcut before 1501 have been registered.

Second, the book offers a survey and analysis of the woodcuts used by each printer. With this inventory, Dr. Kok has developed a very accurate dating system for incunabula. Over 3800 different illustrations have been found in the incunabula printed in the Low Countries, which illustrate the history of the use of woodcuts - the different states, the different stages of wear and tear.

About Ina Kok

Ina Kok was born in The Hague (The Netherlands). After her high school education, she studied Dutch Language and Literature at the University of Amsterdam (main direction: Historical Literature) and graduated cum laude in 1978. The subject of her doctoral thesis was the woodcuts of the prominent fifteenth century printer Gerard Leeu. After this study, she followed the postgraduate study Book and Library Science at the same university.

She held positions at the Royal Library in The Hague and the University of Amsterdam, where she obtained her PhD in 1994 for the study of woodcuts in incunabula.  (Thesis title: De Houtsneden in de Incunabelen van de Lage Landen 1475-1500; Inventarisatie en bibliografische analyse (The Woodcuts in the Incunabula of the Low Countries 1475-1500. An Inventory and Bibliographical Analysis). Positions followed at the Incunabula and Postincunabula Department of the Royal Library, under curator Gerard van Thienen.

In 1985, she became a part-time curator of Manuscripts and Early Printed Books in the Stadsarchief and Athenaeumbibliotheek in Deventer (SAB). Througout her career, Dr. Kok continued the research on woodcuts.

In 2013, the revised, fully illustrated English language commercial edition of her thesis was published in four volumes by Hes & de Graaf Publishers in Houten (now Brill, Leiden): Woodcuts in Incunabula Printed in the Low Countries. In 2015 she received the Menno Hertzberger Prize for this reference book. Dr. Kok retired in 2017 and is currently working on a publication about the fascinating correspondence between the English art historian and woodcut expert William Martin Conway (1856-1937) and his tutor, the renowned bibliographer Henry Bradshaw (1831-1886), which will also be published by Brill.

Washington, DC—Nearly 4,000 smuggled artifacts, bought by Hobby Lobby, will be returned to Iraq today in a ceremony at the residence of Iraqi ambassador to the U.S., Dr. Fareed Yasseen. Assistant Secretary Thomas Homan, Director of U.S. Customs and Immigration Enforcement, will transfer custody of the artifacts, including cuneiform tablets and bricks and cylinder seals from ancient Sumerian sites. The Antiquities Coalition will attend the ceremony.

Hobby Lobby, a national chain of arts and crafts stores, purchased thousands of antiquities which were smuggled into the U.S. in violation of Federal law. The Hobby Lobby case highlights the large U.S. market for looted antiquities. This market fuels the international crisis of cultural racketeering—the looting and trafficking of ancient artifacts to fund crime, conflict, and terrorism—which threatens our world heritage and national security.

The not-for-profit Antiquities Coalition is fighting cultural racketeering with consumer education and its #BuyerBeware awareness campaign. The new awareness video, featuring a consumer unknowingly purchasing a piece of looted ancient art online, brings the issue of the illicit trade and its consequences into the homes of everyday people. “The #BuyerBeware campaign is making a huge impact in the Gulf, a growing market for ancient art, licit and illicit,” noted Antiquities Coalition Executive Director Tess Davis. “More than 65,000 views came from the video being shared just in the United Arab Emirates."

"Still, the U.S. remains the world's largest art market,” said Ms. Davis. “American consumers need to understand the dangers of buying antiquities, especially online. If Hobby Lobby, with its great resources, could not guarantee their purchasers were legal and ethical, how can an individual collector? When it comes to antiquities, let the buyer beware."

The Antiquities Coalition unites a diverse group of experts in the fight against cultural racketeering: the illicit trade in antiquities by organized criminals and terrorist organizations. This plunder for profit funds crime and conflict around the world—erasing our past and threatening our future. The Coalition’s innova

E. Annie Proulx, author of "The Shipping News" and "Brokeback Mountain" will be awarded the 2018 Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction.

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced today that E. Annie Proulx, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel “The Shipping News” and the short story “Brokeback Mountain,” will receive the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction during the 2018 Library of Congress National Book Festival on Sept. 1.

Hayden selected Proulx as this year’s winner based on the recommendation of a jury of previous winners, distinguished authors and prominent literary critics from around the world. The prize ceremony will take place during the National Book Festival at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C.

“E. Annie Proulx has given us monumental sagas and keen-eyed, skillfully wrought stories,” Hayden said. “Throughout her writing, she succeeds in capturing the wild, woolly heart of America, from its screwball wit to its every last detail. She is an American original.”

One of the Library of Congress’ most prestigious awards, the annual Prize for American Fiction honors an American literary writer whose body of work is distinguished not only for its mastery of the art but also for its originality of thought and imagination. The award seeks to commend strong, unique, enduring voices that—throughout long, consistently accomplished careers—have told us something new about the American experience.

“This high honor came as a shock to me,” Proulx said. “My writing has examined the lives of unimportant people—poor people plagued with bad luck, financial and personal troubles. They were hill farmers, small town country music groups, hunters and fishermen, immigrants and accordion repairmen, failed newspapermen and fishermen, war veterans and cowhands, closeted rural gays in denial, ranchers, lumbermen, wood-choppers, widows. They were strung across the continent from Newfoundland to Vermont to Louisiana to Wyoming to Michigan to Oregon. Not the kind of characters to be graced with notice by the Library of Congress. And yet somehow it has happened. I want to believe the people in my writing will step up with me to receive this award, for they are as real as history.”

Proulx was born in Connecticut in 1935 and attended Colby College and the University of Vermont. She lives in Port Townsend, Washington. Proulx is the author of eight books, including “The Shipping News,” which received the Pulitzer Prize, the National Book Award and the Irish Times International Fiction Prize; and “Postcards,” winner of the PEN/Faulkner award—Proulx was the first woman to win the award.

Proulx’s other honors include the F. Scott Fitzgerald Award for Outstanding Achievement in American Literature, the National Book Foundation’s Lifetime Achievement Award for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters, and fellowships from the Guggenheim Foundation and the National Endowment for the Arts. Her O. Henry Prize-winning story “Brokeback Mountain,” which originally appeared in The New Yorker, was made into an Academy Award-winning film. Her most recent novel is “Barkskins.”

For more information on the prize, including previous winners, visit loc.gov/about/awards-and-honors/fiction-prize/.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov, and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

d31c94afe21a5e639252b78f_1100x734.jpgNew York, NY — Known for exhibiting book designs by artists ranging from the Master of Catherine of Cleves to Andy Warhol, the Morgan Library & Museum will now showcase extraordinary works by New York City public school students. The month-long exhibition Inspiring and Illuminating the Classroom, on view in the lobby of the Morgan's Gilbert Court, is the culmination of the Morgan Book Project, a unique collaboration between the Morgan and NYC Department of Education. Now in its ninth year, this free and innovative program guides third to twelfth grade students as they write, illustrate, and bind their own illuminated manuscripts throughout the school year. 

On May 11, 2018, the museum will host the Morgan Book Project Awards Ceremony, honoring the 64 students whose exemplary works have been selected by jury of book professionals, artists, and school librarians. During the award ceremony in Gilder Lehrman Hall, students have the opportunity to display and celebrate their work in the presence of their teachers, principals, and families. 

By sparking interest in the book arts, NYC public school teachers and Morgan educators hope to inspire the next generation of artists, illustrators, and writers from diverse backgrounds. From October through March, students learn to apply traditional book art techniques and language arts skills to their own creative work. Throughout the process of book making, students draw upon the Morgan’s rich collection of illuminated manuscripts and learn about world history for inspiration. They also have the opportunity to make their own paint with traditional pigment sources such as malachite, saffron, insects, to adorn their work with a 22 karat gold leaf, and to use professional grade watercolor and Italian marble paper.

This year’s ceremony marks many important milestones for the program. In 2017, the Morgan became one of the first institutions to gain the status of official Continuing Teacher and Leader Education (CTLE) sponsor. In the past year, it expanded its high school curriculum to reach ninth, tenth, twelfth grade students as well, increasing participation in the 17-18 school year. After modifying its resources and schedule to assist teachers of students with special needs, the Morgan Book Project has also seen the highest participation by students with diverse needs and abilities in the project’s history. More recently, the Morgan tailored the learning experiences to the vast numbers of New York City pupils of non-Western backgrounds and installed multilingual educators in Title 1 participating schools.

“The Morgan Book Project is in many ways a pillar of our arts education initiatives,” said Colin B. Bailey, Director of the Morgan Library & Museum. “Students have the opportunity to not only see great works of art and literature up close, but also experience the creative process firsthand and develop their own gifts. It is wonderful to see such inspired engagement and enthusiasm for the book arts among school children, and we are proud to celebrate their accomplishments at the museum.” 

The Morgan Book Project is made possible by a generous grant from Marina Kellen French and the Anna-Maria and Stephen Kellen Foundation.

Image: Installation of student works at the Awards Ceremony. Photography by Emily Korn.

The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress today announced the appointment of Stephen Houston, an anthropologist, archaeologist and epigrapher, as the inaugural Jay I. Kislak chair for the study of the history and cultures of the early Americas. He will begin his tenure in September 2018. While at the Library, Houston will work on a project titled “Classic Choreography: The Meaning of Ancient Maya Movement.”

By encouraging broad interdisciplinary inquiry, the Kislak chair will help nourish a wide conversation ranging from the technical aspects of archaeological discovery to issues of interest in the current cultural conversation in view of generating broad public engagement with themes related to the early history of the Americas. 

The Kislak chair is funded by the Kislak Family Foundation to support annually a distinguished individual to undertake research using the Kislak Collections and related materials at the Library of Congress. 

Houston, the Dupee Family professor of social science and a professor in the Department of Anthropology at Brown University, has worked on the excavations of several major Mayan cities, most recently the ancient city of El Zotz in Guatemala and on collaborative advances in mapping with lidar technology. 

His interpretations of stylized representations of the human body reveal the concepts that underlie ancient Maya existence and his research on writing around the world reconstructs how early scripts begin, flourish and die. 

A major participant in the decipherment of Maya script, Houston draws on inscriptions and figural art to reconstruct the political and social structure of Mayan civilization, including the dynamics of royal court life and the role of religion. 

The Kislak Collection encompasses more than 3,000 rare books, maps, manuscripts, historic documents, artifacts and works of art related to early American history and the cultures of Florida, the Caribbean and Mesoamerica. It is considered among the finest collections of its kind in the world, one that brings together material that is of equal interest to scholars and the general public.

The John W. Kluge Center at the Library of Congress exists to help address the challenges facing democracies in the 21st century by bridging the gap between scholarship and policymakers. It does this by hosting top thinkers from around the world to conduct research in the Library’s vast collections and engage with national leaders. For more information about the Kluge Center, visit loc.gov/kluge/.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

Screen Shot 2018-04-19 at 10.19.13 AM.pngThe V&A have announced that John Vernon Lord has been shortlisted for this year’s Book Illustration category for the V&A Illustration Awards for his Folio Society edition of Ulysses

The winner will be announced at an exclusive awards ceremony at the V&A on 15 May 2018. 

Sheri Gee, Art Director at The Folio Society said: ‘I’m really delighted that John’s work has been recognised by the V&A jury. He put so much time and thought into this commission, only a small percentage of which is shown in the final illustrations - he deserves to be shortlisted.’ 

John provided an illuminating introduction explaining his research and illustrative process which was published as an introduction to the text. His work on this and Finnegans Wake (also published by Folio) will be exhibited at House of Illustration, London, from July this year. 

Previous Folio illustrators honoured at the V&A Illustration Awards include: David McConochie for Best Book Cover and inaugural winner of the Moira Gemmill Illustrator of the Year prize in 2016 for The Folio Book of Ghost Stories; Sterling Hundley, winner of the Book Illustration Award and Overall Winner in 2015 for Treasure Island; Anne-Marie Jones, winner of the Book Cover Award for Sons and Lovers in 2014; Anna and Elena Balbusso, winners of the Book Illustration Award for Eugene Onegin in 2013; Matthew Richardson, winner of the Book Cover Award with The Outsider in 2012; Tom Burns, winner of the Book Illustration Award and Overall Winner in 2009 for The New York Trilogy

‘The Artful Book’, a display celebrating 70 years of The Folio Society can be visited at the V&A until 1 May, 2018. 

 

New York City-The New England Society in the City of New York (NES) is pleased to announce the finalists, or the “shortlist,” for the 2018 New England Society Book Awards, which honors books of merit that celebrate New England and its culture. The NES Book Awards are made in four categories—Fiction, Nonfiction, Art & Photography, and Specialty—and are presented annually to authors of books published in the previous 12 months. The winning authors will be selected from this shortlist and announced at the annual Founders’ Day celebration on May 15. Winners will be honored at an Evening Literary Salon on June 13 at the Down Town Association followed by the Awards Luncheon on June 14 at the Union League Club of New York. 

For more than 100 years, prominent writers such as Mark Twain, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Louis Auchincloss, William F. Buckley, Jr., David McCullough, and Dominick Dunne have been honored by NES. The Book Awards carry on these literary connections and recognize books that honor New England culture to help expand the audience for these books. “We were particularly pleased to have a broad range of high-quality submissions this year,” said NES Book Awards Committee Chair, Ellen Scordato. “This made the selection process all the more competitive. The finalists were carefully chosen after considerable deliberation by a very dedicated jury of enthusiastic NES members from a variety of professional backgrounds.” 

“The 2018 finalists represent excellence in New England-themed writing across a range of subjects and celebrate the culture, history, and individualism that are central to the New England character. We are delighted to honor this diverse group of books and their authors and look forward to honoring the winners this June,” said NES President Anna Bulkot. The Literary Evening Salon on June 13 is open to the public, offering all NES members and literary enthusiasts a chance to mingle with winners and jury members who evaluated this year’s submissions, followed by a panel discussion and a book signing. 

ART & PHOTOGRAPHY FINALISTS:
Cartoon County: My Father and his Friends in the Golden Age of Make-Believe by Cullen Murphy
(Farrar, Straus and Giroux)
In the middle of the American Century, many of the nation’s top comic-strip cartoonists, gag cartoonists, and magazine illustrators lived together in the southwestern corner of Connecticut. John Cullen Murphy, the author’s father, was the creator of the wildly popular comic strips Prince Valiant and Big Ben Bolt, and was at the heart of this artistic milieu. Comic strips and gag cartoons such as Superman and Beetle Bailey were created by this tight-knit group of Post War pop-culture artists who became known as the Connecticut School. 

Wonderfully illustrated, Cartoon County brings the postwar American era alive, told through the relationship of a son to his father, an extraordinarily talented and generous man who had been trained by Norman Rockwell. Cartoon County gives us a glimpse into a very special community—and of an America that used to be. 

Cullen Murphy is the editor at large at Vanity Fair and the former managing editor of The Atlantic Monthly. He is the author of The Word According to Eve, Just Curious, and God’s Jury. He lives in Massachusetts with his family. 

East of the Mississippi: Nineteenth-Century American Landscape Photography by Diane Waggoner; With Russell Lord and Jennifer Raab (Yale University Press in association with the National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C.)
Although pictures of the West have dominated our perception of 19th-century American landscape photography, many photographers were working in the eastern half of the United States during that period. East of the Mississippi is the first book to focus exclusively on the arresting Eastern photographs that helped shape America’s national identity. Celebrating natural wonders and capturing a cultural landscape fundamentally altered by industrialization, these works also documented the impact of war, promoted tourism, and played a role in an emerging environmentalism. 

Showcasing more than 180 photographs from 1839 to 1900 in a rich variety of media and formats this volume traces the evolution of Eastern landscape photography and introduces the artists who explored this subject. Also considered are the dynamic ties with painters and photographers and the distinctive development of landscape photography in America. 

Diane Waggoner is curator of 19th-century photographs at the National Gallery of Art. Russell Lord is the Freeman Family Curator of Photographs at the New Orleans Museum of Art. Jennifer Raab is assistant professor of the history of art at Yale University. 

FICTION FINALISTS
A Piece of the World by Christina Baker Kline
(William Morrow)
From the #1 New York Times bestselling author of the Orphan Train, a stunning and atmospheric novel of friendship, passion, and art, inspired by Andrew Wyeth’s mysterious and iconic painting Christina’s World. 

To Christina Olson, the entire world was her family’s farm in the small coastal town of Cushing, Maine. Increasingly incapacitated by illness, Christina seemed destined for a small life. Instead, for more than twenty years, she was host and inspiration for the artist Andrew Wyeth, and became the subject of one of the best known American paintings of the twentieth century. 

Christina Baker Kline interweaves fact and fiction in a powerful novel that brings into focus the flesh-and- blood woman behind the portrait by vividly imagining the life of a woman with a complicated past and a special bond with one of our greatest modern artists. Told in evocative and lucid prose, A Piece of the World is a story about the burdens and blessings of family history, and how artist and muse can come together to forge a new and timeless legacy. 

Christina Baker Kline is the author of six novels, including the #1 New York Times bestseller Orphan Train as well as A Piece of the World. She lives outside New York City and spends as much time as possible on the coast of Maine. 

Eden: A Novel by Jeanne McWilliams Blasberg (She Writes Press)
Becca Meister Fitzpatrick, wife, mother, grandmother, and pillar of the community, is the dutiful steward of her family's summer tradition, until she discovers her recently deceased husband squandered their nest egg. As she struggles to accept that this is likely her last season in Long Harbor, Becca summons the courage to reveal a secret: the existence of a daughter she gave up fifty years ago. 

Eden is the account of the days leading up to the Fourth of July weekend, as Becca prepares to disclose her secret and her son and brothers conspire to put the estate on the market, interwoven with the century-old history of Becca's family--her parents' beginnings and ascent into affluence, and her mother's own secret struggles in the grand home her father named "Eden."

Jeanne Blasberg, a voracious observer of human nature, graduated from Smith College and entered Harvard Business School. She later enrolled at Grub Street, a pre-eminent creative writing center, turning her attention to memoir and fiction. Eden is her debut novel. Jeanne and her husband split their time between Boston and Westerly, RI. 

The Outer Cape by Patrick Dacey (Henry Holt & Company)
Robert Kelly and his wife Irene were a golden couple of the late 70s. She an artist, he a businessman, each was possessed by a dynamism that seemed to promise them a place in a new and vibrant age. But Irene struggles to invest meaning into her role as wife and mother. And Robert, haunted by the failure he sees looming, risks the family name and business to pursue a risky real estate scheme. 

Twenty years later, their now-grown sons return to the Cape of their childhood, where Robert and Irene are facing mortality and consequences of Robert’s real estate gamble. In The Outer Cape, Dacey delivers a story of four people grappling with the ghost of infinite possibility, a book in which chasing the American dream and struggling to survive are one and the same. 

Patrick Dacey, MFA from Syracuse University, has taught English at several universities in the U.S. and Mexico, worked as a reporter, a landscaper, door-to-door salesman, and at a homeless shelter and detox center. His stories have appeared in The Paris Review, Zoetrope All-Story Guernica, Bomb magazine, and Salt Hill

NONFICTION FINALISTS 

Darkness Falls on the Land of Light: Experiencing Religious Awakenings in Eighteenth- Century New England by Douglas L. Winiarski (Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture and the University of North Carolina Press 

This sweeping history of popular religion in eighteenth-century New England examines the experiences of ordinary people living through extraordinary times. Drawing on an unprecedented quantity of letters, diaries, and testimonies, Douglas Winiarski recovers the pervasive and vigorous lay piety of the early eighteenth century. Otherwise sensible people became incited by the religious tours of George Whitefield. They became fascinated by visions, bodily fits, and sudden conversions that they attributed to miraculous gifts of the Holy Spirit. Countless New Englanders broke ranks with family, neighbors, and ministers who dismissed their experiences as foolish. These new converts, the progenitors of today's evangelical movement, bitterly assaulted the Congregational establishment. 

The 1740s and 1750s were the dark night of the New England soul, as men and women groped toward a restructured religious order. Then as now, evangelicalism emboldened ordinary people to question traditional authorities, and their challenge shattered whole communities. 

Douglas L. Winiarski is associate professor of religious studies at the University of Richmond and author of Darkness Falls on the Land of Light: Experiencing Religious Awakenings in Eighteenth-Century New England. He is a contributor to Native Americans, Christianity, and the Reshaping of the American Religious Landscape, also from UNC Press. 

The Martyr and the Traitor: Nathan Hale, Moses Dunbar, and the American Revolution by Virginia DeJohn Anderson (Oxford University Press) 

Two men from Connecticut slipped onto Long Island in September 1776. The future of the infant American republic, barely two months old, looked bleak. One of the men, Nathan Hale, was making sketches to bring back to the beleaguered American general, George Washington. The second visitor, Moses Dunbar, had come to Long Island to recruit more farmers to join the King's forces. Neither man completed his mission. Instead, each met his death at the end of a hangman's rope, one executed as a spy for the American cause and the other as a traitor to it. 

In this braided narrative, Virginia Anderson explores how men of the American Revolution have been remembered or forgotten in history. Hale, who uttered a line that has become famous ("I only regret, that I have but one life to lose for my country") was later memorialized as a martyr to the Revolutionary cause. 

Virginia DeJohn Anderson, Professor of History at the University of Colorado, Boulder, also authored New England's Generation: The Great Migration Formation of Society and Culture in the Seventeenth Century, Creatures of Empire: How Domestic Animals Transformed Early America, and American Journey: A History of the United States

SPECIALTY TITLE
Moon New England Road Trip by Jen Rose Smith
(Hachette Book Group)
Moon New England Road Trip presents the expert advice of the author, Jen Rose Smith, about the myriad activities, and local insight, so you can plan your trip your way with strategic, flexible itineraries that can be adapted for your schedule. The themes include: "Fall Foliage," "Acadia National Park," "White Mountain Peaks," "Small-Batch Breweries," "Revolutionary Roads," "Seafood Shacks," "Beach Time," and "Ski the East." You will enjoy full-color, vibrant photos and detailed regional and city maps with focused
coverage of Connecticut, Massachusetts, Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. 

The book features curated information for history buffs, foodies, culture mavens, outdoor adventurers, beach lovers, road trippers as well as honest advice on when to go, where to stay, and how to get around from the author and Vermont local. 

Jen Rose Smith is a freelance writer whose work on travel, food, and drink has appeared in Best of Burlington, Local Banquet of Vermont, Vermont Magazine, Traveler’s Tales: Best Women’s Travel Writing, Culinate, and Overnight Buses. She lives in Vermont’s Green Mountains with her husband. 

B-Franklin-of-Philadelphia-Portrait.jpgThe papers of American scientist, statesman and diplomat Benjamin Franklin have been digitized and are now available online for the first time from the Library of Congress. The Library announced the digitization today in remembrance of the anniversary of Franklin’s death on April 17, 1790.

The Franklin papers consist of approximately 8,000 items mostly dating from the 1770s and 1780s. These include the petition that the First Continental Congress sent to Franklin, then a colonial diplomat in London, to deliver to King George III; letterbooks Franklin kept as he negotiated the Treaty of Paris that ended the Revolutionary War; drafts of the treaty; notes documenting his scientific observations, and correspondence with fellow scientists.

The collection is online at: loc.gov/collections/benjamin-franklin-papers/about-this-collection.

“Benjamin Franklin made history and won respect around the world as a diplomat, publisher, scientist and scholar,” said Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden. “We are thrilled to make this collection of documents by one of the nation’s founding fathers available to highlight his unique role in American history.”

Highlights of the Franklin papers include:

  • Two copies of the petition the First Continental Congress sent to Franklin to present to King George III in 1774 “to lay our grievances before the throne.”
  • Franklin’s scientific speculation on the speed of ships in 1775 while on board a vessel returning from England to America just before the Revolutionary War.
  • Correspondence with John Adams, King George III, Thomas Jefferson, the Marquis de Lafayette and George Washington, among others.
  • Franklin’s Craven Street letterbook, one of the few pre-Revolutionary letterbooks from Franklin to survive, documenting his life as a colonial diplomat in London.
  • Letters exchanged with his wife, Deborah Read Franklin, and his son, loyalist William Franklin, before their estrangement.
  • Franklin’s drawing of bifocal glasses, which he is credited with inventing.
  • Franklin’s letter explaining the effects of lightning on a church steeple.

The Franklin papers have been at the Library of Congress for more than 100 years but had a turbulent history. Many of Franklin’s early papers were scattered and damaged, though he accumulated many more. When he died in 1790, Franklin left his papers to his grandson, William Temple Franklin, who published some of them as the “Memoirs of the Life and Writings of Benjamin Franklin” in 1817-1818. Some of the papers Temple Franklin published were later found cut up in a London tailor shop. The papers were eventually returned to the U.S., purchased by the U.S. government and kept at the U.S. State Department until the early 20th century, when they were transferred to the Library of Congress.

Additional Franklin papers are held by the American Philosophical Society and the University of Pennsylvania, both of which Franklin founded in Philadelphia.

The digitization of the Franklin papers is part of a larger effort to make historical materials available online. Other newly digitized collections include the papers of U.S. Presidents James Buchanan, Ulysses S. Grant, Millard Fillmore, Franklin Pierce and James K. Polk, and the papers of Alexander Hamilton, Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

Image: This print shows Benjamin Franklin seated at a desk, looking to his right at an electrical device. In his left hand are papers upon which he is taking notes, and visible through a window to his left is lightning striking a building. (Edward Fisher, engraver, after a painting by Mason Chamberlin, 1763. Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress)

Los Angeles - The Getty Museum announced today the appointment of James A. Ganz to Senior Curator of Photographs. Ganz will oversee the museum’s renowned collection of nearly 150,000 photographs, which represent the history of the medium from its inception to the present day. He joins the Getty after ten years at the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco, where he served as Curator of the Achenbach Foundation for Graphic Arts.

“Mr. Ganz’s experience is a perfect fit with the mission and scholarly focus of the Getty’s Department of Photographs. His many years of curating exhibitions and acquiring significant works will greatly enrich our collection and the work of our curatorial staff,” says Timothy Potts, director of the J. Paul Getty Museum. “He brings an energy, enthusiasm, and leadership that will help the department engage with an even broader audience and tell new and thoughtful stories about the history of photography up to the present day.” 

“I have long admired the Getty’s commitment to photography, from the depth and breadth of its collections to its spacious galleries and ambitious exhibition and publication programs,” says Ganz. “I look forward to working with my new colleagues on developing and interpreting the museum’s photographic holdings for its diverse audiences, and exploring innovative ways to embrace the public’s special fascination with this dynamic art form.”

The Getty Museum’s collection of photographs includes strong holdings of early European and American photography, as well as becoming increasingly international in scope, with significant holdings of work from Asia, Africa, and South America, and 20th and 21st-century photographs. In addition to overseeing this growing collection, Ganz will also help direct the 7,000 square foot Center for Photographs at the Getty Center, and spearhead a dynamic program of acquisitions, exhibitions, and research projects in partnership with a dedicated team of curatorial professionals.

Ganz received his Ph.D. in art history from Yale University, his M.A. from Williams College, and his B.A. from Trinity College. His specializations include 19th-century European and American photography, as well as California-based photographers, including Carleton Watkins, Eadweard Muybridge, Willard Worden, Peter Stackpole, and Arnold Genthe. Prior to his time at the Fine Arts Museum of San Francisco, Ganz was a curator for over ten years at the Sterling & Francine Clark Art Institute in Massachusetts, where he established the collection of photographs. While at the Clark, he taught the history of photography and of prints in the Williams College Graduate Program in the History of Art. Throughout his career, Ganz has organized dozens of exhibitions, including Jewel City: Art from San Francisco’s Panama-Pacific International Exposition (2015), Portals of the Past: The Photographs of Willard Worden (2015), Arthur Tress: San Francisco 1964 (2012), Édouard Baldus: Landscape and Leisure in Early French Photography (2003), and Arctic Diary: Paintings and Photographs by William Bradford (2002), among others. Ganz has contributed to and authored numerous articles and exhibition catalogues, lectured widely, and held leadership positions at the Print Council of America.    

Ganz will join the Getty in July 2018.

57dae1d663f3b5beb31a5932_834x1100.jpgNew York—The Morgan Library & Museum announced today the acquisition of an extremely rare manuscript leaf by the finest and most original illuminator of the Dutch Middle Ages, the Master of Catherine of Cleves. The work is from an otherwise lost Book of Hours and is the first to be discovered by the artist since 1980. 

The Master of Catherine of Cleves was active in Utrecht, the Netherlands, from around 1430 to 1460. He is named after his masterpiece, the Hours of Catherine of Cleves, which is part of the Morgan’s collections, and only fifteen of his illuminated manuscripts survive. The newly discovered page contains the beginning of the Seven Penitential Psalms, written in Dutch, and the artist framed the text in an elaborate gold and foliate border. Figures depicted in the leaf include David playing the harp, two fighting birds, and an abbot praying to the Virgin Mary who holds the Christ Child. 

Beginning April 17th, the illumination will be added to the current exhibition on view at the Morgan, Now and Forever: The Art of Medieval Time, which runs through April 29. Visitors will be able to compare the new leaf to the Hours of Catherine of Cleves, two volumes of which are on view in the show.

“This is an extraordinary addition to the collections of our Department of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts and testimony to the connoisseurship and eagle eye of department head Roger Wieck,” said Morgan Director Colin B. Bailey. “The work of the Master of Catherine of Cleves is exceptionally scarce and any new discovery is an important development for art history. We are delighted that we can share the leaf with the public almost as soon as it arrives at the Morgan, and we are deeply grateful to the anonymous donor to the manuscript department who made the purchase possible.” 

The Master of Catherine of Cleves decorated books of private devotion for wealthy and noble families and illustrated liturgical books and Bibles for members of the high-ranking clergy. Stylistically, the new leaf suggests the late phase of the artist’s career. This is evident in the thick, angular drapery, the muscular facial features of the Virgin Mary, and the border design and layout. 

Image: The Virgin Offering her Milk to St. Bernard; King David Harping; and Two Fighting Birds on a leaf from a Bookof Hours illuminated by the Master of Catherine of Cleves, The Netherlands,Utrecht, ca. 1460.  Morgan Library &Museum, MS M.1209; purchased as an anonymous gift in honor of Roger S. Wieck, 2018.

 

In celebration of the 100th anniversary of Leonard Bernstein’s birth, the Library of Congress has made available online—for the first time—musical manuscripts and scrapbooks from the legendary composer’s personal and professional archives housed in the nation’s library. These digital offerings and others nearly tripled the existing content at loc.gov/collections/leonard-bernstein/about-this-collection/. The public can now access for free more than 3,700 items, including photos, writings, correspondence, scripts, musical sketches, scrapbooks and audio recordings. This web presentation is a revealing snapshot of Bernstein’s extensive collection at the Library.

“Bernstein arguably was the most prominent musical figure in America in the second half of the 20th century,” said Mark Horowitz, curator of the Leonard Bernstein Collection. “A polymath—a Renaissance man—he was a composer, conductor, pianist, educator and social activist. He composed musicals, ballets, operas, film scores, a mass, chamber music and symphonies.” 

New online content includes materials on Bernstein’s involvement in the civil rights movement, his time as a student at Harvard and scripts for the “Ford Presents” and “Omnibus” programs. Other highlights include:

• “West Side Story” outlines, synopses and notes, including an early synopsis titled “Romeo and Juliet” in which the gangs pit Jews against Catholics as opposed to Anglos versus Hispanics; 

• “West Side Story” audition notes, including Bernstein’s comments about Warren Beatty’s audition for the role of Riff (“Good voice - can’t open jaw - charming as hell - cleancut”);

• All of Bernstein’s musical sketches for “Candide,” including “Glitter and Be Gay” (titled “Cunegonde’s Jewel Song”); “I Am Easily Assimilated” (originally titled “Old Lady’s Jewish Tango”) and “Overture”;

• Materials relating to the Black Panther Party fundraiser that resulted in the famous Tom Wolfe article in New York Magazine, “Radical Chic: That Party at Lenny’s”; also included are letters from Coretta Scott King, Gloria Steinem and Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis;

• A sound recording of Bernstein’s sermon, “Hope in the Nuclear Age,” presented at the All Souls Unitarian Church, Jan. 27, 1985. 

The Bernstein Collection consists of an estimated 400,000 items, one of the largest and most varied in the Library’s Music Division. In addition to music and literary manuscripts, personal correspondence, audio and video recordings, fan mail, business papers, photographs and datebooks, there are unexpected items that range from passports and license plates to batons and the suit in which Bernstein conducted his New York Philharmonic debut in 1943. Also among these unusual items are Bernstein’s notes for a Holocaust opera (tentatively titled “Babel”) he was working on the year of his death; a manuscript for an unproduced circa 1941 ballet, “Conch Town” that included the music for what became “America” from “West Side Story”; and a seven-page, color-illustrated letter to his mother documenting a trip to Israel during the 1948 war. 

The conductor’s collection is also one of the most heavily used in the Music Division. Among its researchers is Bernstein’s own daughter, who is working on a memoir. “It’s beyond gratifying to see that not only musicians and scholars can access these materials, but also students of all ages, and in fact virtually anyone on the planet with an internet connection,” said Jamie Bernstein. “The word I so often find myself using to describe my father is not a word he knew in his lifetime: broadband. The Bernstein collection has this same broadband quality.” 

In addition to the expanded website, the Library will celebrate the Bernstein centennial with a spring mini-fest of activities May 12-19 drawn from the richness of the collection. On Friday, May 18, the Library will present an evening of excerpts from three of Bernstein’s major stage works—the musical “1600 Pennsylvania Avenue” and the operas “Trouble in Tahiti” and “A Quiet Place”—and other extraordinary rarities from the Library’s collection. On Saturday, May 19, rarely seen materials will be on display, providing an illuminating portrait of the man and the artist and informal behind-the-scenes presentations and performances will uncover fascinating details about “West Side Story,” “Candide” and “On the Town.” The celebration also includes film screenings, which include “On the Waterfront,” a National Film Registry classic scored by Bernstein. More information about events can be found at loc.gov/concerts/bernstein100.html.

The Music Division at the Library of Congress contains an unparalleled collection of manuscripts, scores, books, libretti, music-related periodicals and microforms, copyright deposits and music instruments. Manuscripts of note include those of European masters such as Mozart, Beethoven and Brahms and those of such American masters as George and Ira Gershwin, Aaron Copland, Samuel Barber and Charles Mingus. More information can be found at loc.gov/rr/perform.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov

 

Washington, D.C. — Greg Prickman, head of Special Collections at the University of Iowa Libraries, has been named Eric Weinmann Librarian and Director of Collections at the Folger.

"I am so excited to be joining the Folger Shakespeare Library as the Eric Weinmann Librarian,” said Prickman. “The Folger is such a vibrant place, and I am thrilled to begin working with the staff. They have made the collections what they are today, and I look forward to contributing to the next chapter in the life of this magnificent library.”

During his tenure at the University of Iowa, Prickman has prioritized making collections accessible to contemporary audiences. He was the instigator of DIY History (https://diyhistory.lib.uiowa.edu), a crowdsourcing transcription project for Civil War diaries and other digitized manuscripts, and the creator and lead developer of The Atlas of Early Printing (http://atlas.lib.uiowa.edu), a digital, publicly accessible map depicting the development of printing in Europe in the 15th century that uses GIS mapping. Other projects have included the digitization of more than 10,000 science fiction, fantasy, and horror fanzines from the James L. "Rusty" Hevelin Collection; renovation of the UI Libraries exhibition gallery; significant increases in instructional use of the collections; preservation and digitization of reel-to-reel data tapes from the Explorer satellites, first launched in 1958; and an innovative focus on social media and special collections.

Under his leadership, recent acquisitions to the library's collections include the Gallup family papers, the Tom Brokaw papers, and the Brinton Collection of Early Film. He appears in a 2017 documentary featuring this  collection entitled Saving Brinton (http://brintonfilm.com). 

In 2016, Prickman planned and led the exhibition of a Folger First Folio at the University of Iowa as part of the Folger's nationwide tour, The First Folio! The Book that Gave Us Shakespeare. He has also been the curator of more than 20 exhibitions on diverse subjects associated with the library's special collections, including the 250th anniversary of William Blake's birth, the legacy of Abraham Lincoln, and the impact of Star Trek. Prickman co-founded the Iowa City Book Festival, and co-directed it from 2009 to 2011. He is the recipient of the Arthur Benton University Librarian’s Award for Excellence in 2015 for contributions to the University of Iowa Libraries.

Prickman came to the University of Iowa Libraries in 2006, working as a special collections librarian and then as the assistant head of Special Collections and University Archives before becoming the head of Special Collections in 2011. He has also taught graduate-level courses at the university's Center for the Book and School of Library and Information Services. Before Iowa, he worked at public, academic, and corporate libraries, including the Ebling Library at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Special Collections and Preservation Division of the Chicago Public Library. 

He has written many articles and book reviews, including an interview with science fiction and absurdist author Jasper Fforde, whose books, including The Eyre Affair, are richly grounded in libraries and literature. Prickman is a long-standing member of the Caxton Club (Chicago).

A 1994 graduate of Macalester College in St. Paul, Minnesota, Prickman majored in History and Studio Art with a printmaking focus. His MLS, with a specialization in Rare Books and Manuscripts, is from Indiana University.

“Greg Prickman’s deep experience with special collections and ability to lead a talented staff will be a great asset to the Folger for years to come,” said Folger Director Michael Witmore in making the announcement. “I look forward to working with Greg as we continue to build this great collection and make it even more accessible to the many audiences we serve.”

Leslie Hindman Auctioneers is pleased to announce that Francis Wahlgren has joined the firm as an exclusive consultant for its Fine Books and Manuscripts department. He will be based in New York, but will assist the auction house's eight locations nationwide, including its Chicago headquarters. He joins Gretchen Hause, Director of Fine Books and Manuscripts, who joined the firm in May of last year. Mr. Wahlgren and Ms. Hause previously worked together for 7 years in the Books and Manuscripts Department at Christie's in New York.

Over the past twenty-four years, Mr. Wahlgren has appeared regularly as an appraiser on the Antiques Roadshow. Francis first joined Christie's in 1987 as a porter in the Books and Prints Departments and, working through such historic sales as the Estelle Doheny Library sale, continued developing his expertise.

In 1990 he joined Swann Galleries as cataloguer and became an auctioneer before re-joining Christie's in 1993 to start a book department at Christie's East. He headed this department until 1997 when he became Head of the New York Department at Park Avenue and was appointed Senior Vice President in 2000. In 2007 he was appointed International Head of the Books and Manuscripts department based in New York with global responsibilities for the department, and from 2013 to his departure in 2017 served as International Director focusing on the most important clients and business worldwide.

"I am thrilled to be working with Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, and I am eager to contribute my experience and many relationships to this thriving auction firm based in the heart of the American rare book world," said Wahlgren. "I am excited about the opportunity of working together with Gretchen and the Hindman team focusing on bringing important collections and pieces to the market here."

Over the course of his career, Wahlgren managed the sale of numerous important and historic book collections including The Haskell F. Norman Library of Science and Medicine, which realized a notable $18.7 million; The Abel Berland Library of English Literature and early printed books; The History of the Book: The Cornelius J. Hauck Collection, which totaled $12.4 million; The Frank S. Streeter Collection of Navigation and Voyages; Important Books, Atlases and Manuscripts: The Private Library of Kenneth Nebenzahl; and The Arthur & Charlotte Vershbow Collection of illustrated books.

He has also brought significant items to auction such as the Francis Crick "Secret of Life" letter, which sold for a record-setting price exceeding $6 million; a rare suppressed first edition of Lewis Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, which sold for $1.54 million; a Bute set of John James Audubon's The Birds of America, which sold for $8.8 million; and a first edition of Newton's Principia, which sold for $3.7 million, to name some of his other significant accomplishments.

"It is not surprising to me that the majority of the greatest books and collections I have sold over the last three decades have either been consigned by or purchased by clients in the Midwest. I truly believe our combined focus on bringing more high-quality activity through Chicago will be a welcome development for collectors and institutions alike," said Wahlgren. 

Francis began his career at the Pierpont Morgan Library after graduating with a master's degree in art history and medieval books from Queens College, New York.

To contact the Fine Books and Manuscripts department at Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, visit lesliehindman.com or call 312.280.1212.

New York-- Printed Matter is pleased to announce the appointment of Sonel Breslav as Director of Fairs & Editions. Sonel comes to the organization with ten years experience as an arts administrator and curator, and a long-running engagement with artists’ books and the independent publishing community.

In her new capacity as Director of Fairs & Editions, Sonel will oversee all aspects of the NY and LA Art Book Fairs, two of Printed Matter’s largest public programs. She will also direct the organization’s participation in domestic and international art fairs, as well as curate and manage the production of Printed Matter’s fundraising editions. 

Most recently, Sonel was National Chapters and Programs Manager at ArtTable, the foremost professional organization dedicated to advancing the leadership of women in the visual arts. From 2013-2017 she was the Director of Murray Guy, New York, where she curated exhibitions of work by gallery artists such as Moyra Davey, Zoe Leonard, and Alejandro Cesarco, among others. 

Sonel also has an extensive background within the artists’ book community, founding Blonde Art Books in 2012, an independent organization dedicated to promoting small press and self-published art books through exhibitions, talks, and a publishing imprint. In 2013 she initiated the Bushwick Art Books & Zine Fair for a growing community of local publishers, with the most recent event including over 100 exhibitors from across the country and a full schedule of programming.

On her appointment to Director of Fair & Editions, Sonel said: “I’m hugely excited to take on the opportunities and challenges that come with this role, and am eager to contribute to an organization whose mission coincides with my own commitment to artists’ publishing and community building. I have always felt that book fairs provide a uniquely meaningful way to capture the energy, ingenuity, and vision of artists and publishers working in the medium. I look forward to pushing the NY and LA Art Book Fairs in new directions, and continuing to build an environment of support for all reaches of a diverse community.”

Printed Matter’s Executive Director Max Schumann said of the appointment: “We are thrilled to have Sonel taking up the Fair leadership—her long commitment to artists’ publishing and experience working closely with artists makes her remarkably well-suited for the role. We’re grateful to have such a thoughtful and talented individual joining the organization, and we’re excited to see Sonel put her experience to use in support of artists and publishers, and the continued evolution of the NY and LA Art Book Fairs.” 

Max continued: “We remain indebted to the invaluable contributions of Shannon Michael Cane, who served as the Curator of Fairs and Editions from 2013-2017. His passion and advocacy for emerging artists and publishers heightened the dynamism of Printed Matter’s Art Book Fairs— among his many other lasting contributions to the organization—and we look forward to honoring his memory as the Fairs continue into the future.” 

The New York Society Library is proud to announce the winners of the 2017-2018 New York City Book Awards. 

Founded in 1995, these awards honor the best books about New York City published in a given year, regardless of genre. As New York City’s oldest cultural institution, the Library is uniquely suited to present the New York City Book Awards. 

The winning books: 

  • Mike Wallace, Greater Gotham: A History of New York City from 1898 to 1919 (Oxford University Press)
  • Roz Chast, Going Into Town: A Love Letter to New York (Bloomsbury Publishing)
  • Francis Spufford, Golden Hill: A Novel of Old New York (Scribner)
  • Anthony W. Robins, New York Art Deco: A Guide to Gotham’s Jazz Age Architecture (SUNY Press)
  • Jennifer Egan, Manhattan Beach: A Novel (Scribner)
  • Hornblower Award for a First Book: Lisa Ko, The Leavers: A Novel (Algonquin Books)

Members of the book awards selection committee read and reviewed approximately 140 books published in 2017 with New York City as their major topic or setting. The winners qualify as titles of literary quality or historical importance that evoke the spirit or enhance appreciation of New York City, shedding some new or unusual light on it. The Hornblower Award, established in 2011, is presented to an excellent New York City-related book by a first-time author. 

The selection committee itself includes many New York City-based authors. It was chaired by Warren Wechsler and comprised Bianca Calabresi, Barbara Cohen, Ellen Feldman (Terrible Virtue, Next to Love), Ella M. Foshay (John James Audubon), Karl E. Meyer (The China Collectors, Pax Ethnica), Janice P. Nimura (Daughters of the Samurai), Stephen Raphael, and Peter Salwen (Upper West Side Story). 

The winning authors and publishers will be celebrated at a reception and awards presentation on Tuesday, May 1, at the New York Society Library. The ceremony is by invitation.   

More general information and a complete list of winners from the awards’ past 22 years can be found here

The 2017-2018 New York City Book Awards are generously underwritten by Ellen M. Iseman. 

 

2018branch_rickey_486x711.pngBaseball scouting reports of one of the most famous baseball executives and scouts in history, Branch Rickey, who was also responsible for helping Jackie Robinson successfully break Major League Baseball’s color line, have been digitized and are now available online for the first time from the Library of Congress. The archive was digitized in time for Major League Baseball’s new season and for the Library’s new exhibition “Baseball Americana” opening June 29.

The collection includes about 1,750 baseball scouting reports from the 1950s and 1960s, documenting Rickey’s skill in analyzing various aspects of a player’s game and identifying some of the greats. The Rickey Papers are online at loc.gov/collections/branch-rickey-papers/about-this-collection/.

“I have loved baseball my whole life. In fact, when I was little I wanted to be a shortstop. I am really excited to connect fans of the game with this extraordinary history. The Library’s Branch Rickey Collection reveals on how he discovered some of baseball’s greatest players. His spot-on assessment of players will take fans and historians into the mind of a sports genius,” said Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden. “This is a little preview of what is to come in our upcoming exhibition opening this summer, ‘Baseball Americana.’”  

Some of the better-known players featured in the collection include Hank Aaron, Lou Brock, Roberto Clemente, Don Drysdale, Sandy Koufax, Willie Mays and Frank Robinson, among others. In addition to future Hall of Famers, Rickey also evaluated hundreds of players who had varying degrees of success.

Highlights of the Rickey Papers include:

  • Rickey’s 1963 scouting report on Hank Aaron, who broke Babe Ruth’s long-standing home run record of 714 in 1974. Rickey wrote that Aaron was “surely one of the greatest hitters in baseball today” but also noted Aaron “is frequently a guess hitter.”
  • A 1955 scouting report on Roberto Clemente, who amassed 3,000 hits in his Hall of Fame career for the Pittsburgh Pirates
  • A report dated March 30-31, 1964, on future National Basketball Association great Dave DeBusschere, where Rickey predicted that DeBusschere “should become a corking good major league pitcher.”
  • For Hall of Famer Bob Gibson, Rickey noted on March 14, 1964, “when trying out young players… scouts and coaches would keep in mind Bob Gibson as a model for comparison and rate the prospect’s stuff accordingly.”

Rickey’s impressive career earned him a place in the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, but he defied easy categorization.  One biographer concluded that “his writings revealed a man of tremendous intellect and indomitable drive,” but “appeared to be the man of ultimate paradoxes, a capitalist/moralist/competitor/do-gooder/visionary/reactionary.”

The digitization of the Rickey Papers is part of a larger effort to make historical materials available online. Other newly digitized collections include the papers of U.S. Presidents James Buchanan, Ulysses S. Grant, Millard Fillmore, Franklin Pierce and James K. Polk, and the papers of Alexander Hamilton, Margaret Bayard Smith, Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

Image: Detail of American baseball player, manager and executive Branch Rickey between 1909 and 1919. (National Photo Company Collection, Prints and Photographs Division, Library of Congress)

National Comedy Center Opens

Jamestown, NY — The National Comedy Center, the first non-profit cultural institution and national-scale visitor experience dedicated to the art of comedy, announces its opening August 1-5, 2018, coinciding with the organization’s annual Lucille Ball Comedy Festival, in Jamestown, NY. The new 37,000 square foot, $50 million facility tells the story of comedy from its origins through the present, with more than 50 immersive, interactive exhibits.

“There has never been a national cultural institution that provides comedy the opportunity for appreciation often afforded other art forms. Culture is preserved by meaningful storytelling. What these artists have done is important, and it should be both celebrated and contextualized, drawing connections that make the past relevant to the present. Lucille Ball understood the power of comedy, and had the vision for her hometown to become a destination for its celebration in a way that would educate, foster and inspire. That’s what we’ve set out to do here,” said National Comedy Center Executive Director Journey Gunderson.

In a special press briefing at the site on Friday, March 30th, United States Senator Charles Schumer announced his push for a congressional designation for the Center.  The new designation would officially make the National Comedy Center the nation’s cultural institution dedicated to the art of comedy, recognizing it as the only institution of its kind with the mission of preserving, protecting, and showcasing the art of comedy and its role in our culture.

"Comedy is an art form, and it's a part of our rich cultural history in America. I am proud to stand here today, as the Comedy Center takes shape, and begin my push to officially designate this the National Comedy Center of the United States," said Senator Schumer.

Each visitor will experience a personalized trip through the Center as exhibits respond to one’s personal comedic sensibilities via use of a wristband fitted with an RFID chip worn throughout the stay. Highlights include George Carlin’s massive personal archives that provide a glimpse into one of comedy's most prolific minds, a hologram theater that presents performances of some of comedy’s most notable figures, and experiences that allow visitors to step into the shoes of comedic artists. Additionally, the National Comedy Center will feature rare artifacts from some of comedy’s most notable names and bodies of work.

"We are thrilled to announce the opening of this amazing project which was conceptualized and launched more than seven years ago by a group of dedicated and hard-working individuals who have worked tirelessly to make this dream a reality,” said Tom Benson, Project Chairman. “The National Comedy Center will take guests on a journey through all aspects and eras of the art form. It is the repository that has never existed that will respectfully celebrate comedy in a fun and unique way for generations to come. .We sincerely thank all of our funding partners who have provided the support to make this happen.”

Funding for the National Comedy Center was provided by state, federal and private philanthropic support. Through the support of I LOVE NY™, more than $9 million has been provided by Governor Andrew Cuomo and New York State’s Empire State Development and the Office of Parks, Recreation and Historic Preservation. The Center is expected to attract more than 100,000 annual visitors and have a $23 million annual stabilized economic impact on the region.

The National Comedy Center embodies Lucille Ball’s vision for her hometown to become a destination for the celebration of the comedic arts — a vision already realized via the programming of the National Comedy Center’s dialogues, the Lucille Ball Desi Arnaz Museum, and its renowned Lucille Ball Comedy Festival for more than 25 years.

Past festival performers and dialogue participants have included: Jerry Seinfeld, Jay Leno, Ray Romano, Ellen DeGeneres, Bob Newhart, Jim Gaffigan, Lewis Black, Trevor Noah, W. Kamau Bell, Brian Regan, Kevin James, Joan & Melissa Rivers, Robert Klein, David Steinberg, Peter Farrelly, Martin Short, Alan Zweibel, Joy Behar, The Smothers Brothers, the creative team of David Letterman’s 33-year career, the families of Lenny Bruce, Richard Pryor, Harold Ramis and George Carlin, and more than 100 other comedic artists.

The Lucille Ball Desi Arnaz Museum features rare memorabilia from “I Love Lucy”, props, costumes, Lucille Ball's Emmy awards, and replica studio sets. In conjunction with the National Comedy Center, the Lucy Desi Museum is currently updating its facility and will be unveiling new exhibits in August.

Located in Jamestown, a city in Chautauqua County and Western New York, the National Comedy Center is in the region of Buffalo, Niagara Falls, Cleveland, Pittsburgh and Toronto. 

For more information, visit http://www.comedycenter.org

Glass.jpgNew York, NY—In 1976 composer Philip Glass and director Robert Wilson redefined opera with the debut in Avignon, France, of Einstein on the Beach. The nearly five-hour, non-narrative work broke a host of operatic conventions and would become the most celebrated of the many collaborations between these two giants of the musical and theatrical stage.

Now, Mr. Glass’s autograph score for the landmark work is coming to the Morgan Library & Museum as a bequest from the estate of the late New York collector and philanthropist Paul F. Walter. A longtime supporter of the Morgan who died in January 2017, Mr. Walter also bequeathed the museum scene designs and other items related to the work.

“Many have said that the true starting point of contemporary opera was 1976 with the production of Einstein on the Beach in Avignon,” said Colin B. Bailey, director of the Morgan Library & Museum. “The work was groundbreaking on so many levels, from staging to instrumentation to the choral arrangements. The unrivaled genius of Mr. Glass is evident throughout, and we are deeply grateful to Paul Walter and his estate for generously leaving this work to the Morgan. It is an extraordinary addition to our distinguished collection of music manuscripts.”

In 2010 Mr. Walter placed the Einstein on the Beach manuscript on loan at the Morgan for the benefit of scholarly research. Two years later, in 2012, the museum mounted an exhibition devoted to the work and its stage adaptations. 

Mr. Glass eschewed tradition and composed Einstein on the Beach for the synthesizers and woodwinds of the Philip Glass Ensemble in addition to voices and solo violin, instead of the typical orchestral arrangement. Abstract dance sequences, choreographed by Lucinda Childs and Andrew de Groat, were juxtaposed against a sequence of large, recurring images projected on a screen at the back of the stage. The opera’s four acts were framed and connected with a series of short scenes or “knee plays.” Rather than the standard intermission, the audience was free to enter and exit throughout the almost five-hour performance.

The sung portions of the opera use number sequences and solfège syllables (do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, ti); the spoken sections feature texts by Christopher Knowles, Ms. Childs, and actor Samuel M. Johnson. Contemporary events and notable people of the 1970s are referenced in various scenes—from the famous trial of heiress-turned-revolutionary Patty Hearst to the Beatles and pop singer David Cassidy.

Einstein on the Beach was the first of Mr. Glass’s portrait trilogy. It was followed by Satyagraha (1980), in which the composer turned his attention to Gandhi, and Akhnaten (1983), based on the life of the Egyptian pharaoh. 

Paul Walter was involved with the Morgan since the late 1970s, when he generously donated a collection of Indian miniature paintings, an area otherwise not represented in the institution’s collections. He was named a Life Fellow in 1979 and later a Benefactor and Fellow in Perpetuity. He was also a founding member of the Morgan’s Modern and Contemporary Collectors Committee which formed in 2006.

Image: Philip Glass (b. 1937), Autograph manuscript, Einstein on the Beach, The Morgan Library & Museum, Bequest of Paul F. Walter. Photography by Anthony Troncale. © Dunvagen Music Publishers.   

 

486x865_tracyksmith.pngLibrarian of Congress Carla Hayden has appointed Tracy K. Smith to serve a second term as the nation’s 22nd Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry for 2018-2019. During her second year, Smith will expand her outreach efforts to rural communities and unveil a new anthology to be published in the fall.

“I am thrilled that Tracy K. Smith has accepted my invitation to continue sharing her poetry with the nation,” Hayden said. “Her exchanges with Americans in small towns and rural communities are inspiring an appreciation of poetry and history - and remind us that poetry has value for all of our lives.”

During her first term, Smith, a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and professor at Princeton University, gave readings and led discussions as part of a pilot project in rural communities in New Mexico, South Carolina and Kentucky. Her goal is to pursue more engagement in small towns across America, and her reappointment at this time will allow for long-term planning for the expanded rural outreach project.

The laureate will return to Washington on April 19 to report on her outreach efforts and focus for the second term, with an event titled “Staying Human: Poetry in the Age of Technology.”

“Poetry invites us to listen to other voices, to make space for other perspectives, and to care about the lives of others who may not look, sound or think like ourselves,” Smith said. “My project as Poet Laureate has brought me into contact with rural communities in the South and Southwest, and not only do we recognize and have many things to say to each other, but talking about poems together allows us to access and share our feelings and bear witness to the experiences that shape our lives. I’m excited to pursue this project further over the next year.”

The April event will feature Smith reading poems and participating in a discussion with Ron Charles, editor of The Washington Post’s Book World and host of the Library’s “Life of a Poet” series. It will take place at 7 p.m. on Thursday, April 19 in the Coolidge Auditorium on the ground floor of the Library’s Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First Street S.E., Washington, D.C.

The event is free, but tickets are required. For tickets, please visit this event ticketing site. The event will also be livestreamed on the Library’s Facebook page at facebook.com/libraryofcongress and its YouTube site (with captions) at youtube.com/LibraryOfCongress.

New Anthology: American Journal

As part of her second term, Smith has edited an anthology called “American Journal: Fifty Poems for Our Time.” The anthology will be published in September 2018 by Graywolf Press in association with the Library of Congress and will be incorporated into Smith’s visits to rural communities.

“American Journal” takes its title from a poem by Robert Hayden, the first African American appointed as the U.S. Poet Laureate. Poems selected for the anthology offer 50 different outlooks on America, including stories of loss, experiences of immigrants, outcries of injustice and poems that evoke history and celebrate America’s diversity. Poets included in “American Journal” include past Poets Laureate Natasha Trethewey and Charles Wright, as well as award-winning poets Mark Doty, Ross Gay, Terrance Hayes, Laura Kasischke, Mary Szybist and others.

As Smith says in the introduction to the anthology, “‘American Journal: Fifty Poems for Our Time’ is an offering for people who love poems the way I do. It is also an offering for those who love them in different ways and those who don’t yet know what their relationship with poetry will be.”

About the Poet Laureate

Smith is the author of four books of poetry, including “Wade in the Water” in April 2018; “Life on Mars” (2011), winner of the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry; “Duende” (2007), winner of the 2006 James Laughlin Award and the 2008 Essence Literary Award; and “The Body’s Question” (2003), winner of the Cave Canem Poetry Prize. Smith is also the author of a memoir, “Ordinary Light” (2015), a finalist for the 2015 National Book Award in nonfiction.

Born in Falmouth, Massachusetts, in 1972 and raised in Fairfield, California, Smith earned a B.A. in English and American literature and Afro-American studies from Harvard University and an M.F.A. in creative writing from Columbia University. From 1997 to 1999, she was a Stegner Fellow in poetry at Stanford University. Smith has taught at Medgar Evers College of the City University of New York, at the University of Pittsburgh and at Columbia University. She is currently the Roger S. Berlind ’52 Professor in the Humanities and director of the creative writing program at Princeton University.

The Library of Congress Poetry and Literature Center is the home of the Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry, a position that has existed since 1937 when Archer M. Huntington endowed the Chair of Poetry at the Library. Since then, many of the nation’s most eminent poets have served as Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress and, after the passage of Public Law 99-194 (Dec. 20, 1985), as Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry—a position which the law states “is equivalent to that of Poet Laureate of the United States.”

During his or her term, the Poet Laureate seeks to raise the national consciousness to a greater appreciation of the reading and writing of poetry. In recent years, Laureates have initiated poetry projects that broaden the audiences for poetry.

For more information on the Poet Laureate and the Poetry and Literature Center, visit loc.gov/poetry/. Consultants in Poetry and Poets Laureate Consultants in Poetry and their terms of service can be found at loc.gov/poetry/laureate-2011-present.html. To learn more about Poet Laureate projects, visit loc.gov/poetry/laureate-projects.html.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov, and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

Image: U.S. Poet Laureate Tracy K. Smith has been appointed to a second term and will expand her outreach to rural communities. (Shawn Miller/Library of Congress)

shanghai-exhibition-jane-eyre-ms-page copy.jpgOriginal manuscripts by five of the greatest writers in the English language will go on show in Shanghai for the first time in March 2018. ‘Where Great Writers Gather: Treasures of the British Library’ will feature drafts, correspondence and manuscripts by writers including Charlotte Brontë, D.H. Lawrence, Percy Bysshe Shelley, T.S. Eliot and Charles Dickens, alongside Chinese translations, adaptations and responses to their works.

The exhibition will reflect Shanghai’s importance as a historic gateway through which English literature first arrived in China, subsequently finding an audience through its strong traditions of translation and publishing. It also marks a milestone in the relationship between the British Library and Shanghai Library: the two institutions signed a Letter of Intent and arrangements to hold the current exhibition were finalised at UK-China High Level People to People dialogue in London last December.

The exhibition includes valuable and rare manuscripts from the British Library:

  • Charlotte Brontë’s manuscript of Jane Eyre, including the famous line from the concluding chapter: ‘Reader - I married him’;
  • Drafts of poems for Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats by T.S. Eliot, including letters discussing feline behaviour;
  • Letters from D.H. Lawrence about his novel, The Rainbow, discussing the ban on its publication and alternative routes for it to reach a readership; 
  • Manuscript draft of a sonnet dedicated to Lord Byron by Percy Bysshe Shelley; 
  • Five pages from the original manuscript of The Pickwick Papers by Charles Dickens.

Focusing on original manuscripts, the exhibition at Shanghai Library explores the journey of the five writers’ works through China and reveals the story of the translation and reception of English literature in China. It shows the ways in which Chinese and English culture have interacted through various publications in China, and explores how Chinese people absorb and respond to cultural achievements from around the world.

Items from Shanghai Library’s collections are also featured, including a manuscript presented by George Bernard Shaw to the Shanghai dramatist Huang Zuolin in 1937, with the inscription: ‘Rise up, China! You are the future of the eastern world’; the earliest English novel translated into Chinese (Jonathan Swift’s Gulliver’s Travels, published as ‘Tan Ying Xiao Lu’ in 1872); English books used by the famous translator Tu An when he was undertaking the first Chinese translation of Shakespeare’s Sonnets in Shanghai; Charles Dickens' personal collection of books and bookplates; D.H. Lawrence’s signed limited edition of the poetry collection Pansies, and the signed first limited edition of Lady Chatterley's Lover.

Shanghai Library will also hold a series of promotional activities, including a translation competition, a recital of English literary works and a programme of lectures and reading groups. They will invite Shanghai cultural celebrities to send in their handwritten thoughts on ‘English Literature and Me’, to encourage readers to explore and interact with the exhibition and attract the widest possible audience. The British Library will also invite readers to visit the exhibition and take part in a digital campaign ‘Back to the Origins of English Literature’ to discover more about English authors and their works.

Alexandra Ault, the British curator of the exhibition ‘Where Great Writers Gather: Treasures of the British Library’, said: ‘Nothing matches the thrill of seeing first hand original manuscripts: from Charlotte Brontë’s scrupulously neat fair copy to Charles Dickens’ hurried and rather messy draft pages, they reveal the many different ways in which writers create. It has been a pleasure to work with colleagues at Shanghai Library to develop an exhibition that will showcase authors and poets familiar to millions of readers in China’.  

Chen Chao, Director of the Shanghai Library, said: ‘It gives me a great pleasure to host this exhibition presenting literary treasures in Shanghai. This is not just an event of the high-level cultural exchange between China and the UK and the first in-depth cooperation between the Shanghai Library and the British Library, but also a spiritual interaction between the people of both countries’.

Phil Spence, the British Library’s Chief Operating Officer, said: ‘Shanghai has historically been one of the great gateways between Britain and China, with culture, trade and diplomacy flowing in both directions and bringing our peoples closer together. The new exhibition will be an opportunity to share manuscripts of five of our greatest authors with audiences in Shanghai, and to deepen the relationship between the British Library and Shanghai Library, with staff exchanges and the very process of collaborating on an exhibition of this kind enabling us to share knowledge, experience and expertise’.  

The exhibition catalogue of ‘Where Great Writers Gather: Treasures of the British Library’ has been jointly compiled by the Shanghai Library and the British Library and will be published by the Commercial Press.

The exhibition is the latest stage of ambitious cultural exchange programme, ‘The British Library in China: connecting through culture and learning’, which has already seen major exhibitions at the National Library of China in Beijing and, most recently, at Mu Xin Art Museum in Wuzhen, which was visited by more than 41,000 people between October 2017 and January 2018. The initiative is funded by HM Government and also includes a programme of knowledge exchange between staff at the British Library and its counterparts in China, and the development of the Library’s first Chinese website Discovering Literature, introducing more than 200 digitised literary treasures from the Library’s literary collections, as well as in-depth interpretative articles, short films and interactive elements: www.britishlibrary.cn The Library has also grown its audience on its new social media platforms WeChat and Weibo.

Image: Conclusion of manuscript fair copy of Jane Eyre, volume III by Charlotte Brontë , 1847, British Library Add MS 43476, f 259r.

Amherst, MA — The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art is pleased to announce the 2018 Carle Honors Honorees, to be awarded at Guastavino's in New York City on Thursday, September 27, 2018. The 13th annual gala and fundraiser will honor those who have played an instrumental role in making picture books a vibrant and influential art and literary form. This year, The Carle will award the following honors:

Artist: Paul O. Zelinsky is master of many styles, bringing exceptional artistry and poignant storytelling to the field. He received the 1998 Caldecott Medal for his illustrated retelling of Rapunzel. Three additional books received Caldecott Honors: Hansel and Gretel (1985), Rumpelstiltskin (1987), and Swamp Angel (1995). Zelinsky is regarded as one of the most critically acclaimed artists in the field of children's literature. 

Angel: The Sendak Fellowship, represented by Lynn Caponera and Dona Ann McAdams

The Sendak Fellowship has made remarkable strides in advancing the next generation of talent within children's literature. The annual fellowship, created by Maurice Sendak in 2010, encourages the creation of work that "excites and incites," while fostering young illustrators and writers, providing them with artist residencies. Previous fellows include Elisha Cooper, Terry and Eric Fan, Yuyi Morales, Sergio Ruzzier, and other talents.  

Bridge: The Bologna Children's Book Fair, represented by Elena Pasoli

The Bologna Children's Book Fair has successfully brought together books and publishers from around the world, creating a global audience and strengthening international bonds across cultures. Organizers showcase the importance of quality children's books as a tool for opening minds and helping children grow as global citizens. As both a cultural book show and international rights business forum, the fair creates a unique locus of discussion for children's books.

Mentor: Dr. Rudine Sims Bishop has influenced generations of students as a children's literature scholar and as author of Shadow and Substance: Afro-American Experience in Contemporary Children's Fiction (1982) and Free Within Ourselves: The Development of African American Children's Literature (2007). She has been a champion of diversity in the field and is credited with the indispensable metaphor of books as both "windows and mirrors."

The Host of the 2018 awards is best-selling author Andrea Davis Pinkney. Her exemplary work has garnered numerous accolades, including multiple Coretta Scott King Book Awards, Jane Addams Children's Literature Honor citations, the Boston Globe/Horn Book Honor medal, and many more. Pinkney is also a successful children's book publisher and editor with titles by Allen Say, Lois Lowry, Toni Morrison, Henry Louis Gates, Jr., and more.

The awards are selected each year by a committee chaired by children's literature historian and critic Leonard S. Marcus, who was central to the founding of the Honors. The committee recognizes four distinct awards: Artist, for lifelong innovation in the field; Angel, whose generous resources are crucial to making illustrated children's book art exhibitions, education programs, and related projects a reality; Mentor, editors, designers, and educators who champion the art form; and Bridge, individuals who have found inspired ways to bring the art of the picture book to larger audiences through work in other fields. 

The Carle Honors is a key fundraiser for The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, supporting the Museum's mission to inspire a love of art and reading through picture books. The annual event includes a silent auction featuring works of art donated by the industry's most celebrated artists, including Eric Carle. For ticket and sponsorship information, please contact Rebecca Miller Goggins, Director of Development at 413-559-6308 or rebeccag@carlemuseum.org. Use the 

hashtag #CarleHonors and follow @CarleMuseum on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram to stay up to date on new announcements!

K95A9934+copy.jpgMinnesota Center for Book Arts (MCBA) is pleased to announce the next participant in our Artist-in-Residence program:  Kelly Taylor Mitchell.

Project summary and artist bio:

Kelly Taylor Mitchell will research Minnesota’s “Pilgrims,” a group of formerly enslaved Civil War soldiers and their families who fled the south for Minnesota. Mitchell will create a limited varied edition suite of three artist books as well as an in-response open edition of zines and poetry chapbooks which will work to historicize the present by sharing oral histories and decentering narratives of colonization. Mitchell's project will explore how the stories of the Minnesota “Pilgrims” contextualize place-making in Minnesota for new and diverse populations, and inform a collective history of community building, confronting obstacles, and reciprocity in the state. 

Kelly Taylor Mitchell is an installation, book, and print artist currently based in Rhode Island. Mitchell's work recontextualizes oral histories in order to navigate the intertwined decolonial landscape of "Black" trauma and "Black" joy. Concepts of land tenure, territorial claims, community autonomy, inherited identity, and maronage act as an anchor in a cobbling of identity. Mitchell holds a BFA in printmaking from Tufts University, School of the Museum of Fine Arts, and in May will receive an MFA in printmaking from the Rhode Island School of Design. 

The Artist-in-Residence (AIR) program is designed to support selected artists by providing financial and community resources, space, and equipment to assist in the creation and promotion of their work. Residencies may be from two weeks to three months in duration. Studios and equipment are available to facilitate work in papermaking, printing and bookbinding. Artists-in-Residence also receive a stipend of $2000 to be used at the artist’s discretion for supplies, travel and/or living expenses. Participation in the program is based on the artistic merit of proposed projects as well as the degree to which artists further MCBA's artistic mission: to lead the advancement of the book as an evolving art form.

As the largest and most comprehensive center of its kind in the nation, Minnesota Center for Book Arts celebrates the book as a vibrant contemporary art form that takes many shapes. From the traditional crafts of papermaking, letterpress printing and hand bookbinding to experimental artmaking and self-publishing techniques, MCBA supports the limitless creative evolution of book arts through all-ages educational and artistic programming. MCBA is located in the Open Book building in downtown Minneapolis, alongside partner organizations The Loft Literary Center and Milkweed Editions. To learn more, visit www.mnbookarts.org.

Image creditOf John: A Story in 13 Pockets by Kelly Taylor Mitchell.

Open-Album-Tubman-Portrait copy.jpgThe Library of Congress has conserved and digitized an album containing 48 rare photographs dating to the 1860s - including a previously unrecorded portrait of Harriet Tubman and images of other abolitionists - and the album will be exhibited for the first time at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture later this year. Each image was cleaned, digitally scanned and returned to the album.

The full collection is now available online at this link.

The two national cultural institutions jointly acquired the historical album at auction in 2017 by pooling funds to ensure this remarkable gathering of American portraits would be accessible to the public in perpetuity. The images included the previously unknown portrait of Tubman at the back of the album, as well as the only known photograph of John Willis Menard, the first African-American man elected to the U.S. Congress.

Since the acquisition, Library conservators have carefully reattached the cover, treated the leather album and cleaned the photographs to ensure long-term preservation. Digitization experts from both institutions consulted on the best scanning specifications to apply. Two catalogers have studied the individuals portrayed and found full names for all but three of the people. They invite the public to help identify the remaining individuals.

The portraits displayed together in the album can tell many stories. Education is a strong theme as well as abolition. At least 10 individuals portrayed were teachers, including African-American women. They were identified through genealogy records and Freedmen’s School reports published in Quaker journals. Two of the teachers, Nancy Johnson and her sister, Mary Ann Donaldson, were part of the American Missionary Association’s effort to educate African Americans at Port Royal, South Carolina, during the early 1860s.

 “Now people in our nation’s capital and around the world can see these important figures from American history and learn more about their lives,” said Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden. “We are proud this historic collaboration with the Smithsonian has made these pictures of history available to the public online.”

The public will have a chance to view the rare album for the first time in person at the National Museum of African American History and Culture in a special exhibit later this year. The digital images also will be presented through the museum’s website.

“This photo album allows us to see Harriet Tubman in a riveting, new way; other iconic portraits present her as either stern or frail. This new photograph shows her relaxed and very stylish. Sitting with her arm casually draped across the back of a parlor chair, she’s wearing an elegant bodice and a full skirt with a fitted waist. Her posture and facial expression remind us that historical figures are far more complex than most people realize. This adds significantly to what we know about this fierce abolitionist. And that’s a good thing,” said Lonnie G. Bunch III, the founding director of the National Museum of African American History and Culture.

The album was originally compiled as a gift for Emily Howland (1827-1929), a Quaker schoolteacher and abolitionist who lived in Sherwood, New York, and taught at Camp Todd, a Freedmen’s camp in Arlington, Virginia, during the Civil War and then founded her own school after the Civil War. Howland continued adding photographs later.

Tubman escaped slavery in 1849 on Maryland’s Eastern Shore and took great risk to help relatives and others escape bondage as a famous conductor of the Underground Railroad.  Abolitionists and prominent figures portrayed in the album include: Charles Sumner, Lydia Maria Child, William Henry Channing, Colonel C.W. Folsom, Wendell Phillips and Charles Dickens.

The album was jointly acquired with funds from the Library of Congress James Madison Council and funds from the Smithsonian.

Image: Representatives from the National Museum of African American History and Culture and the Library of Congress inspect the photo album of Emily Howland, containing rare portraits of Harriet Tubman and John Willis Menard, April 10, 2017. (Shawn Miller/Library of Congress)

 

PBA Galleries of San Francisco California is excited to announce the return of Mr. Ivan Briggs to their staff as Director of Fine Pens and Comics.  

In 2007 Mr. Briggs moved to Bonhams Auctioneers where he quickly advanced to Senior Specialist and then Director of fine writing instruments. He established himself as a leading worldwide authority on fine pens at auction, with a series of successful previews and sales in San Francisco, Los Angeles, New York, London, Paris and Hong Kong. Selling over $10,000,000 in fine and rare pens during his nine years, numerous world record prices for pens were realized, including $305,000 for a pair of vintage Namiki Emperor fountain pens in 2015. In his role as premier authority, Mr. Briggs has discussed the pen market with the New York Times, the BBC, Robb Report, the South China Morning Post and numerous other media outlets.

Ivan Briggs also brings a longstanding expertise in comic books to PBA.  As comic book buyer in the 1990s for San Francisco's Green Apple Books, he compiled two highly successful mail-order catalogues for rare comic book material, with emphasis on pre-code horror and crime comics and comic-related hardcover books.  During this time, he sold the original cover for Mad #21 (the first cover appearance of Alfred E. Neuman) for five times the value achieved by Sotheby's for the same piece. In December 2014, Mr. Briggs sold a single-owner collection of comic books and graphic novels for Bonhams, San Francisco, and realized world-record auction results for half a dozen lots (including a final price of $16,250 for a copy of Incredible Hulk #181, that featured the first full appearance of Wolverine, CGC-certified at 9.8).

Mr. Briggs has served as a consultant for the Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide, and maintains the world's most extensive collection of vintage comic-related photographs, a number of which have been published by Taschen Books, Kitchen Sink Press and others.  His interest in comics is wide-ranging, with an emphasis on pre-code horror and crime comics (particularly EC), undergrounds (particularly the work of R. Crumb), Golden Age, Silver Age, and original comic art.

Mr. Briggs is excited to bring his expertise to PBA. “I’m eager to work with my network of pen clients around the globe, and to welcome new buyers and sellers into the fold, especially young collectors seeking a more tactile, individual and authentic relationship to the act of writing than is afforded by electronic devices.”

PBA Galleries is a leader in collectible books, maps and works on paper and holds auctions of these every two weeks.  For more information regarding upcoming sales, consignments, or auction results, please contact PBA Galleries at (415) 989-2665 or pba@pbagalleries.com

pjs9398_300dpi.jpgAustin, Texas — The Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin has acquired the Fritz Henle archive, containing about 180,000 black-and-white negatives, 10,000 color transparencies, 150 contact sheet books, 11 books of magazine clippings and tear sheets and thousands of work prints spanning the photographer’s six-decade career. The materials were donated by the Henle Archive Trust.

Henle (1909-1993) was one of the most productive and best-known magazine and editorial photographers of the post-war era. Born in Germany, he immigrated to the United States in September 1936, and between 1937 and 1941 his work was featured on the cover of five issues of Life magazine and in more than 50 stories in its pages.

Henle’s photographs were widely published in magazines such as Harper’s Bazaar, The Saturday Evening Post, Holiday, Collier’s, Look, Town and Country, Mademoiselle and Glamour. In addition to these popular picture magazines, Henle was a frequent contributor to photography publications such as U.S. Camera, Popular Photography, Modern Photography and Minicam Photography.

Henle also published dozens of books of his photographs including “This is Japan” (1937), “China” (1943), “Mexico” (1945), “Paris” (1947), “Hawaii” (1948), “Virgin Islands” (1949), “Figure Studies” (1954), “The  Caribbean” (1957), “Holiday in Europe” (1963), “The American Virgin Islands” (1971), “Fritz Henle” (1973) and “Casals” (1975).

The Fritz Henle archive joins more than 1,000 color and black-and-white photographs acquired by the Ransom Center, through gift and purchase, since 1979.

In 2009, the Ransom Center celebrated the centenary of Henle’s birth by organizing the major exhibition “Fritz Henle: In Search of Beauty,” with a catalog co-published with the University of Texas Press. Exhibition curator Roy Flukinger noted that, “Throughout Fritz Henle’s professional career his photography was recognized repeatedly for its artistry, eloquence and insightfulness.”

“We couldn’t be happier than to have Fritz’s archive be part of the Ransom Center,” note his son and daughter Martin and Tina Henle. “It fulfills his wishes for the disposition of his life’s work and allows it maximum accessibility for future generations.”  

Researchers will have access to the collection once it is processed and cataloged.

Image: Fritz Henle (American, b. Germany, 1909-1993), [Nieves Orozco], 1943. Gelatin silver print (contact sheet). Fritz Henle Papers and Photography Collection, Harry Ransom Center © The Fritz Henle Estate

Screen Shot 2018-02-22 at 8.13.10 AM.pngThe Folio Society and House of Illustration are thrilled to announce Max Löffler as the winner of the eighth annual Book Illustration Competition - a unique partnership between The Folio Society and House of Illustration. Max was named the winner of the prize, a prestigious commission worth £5,000 to illustrate Arthur Conan Doyle's The Selected Adventures and Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes by eminent Holmesian Helen Dorey, at an exclusive ceremony held at House of Illustration on Tuesday 20th February.

Löffler's winning entry was selected from over 450 entries received from 48 countries. Max is a freelance illustrator and graphic designer from Germany. The shortlisted artists, who each receive £500, are Andy Potts (UK), Andrew Pinder (UK), Harry Woodgate (UK, Student), Erik Freij (Sweden, Student) and Zuzana Cupová (Czech Republic, Student).                                                                                        

At the ceremony, Helen Dorey said: 'The standard of the entries was universally high and is a tribute to the universal appeal of Sherlock Holmes. Max Löffler's illustrations elegantly express the essence of the stories with an added element of mystery that makes them utterly compelling.' 

Folio Society Art Director, Sheri Gee commented: 'It's so interesting to see such varied depictions and styles in the shortlisted entries but each is united in representing a cohesive entry - where the binding and each illustration work perfectly together. We felt that for each of these entries we'd like to see what more they'd do if they completed the commission. They had piqued our interest. Max showed real ingenuity and imagination in his entry and gave them a timelessness which sits well with Sherlock Holmes' universal appeal. I felt that the depiction of 'the woman' (left) was particularly sublime. 

Colin McKenzie, Director of House of illustration, said: 'We had a very strong shortlist this year and we particularly admired the different approaches taken to the subject and the high standard of the illustration from all those on the shortlist. But we are delighted with our overall winner whose work intrigued the judges and evoked so powerfully the stories illustrated.' 

2017 BIC winner and member of the 2018 judging panel, Darya Shnykina said: 'This year's longlist presented a lot of strong and enchanting entries and the final selection wasn't easy. But I am very confident about the winner we selected. Max's illustrations aren't just beautiful, they're sophisticated. And after all an exquisitely expressed idea is the most captivating thing.' 

Colin McKenzie also revealed the recipient of the People's Choice Award, voted for by 3681 members of the public online. The winner - Svetlana Boiko - will receive books worth £100 from The Folio Society and a year's membership to House of Illustration.

Arthur Conan Doyle's The Selected Adventures and Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes, illustrated by Max Löffler, will be available from The Folio Society in October 2018. 

 

 

 

Special Exhibitions at AIPAD, April 5-8

New York - Three special exhibitions will be on view at The Photography Show, presented by AIPAD, April 5-8, 2018 at Pier 94 in New York City. Sir Elton John will curate an exhibition on the theme of reflection. Collector Joe Baio's photographs will be the focus of an exhibition exploring childhood and adolescence. Work influenced by the Black Panthers will be on view in an exhibition from the Photographic Center Northwest. 

Featuring 96 of the world’s leading fine art photography galleries, the 38th edition of the Show will open with a vernissage on April 4, 2018. One of the world’s most important annual photography fairs, The Photography Show is the longest running and foremost exhibition dedicated to the photographic medium and is organized by the Association of International Photography Art Dealers (AIPAD).

Sir Elton John: A Time for Reflection

Sir Elton John has invited exhibiting AIPAD member galleries to submit work for an exhibition around the theme, A Time for Reflection. Photographs that Sir Elton John finds inspiring and relevant to the theme will be featured at The Photography Show in a special exhibition. The works will be available for purchase and participating galleries will donate a percentage of the sales to The Sir Elton John Charitable Trust.

Forever Young: Selections from the Joe Baio Collection of Photography

Selections from the Joe Baio Collection of Photography will be exhibited publicly for the first time at The Photography Show. The Baio Collection, built around the themes of childhood and adolescence, spans the history of the medium from the 19th century to the present. Nearly every medium and movement in photography’s history is represented, with vernacular photography hanging democratically beside related images by famous photographers. On view at The Photography Show will be work by many of today’s significant photographers including Elinor Carucci, Larry Fink, LaToya Ruby Frazier, Nan Goldin, Emmet Gowin, Pieter Hugo, Ryan McGinley, Vik Muniz, Nicholas Nixon, Hellen van Meene, and Bjørn Sterri. Classic work by Diane Arbus, Richard Avedon, Brassäi, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Roy De Carava, Charles Dodgson (aka Lewis Carroll), Robert Frank, Lewis Hine, André Kertész, Dorothea Lange, Saul Leiter, Helen Levitt, Ray Metzker, August Sander, and Garry Winogrand will also be shown. Culled from his collection of 6,000 images, the selection for The Photography Show, curated by Mr. Baio and Anne Griffin, will be installed salon-style to echo the collection as it is displayed in their home.

All Power: Visual Legacies of the Black Panther Party

Launched in 1966, and active for less than 20 years, the Black Panther Party for Self-Defense indelibly pierced the public consciousness. All Power: Visual Legacies of the Black Panther Party, curated by Michelle Dunn Marsh, Executive Director and Curator at the Photographic Center Northwest, is drawn from a book of the same name (Minor Matters Books, 2016). The exhibition showcases a select group of contemporary black artists, including emerging and internationally-acclaimed practitioners, from 22 to 70 years of age, who have been informed or influenced by the Panthers. Exhibiting artists include Maikoiyo Alley-Barnes, Endia Beal, Bruce Bennett, Howard Cash, Kris Graves, Ayana V. Jackson, Kambui Olujimi, Lewis Watts, Carrie Mae Weems, Hank Willis Thomas, and Robert Wade. After The Photography Show, the exhibition will be on view through June 10 at the Photographic Center Northwest in Seattle, in conjunction with the 50th anniversary of the founding of the Seattle chapter of the Black Panthers. 

AIPAD TALKS

A program of more than 12 talks and panel discussions will feature daily sessions with leading curators, critics, artists, gallerists, collectors, and journalists. More information is available at AIPADShow.com/Talks.

AWARDS AND HONORS

The AIPAD Award honors visionaries who have contributed to the field of photography including artists, curators, and publishers. This year’s recipient of the second annual award is Keith F. Davis, Senior Curator of Photography, The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, MO.

EXHIBITORS

The Photography Show will feature 96 established and new galleries from at least 14 countries and 49 cities from across the U.S. and around the world, including Europe, the U.K., Asia, Canada, and South America. In addition, more than 30 book sellers and publishers will be represented at the Show. A full list of exhibitors is available at AIPADshow.com/Exhibitors.

SHOW INFORMATION

The Photography Show presented by AIPAD will be held from Thursday, April 5, through Sunday, April 8, 2018. A public vernissage will be held on Wednesday, April 4, from 5:00 - 9:00 p.m.

Thursday, April 5, 12:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Friday, April 6, 12:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Saturday, April 7, 12:00 p.m. - 8:00 p.m.

Sunday, April 8, 12:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

For more information, the public can contact AIPAD at +1 202-367-1158 or info@aipad.com or visit AIPADShow.com.

Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, one of the nation's leading auction houses, will open its newest location in the Buckhead neighborhood of Atlanta, Georgia this spring. In September of 2017, the auction firm announced its expansion into Atlanta after hiring Director of Business Development Mary Calhoun. Prior to this announcement Michael Shapiro (former Director of the High Museum of Art) had joined the firm in April 2017 as Senior Advisor, Museums and Private Collections. 

In May 2018, Leslie Hindman Auctioneers will open at 668 Miami Circle in the Buckhead neighborhood of Atlanta. The facility will accommodate local auctions as well as full-service resources for appraising property and participating in global auctions through the firm¹s Chicago headquarters. The first auction to be conducted in Atlanta is scheduled for August 2018. Consignments are currently being accepted across all categories, which include fine art, fine jewelry, modern design, books and manuscripts, furniture, decorative arts and more.

"We plan on making Atlanta a major auction center," said Leslie Hindman, founder and CEO of Leslie Hindman Auctioneers. "Our focus has always been offering exceptional service and access to the global art market at a local level. The new location will not only be a resource for Atlanta but become a hub for the entire Southeast."

Lelia Williamson has also joined Leslie Hindman Auctioneers' Atlanta team as Consignment Manager. Before starting with the firm, Williamson worked at both Ahlers & Ogletree Auction Galleries in Atlanta and Rago Arts and Auction Center in New Jersey. She was Manager of the Department of American Paintings at Hirschl & Adler and spent time as a Curatorial Assistant at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta. She received her MA from Sotheby¹s Institute of Art in New York, specializing in American Fine and Decorative Arts.

"I'm thrilled to join Leslie Hindman Auctioneers in my native Atlanta," said Lelia Williamson. "The South is filled with extraordinary collectors and institutions, and we look forward to establishing the local expertise and resources needed to serve this thriving market." 

The new Buckhead location will be open Monday through Friday during business hours and on occasional weekends for auction previews. Appraisal appointments are available for all categories and can be scheduled at any time. For more information, please contact Mary Calhoun at (404) 800-0192.

Leslie Hindman Auctioneers is a globally recognized brand with eight national offices and over 60 auctions conducted annually for over a dozen collecting categories. They work with buyers and sellers across the globe, connecting with millions of collectors through each auction conducted.

About Leslie Hindman Auctioneers

Leslie Hindman Auctioneers is among the leading fine art auction houses of the world and one of the largest in the country. As a globally recognized brand, Leslie Hindman Auctioneers conducts over 60 auctions annually in categories such as fine jewelry and timepieces, contemporary art, modern design, rare books, furniture, decorative arts and more. The firm has salerooms and business offices in Atlanta, Chicago, Denver, Milwaukee, Naples, Palm Beach, Scottsdale and St. Louis but connects with millions of collectors worldwide through online resources and global listings. The firm is also a founding partner of Bidsquare, a live auction platform formed by six leading auction houses, and owns a proprietary online bidding platform, LHLive, as well as LHExchange, an e-commerce site specializing in high-end designer furniture and decorative arts. Visit www.lesliehindman.com for more information.

At the Ordinary General Meeting on 4th February 2018 the presidents of ILAB’s national member associations voted for Sally Burdon (Australia) as new ILAB President. She succeeds Gonzalo F. Pontes who served as President from 2016 to 2018; and will be supported by ILAB Vice‐President Fabrizio Govi (Italy).

Sally Burdon is very familiar with the work of ILAB. She has been part of the ILAB committee since 2014 and served as Vice-President under Gonzalo F. Pontes for the past two years.

Ms Burdon was instrumental in organizing the two large, international World Book & Copyright Day campaigns in 2015 and 2016. These fairs motivated booksellers on all continents to promote the trade in their respective countries and to raise over 20,000 Euros for UNESCO’s literacy work in South Sudan.

She is co-convener of the ILAB International Mentoring Programme which was launched in December 2016 to a successful start. Ms Burdon is dedicated to bookseller education, supporting future generations of booksellers through programmes such as the Mentoring Scheme and to the promotion of high standards throughout the trade.

Sally Burdon is a member of the Burdon family of antiquarian booksellers, in effect she was a bookseller in training from the age of 10. After a period of living overseas, she returned to Canberra in 1982 and started working full time in the family business now known as Asia Bookroom. She is a past President of the Australian and New Zealand Association of Antiquarian Booksellers (ANZAAB), served on the faculty of the Colorado Antiquarian Book Seminar for 3 years and has organized conferences on bookselling in Australia.

In further elections, the presidents voted for Stuart Bennett as General Secretary, he follows Michel Bouvier (France) in this position.

Anne Lamort (France) and Pavel Chepyzhov (Russia) became new members of the ILAB Committee.

Norbert Donhofer was elected President of Honour.

ILAB Committee 2018
President: Sally Burdon (Australia)                                                                                    

Vice President: Fabrizio Govi (Italy)                                                                                 

Treasurer: Rob Shephard (UK)                                                                                           

General Secretary: Stuart Bennett (US)                                                                              

Members:

Anne Lamort (France)

Michael Graves-Johnston (UK)

Robert Schoisengeier (Austria)

Pavel Chepyzhov (RU)

Immediate Past President: Gonzalo F. Pontes (Spain)

 

 

Rosin-8_600.jpgSan Marino, CA — A spectacular trove of thousands of valentines and related material—some dating as far back as the late 17th century—has been given to The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens, the institution announced today. Considered the best private collection of its kind in the world, the Nancy and Henry Rosin Collection of Valentine, Friendship, and Devotional Ephemera contains approximately 12,300 greeting cards, sentimental notes, folk art drawings, and other tokens of affection that trace the evolution of romantic and religious keepsakes made in Europe and North America from 1684 to 1970. The Rosins had given the collection to their son, Bob, who together with his wife, Belle, donated it to The Huntington for safekeeping. "This collection was carefully created by my parents," he said. "I can't think of a better place for it to be, given its historical and educational value."

The Rosin Collection brims with well-preserved paper (and in some cases, vellum or mixed media) materials that range from lacy 18th-century devotional cards, hand-cut by French and German nuns, to elegant Biedermeier-era (1815-1848) greeting cards complete with hand-painted love scenes, gilded embossing, mother-of-pearl ornaments, and silk chiffon. The collection includes cameo-embossed lace paper valentines from England, elaborate three-dimensional and mechanical Victorian paper confections, as well as handmade works of American folk art demonstrating traditional paper-cut techniques (scherenschnitte) and colorful Germanic Fraktur illustrations. Some of the most historically significant items include heartrending Civil War soldiers' valentines with personal notes detailing the hardship of war and longing for home. The Rosin Collection also contains bitingly satiric "vinegar" valentines, dance cards, memory albums, and watch papers (sentimental notes inserted into pocket watches), among other items relating to the history of love and devotion.

"We are profoundly grateful to Bob and Belle Rosin for this invaluable, and truly beautiful collection that was so carefully developed," said Sandra L. Brooke, Avery Director of the Library at The Huntington. "It will dramatically enhance our holdings in several areas to which we are committed—especially 19th century social history and visual culture, and of course, our renowned U.S. Civil War material."

Nancy Rosin is president of the National Valentine Collectors Association, president emerita of the Ephemera Society of America, and a member of the American Antiquarian Society and The Grolier Club. She says collecting valentines has been her "passionate obsession" for 40 years. "My quest to acquire sentimental expressions of love, especially those celebrating Valentine's Day—a significant social event that was enjoyed by all strata of society—grew into a desire to share them with the public," said Rosin. "Bob grew up watching us build this collection piece by piece. I'd long hoped the collection would end up where it would have the most research value and the highest standard of preservation, so it is deeply gratifying to know Bob and Belle have given these works to The Huntington."

The Huntington's collection of historical prints and ephemera was begun by its founder, Henry E. Huntington, about 100 years ago, and has since grown to contain hundreds of thousands of items that support public exhibitions and scholars' research, especially in the areas of British and American cultural history. The Rosin Collection significantly increases the institution's distinction of being one of the leading archives for ephemera studies.

"This is a collection I've been familiar with and admired for many years," said David Mihaly, Jay T. Last Curator of Graphic Arts and Social History at The Huntington. "It is without a doubt the best in private hands in terms of quality and range within its focus—to say nothing of the sheer wonder and delight the items provide. Pull a string and an ingenious cobweb device lifts to reveal a mouse in a trap; unfold a die-cut valentine and watch a majestic carriage spring to life in 3-D; read a witty poem and realize it's a hilarious jab at a Victorian-era politician; look closely at a tiny, centuries-old card and see it was delicately perforated with hundreds of tiny pinpricks, and hand painted so expertly. We certainly will enjoy researching and processing this collection—and hope to plan an exhibition in coming years."

The institution expects to start preserving and cataloguing the Rosin Collection this year, with research access soon to follow.

Image: Fold-open Valentine card. German, ca.1900. Maker unknown; three-layer construction of die-cut, embossed, and color lithographed paper with applied elements. 7¼" x 9" x 5" open. Gift of Belle and Robert Rosin. Nancy and Henry Rosin Collection of Valentine, Friendship, and Devotional Ephemera. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

 

image005.pngLos Angeles -The J. Paul Getty Museum announced today the gift of six rare Italian manuscript illuminations from collectors James E. and Elizabeth J. Ferrell. The donation has been made in Elizabeth’s name. The generous donation comprises large historiated initials from a group of twenty known leaves originally from a choir book made around 1400 for the Carthusian monastery of Santo Spirito in Farneta (Lucca), Italy. The book was commissioned by Niccolò di Lazzara, the archbishop of Lucca.
           
“Jim and Zibbie Ferrell have been longtime supporters of the Museum, and we are deeply grateful for this important gift,” says Timothy Potts, director of the J. Paul Getty Museum. “Over the past two decades, they have been very generous and enthusiastic lenders of manuscripts and other works from their collection to exhibitions at both the Getty Center and Getty Villa. A number of their objects are included in the reinstallation of the Villa that will be completed in April. The gift of these six spectacular objects assures Jim and Zibbie a permanent place in the growth and enhancement of our manuscripts collection, and in particular adds greatly to our representation of fourteenth-century art from Central Italy.”
           
The Ferrell’s have been involved with the Museum’s manuscripts department for almost twenty years, frequently lending works from their collection and supporting exhibitions and scholarly projects. This is their first gift of works of art to the Getty. The leaves are from a gradual, a choir book that contains the sung portions of the Mass. The vibrant illuminations were painted by Niccolò da Bologna, known for his expressive figures and crowded, action-filled narrative scenes. The subjects featured within the historiated initials relate to important feast days of the church, including the Trinity, the Assumption of the Virgin Mary, and several related to individual saints (including two scenes of Saint Paul’s martyrdom, a stunning image of Saint Mary Magdalene’s ascent into Heaven, and one with the Twelve Apostles).
           
“Niccolò da Bologna was the most prolific Bolognese illuminator of the late fourteenth century, and the Getty already owns two exceptional examples of his work,” says Elizabeth Morrison, senior curator in the Department of Manuscripts. “Each of the initials demonstrates Niccolò’s ability to render figures with a liveliness that seems to allow them to leap off the page. He is an artist whose rich and varied oeuvre deserves to be represented through multiple examples.”
           
The six initials will make their debut in the upcoming exhibition, Artful Words: Calligraphy in Illuminated Manuscripts on view at the J. Paul Getty Museum from December 18, 2018 through April 7, 2019. Learn more about this important donation and the work of Niccolò da Bologna on the Getty Iris.

Image: Initial P: The Nativity (detail), about 1392-1402, Niccolò da Bologna, from the Gradual of Niccolò di Lazzara for Santo Spirito in Farneta (Lucca). Tempera colors and gold leaf on parchment, 7 ½ x 6 15/16 in. Private collection.

darwin-family_600.jpgSan Marino, CA—The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens announced today that it has acquired a unique photograph album, containing 19 prints, that offers a tantalizing glimpse into the intimate family circle of renowned scientist Charles Darwin (1809-1882). Inscribed to a member of Darwin's circle about whom nothing is known, and depicting several unpublished images of sitters ranging from close family members to those not yet identified, the rarity was purchased at The Huntington's 21st annual Library Collectors' Council meeting held earlier this month. 

The Council also purchased manuscript collections of Henry Dundas, 1st Viscount Melville (1742-1811), the United Kingdom's Home Secretary, Secretary of War, and First Lord of the Admiralty, and of James Francis Mercer (d. 1756), a British officer killed during the Seven Years' War while commanding Fort Oswego in New York.

In addition, The Huntington acquired a letter by Italian explorer and Spanish naval officer Alejandro Malaspina (1754-1810), reporting to the viceroy of New Spain in 1790 on a scientific expedition he co-commanded to the Americas and the Pacific. The Library Collectors' Council is a group of 46 families who assist in the development of the collections by supporting the purchase of important works that the Library would not otherwise be able to afford.

"This year's acquisitions extend and enhance our existing collections in history, the history of science, and photography," said Sandra Brooke, Avery Director of the Library at The Huntington. "Such materials have the potential to open new and unexpected pathways for research in these fields. We are deeply grateful to the Collectors' Council for its vision and exceptional support."

Highlights of the newly purchased materials:

A Darwin Family Photograph Album

This unique carte-de-visite photograph album of 19 albumen prints offers a tantalizing glimpse into the intimate family circle of Charles Darwin, the English scientist best known for his work on the theory of evolution. Victorian photographic albums were cherished artifacts in middle- to upper-class homes, serving as keepsakes to memorialize family and friends. This one offers scholars new insight into the complex web of interpersonal relationships surrounding Darwin. "While we know some of the individuals in the pictures, including Darwin himself, of course, there are others that we have yet to identify," said Jennifer Watts, The Huntington's curator of photography and visual culture. "This is, in a very straightforward way, a researcher's dream."

Similar in size to a prayer book, this album of portraits has the look and feel of a devotional tome, Watts added. "Its sacramental appearance runs counter to our contemporary view of Darwin as pronouncer and arbiter of evolution. At a time in which family bonds proved indispensable—both as social networks and as a means of labor—this album is an object at the intersection of science and sentimentality."

Several of the 10 Darwin offspring were deeply involved in their father's work; six are represented in the album. Some of the images are studio portraits by such notable photographers as Oscar G. Rejlander, who collaborated with Darwin on his The Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals (1872). Other pictures are intimate (and unpublished) tableaus: an unknown baby on the lap of a Darwin son; a Darwin daughter in a windowsill with her two dogs. Also included are pictures of Darwin, his wife, Emma, and children George Howard; Horace (a scientist and the youngest of the Darwin children to survive into adulthood); Elizabeth ("Bessy"); and Henrietta Emma ("Etty") Litchfield.

Henrietta was a valued companion to her father, an editor of his work, and a correspondent with both of her parents. She was a linchpin in the Darwin circle, helping to anchor the scientific and domestic activities of her family. Henrietta's husband, Richard Buckley Litchfield, inscribed the album to a woman named Anne Griffiths in 1879.

The album's many mysteries invite scholarly scrutiny. Nothing is known of Anne Griffiths or the Darwin family's relationship to her. Several unpublished images depict as yet unidentified sitters—none of them known to be blood relatives—who, once identified, will prove crucial in extending our understanding of Darwin's inner circle.

In 1993, The Huntington acquired one of the greatest collections of Darwiniana ever assembled: the Warren D. Mohr collection of 1,600 books, caricatures, engravings, and photographs.

"In one fell swoop, the acquisition of the Mohr collection made The Huntington an international hub for scholars interested in the life and legacy of Charles Darwin," said Daniel Lewis, Dibner Senior Curator of the History of Science and Technology at The Huntington. "Adding this extraordinary photograph album to our Darwin holdings invites the scholarly world to help us puzzle out the evolution of this great scientist's human ties."

Image: Charles Darwin (left) and his daughter Henrietta Emma "Etty" Litchfield. Carte-de-visite Photograph Album (Down, Kent, 1871-1879), 19 albumen prints (2 1/2 x 3 1/2 in.). The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

 

London — The Folio Society and House of Illustration are thrilled to announce the longlist for the annual Book Illustration Competition (#BIC2018). 

Now in its eighth year, The Book Illustration Competition is a partnership between The Folio Society and House of Illustration. To date, the competition has distributed over £50,000 worth of prizes and has received thousands of entries. 

This year from over 450 excellent entries, 24 have been selected for the longlist. 

The winner will receive a prestigious £5,000 commission from The Folio Society to illustrate their new edition of Arthur Conan Doyle’s The Selected Adventures and Memoirs of Sherlock Holmes. The five other entrants who complete the shortlist will each receive £500. As part of the Book Illustration Competition’s committment to nurturing new talent, the judging panel ensures that students form part of the shortlist. 

The difficult task of selecting the longlist fell to Sheri Gee, Art Director at The Folio Society, and Colin McKenzie, Director of House of Illustration. 

Sheri Gee said ‘The longlist represents for me the entries that excelled in both cover and illustration, making a cohesive entry. It’s no simple skill to adapt styles and concepts for both - an illustration which pinpoints an exact moment and a cover which represents the whole in a compelling way.‘ 

Colin McKenzie noted ‘We had a wonderful response to the competition this year with almost twice the number of entries, clearly reflecting the enduring and international popularity of Sherlock Holmes. We were particularly pleased by the large number of student applications and the creativity and ingenuity of so many of the illustrations. As a result we have a very strong longlist.’ 

Entries were received from 48 countries including the USA, Singapore, Iran, Spain and Guatemala, and over 35% of them were from students. 

This year also sees the return of the popular stand alone People’s Choice award. Voted for online (http://competitions.houseofillustration.org.uk/book-illustration-competition-2018/peoples-choice-award/), the People’s Choice can be selected from any of the longlisted entries.The winning artist and one member of the public who voted for them will receive £100 worth of books from The Folio Society and a one-year membership to House of Illustration. 

The shortlist and the winner will be selected from the longlist by eminent Holmesian, Helen Dorey; Sheri Gee, Art Director and Tom Walker, Publishing Director both from The Folio Society; Colin McKenzie, Director and Olivia Ahmad, Curator both from House of Illustration and Darya Shnykina, winner of the Book Illustration Competition 2017. 

The awards will be announced and presented by Helen Dorey at an exclusive ceremony at House of illustration on 20 February 2018.

Book-of-the-City-harley_ms_4431_f004r copy.jpgThe British Library has made over 50 rare medieval manuscripts and early print editions, spanning 1,000 years of literary history, available for free on its Discovering Literature website.

Highlights include:

  • The single surviving manuscript of Beowulf, the longest epic poem in Old English
  • The earliest autobiography in English, The Book of Margery Kempe
  • The Wycliffite Bible, the first complete translation of the Bible in the English language
  • William Caxton’s pioneering illustrated print edition of The Canterbury Tales
  • The first work authored by a woman in English, Julian of Norwich's Revelations of Divine Love 
  • The earliest work of theatre criticism in English, Tretise of Miraclis Pleyinge
  • One of the greatest collections of Scottish medieval verse, the Bannatyne Manuscript from the National Library of Scotland

Bringing together over 50 unique medieval manuscripts and early print editions from the 8th to 16th centuries, Discovering Literature: Medieval presents a new way to explore some of the earliest works and most influential figures of English literature.  From the first complete translation of the Bible in the English language to the first work authored by a woman in English, the website showcases many rarities and ‘firsts’ in the history of English literature.  

Featuring extracts of medieval drama, epic poetry, dream visions and riddles alongside over 20 articles exploring themes such as gender, faith and heroism written by poets, academics and writers including Simon Armitage, Hetta Howes and David Crystal, Discovering Literature: Medieval offers unprecedented access to the British Library’s collections and provides contemporary scholarly insight for young people and learners across the world.

Dr Alex Whitfield, Head of Learning Programmes at the British Library, said:

‘Discovering Literature is a fantastic resource, which enables the British Library to open up its collections to a broader audience.  We are always trying to find innovative ways to help learners of all ages engage with the Library’s collections and we are so pleased that such extraordinary collection items and valuable academic insight can now be accessed by anyone, anywhere. Ultimately, we hope that the website will enrich the study and enjoyment of medieval literature for a new generation.’

Dr Claire Breay, Head of Ancient, Medieval and Early Modern Manuscripts at the British Library, said:

‘The British Library’s medieval collections are world-renowned and it’s very exciting to be opening up the Library’s collections of early literary history to young learners through Discovering Literature.  Each item featured on the website has a rich history and it’s fantastic to see the unique manuscripts of Beowulf and Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, which survived a major fire in the 18th century, showcased on this digital platform for future generations to explore.’

Discovering Literature is a free website aimed at A-Level students, teachers and lifelong learners, which provides unprecedented access to the Library’s literary and historical treasures and has received over 7 million unique visitors since launching in 2014.  The British Library has already published collections relating to Shakespeare and the Renaissance, the Romantic and Victorian periods, and 20th century literature and drama, and will continue to add to the site until it covers the whole rich and diverse backbone of English literature, from The Canterbury Tales to The Buddha of Suburbia.

The project has been generously supported by Dr Naim Dangoor CBE The Exilarch’s Foundation since its inception, along with the British Library Trust and the British Library Patrons. Further development of the project is being supported by the Garfield Weston Foundation, Mark Pigott KBE KStJ, Evalyn Lee, Luci Baines Johnson and Ian Turpin, The American Trust for the British Library, The John S Cohen Foundation, The Andor Trust, and Allan and Nesta Ferguson Charitable Trust. 

Image: The Book of the Queen, written by Christine de Pizan, the first female writer to earn a living from her work (Harley MS 4431) (c) British Library Board

 

The National Comedy Center is proud to announce the acquisition of the archive of ground-breaking comedian Shelley Berman, who passed away in September 2017 at the age of 92. The donation was formally announced during a tribute attended by Larry David, Dr. Demento, Cheryl Hines, Laraine Newman, Howard Storm, David Steinberg, Fred Willard, and Alan Zweibel, hosted by Lewis Black and presented by the National Comedy Center on Tuesday, January 30th at the Comedy & Magic Club in Hermosa Beach, California.

The Berman archive is the latest acquisition for the National Comedy Center, the first non-profit cultural institution and national-scale visitor experience dedicated to the art of comedy, which already houses a number of archival pieces including the 25,000-piece George Carlin collection, donated in 2017. 

In production now in Lucille Ball’s hometown of Jamestown, New York, the National Comedy Center fulfills Ball’s vision to establish a center that celebrates comedy in all of its forms, educating and engaging visitors with the story of the art form and its artists. The National Comedy Center is slated to host its ribbon cutting August 1-4, 2018 during its annual Lucille Ball Comedy Festival.

“No longer the step child to the arts, comedy and those who make us laugh are about to have their own place in the world. When I found myself surrounded by all of Shelley's writings, I wondered what to do with all of it. Do I give it to some museum where they let it gather dust before they throw it away? Along came the National Comedy Center, driven by people who have the vision to know that this material and the material of other comedians has a value. They are dedicated to preserving all for their archives and for future generations who may want to know about those who gave us the gift of laughter. I feel confident that all of Shelley's fine work will be in good hands,” said Sarah Berman, Shelley’s wife of more than 70 years. 

The archive was carefully collected and stored in Berman’s home office for seven decades, and spans from the 1940s to the 2010s. It includes hundreds of photographs, contracts, scripts, calendars, scrapbooks, correspondences and rare footage and audio chronicling his wide-ranging career in stand-up, improv, television, film, theater, and comedy writing. 

Included in the gift are Berman’s consecutive Gold Records for his two landmark 1959 albums Inside Shelley Berman and Outside Shelley Berman, the first of which was the comedy album first to win a Grammy. Also included is the trademark stool on which he performed his classic routines during live engagements across the country.

Berman’s unique brand of anxiety-ridden observational humor helped to redefine stand-up comedy in the late 1950s and ‘60s. He continued to be a favorite with audiences in his later years for his Emmy-nominated portrayal of Larry David’s father, Nat, on HBO’s Curb Your Enthusiasm. 

“Berman had changed the face of stand-up comedy. What I feel helped inform me as a comic, was the precision in his language. You had someone who was this terrific actor doing comedy, and that’s rare,” said event host Lewis Black.

Fred Willard echoed Black’s sentiment. “Shelley Berman came along with that whole new wave of comedy. It forever changed the way we look at stand-up comedy.”

Kelly Carlin further added, “My father looked up to Shelley Berman. He appreciated Shelley’s use of words and his gift for story-telling.  And I can tell you, my dad would be thrilled to know that Shelley’s papers will be sitting next to his in Jamestown.”

Executive Director of the National Comedy Center, Journey Gunderson, concluded the event by saying, “Shelley Berman was there at the very beginning of what we call modern day stand-up comedy. We are so honored that Sarah has chosen the National Comedy Center as the institution to house Shelley’s archive, and has trusted us to preserve and celebrate his legacy.”

 

The Center for the Book in the Library of Congress welcomes the Kentucky Center for the Book as its newest affiliated center. The Kentucky Center is based at Kentucky Humanities in Lexington.

“We are thrilled to become Kentucky’s Center for the Book,” said Kentucky Humanities Executive Director Bill Goodman. “Kentucky Humanities is deeply committed to promoting literacy in Kentucky through PRIME TIME Family Reading Time, the Kentucky Book Fair and our upcoming Kentucky Reads initiative. We look forward to continuing to share the love of reading and writing and promoting community discussions about great literature and its relevance to our lives with citizens of the Commonwealth.”

Before it joined the Center for the Book network, Kentucky Humanities already had many successful programs to its credit, among them, PRIME TIME Family Reading Time, an intergenerational family literacy program that has so far reached more than 40,000 Kentuckians through 204 programs in 81 counties; and Kentucky Humanities magazine, first published in 1994. In 2016, Kentucky Humanities became the manager of the Kentucky Book Fair, the state’s premier literary event since 1981.

“We are pleased to welcome the new Kentucky Center for the Book as the newest affiliate to help promote reading with the Center for the Book at the Library of Congress,” said Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden. “The Kentucky Center already has demonstrated a commitment to the mission of promoting books, reading and literacy with its many programs.”

Congress created the Library’s Center for the Book in 1977 to stimulate public interest in books and reading. It has become a national force for reading and literacy promotion with affiliates in all 50 states, the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands. The affiliates will meet in the spring to exchange ideas. For more information, visit read.gov.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

Kentucky Humanities is an independent, nonprofit affiliate of the National Endowment for the Humanities. Kentucky Humanities is supported by the National Endowment and by private contributions. For information about Kentucky Humanities’ programs and services, visit kyhumanities.org.

 

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