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moore_reclining-figures_600.jpgSan Marino, CA — The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens announced today that it has acquired a major collection of graphic art by Henry Moore (1898-1986), the most prominent British sculptor of the 20th-century. A gift of the Philip and Muriel Berman Foundation, the collection contains about 330 works on paper that represent the full range of Moore’s graphic work and instantly place The Huntington among the largest Moore repositories in North America. Limited-edition etchings and lithographs comprise the greatest part of the collection, and these intricate, often delicate works explore the same universal themes found in Moore’s monumental sculptures, which are enjoyed by millions in sculpture gardens and museums around the world. The gift also includes three drawings by Moore—one a solidly modeled figure of a woman holding a book, another a biomorphic form that is possibly a study for a sculpture, and the third a sheet of varied studies revealing the artist’s process as he works through a series of ideas.

The collection will form the basis of an exhibition at The Huntington next summer. “Spirit and Essence, Line and Form: The Graphic Work of Henry Moore,” will be on view in the Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art’s Susan and Stephen Chandler Wing from June 16 through Oct. 1, 2018.

Berman Foundation president Nancy Berman (a member of The Huntington’s Board of Overseers and chair of its Art Collectors’ Council), along with her husband, Alan Bloch, and the Berman Foundation, have contributed to The Huntington’s art collections in several ways over the past decade. They donated a series of tapestries by Alexander Calder (1898-1976) that are on display in Rothenberg Hall, made the promised gift of a bronze Sounding Sculpture by Harry Bertoia (1915-1978), which stands to the north of the American art galleries, and were instrumental in securing the long-term loan of Calder’s Jerusalem Stabile for a stroll garden at The Huntington. In 2016, they donated a large-scale Moore lithograph. “Nancy tends to lift The Huntington to new levels, and into new areas, time and again,” said Catherine Hess, interim director of the Art Collections at The Huntington. “With this major gift—a selective, well-rounded group of graphic works by one of the greatest artists of the last century—she again exercised her keen understanding of The Huntington and its goals—in this case, our aim to grow our collection of 20th-century British art. Nancy’s contributions always have a special power to move the institution forward.”

The Berman Foundation was founded by Nancy Berman’s parents, devoted collectors who often built friendships with the artists they admired, including Henry Moore. “We’ve long known we’d eventually like to give this group of prints that my parents so carefully assembled to a museum where they were likely to make the biggest difference, and be most useful to a range of visitors and scholars,” said Berman. “Once we were ready to make the gift, The Huntington was the obvious choice. As one of the world’s major institutions for the study of British art and culture, with a substantial body of secondary sources on Henry Moore, the addition of this primary material places The Huntington at the forefront of Moore scholarship in the U.S.”

The prints will complement The Huntington’s strong core collection of early 20th-century British works on paper, which includes drawings by Eileen Agar, Edward Burra, and William Roberts, among others, and dramatically strengthens its collection of British modernist graphic art. Modern British paintings first began joining the collection over the last two years, with an example each by David Bomberg, Mark Gertler, and Duncan Grant.

"Moore’s massive bronze sculptures are already well represented in the Los Angeles-area, in collections including those at the Getty, LACMA, the Norton Simon Museum, and UCLA,” said Hess. “With the Berman gift to The Huntington, the region now has a significant body of his graphic art, providing opportunities for deeper contextualization of the artist’s oeuvre and creative process.”

“Spirit and Essence, Line and Form: The Graphic Work of Henry Moore”

The Huntington will present a broad range of Moore’s graphic work from the Berman gift in “Spirit and Essence, Line and Form” (June 16- Oct. 1, 2018). With approximately 25 works on paper, the exhibition will examine Moore’s graphic work in terms of theme and style, from his explorations of the psyche through the abstracted human figure seen in such examples as Reclining Figure Cave (1979), to musings on the power of creativity in his series on The Artist’s Hand (1979), to studies of architectural forms and found objects with his powerful Stonehenge (1973) and Elephant Skull (1969) portfolios.

“Though he was the most prominent British sculptor of his time,” said Melinda McCurdy, associate curator for British art at The Huntington and curator of the exhibition, “Moore was also a prolific graphic artist, producing powerful drawings as well as hundreds of prints that explore the same themes found in his sculpture - the roots of creation, the body, life, and death. Like his sculpture, his prints examine these primal themes through the language of abstraction, where line and form are imbued with meaning.”

Much like his sculptures, Moore’s prints often express his reactions to the changing political and social climate of his time, as well as his personal life, from the threat of war and nuclear annihilation to the birth of his child. Prints such as Mother and Child (1973) not only express the universal themes of fertility and creation, but also can be read as tender explorations of a topic that became of paramount interest to the artist after his daughter’s birth.

“Spirit and Essence, Line and Form” will introduce visitors to the newly acquired collection and the broad stylistic and thematic range of Moore’s graphic work, revealing his technical interest in the interrelationship of shape and mass and the intersections among different forms, while at the same time showcasing the sheer beauty and power of his imagery.

McCurdy added, “by presenting the exhibition in the American art galleries, we also hope to inspire interesting connections between British and American modernism.” Modernist works in the American art collection include those by Tony Smith (a sculpture For W.A. (1969) and painting Untitled (1960) as well as Sam Francis’s Free Floating Clouds (1980).

Image: Henry Moore, Five Reclining Figures, 1979, lithograph, 19 × 25 in. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens. Gift of the Philip and Muriel Berman Foundation. © The Henry Moore Foundation. All Rights Reserved, DACS 2017 / henry-moore.org

Los Angeles — The J. Paul Getty Museum announced today the donations of two groups of photographs from collectors Leslie and Judith Schreyer and Michael and Jane Wilson. The gifts include works by artists not previously in the Museum’s collection, as well as photographs that enhance the Museum’s existing holdings.

“These generous gifts complement and strengthen our holdings of important photographers from Los Angeles, New York, Europe and Asia,” says Timothy Potts, director of the J. Paul Getty Museum. “Both Les and Judy and Michael and Jane are longtime and enthusiastic supporters of the Museum and our photographs department. Their donations will provide a rich trove of images from which we will be able to organize future exhibitions.”

Adds Virginia Heckert, curator and department head for the Getty Museum’s Department of Photographs, “We are thrilled to receive these new gifts from the Schreyers and the Wilsons. Together this group of donations introduce the work of 15 new photographers into the collection and expand our ability to demonstrate the myriad ways in which photographs document the world of the past and the present.” 

The donation from Leslie and Judith Schreyer is their largest gift to the Getty to date, and includes 50 photographs by 39 artists with a wide range of styles and subject matter. Among the best-known photographers in the group are Diane Arbus (American, 1923-1971), Garry Winogrand (American, 1928-1984), and photographers who have belonged to the groundbreaking Magnum agency, such as W. Eugene Smith (American, 1918-1978), Bruce Davidson (American, born 1933), and Josef Koudelka (Czech, born 1938). The donation also includes works by photographers associated with Los Angeles, including Matthew Brandt (American, born 1982), Jo Ann Callis (American, born 1940), Judy Fiskin (American, born 1945) and Graciela Iturbide (Mexican, born 1942), as well as Helen Levitt (American, 1913-2009), Arthur Leipzig (American, 1918-2014), Leon Levinstein (American, 1913-1988), Jerome Liebling (American, 1924-2011), and David Vestal (American, 1924-2013), all of whom were members of the New York Photo League, an area that is underrepresented in the Getty Museum’s collection.

The Schreyers’ donations vary in subject matter and composition, ranging from formal portraits, architectural studies, and landscape photographs to experiments in light and process. Highlights include Imogen Cunningham’s (American, 1883-1976) study of a tulip tree, an abstract study of peeling paint by Aaron Siskind (American, 1903-1991), and a variant image of a seated man taken during Paul Strand’s (American, 1890-1976) 1932 trip to Mexico.

Michael and Jane Wilson, founding members of the Getty Museum Photographs Council, have regularly donated the work of important photographers to the museum’s permanent collection. This most recent gift includes 71 photographs by nine artists that strengthen the museum’s holdings of European, American, and Asian photographers active in the last quarter of the 20th century and first decade of the 21st century. Six of the artists will be new to the museum’s collection: Darren Almond (English, born 1971), Robbert Flick (Dutch, born 1938), Leland Rice (American, born 1940), Paul Shambroom (American, born 1956), Jem Southam (British, born 1950) and Seung Woo Bak (Korean, born 1973), while works by Wang Jingsong (Chinese, born 1963), Jeff Chien-Hsing Liao (Taiwanese, born 1977), and Hans-Christian Schink (German, born 1961) strengthen existing holdings.

The Wilsons’ donation includes selections from several serial bodies of work, most notably elegiac landscapes of the British countryside and Normandy coastline by Jem Southam and hour-long exposures of landscapes in the Northern and Southern hemispheres by Hans-Christian Schink. Others touch upon topical political issues, such as Paul Shambroom’s examination of the dynamics of political power in city council and community meetings across the United States and Seung Woo Back’s commentary on modes of surveillance in North Korea.

ph_garciamarquezg_38_7_011_300dpi_web.jpgAustin, Texas — More than 27,000 images from Nobel laureate Gabriel García Márquez’s archive are now online. A significant portion of the archive is accessible, including materials from all of García Márquez’s works of fiction, 22 personal scrapbooks and notebooks, a memoir, screenplays, photographs and ephemera.

View at http://hrc.utexas.edu/ggmdigital.

Leer en Español. 

“Anyone with access to the internet can have an in-depth look at García Márquez’s archive,” said Jullianne Ballou, Ransom Center project librarian. “Spanning more than a half century, the contents reflect García Márquez’s energy and discipline and reveal an intimate view of his work, family, friendships and politics.”

Since the archive opened for research in 2015, it has become one of the Harry Ransom Center’s most frequently circulated collections.

This digitization and access project, “Sharing ‘Gabo’ with the World: Building the Gabriel García Márquez Online Archive from His Papers at the Harry Ransom Center,” was supported by a Digitizing Hidden Special Collections and Archives grant from the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR). The grant program is made possible by funding from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.

There are few opportunities for researchers to access digitized archives of contemporary authors, much less those of one of the most significant authors of the 20th century.

“My mother, my brother and I were always committed to having my father’s archive reach the broadest possible audience,” said Rodrigo García, one of the author’s sons. “This project makes my father’s work more widely accessible to a global community of students and scholars.”

The project, which includes text-searchable English- and Spanish-language materials, took 18 months and involved the efforts of librarians, archivists, students, technology staff members and conservators. The university’s Benson Latin American Collection provided guidance on how best to describe García Márquez materials in Spanish.

While accessing the online archive, scholars, fans, educators and students can choose to use the Mirador image viewer, which facilitates side-by-side comparisons of García Márquez’s evolving literary works. This capability is made possible by the International Image Interoperability Framework (IIIF); with the implementation of IIIF, all images from the online archive are accessible to an international network of IIIF-enabled digital image collections.

“This project is significant, fostering new methods of use and scholarship of archival materials,” said Liz Gushee, head of Digital Collections Services at the Ransom Center. “It provides rights-holder-approved online access to copyright-protected archival materials, opportunities for comparative research and interoperability with other IIIF-compatible online collections. The support from García Márquez’s family made this important project possible.”

The online archive is available through the Ransom Center’s digital collections portal, which makes accessible more than 80,000 images from the Ransom Center’s holdings. 

The Ransom Center appreciates the support of CLIR, an independent, nonprofit organization that forges strategies to enhance research, teaching and learning environments in collaboration with libraries, cultural institutions and communities of higher learning.

Image: Unidentified photographer. Gabriel García Márquez with Emma Castro, 1957. Courtesy Harry Ransom Center.

 

Getty Center Celebrates 20th Anniversary

Los Angeles - Twenty years ago this month, visitors streamed to a Brentwood mountaintop to see the brand new Getty Center, featuring breathtaking vistas, sky-lit galleries, dramatic modernist architecture by Richard Meier, and the always-changing Central Garden, created by artist Robert Irwin.

The iconic Getty Center was the result of 15 years of research, planning, design and construction.  After purchasing the hilltop site in the Sepulveda Pass in 1982, the Getty invited 33 architects to submit qualifications.  In 1984, Richard Meier was selected as the architect. Construction began in 1989 - and was briefly halted by the Northridge earthquake in 1994. In December of 1997, the Getty Center opened to the public, with initial demand for visits so strong that advance parking reservations were required for the first few years. 

Since then, more than 20 million visitors from all over the world have come to the hilltop campus, where admission is free (and no reservations are necessary). More than 160,000 K-12 students visit each year, including more than 130,000 from Title One schools, whose transportation is subsidized by the Getty.  

“The Getty Center was envisioned as a destination where people could come for inspiration and contemplation,” said Getty President and CEO James Cuno.  “That vision came true, and we’re honored to host visitors from across the globe, as well as our neighbors here at home. But by coming together in one location, the Getty programs were also transformed, becoming infinitely greater than the sum of their parts.”

Working together from their hilltop campus in Los Angeles over the last 20 years, the Getty Conservation Institute, Getty Foundation, J. Paul Getty Museum, and Getty Research Institute have helped conserve, study and present Old Master panel paintings in Europe, ancient mosaics in the Middle East, icons from the Sinai Desert, cave temples in the Gobi Desert, contemporary video art in Latin America, modern architecture in India - and much more.

“In the 20 years since the Getty Center opened, the Getty has begun to fulfill its potential as the world's largest cultural and philanthropic organization dedicated to the visual arts,” said Maria Hummer-Tuttle, chair of the Getty Board of Trustees. “We are able to look around the world and see the benefits of our research and work on every continent.”

One example is Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA, underway now, an unprecedented international collaboration of more than 70 visual and performing arts organizations.  An exploration of Latin American and Latino art, Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA comprises more than 80 exhibitions and events, creating new scholarship in an area that has not received sufficient study.

“As we celebrate this 20th anniversary, we continue to look for ways to have an impact in the world,” said Cuno, “to do what can’t be done by others, what only the Getty could do.”

Throughout the next few months, the Getty Center will host a number of events in honor of the anniversary, including an exhibition of photographs by acclaimed photographer Robert Polidori (Canadian-American, born 1961), known for his images of architecture and human habitats, who created a series of images of the Getty Center shortly before its opening in 1997. Robert Polidori: 20 Photographs of the Getty Museum, December 12, 2017-May 6, 2018, features captivating behind-the-scenes views of the building and the new galleries as objects from J. Paul Getty’s painting, sculpture, and decorative arts collections were being installed in the museum.

Getty Publications is producing a special edition commemorative volume, The Getty Center at 20, which will be on sale in the Museum Store beginning in January, at a special price of $5. The book features striking photographs of the Getty Center, and documents the work of the Getty’s programs around the world over the last 20 years.

From January through March, Sounds of LA, the Getty’s annual concert series exploring the city's varied musical geography, will feature some local favorites curating programs honoring master musicians who’ve played at the Getty over the years.  Mariachi Los Camperos, Cuba LA, and Mythili Prakash have created concerts paying homage to the legacies of Natividad “Nati” Cano, Francisco Aguabella and Lakshmi Shankar.

In February and March, Jim Cuno will present a special series of the Art and Ideas podcast focusing on the anniversary, featuring interviews with Los Angeles Times architecture critic Christopher Hawthorne, architect Richard Meier, and Stephen Rountree, who served as the director of the Getty’s building program.

J. Paul Getty Museum Director Timothy Potts leads a panel of senior curators from the Museum to look at some significant recent acquisitions to the collection.  Hear the intriguing behind-the-scenes stories behind some of these acquisitions on February 13.

On March 10, the community is invited to join an unforgettable birthday bash in an engaging and immersive Family Festival featuring dance, music, Getty Center-inspired crafts, and birthday games (Getty style).

“We invite visitors to join us as we celebrate the 20th anniversary of the Getty Center and the Getty’s work preserving cultural heritage at home and around the world,” said James Cuno. 

For more information visit getty.edu/360.

Smart-Guard.jpegPalm Beach, FL—Fine art dealers and collectors who are tired of the worry and hassle of shipping their treasured pieces using bubble-wrap, packing tape and Styrofoam will be relieved to know there’s a better, safer, cheaper (and greener) way. Smart-Guard is a sturdy, re-usable fine art packing system that just hit the market, having secured a patent and registered trademark.

Users place their artwork between two protective panels, which are then secured using hook-and-loop closures around the perimeter. That is placed into an appropriately sized vacuum bag, into which a desiccant pouch is placed. The bag is sealed using a zipper pull, and air is removed from the Smart-Guard system using a vacuum pump (or vacuum cleaner). After that, just box and ship.

To view a brief YouTube video clip about Smart-Guard, please visit https://youtu.be/Lv65Tr2Opzw.

Smart-Guard is the brainchild of John Prayias, who invented the product quite by accident and with no background in the fine art world. His late wife, Adele, was the owner of Adele Prayias Fine Art and her years of shipping art for her business and personal use between Florida, New York and Connecticut inspired John to see the need for simple, safe and economical packaging.

“I was in the restaurant business, but every Tuesday I drove my wife from Greenwich to New York City, to go to auction galleries and art galleries to buy for her business,” Mr. Prayias said. “As we became more and more involved in the art world, we found ourselves shipping fine art from time to time, as well as receiving art from other dealers. And let me tell you, it was a pain.”

Not only was it a time-consuming and laborious chore - wrestling with the bubble wrap, paper and tape - but then came the worry that the artwork would arrive in one piece. Years passed - and so did Mrs. Prayias - but it took the shock of a cost estimate to ship the couple’s sizable art collection from New York to Florida that led to John’s epiphany and the birth of Smart-Guard.

“The price the mover gave me was so outrageous, I decided to crate three of the more valuable pieces and pack the rest myself, using bubble wrap and tape,” John said. “It took three days and three people to pack the art. Then, when the art arrived at my new home in Palm Beach, it took another three days to unpack it. After it was all over, I was left with a big mountain of garbage.”

He hung as many paintings as he could in his two-bedroom apartment and decided to put the rest into storage. But he quickly learned that art storage was expensive, too, so he opted to place all the paintings into temporary storage. Then one day he noticed all the overhead sprinklers in the storage facility. “That’s great in case of a fire, not so great for the fine art if they go off,” he said.

The whole experience led John to experiment with different methods of quickly, securely and safely packing, shipping and storing fine art. The result was Smart-Guard. “Now, every artwork, no matter how valuable, can be crated and stored safely, at a fraction of the cost. It’s quick and easy, with no mess or waste, and the artwork is protected from sprinklers, bumps, dirt and more.”

High-end art galleries are already using Smart-Guard to wrap fine art for their customers. One customer recently transported a Picasso worth millions from his restorer using Smart-Guard. Mr. Prayias, in developing the product, wrapped an artwork using the Smart-Guard system and put it in his bathtub, filled with water and secured in place with bricks, for days. It stayed perfectly dry.

Practically speaking, the purchase of a Smart-Guard system pays for itself over time. It’s sturdy, it’s reusable, and it’s far better for the environment than Styrofoam packing peanuts or plastic bubble wrap that can’t even be recycled in many communities and remains in the landfill, intact, for decades or even centuries. And the time saved in packing and unpacking art is immeasurable.

Smart-Guard is currently available in two sizes, with panels of 26 inches by 30 inches and 32 inches by 36 inches. A third size is on the way; it will be the largest size permissible via UPS before being considered “freight”. Panels, dessicant bags and vacuum bags can be purchased separately or in package price deals. The Smart-Guard vacuum pump has a price tag of $29.95. 

The panels are made from an impact-resistant, double-layer rigid corrugated material with foam layering that protects artwork. The heavy duty Velcro tabs enclose and secure artwork between the panels. The industrial strength sealed outer bag protects the artwork from dust and moisture. 

The moisture-absorbent desiccant pouch guards the artwork against moisture and humidity damage during transport or long-term storage. Information about contents and instructions can be easily applied to the package with the adhesive-backed content labels included with each order. For buy-American fans, all Smart-Guard systems are made and assembled in the United States.

To recap, Smart-Guard is a reusable system that eliminates the need to buy disposable art packaging materials, saving money and saving the environment every time it is used.  Smart-Guard offers modern protection from water, dampness, temporary flooding, mold and mildew and impact damage.  It protects a person’s investment in fine art and gives them peace of mind.

To learn more about Smart-Guard, or to make a purchase, please visit www.artshippingbox.com.

Boston, MA—How does a show about the past evolve for the future? With an innovative production tour and new-look episodes! ANTIQUES ROADSHOW, PBS's most-watched ongoing series, releases the 2018 production tour with first-time stops exclusively at distinctive, historic locations across the country.

"This past fall while filming at a Gilded Age mansion in Newport, Rhode Island, I saw immediately that capturing hidden treasures and guest stories against backgrounds rich with history brought a new depth to our show," said ROADSHOW executive producer Marsha Bemko. "Holding events at these locations allows our cameras to go outdoors, capturing vivid settings and a peek into places that are treasures in their own right. It was a natural next step to create our entire tour with stops at these types of stunning locations."

City locations and dates are announced below, historic venues in each city will be revealed closer to each event date.

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW 2018 Summer Tour Dates:

       April 12                Sarasota, Florida

       April 21                Tulsa, Oklahoma

       May 22                 Louisville, Kentucky

       May 29                 San Diego, California

       June 14                Rochester, Michigan

Admission to ANTIQUES ROADSHOW is free, but tickets are required and must be obtained in advance. Fans can apply for a chance to receive one pair of free tickets per household. The 2018 Tour ticket application process opens Monday, December 4 at 3pm ET. To enter the drawing for free tickets to a 2018 ROADSHOW event and to see complete application rules, go to pbs.org/roadshowtickets. For more information you may also call toll-free 888-762-3749.

Deadline for applications is Tuesday, February 27, 2018 at 11:59 PM PT. 

At each appraisal event, approximately 3,000 ticketed guests will receive free valuations of their antiques and collectibles from experts from the country's leading auction houses and independent dealers. Each guest is invited to bring two items for appraisal. To see FAQs about ANTIQUES ROADSHOW events, go to: pbs.org/wgbh/roadshow/tickets/faq.

From each of the 2018 events, three episodes of ROADSHOW per city will be created for inclusion in the 15-time Emmy® Award nominated production's 23rd broadcast season, to air in 2019.

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW, produced by WGBH Boston, is seen by an average of 8 million viewers each week, airing Mondays at 8/7c PM on PBS.

Washington, DC—At its October 2017 Board of Trustees meeting, the National Gallery of Art acquired works including a rare early painting by Morris Louis (1912-1962), two complete bound volumes by Giovanni Francesco Costa  (1711-1773), a 1928 drawing by Stuart Davis (1892-1964), and a handcrafted album by ringl + pit (active 1930-1933).

"We are delighted with the acquisition of these important works by Morris Louis, Giovanni Francesco Costa, Stuart Davis, and ringl + pit, among others," said Earl A. Powell III, director, National Gallery of Art. "We are grateful as well to our many donors whose generosity continues to strengthen the Gallery's collection."

Paintings

Morris Louis's Sub-Marine (1948) is one of his few existing early paintings. After developing his signature technique of staining in 1953, Louis destroyed much of his previous work, which makes Sub-Marine an important document in the career of an artist who went on to become one of the most lyrical artists of the so-called Washington Color School. The whiplash lines and washed colors show the influence of Arshile Gorky, while the biomorphic shapes recall Joan Miró and Alexander Calder. The yellow forms flowing in rhyming fashion foreshadow the parallel bands and rivulets of his mature work. The painting joins six others by Louis in the Gallery's collection, including an even earlier work, Country House (1938), from the Corcoran Collection. Sub-Marine was purchased with funds from the Howard and Roberta Ahmanson Fund.

The Gallery has also acquired important paintings by Juan Gris (1887-1927) and Pierre Soulages (born 1919). Given to the Gallery by Dian Woodner for the Woodner Collection, Gris's Glass and Checkerboard (1917) is a daring still life in which only a checkerboard and glass can be discerned. Other objects are incorporated into an intense play of abstract pattern, repetition, and texture. Gris's characteristic manipulation of light, shadow, and silhouette adds mystery to this painting, the modest size of which belies its power and complexity. Soulages, a master of French postwar abstraction, has limited himself in recent decades to black paint applied with rakes and other tools. A gift from Pierre and Colette Soulages, Peinture 326 x 181 cm, 14 mars 2009 (2009) consists of four panels reaching over ten feet high. Through the careful manipulation of these four surfaces, each treated differently, Soulages demonstrates that the true medium of his so-called "outre-noir" (beyond black) paintings is light.

Prints and Drawings

Giovanni Francesco Costa's Le Delizie del fiume Brenta nei palazzi e casini situati sopra le sponde dalla sua sboccatura nella laguna di Venezia infino alla città di Padova (The Delights of the Brenta River, in the Palaces and Villas Along the Banks, from Its Mouth in the Lagoon of Venice to the City of Padua) (1750/1756) is one of the most ambitious and rare print projects from 18th-century Venice. In 1747 Costa etched a series of views along the Brenta canal between Padua and the lagoon, a favorite location for the rural residences of Venice's principal families. Inspired by the etchings of Canaletto created a few years earlier, the plates are extraordinary in the variety of their composition, the sensitivity of their drawing, and the evocation of a luminous atmosphere. The views proceed from east to west, each featuring an aristocratic structure, and together form a continuous trip up the canal. The series culminates not just 18th-century Venetian projects of the kind, extending their range to terra firma and vastly expanding their number, but the tradition of vicarious travel around actual places through printed series that goes back to 17th-century Holland. These volumes join the Gallery's holdings of 18th-century Venetian prints, drawings, and illustrated books, among which is the most complete collection in existence of Costa's rare architectural fantasies and a unique series of anamorphic etchings, all acquired over the previous six years. These volumes were purchased with funds from the New Century Fund, O'Neal Fund, and Garbaty Fund.

Torso and Head of Two Figures (1928) by Stuart Davis, one of the most original of the American modernists, resembles a stripped-down design for a machine. Done in black ink and graphite, the drawing exemplifies the tension between abstraction and realism that invigorates much of Davis's art. It also represents a study in contrasts between black and white, solid and void, organic and inorganic, and surface and depth. The drawing's mechanical underpinnings and its emphasis on geometric forms evokes not only the works of Russian constructivist El Lissitzky but also those of Louis Lozowick, an American artist born in Ukraine, whose Machine Ornament drawings (1923-1930) bear a striking resemblance to Torso and Head. The Davis drawing was purchased through the Pepita Milmore Memorial Fund and Clark Fund and is presently on view in Machine Art Modernism, an installation of drawings, photographs, and prints on the ground floor of the East Building through mid-May 2018.

Sculpture

The Adoration of the Shepherds (1530s), a bronze plaquette, is among the most successful religious narrative compositions by Valerio Belli (1468-1546), a gifted sculptor of rock crystals and medals as well as plaquettes. In a characteristically monumental composition on a miniature scale, in Adoration he has infused his figures with classical grace—slender angels hovering with olive branches and a crown, shepherds assembling with gifts, and the Virgin kneeling in rapture before her newborn son, who reaches out toward her. In front of a majestic structure with a Roman arcade, the figures reflect both Belli's studies of ancient reliefs and his immersion in the culture of Renaissance Rome, especially the school of Raphael. The composition shows the influence of an engraving of the same subject from the circle of Giulio Bonasone after Raphael, and it builds on another Adoration of the Shepherds by Belli, carved for the crystal casket (1530-1532) he made for the Medici pope Clement VII. While the Gallery owns a version of the latter plaquette as well, the workmanship of this new acquisition particularly demonstrates Belli's genius for expressive modeling in miniature. This plaquette was given to the Gallery by Michael Riddick as a gift of the Riddick Family in memory of Eleonora Luciano.

In October the Gallery also acquired works of modern sculpture by Alex Katz (born 1927), Alexander Calder (1898-1976), and Barbara Hepworth (1903-1975). Katz, renowned painter of pop-inflected portraits, has been treading the line between painting and sculpture with painted cutouts or silhouettes for decades. In Ada (Weathervane) (2016) Katz once again depicts Ada, his wife and muse, setting her painted head into motion as the image spins on a tall pole, alternately revealing front and back. This sculpture is a gift of Robert Lococo and the Artist.

Two brass wire sculptures by Alexander Calder, French Poodle (c. 1952) and Vogelgesang [Birdsong] (c. 1930), as well as a bronze sculpture by Barbara Hepworth were given to the Gallery by Elaine Kaufman as a gift of Richard and Elaine Kaufman. In Vogelgesang [Birdsong] Calder conjures what may be a quacking duck from a single piece of wire; in the later sculpture, French Poodle, multiple pieces of wire create a poodle with the ambition to be a lion. Calder was a master of manipulating wire, one of the first materials he used, as demonstrated by these works as well as two wire sculptures already in the Gallery's collection. Sculpture with Strings (date unknown) by Barbara Hepworth, one of the great British sculptors of the modern era, is the first work by the artist to enter the Gallery's collection. This bronze sculpture was cast in 1961 from a plaster model made in 1939, a time when she was incorporating voids into her work and spanning them with strings. The result is a lyrical fusion of constructivist geometry and surrealist biomorphism.

Photographs

Grete Stern and Ellen Auerbach were two pioneering women artists whose studio—ringl + pit, named after their childhood nicknames (ringl for Stern, pit for Auerbach)—focused on advertising, fashion, and portrait photography. With a playful yet powerful surrealist sensibility, ringl + pit often used mannequins and wigs to question the artifice involved in the construction of female identity. Their close relationship is vividly expressed in the remarkable bound album The Ringlpitis (1931), which Auerbach gaveto Stern as a birthday gift in 1931. A unique, handmade album, it is composed of photographs that the two artists made of each other along with drawings, pieces of fabric, and handwritten and typed texts that are often collaged to create playful and poetic narratives. It also includes an exceptional fold-out section that depicts a circus performance with images of Stern and Auerbach in masquerade. Precedents for such albums are 18th-century friendship albums and 19th-century collage photo albums, including the magnificent Cator Family Album (1866-1877) in the Gallery's collection. A one-of-a-kind work, The Ringlpitis is an important addition to the Gallery's collection of modern photography and an object that sheds light on the complexity of artists' relationships with one another and the role of women in the history of photography. This album was purchased with funds from the Alfred H. Moses and Fern M. Schad Fund.

For 50 years, Robert Adams (born 1937) has made compelling, provocative, and highly influential photographs that explore some of the most profound questions of our time—our responsibility to the land we inherited and the moral dilemmas we face as we live with the contradictions of progress. Working in Colorado, California, and Oregon from the 1960s to the present, he has photographed a wide variety of subjects including suburban sprawl, strip malls, and highways; homes and stores; as well as the land itself—rivers and skies, the prairie and ocean—and the ravages we have inflicted on it. North edge of Denver, Colorado (1973-1974) addresses the construction of a new kind of American environment, one in which industry has transformed the landscape, producing great isolation and little sense of community. Given to the Gallery by Robert and Kerstin Adams, it will be included in the exhibition American Silence: The Photographs of Robert Adams, 1965-2015 in the fall of 2019.

Shooting from a helicopter, Canadian photographer Edward Burtynsky (born 1955) captured a striking aerial view of an open quarry near Barre, Vermont. Such a dramatic perspective reveals the astounding scale of the project, where stonecutters work precariously atop massive blocks of granite. Part of a larger series that examines both the geological and social history of the area, Burtynsky's Rock of Ages #7, Active Granite Section, Wells-Lamson Quarry, Barre, Vermont (1991) calls attention to the delicate balance between human ambition and the environment. An early example of what became Burtynsky's signature approach, this unexpectedly beautiful photograph subverts our understanding of the sublime in nature by asking us to contemplate how humans have reshaped the natural landscape.

The Joy of Giving Something, Inc. recently gave the Gallery 87 photographs by the American photographer Thomas Roma (born 1950) from his series Come Sunday (1991-1994). In the early 1990s while he was photographing the exterior of houses of worship in Brooklyn, Roma was invited inside to record the service itself, sparking a three-year project in which he photographed more than 150 services. His photographs, as Henry Louis Gates has noted, "capture the sublimity of the beliefs of the people who are most 'caught up in the whirling storms of life.'" A selection of these photographs will be shown in 2018.

Two photographs from c. 1950 by Saul Steinberg (1914-1999), acquired from the Saul Steinberg Foundation, are part of a series the artist dubbed "photoworks" begun in the late 1940s. In this series Steinberg playfully transformed everyday objects by drawing on or around them. He then had these site installations photographed in spare compositions by different photographers, intending them to represent ideas rather than function as sculptures. He published inset booklets of these photographs in the March and September 1950 issues of Flair magazine. These photographs are on view in the Saul Steinberg installation on the East Building Mezzanine through May 18, 2018.

 

London—Today we reveal the British Library’s cultural highlights for the year ahead, including:

  • James Cook: The Voyages, a major exhibition marking 250 years since Captain James Cook set sail on three voyages that changed the world
  • Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms, a spectacular exhibition exploring the riches of Anglo-Saxon art and ideas over six centuries
  • The acquisition of Booker Prize-winning author Penelope Fitzgerald’s personal archive
  • A landmark exhibition commemorating the 70th anniversary of the Empire Windrush bringing hundreds of Caribbean migrants to their new home in the UK 

James Cook: The Voyages (27 April 2018 - 28 August 2018) 

To mark 250 years since Captain James Cook’s ship Endeavour set sail from Plymouth, this major British Library exhibition will tell the story of Cook’s three great voyages through original documents, many of which were produced by the artists, scientists and seamen on board the ship.  

From Cook’s journal detailing the first crossing of the Antarctic Circle to handwritten log books, stunning artwork and intricate maps, this exhibition will chart the three voyages, which spanned more than a decade, and shed new light on the experiences of people on the ship and in the places visited.

Today we can reveal that drawings by the Polynesian high priest and navigator Tupaia, who joined the first voyage at Tahiti and accompanied Cook to New Zealand and Australia, will be going on public display for the first time together, alongside works by expedition artists Sydney Parkinson, John Webber and William Hodges.  Tupaia’s paintings include a series of depictions of Tahitian society and culture, as well as drawings from New Zealand and Australia.

The exhibition will also examine the scientific work of the expeditions and will feature some of the original natural history drawings made on the voyages, including the first European depiction of a kangaroo drawn by Sydney Parkinson, on loan from the Natural History Museum.

The British Library holds distinguished collections of original maps, artworks and journals from the voyages and, alongside rare printed books and newly commissioned video content, the exhibition will seek to shed new light on encounters that completed the outline of the known world and formed the starting point for the following two centuries of globalisation.

Tickets will be available to buy on the British Library website from 1 December 2017.

Roly Keating, Chief Executive of the British Library, said:

‘From James Cook’s Endeavour to the Empire Windrush, we’ll be taking our visitors in 2018 on an unforgettable series of voyages and encounters, across cultures, continents and centuries - culminating in one of the most ambitious exhibitions we have ever mounted: the extraordinary treasures of the Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms.’

Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms (19 October 2018 - 19 February 2019)

In autumn 2018, the British Library will be staging a landmark exhibition on the history, art, literature and culture of Anglo-Saxon England, across six centuries from the eclipse of Roman Britain to the Norman Conquest.  

Highlights from the British Library’s outstanding collection of Anglo-Saxon manuscripts will be presented alongside a large number of exceptional loans.  

Today we are delighted to announce that Codex Amiatinus, one of three giant single-volume Bibles made at the monastery at Wearmouth-Jarrow in the north-east of England in the early eighth century and taken to Italy as a gift for the Pope in 716, will be returning to England for the first time in more than 1300 years, on loan from Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana in Florence. It will be displayed with the St Cuthbert Gospel, also made at Wearmouth-Jarrow around the same time, and acquired by the British Library in 2012.

We can also reveal that we will be displaying a number of major objects from the Staffordshire Hoard, found in 2009, including the pectoral cross and the inscribed gilded strip, on loan from Birmingham and Stoke-on-Trent City Councils.

Bringing together the four principal manuscripts of Old English poetry for the first time, the British Library’s unique manuscript of Beowulf will be displayed alongside the Vercelli Book on loan from the Biblioteca Capitolare in Vercelli, the Exeter Book on loan from Exeter Cathedral Library, and the Junius Manuscript on loan from the Bodleian Library.

Dr Claire Breay, curator of Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms, said:

‘The Anglo-Saxon period saw the formation of the kingdom of England and the emergence of the English language and English literature.  Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms will be the most spectacular exhibition to date of manuscripts and related objects covering the whole Anglo-Saxon period.’

Karl and Eleanor Marx Treasures Gallery display (1 May 2018 to 5 August 2018)

As part of the commemorations of the 200th anniversary of Karl Marx’s birth, this Treasures Gallery display will explore the role the British Museum Reading Room, a predecessor institution of the British Library, played in the life and work of Marx and his daughter Eleanor, a notable writer and political activist in her own right. 

The display will include correspondence by Marx, his family and Friedrich Engels, covering both personal and political affairs, as well as rare copies of first editions of Marx’s writings, several of which he himself donated to the Library.  Among these is a copy of the first French translation of Capital, which is believed to feature annotations in Marx’s own hand. 

Michael Palin Treasures Gallery display (7 August 2018 - 11 November 2018)

Following the British Library’s acquisition of Michael Palin’s archive earlier this year, there will be a free display in the Treasures Gallery focusing on the development of his literary and creative career.

The display will trace a line from his early days with The Frost Report and Monty Python’s Flying Circus to his successes across fiction, stage and screen, as well as exploring his humour, versatility, multi-faceted imagination and enduring appeal.

The archive covers 1965-1987 and includes over 50 ‘Python Notebooks’ containing drafts, working material and personal reflections relating to Palin’s Monty Python writing. It also includes his personal diaries kept during this period, and project files comprising material relating to his film, television and literary work.

Acquisition: Penelope Fitzgerald’s archive

The British Library is delighted to announce it has acquired a significant collection of papers belonging to the Booker Prize winning writer, Penelope Fitzgerald (1916 - 2000).  

Born into a distinguished family and confronted with domestic and economic crises throughout her life, Penelope Fitzgerald launched her literary career at the age of 58 and is now regarded as one of the finest British novelists of the 20th century.  

The collection comprises literary notebooks and drafts, including from her first novel The Golden Child (1977) to later novels including The Gate of Angels (1990) and The Blue Flower (1995), along with diaries and family and personal correspondence with figures including Muriel Spark, Rebecca West and Penelope Lively.  

The archive also includes Fitzgerald’s personal library, which comprises her heavily annotated teaching copies of editions of Beckett, Milton and Austen amongst others. 

Joanna Norledge, Lead Curator of Contemporary Literary and Creative Archives at the British Library, said:

‘The Penelope Fitzgerald archive includes a lot of unpublished material, particularly her ideas and notes on unrealised creative and critical projects, and is a great source to be mined.  From Fitzgerald’s notebooks and correspondence to her personal library, the collection provides significant research value as it elucidates her professional, intellectual and writing life.’

The archive is currently being catalogued and will be available in British Library Reading Rooms from late 2018.  For more information on how to become a Reader, please visit the British Library website.

Windrush (1 June 2018 to 21 October 2018)

Next year marks 70 years since the Empire Windrush arrived at Tilbury Docks in Essex carrying hundreds of Caribbean migrants to Britain. It also marks the passing of the British Nationality Act, which established common citizenship and enabled all British subjects to settle in Britain.

Through literature, personal correspondence and official reports - from a 1940s suppressed report detailing labour protests and rebellions across the Caribbean to E.R. Braithwaite’s annotated typescript of To Sir, With Love - this free Entrance Hall Gallery exhibition will explore the significance of the arrival of the Windrush within a broader narrative of Caribbean history.  

Though the arrival of the Windrush was initially met with fear-mongering and prejudice, the ship has since come to symbolise the origins of British multiculturalism. This exhibition, however, will tell a different and deeper story of Caribbean people’s struggles for self-expression and recognition across the 20th century. 

We are delighted to announce that we will be exhibiting Andrea Levy’s manuscript of her award-winning 2004 book Small Island. The novel was loosely based on the experiences of Levy’s parents, who emigrated to Britain from Jamaica in 1948, and the manuscript will be displayed alongside other items her father brought with him on the Windrush.

British Library in China 

In 2017 the British Library took some of its most specular collection items, including Charlotte Brontë’s handwritten manuscript of Jane Eyre and one of the earliest quarto editions of Romeo and Juliet, to China for the first time.  

The British Library will open further displays at Shanghai Library in March 2018 and in Hong Kong in November 2018, following the success of exhibitions in Beijing and Wuzhen.

The British Library will also continue to expand its online presence aimed at Chinese audiences with the Chinese language version of Discovering Literature now featuring more than 200 digitised items and 70 interpretative essays.

Discovering Literature: Medieval 

Launching in January 2018, the British Library will publish 50 medieval manuscripts and early print editions, including the single surviving manuscript of Beowulf and Caxton’s pioneering illustrated print edition of the Canterbury Tales, on Discovering Literature.  

The site will also investigate a range of themes including multilingualism, gender, faith and heroism, and cover key genres including epic poetry, dream visions and riddles.

Discovering Literature is a free website aimed at A-Level students, teachers and lifelong learners, which provides unprecedented access to the Library’s literary and historical treasures and has received over 6.5 million unique visitors since launching in 2014.

The British Library has already published collections relating to Shakespeare and the Renaissance, the Romantic and Victorian periods, and 20th century literature and drama, and will continue to add to the site until it covers the whole rich and diverse backbone of English literature from Beowulf to Zadie Smith.

Events programme

The British Library will be hosting a series of events to accompany the Library’s 2018 cultural programme; from Philip Pullman talking about his writing life to Harriet Harman discussing 100 years of women having the vote and Brian Eno showcasing a selection of music from his work as a visual artist in our Entrance Hall.  

Tickets for events between January and March 2018 can be purchased online from Friday 1 December by Members and are on general sale from Friday 9 December.

 

Bidsquare's Holiday Gift Guide

6ef7d710-91d5-4cbe-b1aa-ba1030fd14ec.jpgNew York, NY—Bidsquare is kicking off holiday shopping with a gift guide that will impress anyone who is hard to buy for. There's one in every family - the person who has (almost) everything! The impossible, particular and eccentric personalities are the most exciting to surprise. Impress those on your list with not only a creative gift, but something you had to roll up your sleeves and bid on!

For the Hobbyist Collector

Help someone start their fine print, poster or vintage sign collection. Book worms will crunch through the pages of first and limited edition options, while those with the need for speed can cruise happily through catalogs featuring vintage toys, luxury collectibles and blinking oddities. 

The Forever Decorator

Satisfy the ultimate nest maker, the person who simply cannot turn away a special object. With a massive group of Picasso ceramics and an extraordinary lamp auction coming up, you won't want to miss your chance to hack into these unique holiday selections.

For the Seriously Styled

There's no time like the present and watch auctions are happening this minute! If you know someone who enjoys the finer things in life, flip through fashionable auctions that include impressive jewelry, handbags, silk scarves, couture and other wearable wonders. 

For Those Busy in the Kitchen

A favorite holiday sound is the banging of pots and pans - a sure sign of the scrumptious meal to come! Do you know someone with a passion for table top decor? Take a peek at items that will spice up your hosts' distinguished taste!

Bid now on curated art, antiques and collectibles. With rare and authentic items added everyday, you can bid on an impressive gift or browse for your own collection. View online sales now at www.bidsquare.com.

About Bidsquare

Bidsquare is a curated platform where collectors can discover and bid on rare and authentic fine art and antiques from over 130 vetted auction houses and galleries. Bidsquare is the destination for individuals and collectors seeking exceptional, one-of-a-kind pieces, with new, unique property added every day. Visit http://www.bidsquare.com to view all auctions. 

Image: Top Row: Rattan Bicycle, Estimate $800-1,200; Jim Dine, Hand Painting on the Mandala, 1986, Estimate $6,000-8,000; Lionel Standard Gauge #33 Toy Train Outfit, Estimate $200-400.Bottom Row: Ray Bradbury, 18 works with First Editions; Estimate $400-600; Monumental Architectural Signage, Crown, Estimate $3,000-4,000; Baby Bugatti, Electric-powered Child's Car, Estimate $6,000-8,000

Boston, MA—After more than 20 years searching for America's hidden treasures, ANTIQUES ROADSHOW finds sensational first-time objects in six cities featured as part of season 22, premiering January 8. From eyewitness accounts of historic moments to items that are truly macabre, ROADSHOW appraisers, guests and locations make this a ground-breaking new season!

"I was amazed by the number of never-before-seen items discovered on this year's tour," says executive producer Marsha Bemko. "That mix of new treasures and sizzling stories along with our first event filmed at a Gilded Age mansion in Newport, RI fills this season with can't-miss episodes!"

Along with discovering the mystery of the mosquito and the masterpiece, viewers will see other first-time items such as: 

  • In Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, a head in a box! A plaster head, that is, of a convicted bank robber who fashioned the prop to aid in his attempted prison escape. Harrisburg episodes will air January 8, 15 and 22.
  • In New Orleans, Louisiana, a charming study of Andy Warhol painted by his friend, artist Jamie Wyeth, capturing Warhol with his beloved dog Archie. New Orleans episodes will air January 29, February 5 and 12.
  • In St. Louis, Missouri, a vintage Ozark Airlines poster, ca. 1960, featuring aircraft of the era and company logo illustrated through mid-century modern design. St. Louis episodes will air February 19 and 26, and March 26.
  • In Portland, Oregon, an eyewitness account of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln captured in a letter written by the guest's grandfather, who was at Ford's theater that fateful night and captured a most remarkable description of John Wilkes Booth. Portland episodes will air April 2, 9 and 16.
  • In Green Bay, Wisconsin, a rare Cadillac "rain lamp," ca. 1968, used to promote the famous auto brand through modern design and a unique mineral-oil-on-wire feature that simulated rain. Green Bay episodes will air April 23 and 30, and May 7.
  • In Newport, Rhode Island, a one-of-a-kind 1939 Royal typewriter, plated by Cartier in 24k gold and presented to the guest's grandfather, who was vice president of sales at Royal during the period. Newport episodes will air May 14 and 21. 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW offers engaging ways to experience the season premiere and new episodes, including live tweeting with producers and appraisers Mondays at 8/7c PM; an after-show AR Extras LIVE broadcast on Facebook; the weekly AR Extras newsletter; and original feature articles, video archive and more on pbs.org/antiques.

Part adventure, part history lesson, part treasure hunt, 15-time Emmy® Award-nominated ANTIQUES ROADSHOW is a production of WGBH Boston. The series is the most-watched ongoing series on PBS and is seen by around 8 million viewers each week.

Codez Quet.jpgThe Codex Qutzalecatzin represents one of the most important indigenous manuscripts from the earliest history of America to become available in the last century.

The Library of Congress has acquired the Codex Quetzalecatzin, one of the very few Mesoamerican manuscripts to survive from the 16th century. After being in private collections for more than 100 years, the codex has been digitally preserved and made available online for the first time to the general public at loc.gov/resource/g4701g.ct009133/.

The codex, also known as the Mapa de Ecatepec-Huitziltepec, represents one of the most important indigenous manuscripts from the earliest history of America to become available in the last century. Only few examples of manuscripts of this kind have endured the ravages of time.

While digitizing the codex at the Library, the Librarian stated: “The acquisition of the map, because of its relevance to the early history of the European contact with the indigenous people of America, makes an important addition to the early American treasures at the Library of Congress, including the Oztoticpac Lands Map and the Huexotzinco Codex. It’s a rare document of world history and American history in general.”

The manuscript dates from 1593, a time when many cartographic histories were being produced as part of a Spanish royal investigation into the human and community resources in the American colonies. The Codex Quetzalecatzin serves as an example of these maps that were largely made by indigenous painters and scribes.

As with many Nahua, indigenous group, manuscript maps of the period, the Codex Quetzalecatzin depicts the local community at an important point in its history and the iconography that makes up the map reflects some Spanish influence.

“The codex shows graphically the kinds of cultural interactions taking place at an important moment in American history,” said John Hessler, curator of the Jay I. Kislak Collection for the archaeology of the early Americas of the Library of Congress. “In a sense, we see the birth of what would be the start of what we would come to know as the Americas.”

Hessler added: “The codex relates to the extent of land ownership and properties of the family line known as “de Leon,” most of the members of which are portrayed on the manuscript. With Aztec stylized graphics, the map illustrates the family’s genealogy and its descent from Quetzalecatzin, who in 1480 was the major political leader of the region. It also shows churches, some Spanish place names and images suggesting a community adapting to Spanish law and rule.”

In the codex, certain features that point to indigenous authorship include pre-Hispanic stylistics, such as symbols for rivers, roads and pathways, and hieroglyphic writing. The marginal notations with alphabetic writing utilizing the Latin alphabet and the names of some of the indigenous elites, such as “don Alonso” and “don Matheo,” are clues to its colonial era composition. This is evidence that some indigenous people enjoyed the Spanish title “don” and had been baptized with Christian names.

The codex has a great provenance. The Library acquired the manuscript from the collections of Charles Ratton and Guy Ladriere in France. From previous owners like William Randolph Hearst, who also owned the Jefferson Bible, to the first Viscount Cowdray, the codex can be traced all the way into the 19th century.

The manuscript belongs to a larger group of interrelated pictographic documents, called “Pinome Group,” from northern Oaxaca and Southern Puebla in Mexico. The codices include the Tecamachalco Canvas, Cuevas Codices and Fragmented Codex, which together show the extent, the people and history of the region.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States - and extensive materials from around the world - both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office.  Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

The Folio Society is delighted to announce that their Limited Edition of Robert Hooke’s Micrographia won the Scholarly, Academic and Reference Book category at The British Book Design & Production Awards 2017, presented in London last week. 

The British Book Design & Production Awards is one of the most prestigious and popular literary events of the year, the awards recognise and promote excellence in the British book industry by celebrating the best editions of the year. 

The judges said: ‘Micrographia is a delightful book traditionally typeset with stunning illustrations of insects and plants including throw-outs for the larger illustrations. The book is beautifully quarter-bound in leather, with silver foiled sides and a silver gilt top, and presented in a cloth-bound slipcase. It may be a large format book but you will fnd it very hard to put down!’ 

Kate Grimwade, Production Director at The Folio Society said: ‘Folio are delighted to have won the Scholarly, Academic and Reference Books category with Micrographia. The images in the book were painstakingly reproduced and restored to their original glory from copies held at the Bodleian and the Museum of the History of Science in Oxford. With five throw-outs, gilded tops, a leather quarter-binding and a stunning blocked design, Micrographia encompasses the very best of Folio’s design and production values. 

 

Paris Photo and Aperture Foundation are pleased to announce the winners of the 2017 edition of the Paris Photo-Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Awards. Monsanto: A Photographic Investigation by Mathieu Asselin (Verlag Kettler) is the winner of $10,000 in the First PhotoBook category. The selection for Photography Catalogue of the Year is New Realities: Photography in the 19th Century by Mattie Boom and Hans Rooseboom (Rijiksmuseum/nai010). Museum Bhavan by Dayanita Singh (Steidl) is the winner of PhotoBook of the Year. A Jurors’ Special Mention is also given to La Grieta (The Crack) by Carlos Spottorno and Guillermo Abril (Astiberri Ediciones). 

A final jury at Paris Photo selected this year’s winner. The jury included: Florencia Giordana Braun, director and founder of Rolf Art gallery, Buenos Aires; Krzysztof Candrowicz, the artistic director of the Triennial of Photography in Hamburg; Mitch Epstein, New York-based, award-winning photographer whose most recent book, Rocks and Clouds, will be published by Steidl this fall; Nathalie Herschdorfer, director of Museum of Fine Arts, Le Locle, Switzerland; and Cristiano Raimondi, head of development and international projects at the New National Museum of Monaco and an invited curator for Platform 2017.

Regarding the jury’s selection this year, Mitch Epstein said, “Our jury choices speak to the pluralism of the medium; photography continues to be a vital language in the art, science, and documentary worlds.” Krzysztof Candrowicz added, “What I see in all the books points to a change in traditional thinking about the photobook, blurring the boundaries and expanding the scope of what a photobook can be.”

Cristiano Raimondi remarked on the First PhotoBook winner, Monsanto: A Photographic Investigation, “Asselin’s Monsanto is a courageous, investigative project that connects evidence-driven photography and visual research to the democratization of knowledge; it’s important that this book exists in physical form, as a document, and not just in the virtual world.” 

“Dayanita Singh has extended the concept of what a book might be with Museum Bhavan: a book of books,” said Mitch Epstein on the PhotoBook of the Year. “Her work is a sophisticated merger of Eastern and Western sensibilities, and celebrates the democratic possibilities of the offset multiple.”

On the winner of the Photography Catalogue of the Year, Natalie Hershdorker said, “New Realities takes what might be considered ‘dusty’ material of the nineteenth century and brings new perspectives and fresh design to enliven this classical material. It’s an important example of how to preserve and capture new interest in the history of photography.”

About the 2017 Paris Photo-Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Awards 

First PhotoBook: A $10,000 prize is awarded to the photographer(s)/artist(s) whose first finished, publicly available photobook is judged to be the best of the year. Twenty books from this category were selected for the Shortlist, were presented to the jury for the final selection, and are being exhibited during Paris Photo.

PhotoBook of the Year: This prize is awarded to the photographer(s)/artist(s) and publisher responsible for the photobook judged to be the best of the year. Ten books from this category were selected for the Shortlist, were presented to the jury for the final selection, and are being exhibited during Paris Photo.

Photography Catalogue of the Year: This prize is awarded to the publication, publisher, and/or organizing institution responsible for the exhibition catalogue or museum publication judged to be the best of the year. Five books from this category were selected for the Shortlist, were presented to the jury for the final selection, and are being exhibited during Paris Photo.

This year’s Shortlist selection was made by a jury comprising Gregory Halpern, winner of the 2016 PhotoBook of the Year Award; Lesley A. Martin, creative director of the Aperture Foundation book program and publisher of The PhotoBook Review; Kathy Ryan, director of photography, New York Times Magazine; Joel Smith, Richard L. Menschel Curator of Photography at the Morgan Library & Museum; and Christoph Wiesner, artistic director, Paris Photo. The Shortlist was first announced at the New York Art Book Fair, on September 22, 2017. The thirty-five selected photobooks are profiled in The PhotoBook Review, issue 013. 

Initiated in November 2012 by Aperture Foundation and Paris Photo, the Paris Photo-Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Awards celebrate the photobook’s contribution to the evolving narrative of photography, with three major categories: First PhotoBook, PhotoBook of the Year, and Photography Catalogue of the Year. Since the announcement of the 2016 winners last November, last year’s shortlisted titles have been exhibited in six venues internationally, including at Ivorypress, Madrid; Duesseldorf Photo Weekend, Germany; The Lumiere Brothers Center for Photography, Moscow; and Museum of Fine Arts, Le Locle, Switzerland.

Following Paris Photo, the exhibition of the 2017 Shortlist will travel to 6 pt Book Design Conference, Vilnius, Lithuania; Duesseldorf Photo Weekend, Germany; Month of Photography Los Angeles, Venice Arts, Venice, California; Photobookfest 2018, Lumiere Brothers Center for Photography, Moscow; Triennial of Photography, Hamburg, Germany; Photo Basel, Switzerland; Cortona on the Move, Italy; and Medium Festival of Photography, San Deigo, California, among other venues.

lincolnpapers_486x652.pngAbraham Lincoln’s papers from his time as a lawyer, congressman and the 16th president are now online in full color in a new presentation after a multi-year digitization effort at the Library of Congress.

The Library holds a collection of more than 40,000 Lincoln documents dating from 1774 through Lincoln’s presidency and beyond, including materials from his campaigns, Lincoln’s first and second inaugural addresses and the earliest known copies of the Gettysburg Address. The more than 20,000 original documents in the collection have been digitized as high-resolution images through a collaboration with agencies in Illinois.

“The thousands of manuscripts, documents and images that tell the story of Abraham Lincoln’s life are an invaluable resource, and more people than ever can study these primary sources from the Library of Congress,” said Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress. “More than 150 years after Abraham Lincoln’s presidency, his model of leadership and public service continues to inspire us as a nation.”

The collection is online at loc.gov/collections/abraham-lincoln-papers/about-this-collection/.

Researchers, students and scholars around the world can get a realistic view, zoom in and read documents written by Lincoln and his correspondents. The collection includes original documents as well as transcripts of many of the historic papers. Full-color images of Lincoln’s papers were created using the highest resolution for digitized documents available at the Library.

Treasures from the collection include:

  • Lincoln’s printed copy of his second inaugural address. Historians believe he read from this copy to deliver his inauguration speech on March 4, 1865. For the first time, this document is included with the collection online;
  • Lincoln’s July 1862 preliminary draft of the Emancipation Proclamation;
  • A memorandum expressing Lincoln’s expectation of being defeated for re-election in 1864;
  • A condolence letter by Queen Victoria to Mary Todd Lincoln after the assassination of Abraham Lincoln.

The papers include Lincoln’s correspondence with his wife, members of his cabinet, military generals and other key figures.

Lincoln materials have long been some of the most frequently used resources in the Library’s collection by researchers and the public. “Civil War” and “Abraham Lincoln” have been among the top search terms on the Library’s website for more than 10 years.

The Lincoln Papers came to the Library in 1919 from Lincoln’s oldest son, Robert Todd Lincoln, who inherited the papers after his father was assassinated in 1865. The collection was first opened to the public in 1947 at the end of a moratorium period mandated by Robert Lincoln.

Digital images of the Lincoln Papers were first made available online in 2001 based on scans from microfilm. The refreshed digital collection now has been updated with additional features, full-color images and materials not included in the previous online presentation. The Library holds the papers of 23 presidents.

The Lincoln Papers are among several collections made available online during the past year. Other newly digitized collections include the papers of U.S. Presidents Ulysses S. Grant, Millard Fillmore, Franklin Pierce and James K. Polk; the papers of Alexander Hamilton, Sigmund Freud and Margaret Bayard Smith; more than 4,600 newspapers from Japanese-American internment camps; a collection of web-based comic books; and 25,000 fire insurance maps from communities across America, the first of 500,000 that will be accessible online.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

An historic agreement will be signed in Jerusalem on 7 November 2017 between the National Library of Israel in Jerusalem, the Russian State Library in Moscow, and the Moscow-based Peri Foundation regarding the future of the Gunzburg Collection, which includes some of the most important Hebrew manuscripts and books in the world. Through the generous support of the Peri Foundation, 2,000 manuscripts and thousands of books in the collection will be digitized, making these significant works accessible online to both institutions as well as to the general public. 

The addition of the digitized Gunzburg Collection marks a significant milestone in the renewal process of the National Library of Israel, the home of the greatest collection of Hebrew books and manuscripts in the world, and advances its key aim to preserve the national memory of the Jewish people. The new high-quality images of the ancient Hebrew manuscripts will be integrated with the National Library of Israel's new and comprehensive digital platform: Ktiv, which will eventually include images of all known Hebrew manuscripts. 

The Russian State Library is Russia’s largest library according to the number of items - about 47 million - preserved in its collections. The Library was originally part of the Rumyantsev Museum, which opened in 1828. At present it is one of Russia’s national libraries and is located in Moscow where it holds the most comprehensive collection of books published in the Russian Federation.

The NLI is currently undergoing an extensive process of regeneration, the aim of which is to develop and adapt the institution to the twenty-first century. A key element of this process is the development of a new library building designed by world-leading architects Herzog & de Meuron, due to open in 2021.

The Peri Foundation was created in 2012 by Ziyavudin Magomedov, chairman of Summa Group. Central to the foundation’s aims is to create educational opportunities to unlock the potential of young people and to offer access to the latest technological developments.

Mr. Oren Weinberg, Director of the National Library of Israel, said: 

“We are enormously grateful to the Peri Foundation for enabling this landmark agreement with the Russian State Library, an institution that we hold in such esteem.  We are gratified that the digitized Gunzburg books and manuscripts will join other Hebrew manuscripts on Ktiv, a joint venture of the National Library of Israel and the Friedberg Jewish Manuscript Society, with the support of the Israel Ministry of Jerusalem and Heritage-Land Marks Project. Ktiv is one of the largest digital collections of manuscripts in existence.”

Lord Rothschild, funder of the NLI, said: 

“For many decades now the National Library has lived in hope of having access to the great Gunzberg Collection in Russia.  Thanks to the imaginative generosity of Ziyavudin Magomedov and the Peri Foundation and with the support of the Russian State Library, this will at last happen.  This is of particular sentimental importance to me as I happen to be an Executor of the estate of Isaiah Berlin’s widow, born Aline Gunzberg, a direct descendant of the Gunzberg family.”

Vladimir Gnezdilov, Acting General Director, Russian State Library, said:
“Modern information technology has opened new and unlimited possibilities for accessing the cultural values of countries and their peoples.”

Ziyavudin Magomedov, Founder, Peri Foundation, said:
“I personally consider this a project of the utmost importance. New technology has the potential to assist in comprehending one’s identity, history and culture, change approaches to education, and give access to the exploration of historical heritage. Humanitarian collaboration is extremely important for a balanced world.”

Rembrandt_Four Studies Male Heads_51951_PR copy.jpgCambridge, MA—The Harvard Art Museums announce the extraordinary gift of 330 16th- to 18th-century Dutch, Flemish, and Netherlandish drawings from the esteemed collection of Maida and George S. Abrams (Harvard A.B. ’54, LL.B. ’57), considered the best collection of such material in private hands. The gift further establishes the museums as the major site for the appreciation, research, and study of works on paper from the Dutch Golden Age in North America. This newest promised gift from the Abrams family brings tremendous depth and breadth to the museums’ holdings; the works represent over 125 artists and include extremely fine examples by major masters such as Rembrandt, Jacques de Gheyn II, Hendrick Goltzius, and Adriaen van Ostade, as well as a remarkable range of drawings by lesser-known masters who worked in a wide range of subjects and media. Impressive drawings by artists Nicolaes Berchem, Jacob Marrel, and Cornelis Visscher will help fill gaps in the museums’ collections. Taken as a whole, the Abrams Collection at the Harvard Art Museums reveals the critical role of drawing in the art world of the Dutch Golden Age. 

“George has generously supported the Harvard Art Museums over many decades and in countless ways; we are incredibly thankful for the role that he and Maida have played in galvanizing the study of drawings at Harvard and particularly for their commitment to telling the rich story of draftsmanship from the Low Countries,” said Martha Tedeschi, the Elizabeth and John Moors Cabot Director of the Harvard Art Museums. “The latest gift from the Abrams family is truly transformative for our museums—indeed, for the entire Boston area, especially as the city strives to become a major destination for the study and presentation of Dutch, Flemish, and Netherlandish art. Together with the newly founded Center for Netherlandish Art at the Museum of Fine Arts, we now can pursue institutional collaborations that will serve visitors and scholars from around the world.” 

Mr. Abrams and his late wife Maida made earlier gifts that brought more than 140 drawings to the Harvard Art Museums over the course of several decades. With their collective gifts, the museums now have the most comprehensive holding of 17th-century Dutch drawings outside Europe. 

“When the collection grows in quality and quantity in such a major way, suddenly there are stories you can tell with greater force and depth, with fewer gaps in the narrative,” said Edouard Kopp, been a key U.S. institution for the study and appreciation of drawings, and this gift will enable us to be an even more vibrant center, particularly for Dutch drawings.” 

News of the promised gift was shared on November 3, just a day before the museums hosted the symposium Dutch Drawings on the Horizon: A Day of Talks in Honor of George S. Abrams. The event brought together international experts on 17th-century Dutch drawings to discuss the exceptional draftsmanship of the Dutch Golden Age, from Goltzius to Rembrandt. Speakers and chairs at the event included George Abrams’s longtime friends and associates Arthur Wheelock, Peter Schatborn, Peter C. Sutton, Jane Turner, and William W. Robinson. 

In 1999, the Abrams gave an initial landmark gift of 110 drawings to the Harvard Art Museums. Many of those works had been included in the 1991-92 exhibition Seventeenth-Century Dutch Drawings: A Selection from the Maida and George Abrams Collection, which was on view at the Rijksprentenkabinet in Amsterdam, the Graphische Sammlung Albertina in Vienna, the Pierpont Morgan Library in New York, and the Fogg Museum. William W. Robinson, former Maida and George Abrams Curator of Drawings at the Harvard Art Museums, wrote the accompanying catalogue. The 2002-03 traveling exhibition and accompanying catalogue for Bruegel to Rembrandt: Dutch and Flemish Drawings from the Maida and George Abrams Collection, also written by Robinson, complemented (and supplemented) the previous catalogue by presenting the most significant acquisitions of the Abrams Collection since the 1991-92 show. Bruegel to Rembrandt was shown at the British Museum in London, the Institut Néerlandais in Paris, and the Fogg Museum. The 1999 gift led the museums to publish Drawings from the Age of Bruegel, Rubens, and Rembrandt (William W. Robinson, with Susan Anderson; 2016), a catalogue of 100 of the museums’ best drawings from this period; almost half of the drawings chosen were part of the Abrams gift. An exhibition of the same title was on display at the Harvard Art Museums from May 21 through August 14, 2016. 

“The Harvard Art Museums’ support of original scholarship and their dedication to training tomorrow’s leaders in the field have long been important to me and my late wife Maida,” said George Abrams. “As a result, I am delighted that our collection will now be housed at the museums and available to a range of audiences. With leadership from director Martha Tedeschi, who deeply understands the importance of works on paper, the museums now stand to have the leading Dutch drawings collection in the United States, with more excellent examples by Rembrandt and wonderful drawings by top draftsmen Hendrick Goltzius and Jacques de Gheyn II.” 

The Abrams Collection at the Harvard Art Museums has particular depth and strength in the following areas: 

  • High and low genre subjects, especially sheets by Adriaen van Ostade, Isaack van Ostade, and Cornelis Dusart 
  • Natural history watercolors (birds, plants, flowers, insects, etc.) by artists such as Jacob Marrel, Maria Sibylla Merian, Johannes Bronkhorst, Pieter Holsteyn II, Gerardus and Rochus van Veen, Margareta de Heer, and Pieter Withoos 
  • Rembrandt and his school, with a particularly impressive range of artists represented who studied directly under Rembrandt or contemporaries who came under the spell of his influential style 

“George’s generosity to the Harvard Art Museums never ceases to amaze me. He has supported us for decades: through gifts of art, steadfast advocacy, and advice,” said William W. Robinson, the former Maida and George Abrams Curator of Drawings at the Harvard Art Museums. “Now, with the commitment of his collection, the museums are able to carry on Harvard’s great tradition of drawings scholarship, taking it to an even higher level.”

At a dinner held in his honor on November 3, Abrams was appointed Knight in the Order of Orange- Nassau of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The royal decoration was given by Dutch Consul General Dolph Hogewoning for Abrams’s significant contribution to the study and international promotion of Dutch art. The order bears the hyphenated name used by the royal family of the Netherlands since the 16th century and is a chivalric order open for those who have earned special merits for society: people who deserve appreciation and recognition from society for the special way in which they have carried out their activities.

Mr. Abrams has served for years as head of the Drawings Committee at the Harvard Art Museums and was instrumental in securing funds for the Drawings Department at the museums from the Stanley H. Durwood Foundation. These funds support a wide range of events, including the November 4 symposium Dutch Drawings on the Horizon: A Day of Talks in Honor of George S. Abrams. The Durwood Foundation also endowed a fellowship in Dutch art, currently held by Austėja Mackelaitė, who curated an exhibition of drawings from the Abrams Collection now on view, The Art of Drawing in the Early Dutch Golden Age, 1590-1630: Selected Works from the Abrams Collection.

Said Edouard Kopp: “Without George’s help, we wouldn’t be able to engage Harvard students with our drawings collection nearly as much as we do.” For example, Kopp brings museum curatorial fellows and Harvard students to Paris each year for the Salon du Dessin, a major event in the field, for a practicum in acquisitions.

Related Exhibition 

The Art of Drawing in the Early Dutch Golden Age, 1590-1630: Selected Works from the Abrams Collection is currently on view through January 14, 2018; it is installed on Level 2, in the museums’ galleries dedicated to 17th-century Dutch and Flemish art. The installation of 31 drawings explores the extraordinary developments in Dutch art in the period between 1590 and 1630. The works on view present some of the major themes in Dutch art, including the development of high and low genres, the study of landscape, and the interest in the nude; many of these subjects initially emerged in the medium of drawing. The works on display celebrate the role of drawing as a catalyst of creativity during the early Golden Age. 

Image: Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, Four Studies of Male Heads, c. 1636. Brown ink and brown wash on cream antique laid paper. The Maida and George Abrams Collection, Boston, Massachusetts. Photo: © President and Fellows of Harvard College. 

 

With a career spanning more than 50 years, legendary TV personality Dick Cavett is recognized as one of the most cultured and savvy talk-show hosts in the history of television.  The Library of Congress announced today that Cavett has donated 2,500 programs of his decades-long talk-show series—showcasing some of the golden moments in television—to the American people. 

The collection totals nearly 2,000 hours of programming—about 78 days worth of viewing—and features more than 5,000 guests.  The list of guests, many whom rarely appeared on late-night television, is a testament to Cavett’s appeal as a knowledgeable and thoughtful interviewer.   They include Muhammad Ali, Louis Armstrong, Fred Astaire, James Baldwin, Marlon Brando, Ingrid Bergman, Mel Brooks, Truman Capote, Noel Coward, Duke Ellington, Helen Hayes, Jim Henson, Katharine Hepburn, Alfred Hitchcock, John Kerry, Myrna Loy, Norman Mailer, Mickey Mantle, Groucho Marx, Arthur Miller, Toni Morrison, Paul Newman, Laurence Olivier, Anthony Perkins, Ronald Reagan, Jackie Robinson, Mort Sahl, Charles Schulz, Steven Spielberg, Gloria Swanson, Gore Vidal, Orson Welles, Tennessee Williams, Joanne Woodward and many more.

Many rock-and-roll musicians were also featured guests on his shows, including David Bowie, Judy Collins, David Crosby, Jimi Hendrix, Mick Jagger, Janis Joplin, John Lennon and Yoko Ono, Stephen Stills and Joni Mitchell.

“Dick Cavett turned interviewing into an art form,” said Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden. “He could talk to anyone, and his ability to listen and make the fascinating people who sat across from him more relatable guaranteed his place in television history.”

“I still have to convince myself that I actually interviewed and knew all of those incredible people,” said Cavett.  “Looking at the archive of my shows now is simply overwhelming for me. I’m thrilled that the Library of Congress will be the permanent repository for the collection. When I see one of the old shows now, my first thought is ‘What is that starstruck kid from Nebraska doing with whoever the genius of the moment happened to be.’”

Cavett’s archive represents a significant addition to the Library’s impressive collections of film and television icons, including Jerry Lewis, Bob Hope, Groucho Marx, Ernie Kovacs and Edie Adams, Danny Kaye, Johnny Carson and Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz.  The Dick Cavett Collection will be available to qualified researchers in the Library’s Motion Picture and Television Reading Room in Washington, D.C.

Many of Cavett’s interviews with the famous and sometimes infamous were often filled with humor, startling revelations and high drama, including on-air altercations.  Collection highlights include:

  • A controversial confrontation between writers Gore Vidal and Norman Mailer about Mailer’s misogynistic tendencies and Vidal comparing him to Charles Manson;
  • The widow of Lee Harvey Oswald talks about her actions immediately after watching John F. Kennedy’s assassination on television;
  • A humorous conversation with Louis Armstrong reflecting on being in Chicago in the days of Al Capone; 
  • James Baldwin in a 1968 interview candidly talks about the negative perception of black activism and his view that integration is a euphemism for white superiority;
  • Mickey Mantle shares a startling personal secret about his teen years;
  • In a 1971 interview, John Lennon and Yoko Ono talk about their relationship and the Beatles;
  • Arthur Miller describes being blacklisted because of his protests against McCarthyism and the writing of “The Crucible”;
  • Lauren Bacall reveals her best-kept secret as a young star in Hollywood—her Jewish heritage;
  • The interview with Judy Collins, whose censored comments caused a firestorm;
  • Surrealist artist Salvador Dalí’s unorthodox appearance in 1970 with Lillian Gish and Satchel Paige.

A winner of three Emmy Awards, Cavett has been nominated for the award 11 times.  During his 35 years as a talk-show host, he has appeared on five different networks.  He was the host of the “Dick Cavett Show” on ABC from 1968 to 1975 and on public television from 1977 to 1982.  He also successfully hosted shows on CBS, USA and CNBC.  Cavett also hosted a series of programs on HBO and his compelling interviews were the inspiration for the PBS documentaries “Dick Cavett’s Watergate” (2014) and “Dick Cavett’s Vietnam” (2015).

Cavett is an accomplished actor and writer.  He appeared in a dozen feature films including “Beetlejuice” and “Forrest Gump.”  He wrote for Jack Paar’s and Johnny Carson’s late-night talk shows and authored four books, including the most recent “Talk Show: Confrontations, Pointed Commentary, and Off-Screen Secrets” (2010) and “Brief Encounters: Conversations, Magic Moments, and Assorted Hijinks” (2014). He has written an online opinion column for the New York Times since 2007 and for numerous other publications, including the New Yorker, TV Guide and Vanity Fair.

The Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation is a state-of-the-art facility funded as a gift to the nation by the Packard Humanities Institute. The Packard Campus is the site where the nation’s library acquires, preserves and provides access to the world’s largest and most comprehensive collection of motion pictures, television programs, radio broadcasts and sound recordings. The Packard Campus is home to more than 7 million collection items. It provides staff support for the Library of Congress National Film Preservation Board, the National Recording Preservation Board and the national registries for film and recorded sound.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

Brooklyn, NY—Brooklyn Public Library (BPL) today announced Tommy Pico as the 2017 Fiction & Poetry Prize recipient for IRL (Birds, LLC) and Richard Rothstein as the Nonfiction Prize recipient for The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America (Liveright Publishing) for the third annual Brooklyn Public Library Literary Prize presented by the Brooklyn Eagles, BPL’s young donor group.

Created in 2015, the Prize recognizes new works that reflect the Library’s mission to convene renowned writers, scholars, critics, and artists with members of the borough’s diverse community to discuss urgent social, political, and artistic issues that resonate with Brooklynites and the world at-large.

“With the Brooklyn Public Library Literary Prize, our dedicated librarians honor vital contributions to contemporary literature,” said BPL President and CEO Linda E. Johnson. “In dramatically different ways, Rothstein’s meticulously researched exposé and Tommy Pico’s gleefully honest poetry spark the kind of dialogue the Library strives to foster throughout the borough and beyond.”

Nominations for the 2017 prize were submitted by BPL librarians from across the system’s 60 branches, with 29 librarians participating in the Prize committee to select the long- and shortlists. BPL’s Director of Outreach Services Nick Higgins and Coordinator of School Outreach Amy Mikel joined an esteemed panel of prominent authors and cultural leaders that included Claudia Rankine, Chris Hayes, and Téa Obreht to select the prizewinners.

Rothstein and Pico will accept their awards, which come with a $5,000 prize, tomorrow at the Brooklyn Classic, the signature fundraising event of the Brooklyn Eagles. This year’s co-chairs for the Brooklyn Eagles’ nonfiction and fiction and poetry prize committees are Charles Duhigg, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and best-selling author of The Power of Habit and Smarter Faster Better, and Ashley Mihlebach, National Account Manager at HarperCollins.

“The Brooklyn Eagles are proud to honor the achievements of Richard Rothstein and Tommy Pico with the Brooklyn Public Library Literary Prize,” said Charles Duhigg, Nonfiction Prize Committee Co-Chair. "Their works embody many of the values the library holds most dear: debate and discussion, ideas that challenge us to think differently, and a belief that the right book can change the world."

About the Winners

In The Color of Law, Richard Rothstein, a leading authority on economic and housing policy, debunks the myth that American cities became segregated through individual prejudices, income inequality, or the actions of private institutions. Rothstein argues the laws and policy decisions passed by local, state, and federal government bodies led to officially segregated public housing and to the rapid decline of previously integrated neighborhoods. His powerful history sheds light on an untold story in America’s turbulent racial history that begins in the 1920s, and contextualizes its enduring legacy by pointing to outbursts of violence in Baltimore, Ferguson, and Minneapolis, among other cities.

“In these troubled times in which frightening white supremacist activities have been exposed, there is also a growing willingness by many to re-examine, with unprecedented frankness, the legacies of slavery and Jim Crow that determine the inequality we still experience today," said Rothstein. "I am personally gratified by the Brooklyn Public Library’s recognition of The Color of Law, but especially grateful for how such recognition contributes to this national re-examination.”

The Color of Law was selected by the Nonfiction jury that featured Chris Hayes (Emmy Award-winning MSNBC news anchor and New York Times bestselling author), Claudia Rankine (poet, National Book Award finalist, and MacArthur Fellow), Siri Hustvedt (Man Booker-longlisted novelist, essayist, and international lecturer on psychoanalysis and neuroscience), James Shapiro (award-winning Shakespeare scholar and Columbia University professor), Simon Critchley (moderator of The New York Times opinion series "The Stone" and philosophy professor at The New School for Social Research), and Amy Mikel (BPL Coordinator of School Outreach).

“We, as a society, are right now deep in what The Color of Law addresses, and Dr. Rothstein’s research gives people a context regarding the decisions that have been and continue to be made about policies that affect everyone in America,” said Claudia Rankine. “It’s about democracy—how it goes wrong, how it should be enacted—and the fact that this book is being championed by the library, one of our most democratic institutions, will allow more people to read it and be exposed to its arguments.”

Tommy Pico is a Brooklyn-based queer writer originally from the Viejas Indian reservation of the Kumeyaay nation. IRL is an extended poem, composed like a long text message, that draws from the epic tradition of A.R. Ammons, ancient Kumeyaay Bird Songs, and Beyoncé’s visual albums. It follows a reservation-born, queer 20-something from Brooklyn looking to understand and define his identity amidst the challenges of emerging adulthood, sexual discovery, social media and the digital age, and a keen awareness of how he is shaped by the legacy of the U.S.’ fraught relationship with Native American communities.

IRL is a dive into a character's indigenous religion, or rather its violent theft, and what he does to keep himself tethered to life in its absence,” said Pico. “Seeing it awarded a literature prize by a library is pretty cosmic. When I was young and bullied, libraries gave me books and books gave me a reason to want to keep going.” 

Pico was awarded the Fiction & Poetry prize by a jury that featured Téa Obreht (novelist, National Book Award finalist), Anderson Tepper (Vanity Fair editor and Brooklyn Book Festival international committee co-chair), Imbolo Mbue (novelist, winner of the 2017 PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction), Jack Halberstam (eminent queer theorist and Columbia University professor), and Nick Higgins (BPL Director of Outreach Services).

“Tommy Pico's IRL delights and surprises, defies categorization, and challenges our narrative and linguistic expectations,” said Téa Obreht. “It is, on every level, a remarkable achievement.”

About the Prize

The Brooklyn Public Library Literary Prize is supported by the Peck Stacpoole Foundation. Brooklyn Public Library is grateful to sponsors of the 2017 Brooklyn Classic: EvensonBest, Compass, Marvel Architects and the Tillary Hotel; and to food and beverage sponsors Sixpoint Brewery, New York Distilling Company, Colson Patisserie, Heights Chateau, and Tito’s Handmade Vodka.

The 2017 Brooklyn Public Library Literary Prize shortlists were comprised of Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann; Fear City: New York’s Fiscal Crisis and the Rise of Austerity Politics by Kim Phillips-Fein; and The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein in Nonfiction, and Exit West: A Novel by Mohsin Hamid; What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky: Stories by Lesley Nneka Arimah; and IRL by Tommy Pico in Fiction & Poetry.

p1btbsh8pa11igl821dkhfsq1o3q5.003.jpegA collection of 26 negatives containing rare never before seen photographs of John Lennon from February 1970 have been uncovered at The Beatles Story.

The negatives, which depict intimate portraits of the former Beatle, were bought to a ‘Memorabilia Day’ held at The Beatles Story on Wednesday (25th October), an event where members of the public were being offered free valuations from leading celebrity memorabilia experts Julien’s Auctions.

Darren Julien, President/CEO of Julien’s Auctions estimated that the collection could sell for over £10,000 at auction. He said: “It’s not often when you find images of John Lennon that have never before been seen by the public. These 26 images/negatives of John Lennon are a rare find”.

The owner of the negatives, who wishes to remain anonymous, told experts that the collection had been stored away in the family’s junk draw for around 34 years, and were presumed to have no value.

Many other items were discovered on the day, including a Beatles Christmas Show programme from 1963 signed by all four Beatles, valued at £8,000 and a signed postcard, valued at £5,000.

These join the letter found at last year’s event, written by John Lennon and addressed to The Queen, the document explains the singer’s reasons for returning his MBE and was valued by Julien’s at around £60,000.

The negatives, the John Lennon letter and many of the other items are to be consigned into an auction taking place at The Beatles Story next year, in October 2018. This will be the first Beatles auction to take place at the award-winning Liverpool attraction and will see around 100 Beatles and music-related items go under the hammer.

The collection of negatives will go onto temporary display within The Beatles Story’s main exhibition from Thursday 9th November 2017, for the public to view and enjoy before the auction.

For more information about The Beatles Story and to purchase tickets please visit: beatlesstory.com

 

Percier.jpgNew York—Charles Percier: Architecture and Design in an Age of Revolutions has been awarded the 2017 Alice Award. The book is edited by Jean-Philippe Garric, professor of history of architecture at the University of Paris I, Panthéon-Sorbonne and co-published by Bard Graduate Center Gallery, château de Fontainebleau, Réunion des musées nationaux-Grand Palais, and Yale University Press. 

The book, published in separate English and French editions, accompanied the exhibition of the same name that was on view at Bard Graduate Center Gallery in fall 2016 and at the château de Fontainebleau in spring 2017. Barbara Glauber, of the firm Heavy Meta, was the designer. 

The $25,000 annual Alice Award, inaugurated in 2013 and administered by Furthermore grants in publishing, a program of the J. M. Kaplan Fund, is given to a book that represents excellence in all aspects of the work, from idea to design to quality of production. Each book on the short list was also awarded $5,000. 

Joan K. Davidson in commenting on the award said: “The Alice was created to encourage in some way the efforts of the writers, editors, designers, publishers, and the cultural institutions who publish books that become works of art. The Alice hopes that praise from a distinguished jury, some public attention and modest grant money can help keep these extraordinary publications coming.” 

“To be named among the other distinguished books that were short-listed for this award is a wonderful tribute,” said Susan Weber, Bard Graduate Center founder and director. “I would like to thank Jean-Philippe Garric, our partners at the château de Fontainebleau and the Réunion des musées nationaux, as well as the Bard Graduate Center staff and catalogue production team who worked with the other outstanding scholars and designers to create this remarkable publication. I am honored that Charles Percier has been recognized by Furthermore and the J. M. Kaplan Fund with the Alice Award.” 

The fifth Alice Award will be presented at a ceremony at the Strand Book Store in New York City in November. To date, the award has contributed $125,000 to institutions in support of illustrated publications. 

2017 SHORTLISTED BOOKS 

Conflicts of Interest: Art and War in Modern Japan by Philip K. Hu and Rhiannon Paget. Co- published by the Saint Louis Art Museum and the University of Washington Press. 

Inventing Downtown: Artist-Run Galleries in New York City, 1952-1965 by Melissa Rachleff. Co- published by the Grey Art Gallery and DelMonico Books*Prestel. 

Robert Winthrop Chanler: Discovering the Fantastic edited by Gina Wouters and Andrea Gollin. Published by The Monacelli Press. 

THE 2017 ALICE JURY 

R.O. Blechman / Illustrator
Paula Cooper / Director, Paula Cooper Gallery
David Godine / Publisher
Jock Reynolds / Director, Yale University Art Gallery, Chair 

ABOUT BARD GRADUATE CENTER 

Bard Graduate Center is a graduate research institute in New York City devoted to the study of decorative arts, design history, and material culture through research, advanced degrees, exhibitions, publications, and public programs. Our community encourages creative investigation of objects, from the everyday to the esoteric. For more information about our MA and PhD degree programs, Gallery exhibitions, research initiatives, and public programs, visit www.bgc.bard.edu. 

 

The Letters About Literature program kicks off its 25th annual competition, run by the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress, with a special webinar for educators interested in learning more about the program and how to use it in a classroom on October 25, 2017 at 4 p.m. The program invites readers in grades four through 12 to share letters they have written to authors whose books affected them. For more information about the contest, including instructions for entering and deadlines for each state, and to register for the webinar, visit read.gov/letters

The contest challenges young readers to explore and express how books have changed their view of the world or of themselves. The initiative is designed to instill a lifelong love of reading in our nation’s youth and to engage and nurture their passion for literature. More than one million students have participated in the contest since it began.

A new book from Candlewick Press in association with the Library and edited by Catherine Gourly, titled “Journeys: Young Readers’ Letters to Authors Who Changed Their Lives,” collects 52 letters submitted to the program that contain insights as profound as they are personal. In one letter, Annie Schnitzer wrote Elie Wiesel, “Reading your story allowed me to connect with my own history,” explaining how reading his memoir deepened her understanding of her grandparents’ plight during the Holocaust. After reading “The House of Mango Street,” Julia Mueller wrote to Sandra Cisneros, “You didn’t tell me how to pull myself back together; you just showed me that I could. I was trying to be somebody else’s definition of beautiful, and you told me that was okay.” 

The letters in this collection offer a glimpse into young people’s lives and their powerful connections to the written word. Booklist calls “Journeys” “a wise pick for educational settings,” and Kirkus Reviews said “students’ letters reveal how deeply books and poetry affect the lives of young readers,” calling them “earnest and often revealing.”

Research has proven a strong link between reading and writing: children who read, write better and children who write, read more. It has also been shown that students benefit most from literacy instruction when they have a personal connection to their reading and writing activities. Letters About Literature was created to channel both those facts - providing an opportunity for students to read and write and challenging students to identify a personal connection with the books they read.  

“Journeys” is available in hardcover ($18.99), softcover ($9.99) and e-book ($9.99) editions. It is available at the Library of Congress Shop, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C., 20540-4985. Credit card orders are taken at (888) 682-3557 or loc.gov/shop/.

The Center for the Book in the Library of Congress promotes books, reading, literacy, and libraries, as well as the scholarly study of books. It was founded in 1977 and has established affiliate centers across the country and in the U.S. Virgin Islands. The Letters About Literature program is made possible by a generous grant from the Dollar General Literacy Foundation, with additional support from gifts to the Center for the Book. 

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

dean002.jpgAUSTIN, Texas—The Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin is now home to the Dean F. Echenberg War Poetry Collection. The collection was started in the early 1970s by Dean Echenberg, a flight surgeon during the Vietnam War who later became the director of disease control for the City of San Francisco during the first years of the AIDS crisis.

“The Dean Echenberg War Poetry Collection extends the Ransom Center’s holdings in significant ways,” said Stephen Enniss, director of the Ransom Center. “It reminds us that one of the persistent sources of art is in suffering.”

Throughout history numerous writers have tried to capture their experiences of war in language, often turning to poetry for its ability to convey intensity of feeling and for its authenticity. The common thread that runs through the collection is poetry by people who have experienced war, combatants and noncombatants alike. Included in the collection are printed and manuscript works by men and women from many countries and multiple languages and conflicts. The mix of poetry by both established and nonprofessional writers makes this a uniquely valuable collection for research into war literature.

Noteworthy items in the collection include poet Edmund Blunden’s manuscript for his prose account of his wartime experience “De Bello Germanico: A Fragment of Trench History” and the rare first printing of Robert Graves’ “Goodbye to all That.” Contemporary authors include Dunya Mikhail, Shelly Taylor and Kevin Powers, a graduate of UT Austin’s Michener Center for Writers.

The collection joins others at the Ransom Center related to the experience of war, including collections of World War I poets Edmund Blunden and Siegfried Sassoon, as well as the archives of critically acclaimed novelists such as Norman Mailer, Tim O’Brien and James Salter.

“I had explored various institutions, both here and abroad, as a final home for my war poetry collection,” Echenberg said. “None were the caliber of the Ransom Center, with its complementary holdings and an expressed interest in ensuring the future growth of the collection.”

It was while deployed with the F-100F Fast Forward Air Controllers (call sign “Misty”) that Dean Echenberg read and was moved by an English-language translation of Yevgeny Yevtushenko’s “Bratsk Station and Other New Poems” (1966). After the Vietnam War he sought other poetry inspired by first-hand experiences of war. Initially he focused on the celebrated poets of the First World War, before expanding his scope to include the Second World War, and eventually all conflicts of all periods. The collection has grown to comprise more than 6,500 volumes.  

“War poetry is a constant genre in all countries of the world and has been produced during all conflicts from the earliest times to the present,” Echenberg said. “Over the years, the collection has had a life of its own.” Read the Ransom Center's interview with Echenberg.

Once cataloged, the collection will be available for research and teaching.

Image: Dean Echenberg during his service in Vietnam.

Jarry large images.jpgNEW YORK, NY—The Morgan Library & Museum announced today the acquisition of one of the most important private collections of material related to the life and work of avant-garde French writer Alfred Jarry (1873-1907). Assembled by Dr. Robert J. Stillman and Dr. Linda Klieger Stillman, of Potomac, Maryland, the gift totals some three hundred items, including books, magazines, correspondence, musical scores, and ephemera, encompassing every significant appearance of Jarry in print, as well as modern and contemporary publications that reflect his ongoing legacy.                                              

The formal name of the gift is the Robert J. and Linda Klieger Stillman Pataphysics Collection.

Jarry was a ground-breaking pioneer of the early modernist movements of the turn of the twentieth century. His unusual works traversed literature, art, theatre, journalism, and book design. He is best known for the play Ubu Roi (1896) and for his invention of the set of ideas he termed “Pataphysics”—loosely defined as “the science of imaginary solutions.” Jarry’s work would influence such art movements as Dada, Surrealism, and Futurism. 

“The Morgan Library & Museum is honored that Robert and Linda Stillman have chosen to donate this extraordinary collection to us,” said Colin B. Bailey, director of the museum. “Alfred Jarry’s short life had enormous consequences for art of the twentieth century and, indeed, up to the present day. We look forward to organizing an exhibition of these exceptional pieces and to producing a catalog to help foster ongoing scholarship of the artist’s work.”

Included among the many highlights are first editions of Jarry’s rare books, several of which are inscribed to his contemporaries, such as Minutes de sable mémorial (1894) and César Antechrist (1895); the first publication of Ubu Roi as it appeared in the avant-garde magazine Livre d’Art; the author’s corrected proofs for Ubu enchaîné; and the two editions of the Almanach du Père Ubu, illustrated by Pierre Bonnard. Other noted artists represented in the collection include George Rouault and Joan Miró. 

The collection has two important letters from Jarry to his closest friend, Rachilde, one of which is well-known to scholars as “The Testament of Père Ubu,” signed with his character’s name, and previously belonging to Tristan Tzara, founder of the Dada movement.

The Stillman donation also includes extremely rare copies of Jarry’s own artistic magazines L’Ymagier, co-edited by Remy de Gourmont, and Perhinderion. Many other important avant-garde magazines of the day are represented, such as La Revue Blanche, La Plume, Soirées de Paris, and Le festin d’Ésope, edited by Apollinaire. Along with publications from Jarry’s time are hundreds of journals and artists’ books associated with the Collège de ‘Pataphysique and its affiliated societies all over the world, which have furthered Jarry’s eccentric work and ideas.

In addition, the Stillmans have collected visual art contextualizing Jarry and Pataphysics. These pieces include original Jarry woodcuts, a rare photograph of Jarry in his fencing studio plus other original photos, and works by such modern artists as Joan Miró, Thomas Chimes, and William Kentridge. This parallel collection will be loaned to The Morgan Library & Museum for the special exhibition.

“The Morgan Library & Museum epitomizes the ideal venue to house our collection,” wrote the Stillmans, in a statement regarding their gift. “Our primary objective in assembling this unique material was to make it available to researchers and to the public, which aligns with the mission of the museum.

“We look forward to a mutual focus on scholarship, creativity, access and transparency; we value the Morgan’s stewardship and accountability. The institution excels in curating, conservation, cataloguing, digitization, education, display, and exhibitions. We are delighted that the professional staff and the Board of Trustees have enthusiastically welcomed the collection. Global interest in Pataphysics and the Pataphysics of the future assures ongoing engagement with the collection. We are honored to collaborate with the Morgan, and we deeply appreciate the connection we have had made with its extraordinary leadership.”

Dr. Linda Klieger Stillman holds a Ph.D. from Georgetown University’s School of Languages and Linguistics. She is a leading international authority on Pataphysics and a longtime member of the Collège de ‘Pataphysique. She has devoted several decades to the study of Jarry and his legacy, and is the author of a number of books and scholarly articles, including a critical biography. Dr. Stillman has also organized international symposia on Jarry and Pataphysics. Dr. Robert Stillman received his medical degree from Georgetown University, is a notable physician in the Washington, DC area, and is currently director emeritus of the Shady Grove Fertility Center with national and international facilities. He is also a clinical professor of endocrinology at Georgetown.

Image: Alfred Jarry (1873-1907), Ubu roi. Paris: Mercure de France, 1896. The Robert J. and Linda Klieger Stillman Pataphysics Collection.

ishigurok_uncat_orphans_001_300dpi-copy_0.jpgThe Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin holds the archive of novelist Kazuo Ishiguro, the recent recipient of the Nobel Prize in literature for 2017.

Ishiguro was recognized by the Swedish Academy that awards the prize as a writer “who, in novels of great emotional force, has uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense of connection with the world.”

Ishiguro joins other Nobel laureates represented in the Ransom Center’s collections including Samuel Beckett, Pearl Buck, J.M. Coetzee, T.S. Eliot, William Faulkner, Gabriel García Márquez, Ernest Hemingway, Doris Lessing, George Bernard Shaw, Isaac Bashevis Singer, John Steinbeck and W.B. Yeats.

“It is one thing for the Ransom Center to collect the papers of Nobel laureates and another thing entirely to collect the papers of future Nobel laureates,” said Stephen Enniss, director of the Ransom Center.  

Acquired in 2015 with the support of then-university President Bill Powers and then-Provost Gregory L. Fenves, the archive provides a meticulous record of Ishiguro’s writing projects, including his seven published novels. Ishiguro kept his notes and multiple drafts for each of his novels.

Prior to the archive’s arrival at the Ransom Center, Ishiguro spent months organizing the materials and making substantial explanatory comments, including a document he titled “HOW I WRITE,” which reveals his drafting process, and page-long documents titled “ARCHIVE NOTES.” These notes elaborate on materials in the archive, ranging from Ishiguro’s one attempt to keep a diary to two early unpublished novels. Throughout the collection are notes with Ishiguro’s annotations, providing a further commentary from the author about his papers and his career.

“The papers offer a deeply intimate glimpse of Ishiguro’s creative process and his struggle to fashion each of his critically acclaimed novels. Rarely does an archive dramatize so fully the play of memory and its ties to the novelist’s art,” Enniss said.

The collection is already accessed frequently by international scholars, students and faculty members, including Fenves (now UT Austin’s president), who led a session on Ishiguro’s “Never Let Me Go” with incoming first-year students in fall 2015. Fenves engaged students in a discussion about the book’s themes while exploring Ishiguro’s papers.

“I am so pleased that Kazuo Ishiguro has won the Nobel Prize in literature,” Fenves said. “His archive is a source of tremendous inspiration for our students and scholars. He has a gift for crafting narratives that are at once haunting, imaginative and emotionally vital. He is one of the great authors living today.”

A selection of materials from Ishiguro’s archive, including early items that showcase how Ishiguro found his voice and developed into a writer, are on view in the Ransom Center’s galleries through Oct. 31.

Image: Kazuo Ishiguro's chapter 1 plan for "When We Were Orphans." Courtesy of Harry Ransom Center

Minnesota Center for Book Arts is pleased to announce the recipients of Series XIV of the MCBA/Jerome Foundation Book Arts Fellowships:

  • Cathy Ryan, printmaker and book artist
  • Ioana Stoian, artist
  • Peng Wu, paper maker and social practice artist, and Jammo Xu, installation artist

Three jurors, reflecting diverse perspectives and considerable expertise, reviewed the 18 applications received. They were: Kent Aldrich, master printer and proprietor of Nomadic Press in St. Paul; Christina Chang, independent curator; and Jody Williams, book artist and past MCBA/Jerome Book Arts Fellowship recipient. All were excited by the general quality of the applications received. After several hours of careful deliberation and discussion, they made a final selection of four participants.

Fellowship recipients will receive project funding, studio and equipment use, artistic support from MCBA staff and artists, as well as a one-year MCBA membership. Recipients have one year to complete the proposed work, which will be exhibited at MCBA in the fall of 2018..

Recipients will also give public presentations relating to their work on February 13, 2018 at 6pm in MCBA’s studios.

 

_pjs2056.jpgAUSTIN, Texas — The archive of award-winning author Michael Ondaatje has been acquired by the Harry Ransom Center, a humanities research library and museum at The University of Texas at Austin. Ondaatje, author of the Booker Prize-winning novel “The English Patient,” is widely regarded as one of the finest English-language novelists writing today. 

Ondaatje’s archive, which fills more than 90 boxes, documents in great detail his working methods.  Present are research notes containing background detail on the places where his fiction is set. He composed his novels in dozens of handwritten notebooks often resembling scrapbooks, with found images inserted among the manuscript pages. Also present are audio recordings of Ondaatje dictating his difficult handwriting to a typist, and, finally, heavily annotated printed drafts. These materials will give students and scholars a glimpse of his writing process from the 1960s to the present, and the archive will serve as the primary resource for all future studies of Ondaatje’s work. 

“Displaced by history, the inhabitants of Michael Ondaatje’s novels often find their most stable home in language,” said Stephen Enniss, director of the Ransom Center. “He is a master stylist in both poetry and prose, and we are honored to add his work to the Ransom Center’s collections, which include many of our finest contemporary writers.” 

Born in Sri Lanka, formerly Ceylon, in 1943, Ondaatje immigrated to England in 1954 and moved to Canada when he was 18. He has said of himself, “I am a mongrel of place. Of race. Of cultures. Of many genres.”

During a career spanning more than 50 years, he has written fiction, poetry, short stories and a memoir. He began his career as a poet but is best known as the author of the 1992 novel “The English Patient,” which was made into a critically acclaimed motion picture. He followed that success with “Anil’s Ghost” (2000), “Divisadero” (2007) and “The Cat’s Table” (2011), each of which is represented in the archive with extensive manuscript drafts. Also present are drafts for each of his poetry collections including “The Collected Works of Billy the Kid” (1970), “Secular Love” (1984), “The Cinnamon Peeler” (1990) and “Handwriting” (1998). 

In addition to materials documenting the genesis of his writings, the archive also contains abundant correspondence demonstrating Ondaatje’s centrality to the literary and cultural communities of Canada and the broader world during more than 50 years.

At the Ransom Center, the archive joins those of several correspondents documented in the Ondaatje papers, including Russell Banks, J. M. Coetzee, Don DeLillo, Kazuo Ishiguro, Jayne Anne Phillips and James Salter. There is also extensive correspondence between Ondaatje and such friends and fellow authors as Margaret Atwood, John Berger, Carolyn Forché, Joan Didion, Richard Ford, Carlos Fuentes, Victoria Glendinning, Jim Harrison, Hanif Kureishi, W. S. Merwin, Alice Munro, Sharon Olds, Salman Rushdie, Elizabeth Smart and Graham Swift.

Correspondence and documentation relating to the development of the Academy Award-winning film adaptation of “The English Patient” includes a rich and lengthy correspondence between Ondaatje and the film’s director and screenwriter Anthony Minghella, and letters from actors Juliette Binoche, Willem Dafoe, Ralph Fiennes and Kristin Scott Thomas.

Other materials include scripts, plays, poetry manuscripts, address books, calendars, photographs, speeches, talks, audio and video recordings, rare Canadian literary journals and research materials.

The archive is an essential source for scholars interested in understanding the development of the creative works of the author. The archive will be available for research and teaching once processed and cataloged.

Image: Notebooks containing the first draft of Michael Ondaatje's novel "The English Patient," 1988. Photos by Pete Smith.

SAN MARINO, Calif.—Sandra Ludig Brooke, Librarian of the Marquand Library of Art and Archaeology at Princeton University, has been named the Avery Director of the Library at The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens, The Huntington’s Interim President, Steve Hindle, announced today. She joins the staff in early January 2018.

“It is with enormous enthusiasm that we bring Sandra on board to lead the Library division at this transformative time,” said Hindle. “Libraries—including significant rare book and manuscript libraries like The Huntington—are undergoing spectacular shifts in the way that they function, underscored by the rapid changes in technology. Tremendous opportunities lie ahead for making our collections more discoverable, and more relevant, than ever before, and we look forward to Sandra and her very capable team leading the way forward.”

Brooke succeeds David Zeidberg, who has served as director for the past 21 years.

“This is an auspicious moment for research libraries,” said Brooke. “Rare book and manuscript collections are astonishingly nuanced embodiments of the cultures that created them. Today, digital technologies offer myriad ways to magnify the impact of these rare and precious materials—to enhance their discovery and make new kinds of scholarly inquiry possible. It’s an exhilarating time, and I look forward to being a part of it at The Huntington.”

For the past 10 years, Brooke has overseen the Marquand Library’s staff and collections. The Library is one of the oldest and most extensive art libraries in the United States, attracting more than 150,000 visitors each year. Its collection comprises a full range of library materials to support research in art and architecture, the decorative arts, photography, and archaeology from prehistory to the present. She previously was head of collection development at the Williams College Libraries and an editor for the J. Paul Getty Trust’s Bibliography of the History of Art, and has done curatorial and museum education work at the Yale Center for British Art and the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute. She holds B.A. and M.A. degrees in art history from Northwestern University and Williams College, respectively, and did graduate work in the history of art at Yale University where her principal research was in 18th and 19th century British art. She also holds a master’s degree in library science from the State University of New York at Albany.

At The Huntington, she will be responsible for a staff of more than 70 and a world-renowned collection of some 9 million rare books and manuscripts covering, principally, British and American history, literature, art, and the history of science, stretching from the 11th century to the present. Among the collections are 7 million manuscripts, 420,000 rare books, 275,000 reference books, and 1.3 million photographs, prints, and ephemera.

She will serve as one of 10 members of the Huntington’s senior staff, reporting to the President. Central to the Library’s mission is its work with scholars; some 1,700 or so access the collections each year conducting advanced research in the humanities. The Library also is responsible for a Main Exhibition Hall, showcasing some of the most significant rare books and manuscripts in the collection; for the Dibner Hall of the History of Science, a permanent exhibition on astronomy, natural history, medicine, and light; and a temporary exhibition space which most recently displayed an acclaimed exhibition on the work of science fiction author Octavia E. Butler.

Among the Library’s most iconic holdings are the Ellesmere manuscript of Chaucer’s Canterbury Tales (ca. 1400-1405); one of 12 vellum copies of the Gutenberg Bible known to exist (ca. 1455); quarto and folio editions of Shakespeare’s plays, some of which were printed during the writer’s lifetime; the monumental Birds of America by John J. Audubon; and the original manuscript of Benjamin Franklin’s autobiography. Newer holdings include manuscript collections from writers Charles Bukowski, Octavia E. Butler, Jack London, and Hilary Mantel.

 

The ABAA is pleased to announce the winners of the 2017 National Collegiate Book Collecting Competition

1st Place  

Alexander M. Koch, The Breath and Breadth of the Maine Woods

Unity College

2nd Place 

Mark Gallagher, A New Spirit of Truth: The Writings of the American Transcendentalists

UCLA 

3rd Place 

Xavier González, “Books That Count”  Books and DVDs Calculated to Inspire Children and Young Adults to Explore the Wonderful World of  Mathematics 

Harvard University

Essay Winner

Sarah Linton, “THE FICTION WE HAVE BECOME” William Gibson’s Uncertain Future and the Cyberpunk Revolution

Johns Hopkins University 

The judges were very impressed with the submitted collections and wish to thank all who participated.  The Awards Ceremony will take place at the Library of Congress, James Madison Building, Montpelier Room on Friday, October 20th at 5:30pm. The event is free and open to public. 

The National Collegiate Book Collecting Contest was establishing in 2005 by Fine Books & Collections magazine to recognize outstanding book collecting efforts by college and university students, the program aims to encourage young collectors to become accomplished bibliophiles. 

The contest is now administered jointly by the Antiquarian Booksellers' Association of America (ABAA), the Fellowship of American Bibliophilic Societies (FABS), the Grolier Club, and the Center for the Book and the Rare Books and Special Collections Division (the Library of Congress), with major support from the Jay I. Kislak Foundation.

Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, one of the nation's leading auction houses, will expand its regional reach to Atlanta, Georgia. With headquarters in Chicago, this will be the firm's eighth location in addition to Denver, Milwaukee, Naples, Palm Beach, Scottsdale and St. Louis. 

Mary Calhoun has been hired as director of business development for the location. Calhoun is a civic leader who sits on the board of numerous local organizations and helps to coordinate some of their largest annual events. These organizations include the Atlanta Opera, the Trust for Public Land, Atlanta History Center, Cherokee Garden Library and Cherokee Garden Club.

Calhoun spent seven years at Sotheby's New York in a number of business development and marketing roles. Notably, she oversaw marketing initiatives for the Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and Duke and Duchess of Windsor collections.

"I'm thrilled to bring my years of experience to Leslie Hindman Auctioneers as the firm grows in Atlanta," said Mary Calhoun. "With the recent hiring of Michael Shapiro, former Director at the High Museum of Art, I'm excited to help bring the exceptional service and reach of an international auction firm to Atlanta." 

Regarding Leslie Hindman Auctioneers' expansion into Atlanta, Michael Shapiro, who joined the firm as a Senior Advisor, said, "Leslie has created one of America's leading auction houses, and I look forward to helping Leslie Hindman Auctioneers continue to flourish."

At Sotheby's Calhoun worked closely with management teams, specialists in numerous categories and all areas of client service. She received her Bachelor of Arts in Classical Languages from Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio. 

"We plan on making Atlanta a major auction center," said Leslie Hindman, founder and CEO of Leslie Hindman Auctioneers. "We are delighted that Michael Shapiro and Mary Calhoun will lead our efforts in building a hub for the entire Southeast."

Leslie Hindman Auctioneers is a globally recognized brand with eight national offices and over 60 auctions conducted annually in collecting categories such as fine jewelry and timepieces, contemporary art, 20th century design, rare books, furniture, decorative arts and more. They work with buyers and sellers across the globe, connecting with millions of collectors through each auction conducted. For more information, please contact Jim Sharp at (312) 280-1212.

About Leslie Hindman Auctioneers

Leslie Hindman Auctioneers is among the leading fine art auction houses of the world and one of the largest in the country. As a globally recognized brand, Leslie Hindman Auctioneers conducts over 60 auctions annually in categories such as fine jewelry and timepieces, contemporary art, modern design, rare books, furniture, decorative arts and more. The firm has salerooms and business offices in Atlanta, Chicago, Denver, Milwaukee, Naples, Palm Beach, Scottsdale and St. Louis but connects with millions of collectors worldwide through online resources and global listings. The firm is also a founding partner of Bidsquare, a live auction platform formed by six leading auction houses, and owns a proprietary online bidding platform, LHLive, as well as LHExchange, an e-commerce site specializing in high-end designer furniture and decorative arts. Visit www.lesliehindman.com for more information.

LONG ISLAND CITY, NY - On September 21, Artbook @ MoMA PS1 opens the doors to a larger, newly designed location on the first floor of the museum, featuring dedicated space for programming organized in collaboration with MoMA PS1.

Coinciding with the New York Art Book Fair, September 21-24, 2017, the space's opening events include signings with Christian Wassmann, Debi Cornwall, Katherine Bernhardt and Sascha Braunig, and magazine issue launches with BOMB and OSMOS. Artbook @ MoMA PS1 is also proud to host a celebration for the new facsimile of Depero’s Bolted Book published by Designers and Books. For a complete, up-to-date event schedule, please visit us online at www.artbook.com/momaps1.

Also during the fair, internationally recognized artist’s book maker Jan Voss will be the featured artist hosted by the new Artbook Atelier within the space. A unique print shop, the Artbook Atelier will commission artists to design “unlimited” limited editions that will be produced "on-site and on-demand" for finite periods of time. Customers will be able to request commissioned prints by the yard on a variety of papers. Each edition will be printed on demand for one year, after which Artbook Atelier will declare and cap the edition size.

As part of MoMA PS1 and the community, Artbook has a special bond with Greater New York and Long Island City in particular, and continues to welcome neighborhood residents and families. Ongoing programs developed with the museum's curatorial team will make Artbook @ MoMA PS1 a hub for the community.

In the fall, Artbook @ MoMA PS1 opens its new children's book area, where kids will have a space of their own to play and discover new and classic children's titles. A cozy maze of low shelves housing a world of books recognizable to children as their own, this space will become an ongoing focal point of the new store. An adjacent area with comfortable seating will be filled with lush greenery provided by The Sill, a plant shop on the Lower East Side of Manhattan.

In the winter, Artbook @ MoMA PS1 will unveil another new section: a world-class selection of rare art and photography books that will complement its acclaimed offering of titles on contemporary art, theory, and visual culture. Continuing our decade-long partnership with the museum, we will continue to stock titles from publishers large and small, and from imprints based locally as well as internationally.

As visitors return to Artbook over the months and years to come, they will discover that the space looks a little bit different each time. In fact, Artbook @ MoMA PS1 has been specially designed to encourage fluidity in its layout, enabling this dynamic environment to accommodate different kinds of events, panel discussions, workshops, and experimental programming. With its carefully-conceived, flexible configuration, the new space embraces and supports MoMA PS1’s mission to serve as a catalyst and an advocate for new ideas, discourses, and trends in contemporary art.

Both a world-class art bookstore and an inviting public space for museum programs, Artbook @ MoMA PS1 welcomes international, American, and local visitors; artists as well as students; and readers steeped in art theory alongside people coming to contemporary art for the first time.

"We are thrilled to be partnering not only with the curatorial team at MoMA PS1 but also with the Long Island City community, Greater New York City, and local artists," says founder Skuta Helgason. "We look forward to becoming a hub for book-focused events, artist-centered programs, and community partnerships. It makes our day when we see someone browsing the shelves and discovering an artist for the first time."

“It is so important to give books, their covers, and their content a physical and visual presence in a space beyond the internet. Once a year, MoMA PS1 is completely filled with books for the New York Art Book Fair, but with the newly expanded book space, Artbook @ MoMA PS1, we can offer a dedicated home for books and related programs throughout the year,” added Klaus Biesenbach, Director of MoMA PS1 and Chief Curator at Large at the Museum of Modern Art. “Visitors can browse and experience this environment of inspiration, discovery, surprise, and discussion, looking over the surfaces of books displayed generously like a landscape, open them and go deeper into their content, and even participate in programs—which is more than what is possible at any other space in New York City. We are filling an urgent need in the creative community.”

ABOUT ARTBOOK

Artbook LLC is a wholly-owned subsidiary of D.A.P. / Distributed Art Publishers, Inc., the world's largest distributor of books and museum catalogs on art, photography, architecture, and design. In addition to the bookstore at MoMA PS1, Artbook also runs the acclaimed magazine store in the entry Kiosk to the museum on Jackson Avenue.

Other Artbook store locations include:

  • Artbook @ Hauser Wirth, Los Angeles, CA
  • Artbook @ Walker, Minneapolis, MN

And art fairs:

  • Artbook @ Art Basel Miami Beach, Miami, FL
  • Artbook @ Design Miami, Miami, FL
  • Artbook @ Frieze NY, New York, NY
  • Artbook @ New York Art Book Fair, New York, NY
  • Artbook @ The LA Art Book Fair, Los Angeles, CA

Online, artbook.com offers an ever-expanding selection of art, photography, architecture, and design titles from world-class museums and galleries, international imprints, and small presses.

MS. Sansk_d.14_16v copy.jpgOXFORD, 14 September 2017 - The origin of the symbol zero has long been one of the world’s greatest mathematical mysteries. Today, new carbon dating research commissioned by the University of Oxford’s Bodleian Libraries into the ancient Indian Bakhshali manuscript, held at the Bodleian, has revealed it to be hundreds of years older than initially thought, making it the world’s oldest recorded origin of the zero symbol that we use today.

The surprising results of the first ever radiocarbon dating conducted on the Bakhshali manuscript, a seminal mathematical text which contains hundreds of zeroes, reveal that it dates from as early as the 3rd or 4th century - approximately five centuries older than scholars previously believed. This means that the manuscript in fact predates a 9th century inscription of zero on the wall of a temple in Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh, which was previously considered to be the oldest recorded example of a zero used as a placeholder in India. The findings are highly significant for the study of the early history of mathematics.

The zero symbol that we use today evolved from a dot that was used in ancient India and can be seen throughout the Bakhshali manuscript. The dot was originally used as a ‘placeholder’, meaning it was used to indicate orders of magnitude in a number system - for example, denoting 10s, 100s and 1000s.

While the use of zero as a placeholder was seen in several different ancient cultures, such as among the ancient Mayans and Babylonians, the symbol in the Bakhshali manuscript is particularly significant for two reasons. Firstly, it is this dot that evolved to have a hollow centre and became the symbol that we use as zero today. Secondly, it was only in India that this zero developed into a number in its own right, hence creating the concept and the number zero that we understand today - this happened in 628 AD, just a few centuries after the Bakhshali manuscript was produced, when the Indian astronomer and mathematician Brahmagupta wrote a text called Brahmasphutasiddhanta, which is the first document to discuss zero as a number.

Although the Bakhshali manuscript is widely acknowledged as the oldest Indian mathematical text, the exact age of the manuscript has long been the subject of academic debate. The most authoritative academic study on the manuscript, conducted by Japanese scholar Dr Hayashi Takao, asserted that it probably dated from between the 8th and the 12th century, based on factors such as the style of writing and the literary and mathematical content. The new carbon dating reveals that the reason why it was previously so difficult for scholars to pinpoint the Bakhshali manuscript’s date is because the manuscript, which consists of 70 fragile leaves of birch bark, is in fact composed of material from at least three different periods.

Marcus du Sautoy, Professor of Mathematics at the University of Oxford, said:

‘Today we take it for granted that the concept of zero is used across the globe and is a key building block of the digital world. But the creation of zero as a number in its own right, which evolved from the placeholder dot symbol found in the Bakhshali manuscript, was one of the greatest breakthroughs in the history of mathematics.

‘We now know that it was as early as the 3rd century that mathematicians in India planted the seed of the idea that would later become so fundamental to the modern world. The findings show how vibrant mathematics have been in the Indian sub-continent for centuries.’

 Richard Ovenden, Bodley’s Librarian, said:

‘Determining the date of the Bakhshali manuscript is of vital importance to the history of mathematics and the study of early South Asian culture and these surprising research results testify to the subcontinent’s rich and longstanding scientific tradition. The project is an excellent example of the cutting-edge research conducted by the Bodleian’s Heritage Science team, together with colleagues across Oxford University, which uncovers new information about the treasures in our collections to help inform scholarship across disciplines.’ 

The Bakhshali manuscript was found in 1881, buried in a field in a village called Bakhshali, near Peshawar, in what is now a region of Pakistan. It was found by a local farmer and was acquired by the Indologist AFR Hoernle, who presented it to the Bodleian Library in 1902, where it has been kept since.

An academic paper about the results, conducted at the Oxford Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit, is currently being prepared for publication. A short video about the research results can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pV_gXGTuWxY&feature=youtu.be 

A folio from the Bakhshali manuscript will go on public display at the Science Museum in London as a centrepiece of the major exhibition Illuminating India: 5000 Years of Science and Innovation, opening 4 October 2017. The exhibition will celebrate India’s central role in the history of science and technology by exploring its influential contributions to subjects as diverse as space exploration, mathematics, communication and engineering.

Image: Carbon dating has revealed that folio 16 from the 70-page Bakhshali manuscript dates from 224-383 AD. This is therefore one of the earliest known examples of the use of zero (written as a dot) used as a placeholder, i.e. the use of zero to indicate orders of magnitude in a number system.

mostyn-add-ms-89250-f052r copy.jpgA rare and beautiful Psalter - a volume of psalms - produced in thirteenth-century London has been acquired by the British Library. The Mostyn Psalter-Hours was acquired for the nation with a grant of £390,000 from the National Heritage Memorial Fund (NHMF) and funding from other generous supporters.

The book includes a calendar, decorated with twenty miniatures of the labours of the months and the signs of the Zodiac, and a Psalter with eight of the original ten large historiated initials, the Hours of the Virgin, and the Office of the Dead.

The manuscript can be identified securely as having been produced in London, and is one of relatively few surviving examples of luxury books known to have been made in the capital during the medieval period. Its calendar features a sequence of London saints - including the seventh-century bishops of London, Melitus and Erkenwald - and the feast of the translation of Edward the Confessor in Westminster in 1269. 

The manuscript’s original patron is unknown, but its high quality illumination - where text sits alongside highly decorative letters and illustrations - indicates that it was made for an important individual - possibly a bishop, as an image of a bishop appears in the illustration for Psalm 101, which is where a donor portrait might be expected.     

“The Mostyn Psalter-Hours is an outstanding example of English illumination of the highest quality and represents a crucial piece of evidence for the history of English painting,” said Kathleen Doyle, Lead Curator, Illuminated Manuscripts at the British Library. “Because the manuscript is localised to London, it is a critical focus around which to group other manuscripts - of Psalter texts and others - in a Westminster/London context, and to compare with books made in other centres. The addition of the Mostyn Psalter to the British Library’s collections will facilitate identification of London-based scribes and artists in other manuscripts. Similarly, the representation of the possible patron within the book will also help shed light on the process of creating such luxury books.”

The purchase price of the manuscript was £775,000 and was supported by a contribution of £390,000 from the National Heritage Memorial Fund, along with support from the Art Fund, Sir Siegmund Warburg’s Voluntary Settlement, the late Bernard Breslauer, the Friends of the British Library, and the Friends of the National Libraries.

John Glen, Minister for Arts, Heritage and Tourism said: “This important thirteenth-century manuscript was produced in London so it is fitting that it will now go on display at the British Library. I am pleased that this rare work has been saved for the nation through a generous donation from the National Heritage Memorial Fund and that the manuscript will be digitised and available for all to enjoy.”

Sir Peter Luff, Chair of NHMF, said: “The Mostyn Psalter-Hours is quite simply exquisite. What makes it particularly special is that we are able to trace its production back to thirteenth-century London and with just a few luxury books produced in the capital during this period still remaining, it’s a rare survival. The National Heritage Memorial Fund was set-up to save the UK’s most precious heritage at risk and so we felt it imperative this treasure should be safeguarded for future generations to study and enjoy.”

“We are hugely grateful to the NHMF and for the generous support of all the other funders, for making this important acquisition possible,” said Scot McKendrick, Head of Western Heritage Collections. “The British Library holds the world’s largest collection of medieval English Psalters and current and future generations of scholars will be able to study the Mostyn Psalter-Hours alongside other notable examples from the period.”

The manuscript has been digitised and is available to view on the Library’s Digitised Manuscripts website. It will also be placed on display in the Library’s Sir John Ritblat Treasures gallery (which is open seven days a week), after which it will be available to scholars in the Library’s Manuscripts Reading Room.

Image: lluminated page from the Mostyn Psalter-Hours (Add MS 89250 folio 52r).

Speke title MR copy.jpgThe National Library of Scotland and Bernard Quaritch Limited today announced the Library’s acquisition of one of only twelve family copies of John Hanning Speke’s What Led to the Discovery of the Source of the Nile, which includes an additional eight-page supplement, describing Speke’s announcement of his discovery of the source of the Nile to the Royal Geographical Society, as well as details of his feud with Sir Richard Burton - pages which were suppressed from the trade edition at the behest of Speke’s family and his publisher, Blackwood’s. 

Speke and Burton’s dispute stemmed from their first joint expedition to Africa in 1854-1855, and continued to blight their second expedition in 1856-1859. During their second expedition they located Lake Tanganika, and Speke, leading a subsidiary party, discovered Ukerewe Lake on 3 August 1858, which he named the Victoria Nyanza. As Speke’s biographer Alexander Maitland wrote, it was ‘in this moment [...] that the inspiration struck him, so clearly henceforward he could never be in any doubt, that here, stretching out before him, was the lake which formed the great reservoir of the White Nile’. 

Burton disagreed with Speke’s hypothesis, but Speke travelled back to England before him and lectured to the Royal Geographical Society on the expedition’s discoveries and his (correct) conviction that he had identified the source of the Nile, before publishing an account of the expedition in Blackwood’s Magazine. In his final expedition (1860-1863), Speke was able to confirm that the Victoria Nyanza was the source of the Nile, and he returned to England in 1863 to a rapturous reception. Later in the year he published his Journal of the Discovery of the Source of the Nile and then in 1864 What Led to the Discovery of the Source of the Nile, his final work, which was based on his notes from the two earlier expeditions, and was intended to provide a context to his discovery while also presenting his arguments against Burton. 

For nearly 150 years after its publication Speke’s final work, published just weeks before his death, held a secret known to very few and unremarked in print: an eight-page supplement, which he called the ‘Tail’, with a description of his first public announcement to the RGS on the source of the Nile and further details on his feud with Burton. Speke had originally wanted to include the ‘Tail’ in his book, but pressure from his family and his friend and publisher John Blackwood led Speke to agree to suppress it. By way of a compromise, Blackwood’s printed twelve extra copies for the author to distribute to his family, which included the additional material; of these twelve, only five are known to survive. 

The archive of William Blackwood & Sons is held by the National Library of Scotland, and Blackwood’s ledgers for the publication of the book document these twelve ‘Tail’ copies, which are also recorded in a letter from William Blackwood to Speke of 16 July 1864: Blackwood wrote to Speke that he would receive his copies of the book shortly, adding, ‘[i]n a short note I have to day from my Uncle John, he beg[s] of me, to drop you a line to be very cautious, & not let any of these copies be sent about beyond your family circle’. Until very recently the Library has only held a copy of the standard edition of What Led ..., but it has now acquired a ‘Tail’ copy from the antiquarian booksellers Bernard Quaritch Ltd, who were offering it on behalf of a private collector. 

This copy was inscribed by the author’s brother Benjamin Speke, presumably after John Hanning Speke’s death on 15 September 1864. Dr Graham Hogg, a rare books curator in the National Library of Scotland, said: ‘We are delighted to acquire this copy for our collections in view of the fact that the Blackwood’s archive provides the key to the history of this long-forgotten suppressed text, and we also hold correspondence between the Blackwoods and John and Benjamin Speke. Moreover, this example is, as far as we know, the only one of the five recorded copies to be held in any institution internationally and thus freely available to scholars’. Maitland, who drew heavily on the Blackwood’s archive when writing Speke, commented, ‘I can’t think of a better place than the National Library of Scotland for this book now’. 

Mark James of Bernard Quaritch Ltd added, ‘Quaritch is delighted to have facilitated the acquisition of this rare and remarkable volume by the Library, and its previous owner is very pleased that we have found a permanent home for it in such a suitable collection’. 

 

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced the winners of the 2017 Library of Congress Literacy Awards at the Library of Congress National Book Festival gala.

Three organizations received awards from Hayden and philanthropist David M. Rubenstein: the Children’s Literacy Initiative; the National Center for Families and Learning; and Pratham Books.

Originated by Rubenstein in 2013, the Literacy Awards honor organizations working to promote literacy and reading in the United States and worldwide. The awards recognize groups doing exemplary, innovative and replicable work, and they spotlight the need for the global community to unite in striving for universal literacy.

“Literacy is the first line of defense against so many problems—unemployment, hunger, poor health—and gives people a foundation for a brighter future,” Hayden said. “Through the generosity of David M. Rubenstein, the Library of Congress is proud to honor these exemplary organizations for their continued efforts to raise reading levels. Their work is moving and truly life-changing, and it is our privilege to recognize them here tonight.”

Prizes and Recipients

  • David M. Rubenstein Prize ($150,000): Children’s Literacy Initiative, Philadelphia

Children’s Literacy Initiative (CLI) works with pre-K through third-grade teachers to improve early literacy instruction so children become powerful readers, writers and thinkers. CLI creates a sustainable, school-wide culture of literacy that introduces students to the joys of reading, writing and lifelong learning. The organization coaches teachers one-on-one and in small groups in the classroom—providing demonstrations and feedback that help teachers incorporate effective literacy practices into their daily work with students. It stocks classrooms with learning materials and collections of high-quality children’s literature and extends its services with online professional development resources. CLI provides workshops and seminars to build a teacher’s knowledge of literacy content and pedagogy.

  • American Prize ($50,000): National Center for Families Learning, Louisville, Kentucky

Established in 1989 by its current president, Sharon Darling, the National Center for Families Learning (NCFL) works to eliminate poverty through educational solutions for families. Throughout its 28-year history, NCFL has changed the lives of millions of families across the country by providing literacy strategies, programming and resources. Engaging multiple generations together has been a fundamental and distinguishing aspect of NCFL’s work, because it knows this creates a stronger impact and greater success for families.

  • International Prize ($50,000): Pratham Books, Bangalore, India

Established with the mission of “a book in every child’s hand,” Pratham Books has helped millions of children have access to engaging, affordable, multilingual books. In order to scale the creation and distribution of multilingual content, Pratham Books launched StoryWeaver, India’s first open-source, digital repository of multilingual stories. All content on StoryWeaver is openly licensed. Users can read, download, print and share stories for free as well as use tools embedded on the platform to create and translate content into local languages.

The Library of Congress Literacy Awards program is also honoring 15 organizations for their implementation of best practices in literacy promotion. These organizations are:

  • The Asia Foundation, San Francisco
  • Canadian Women for Women in Afghanistan, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  • Center for Teaching and Learning, Edgecomb, Maine
  • Centre for Knowledge Assistance and Community Development, Hanoi, Vietnam
  • CODE, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • CommonLit Inc., Washington, D.C.
  • Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities/PRIME TIME, New Orleans
  • Reading Partners, Oakland, California
  • Reading Works Inc., Albuquerque, New Mexico
  • Sealaska Heritage Institute, Juneau, Alaska
  • Serve Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • State Library of Western Australia - Better Beginnings Family Literacy Program, Perth, Australia
  • Story Share Inc., Boston
  • Tales and Travel Memories, Elgin, Illinois
  • Yayasan Sulinama, Ambon, Maluku, Indonesia

Rubenstein is the co-founder and co-chief executive officer of The Carlyle Group. He is a major benefactor of the Library of Congress and the chairman of the Library’s lead donor group, the James Madison Council.

The Library of Congress Literacy Awards are administered by the Library’s Center for the Book, which was created in 1977 by Congress to “stimulate public interest in books and reading.” A public-private partnership, the center sponsors educational programs that reach readers of all ages, nationally and internationally. The center provides leadership for affiliated state centers for the book and nonprofit reading-promotion partners and plays a key role in the Library’s annual National Book Festival.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

student_poets_2017_pr_486x506.jpgThe Library of Congress today announced the winners of its A Book That Shaped Me: Letters About Literature Summer Writing Contest, a program that asks rising fifth- and sixth-graders to reflect on a book that has made a personal impact in their lives.

More than 300 young readers submitted essays to participating public libraries in the Mid-Atlantic region in this sixth year of the contest. Launched in 2012 with the DC Public Library, "A Book That Shaped Me" expanded with the help of public libraries in Washington, D.C., Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. The local libraries offered the contest as part of their summer-reading programs.

Five finalists per state were chosen in an initial round of judging. The finalists each will receive a $50 gift-card prize.

Judging was conducted by members of the American Association of School Librarians (AASL), a division of the American Library Association (ALA). The AASL works to ensure all elementary- and secondary-school librarians participate as collaborative partners in the teaching and learning process.

The grand-prize judging round, which selected state and grand-prize winners from the pool of state finalists, was conducted by a panel assembled by the Library of Congress that included educators, children’s authors and Library of Congress staff.

Each state winner will receive another $50 gift-card prize. The first-, second- and third-place grand-prize winners will be awarded additional gift-card prizes in the amounts of $200, $150 and $100 respectively.

Grand-prize winners will read their essays during the "A Book That Shaped Me" awards presentation at the Library of Congress National Book Festival. The contest presentation will take place at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, Sept. 2, 2017 at 11:50 a.m. at the Children’s Green Stage and will be emceed by Eun Yang, NBC4 Washington television anchor.

Grand Prize & State Winners

1st Place Grand Prize & Virginia State Winner
Suzahn Vollstad, Prince William Public Library, who wrote about “A Dog’s Purpose: A Novel for Humans” by W. Bruce Cameron

2nd Place Grand Prize Winner
Isla Rodriguez, Richmond Public Library - Ginter Park Library, who wrote about “Hidden Figures” by Margot Lee Shetterly.

3rd Place Grand Prize & Pennsylvania State Winner
Megan S. Garrabrant, Bucks County Free Library System - Langhorne Branch, who wrote about “Courage to Soar” by Simone Biles.

Delaware State Winner
Molly Amerling, Frankford Public Library (of Sussex County Department of Libraries), who wrote about “The Journey” by Francesca Sanna.

Maryland State Winner
Lily Luther, Montgomery County Public Library, who wrote about “Smile” by Raina Telgemeier.

Washington, D.C., Winner
Safya Biswal, DC Public Library - Northeast Library, who wrote about “Pax" by Sara Pennypacker.

West Virginia State Winner
Alexander Irby, Cabell County Public Library - Gallaher Village Public Library, who wrote about “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone" by J.K. Rowling.

State Finalists (winners indicated by asterisks)

District of Columbia Finalists
* Safya Biswal, DC Public Library - Northeast Library
Nekole Isaac, DC Public Library
Sienna Morgan, DC Public Library

Maryland Finalists
Rushi Jain, Montgomery County Public Library - Germantown Public Library
* Lily Luther, Montgomery County Public Library
Josiah Main, Montgomery County Public Library
Raniya Najih, Montgomery County Public Library
Sidney D. Robinson, Montgomery County Public Library

Virginia Finalists
Devin Dunn, Alexandria Library - Beatley Central Library
Lucy Garfield, Prince William Public Library System
Olivia Hana Lee, Prince William Public Library System - Montclair Public Library
Isla Rodriguez, Richmond Public Library - Ginter Park Library
* Suzahn Vollstad, Prince William Public Library System 

Delaware Finalists
* Molly Amerling, Frankford Public Library (of Sussex County Department of Libraries)
Catherine Cole, New Castle County - Kirkwood Library
Kestra Cole, New Castle County - Brandywine Hundred Library
Maggie Clarke-Fields, New Castle County - Brandywine Hundred Library
Kate McGowan, Delaware Library System - Dover Public Library

Pennsylvania Finalists
Shannon Connor, Indian Valley Public Library
* Megan S. Garrabrant, Bucks County Free Library System - Langhorne Branch
Isabella Peli, York County - Guthrie Memorial Library
Annabelle Troup, Bucks County Free Library System - Quakertown
Eliana Whing, York County - Collinsville Community Library

West Virginia Finalists
Kathryn Bell, Cabell County Public Library
Brooke Hayden Carey, Cabell County Library
Alivia Harley, Putnam County Library
* Alexander Irby, Cabell County Public Library - Gallaher Village Public Library
Kaylee J. Polk, Putnam County Library

The detailed list of current and previous winners, along with more information about the "A Book That Shaped Me" program, is available at loc.gov/bookfest/kids-teachers/booksthatshape/. For further details, contact booksshapecontest@loc.gov.

The Library of Congress National Book Festival, now in its 17th year, will gather more than 100 authors for readers of all ages to offer talks, Q&As and book-signings. The festival will be presented free of charge at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center on Saturday, Sept. 2, from 9 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Doors open at 8:30 a.m. For more information, visit loc.gov/bookfest/.

The National Book Festival is made possible by the generous support of private- and public-sector sponsors who share the Library’s commitment to reading and literacy, led by National Book Festival Co-Chairman David M. Rubenstein. Charter Sponsors include the Institute of Museum and Library Services, The James Madison Council, The Washington Post and Wells Fargo; Patron sponsor is the National Endowment for the Arts; the Contributor-level sponsors are Thomas V. Girardi, Beverly and Lyman Hamilton, the National Endowment for the Humanities, Scholastic Inc. and the Junior League of Washington; and, in the Friends category, Booklovers Circle members, Candlewick Press, Marshall B. Coyne Foundation Inc., Democracy Fund, Joseph and Lynn Deutsch, Embassy of Ireland, Embassy of Sweden, The Hay-Adams, J.J. Medveckis Foundation, Mensa Foundation, the Mexican Cultural Institute, Timothy and Diane Naughton, Reading Is Fundamental, the Nora Roberts Foundation, Patricia Glass Schuman and Vincent Civello, Small Press Expo (SPX), Split This Rock and the White House Historical Association. Media Partners are C-SPAN2’s Book TV, NPR and PBS Book View Now. Those interested in supporting the National Book Festival can contact the Library at devofc@loc.gov.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

Image: 2017 National Student Poets

 

1 Goya Leave it to Providence.jpgNew York, NY—The Thaw Collection is considered among the foremost private collections of drawings assembled over the last half century. It was first promised to the Morgan in 1975 by Eugene V. Thaw, now a Life Trustee, and the museum received the full collection of 424 works in early 2017. In honor of this extraordinary gift—one of the most important in the history of the museum—the Morgan presents Drawn to Greatness: Master Drawings from the Thaw Collection.

On view from September 29 through January 7, 2018, the exhibition includes more than 150 masterworks from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. A partial list of artists represented includes Mantegna, Rubens, Rembrandt, Canaletto, Watteau, Piranesi, Fragonard, Goya, Turner, Ingres, Daumier, Degas, Cézanne, Redon, Gauguin, van Gogh, Matisse, Picasso, and Pollock.

“It is difficult to summarize in a few words what the acquisition of the Thaw Collection means to the Morgan but ‘transformative’ may be the best single way to describe it,” said Director Colin B. Bailey. “The great range of artists, schools, and regions represented is remarkable. Moreover, the quality of the individual drawings reflects Gene Thaw’s exceptional critical eye—and his keen intellectual curiosity. Over the years Gene’s passionate commitment to the Morgan has never wavered and we can think of no better way to honor him and his late wife, Clare, than to present this exhibition of some of the greatest works from their collection.”

THE EXHIBITION 

The exhibition is organized in a series of sections that illustrate key moments in the history of draftsmanship while also highlighting the work of artists whom the Thaws collected in depth, among them Rembrandt, Goya, Redon, and Degas.

I. The Renaissance and the Rise of the Artist

During the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, a dramatic shift occurred in the theory and practice of drawing. It came to be conceived not merely as a mechanical practice but as an intellectual one associated with invention. Artists made many more preparatory drawings than ever before, and even the most sketchy, exploratory sheets came to be sought and preserved by a new class of collectors and connoisseurs.

Andrea Mantegna (1431-1506) was among the leading lights in the new generation of intellectual artists in the Italian Renaissance. His study of Three Standing Saints in the Thaw Collection is one of the treasures not only of the Thaw Collection, but of the Morgan’s Italian drawings collection as a whole. In the later fifteenth century, sketching like that seen in this sheet would become the defining feature of Renaissance draftsmanship, but this is a notably early example, and a rare survival from one of the most important artists of the period.

Alongside the rise of the working drawing, Renaissance artists also created new categories of drawings that were independent pictorial works, and important examples by Albrecht Altdorfer (ca. 1480-1538) and Jörg Breu (ca. 1510-1547) are included in this section as well.

II. Looking at the World in the Seventeenth Century

While maintaining the intellectual approach to drawing that began in the Renaissance, seventeenth-century drawing represents a revitalized interest in both observation and imagination. Often specializing in a particular subject, artists looked closely at the world around them. This naturalism can be found in many genres ranging from Claude Lorrain’s landscapes to Saenredam’s church interiors to Nanteuil’s portraits. The greatest artists of the age, including Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640) and Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-1669), focused not only on the appearance of their subjects, but also on the emotional states evoked in the stories of these figures.

Four Musicians with Wind Instruments (ca. 1638) shows Rembrandt’s experimentation with an elaborate technique that included pen, ink, wash, and a rare yellow chalk. The lively procession of musicians in old-fashioned costumes seems to celebrate a prominent wedding or festivity. Though Rembrandt’s bravura style suggests that he drew these lively figures from life in the street, recent evidence suggests that he recorded them in the studio by placing models in front of a mirror.

III. Contemporary Life and Fantasy in Eighteenth-Century Italy 

In the eighteenth century, Italian artists developed new and distinctive types of drawings. Infused with sparkling light and even, at times, a sense of humor, these works showcase subjects that dance on the edge between fantasy and reality. Artists were also eager to illustrate astonishing views of their cities along with many imagined scenes, or capricci. Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo (1727-1804) also produced sheets and series of independent drawings, which were avidly collected by a growing number of connoisseurs. In his series Scenes of Contemporary Life, The Picture Show (1791) illustrates an itinerant showman or storyteller with a guitar slung over his shoulder, attracting a crowd that contains both sailors and aristocrats. In this intriguing scene, the showman presents a picture mounted on the wall before him, but it is not clear what it represents or which story is being told. 

IV. Artists Drawing Everywhere: Rococo and Enlightenment in France

In Paris and at the French Academy in Rome, drawing was a firmly established element of academic practice, but it also became a valuable tool for artists who worked mostly outside the Academy, such as Antoine Watteau (1684-1721), who produced a vast repertoire of life studies that he kept in albums for future use. These artists grew to prefer natural chalks and the exquisite effects they produced. They developed an interest in the individual and the foreign as well, which can be seen in Watteau’s study of a Persian soldier. Watteau drew A Member of the Persian Embassy (1715) after the Persian envoy Mehmet Reza Bey and his retinue arrived in Paris to pay a visit to Louis XIV on February 7, 1715. Watteau sketched many of the members of the embassy during their six-month stay, vividly portraying their exotic clothing in drawings of red and black chalk. He drew this slender young man with a thin mustache wearing a peaked fur-trimmed cap and cloak at least twice. 

V. Visionaries: British and German Romantic Drawings

In the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, drawing in England and Germany became a forum for social issues and deeply subjective explorations. Artists valued expression over academic correctness. As drawing societies formed, it became common practice to produce, exhibit, and collect drawings. Artists embraced watercolor as a medium and investigated subjects related to literature, philosophy, history, and religion with a particular fervor. As Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840), Philipp Otto Runge (1777-1810), and William Blake (1757-1827) began earnestly exploring spirituality, Samuel Palmer (1805-1881) and J. M. W. Turner (1775-1851) searched for the divine in sublime mountain landscapes or a single oak tree.

On a tour of Switzerland in 1842, Turner traveled the Gotthard Pass in the Alps and made a rapid sketch that he showed to John Ruskin on his return to England: Ruskin promptly commissioned a finished watercolor from Turner, a work that Ruskin later described as “the greatest work he produced in the last period of his art.” The Pass at St. Gotthard, near Faido (1843) illustrates the melting ice that would turn the Ticino River into a torrent capable of sweeping rocks downstream.

VI. Revolutionary Artists

After the disruptive political and social upheaval that followed the French Revolution in 1789, the traditional art world established by the ancien régime collapsed; in its place, new systems, paths, and possibilities for becoming a successful artist emerged. Artists fluidly adapted varied practices and materials of drawing to their individual circumstances. 

The prevalence of finished pictorial sheets suggests that drawing was held in high standing. In sketchbooks and independent sheets, Théodore Géricault (1791-1824) explored ideas for his ambitious projects, and Eugène Delacroix (1798-1863) produced scenes he would revisit and revise over the years. Francisco de Goya (1746-1828) made incisive and amusing vignettes for his private albums, such as Leave It All to Providence from the Black Border Album (1816-20). Although the caption may carry a sardonic tone, here Goya shows empathy for the downtrodden and an awareness of the larger forces at play in life. 

VII. From the Quotidian to the Sublime: Drawing in France After the Revolution

By the middle of the nineteenth century, many artists worked closely with dealers to produce a remarkable variety of finished drawings for sale at art markets and galleries in Paris. Artists were often politically engaged, creating scenes of modern life that were often infused with pathos or humor. In the same era, independent artists like Odilon Redon (1840-1916) experimented with materials and developed a personal and unconventional visual language that rejected realism and embraced dark visions and emotions. Beginning in the late 1870s, Redon entered an extremely productive creative period in which he worked almost exclusively in black chalk. These so-called noirs began to convey an esoteric symbolism, drawing on a broad range of sources and references. The Fool (1877) portrays a figure that has variously been described as an embodiment of intuition, the demon Mephistopheles, and an archetypal fool. It is one of Redon’s most enigmatic imagined portraits. Here, the fool subverts expectations: instead of looking comical, his penetrating gaze and threateningly lifted fingernail appear foreboding. 

VIII. Charting New Territory: Impressionist and Post-Impressionist Drawings 

Avant-garde artists in France during the late nineteenth century continued to use drawing for more varied purposes than ever: not only did they record observations from life and nature, but they also used drawing to replicate compositions, rework ideas, and produce finished works for exhibition and sale. They drew on diverse media, including modern manufactured materials such as the Conté crayon preferred by Seurat, which allowed for novel effects. Paul Cézanne (1839-1906) in particular used innovative techniques in watercolor and tested the boundaries of traditional materials, while Hilaire-Germain-Edgar Degas (1834-1917) expanded the definition of drawing: he used thinned oil paint and applied pastel over prints. Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890) developed a particularly modern role for drawing: he sent letters from Arles with sketches of paintings in progress to his Parisian friends. In a letter to Paul Gauguin (ca. October 17, 1888), Van Gogh extolled the attractions of Arles and chronicled his progress on one of his masterpieces from the period, Bedroom at Arles, even including a sketch. He described the colors and composition of the painting as well as his intention that it “express an absolute restfulness.”

IX. Modern Forms

Twentieth-century artists continued to depict traditional subjects in conventional materials—as is evident in the portraits of Pablo Picasso (1881-1973), the still lifes of Henri Matisse (1869-1954), and the landscapes of Piet Mondrian (1872-1944). But these artists also generated new forms as a response to modern life. They reflected new ways of seeing and thinking about space, time, and movement. Cubism perhaps best demonstrates this new approach, as Picasso, Juan Gris (1887-1927), and Fernand Léger (1881-1955) began to challenge the very notion of drawing with inventive techniques such as collage. 

This paved the way for artists like Jackson Pollock (1912-1956) to experiment with levels of abstraction and to explore the subconscious and the irrational. Untitled [Drawing for P.G.] (ca. 1943) is an important example of the fusion of primitivism and modernism that characterized Pollock’s art in the first half of the 1940s. This drawing reveals the wide range of his sources, from the masklike figures, mythic animals, and pictographs of primitive art to the imagery and style of Paul Klee (1879-1940) and Picasso. This sheet is dedicated to Peggy Guggenheim, who played a vital role in fostering Pollock’s career. The sheer diversity of his influences—from Native American art and Mexican mural painting to Picasso, Surrealism, and Jungian theory—indicates just how much drawing has evolved throughout the course of Western art. 

Eugene Thaw and the Morgan

One of the leading art dealers of his day, Eugene Thaw, who was born in Manhattan’s Washington Heights neighborhood, initially was drawn to contemporary artists before focusing on major masters of the first decades of the twentieth century. He soon expanded his range to include earlier work, with a particular penchant for nineteenth-century French artists. Not long after his marriage to Clare Eddy in 1954, he was encouraged by his wife to keep some of the drawings for which he was particularly enthusiastic, and their private collection began to take shape. 

Thaw acquired these great objects from a variety of sources: from art dealers and their galleries, through fellow collectors, at bookshops, and, perhaps most spectacularly, at auction. A major early purchase, in 1980, was the rare sheet by the Renaissance master Andrea Mantegna that set a record price for a drawing by the artist. Later, Thaw had the opportunity to acquire one of the last significant landscape drawings by Rembrandt still in private hands.

The Thaws first became involved with the Morgan in the 1960s. The relationship deepened during the tenures of Morgan directors Charles Ryskamp (1969-86) and Charles E. Pierce, Jr. (1987-2007). In 1975, on the occasion of the collection’s first exhibition at the Morgan, the Thaws announced that they were making a promised gift of their drawings.

Over the years Thaw has contributed other important works to the Morgan including a superb group of landscape oil sketches which the museum shares with the Metropolitan Museum of Art. He also gave a collection of early Medieval ornamental objects currently installed in the McKim building’s North Room, and a cache of nineteen illustrated letters by Vincent van Gogh to his protégé, Émile Bernard.

In addition to his gifts of art, Eugene underwrote the museum’s state-of-the-art Thaw Conservation Center, which opened in 2002. He also endowed two galleries in his wife’s name—most recently, the Clare Eddy Thaw Gallery in 2006. His donation in 2011 helped establish the Morgan’s Drawing Institute, a center for the study of works on paper. In 2013, an additional gift endowed the position of the Eugene and Clare Thaw Curator in the Department of Drawings and Prints.

In discussing his passion for collecting and his gift to the Morgan, Thaw said, “All true collectors want a group of works that reflects their own taste and judgement of what’s best. But critical to this drive or need to accumulate objects that excite the eye and mind, and to put them in order, is also the art of sharing them. I can think of no better place to do that than the Morgan Library & Museum.”

Image: Francisco Goya (1746-1828), Leave it all to Providence (Dejalo todo a la probidencia), 1816-20, black ink and gray wash, Thaw Collection, The Morgan Library & Museum, 1999.22.

The Library of Congress has put the papers of Alexander Hamilton online for the first time in their original format.

The Library holds the world’s largest collection of Hamilton papers—approximately 12,000 items concentrated from 1777 until Hamilton’s death in 1804, including letters, legal papers and drafts of speeches and writings, among other items. Now, for the first time, these original documents—many in Hamilton’s own hand—will be available for researchers, students or the generally curious anywhere in the world to explore, zoom in and read at loc.gov/collections/alexander-hamilton-papers/.

“The Library of Congress is home to millions of one-of-a-kind manuscripts that reveal America’s history directly from the minds of the individuals who helped shape it,” said Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress. “Alexander Hamilton is certainly having his moment and I am so thrilled that people can learn more about him—actually read his descriptions of Revolutionary War battles, read letters to his wife, see the cross-outs in his draft of George Washington’s farewell address and so many other things. Sharing this history is what the Library is all about.”

Items in the collection include:

  • A letter written when Hamilton was 12 or 13 to his friend Edward Stevens describing his wish to raise his station in life;
  • The outline of Hamilton’s speech at the Constitutional Convention;
  • Hamilton’s draft of George Washington’s farewell address;
  • His draft of the infamous Reynolds pamphlet;
  • A letter to his wife, Eliza, written shortly before his fatal duel with Aaron Burr.

In addition, the Library recently acquired 55 items, previously privately held—mostly letters from Hamilton’s powerful father-in-law, General Philip Schuyler, to him and his wife—that have also been digitized and made available for the first time. Most of these have never been published.

Congress appropriated $20,000 in 1848 to buy the papers of Alexander Hamilton from his family, including his widow, Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton. The papers were originally housed at the U.S. Department of State and came to the Library in 1904, along with all the department’s historical papers, at the direction of President Theodore Roosevelt.

The Library supplemented the collection over time with additional gifts and purchases. The papers cover almost every aspect of Hamilton’s career and private life: growing up in St. Croix, as George Washington’s aide-de-camp during the Revolutionary War, New York delegate to the Constitutional Convention of 1787, the first U.S. treasury secretary, New York lawyer, and more.

The papers also include correspondence with and among members of his family, including his wife Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton, his sister-in-law Angelica Schuyler Church, and his father-in-law Philip Schuyler.

The Hamilton Papers are among collections newly available online during the past year. Others include the papers of U.S. Presidents Millard Fillmore, Franklin Pierce and William Henry Harrison; the papers of Sigmund Freud; a collection of more than 4,600 newspapers from Japanese-American internment camps; a collection of web-based comic books; and 25,000 fire insurance maps from communities across America, the first installment of 500,000 that will be accessible online.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

Screen Shot 2017-08-21 at 9.01.34 AM.pngThe Folio Society is delighted to announce that six of their titles have been selected as finalists in five categories of the prestigious British Book Design & Production Awards 2017. 

Emily Dickinson: Selected Poems (illustrated by Jane Lydbury) in the Literature category 

The Folio Science Fiction Anthology (illustrated by Florian Schommer) in Best Jacket/Cover Design category 

The Malay Archipelago and Micrographia in the Scholarly, Academic and Reference Books category 

The Call of Cthulhu and Other Stories (illustrated by Dan Hillier) in the Limited Edition and Fine Binding category 

The Douglas Adams Hitchhiker’s Series (illustrated by Jonathan Burton) in the Brand/Series Identity category 

Kate Grimwade, Production Director at The Folio Society said: ‘We are delighted to be a finalist in five categories for the prestigious BBDP awards. Each of the books shortlisted reflect Folio’s aesthetic: to treat every book we publish as a unique object, to be innovative in design approach and the materials we select, and to continuously strive for the very highest quality in all aspects of its production.’ 

The British Book Design & Production Awards is one of the most prestigious literary events of the year, the awards recognise and promote the excellence of the British book design and production industry by celebrating the best books of the year. The judges look for exceptional design, free of typographical errors, with particular emphasis given to excellent layout and standards of typography. 

Entries for the awards must be published, designed, typeset, printed or bound by the entrant in the UK. The winners will be announced at a gala dinner to be held on Thursday 16 November in London. 

 

Madonna 7.jpgNEW YORK CITY, N.Y. - A complete set of 66 original Polaroid photos of Madonna, taken in 1983 by the noted portrait photographer Richard Corman (Am., b. 1954), just six weeks before the release of the young singer’s debut album and eventual skyrocket to fame, is for sale through Manhattan Rare Books, located inside Gallery 90 in New York City, at 1050 Second Avenue.

The sale price of the set is $350,000. “We are offering these unique Polaroids of Madonna until September 5th,” said Michael DiRuggiero owner of Manhattan Rare Books. “After that, if there is no buyer, the set will be dispersed and the images offered individually.” The photos are featured in Corman’s limited-edition fine art book Madonna 66, which was released in November 2016.

Harper’s Bazaar said of the book, “Corman’s Polaroids prove with utter certainty that Madonna was destined for icon status.” Mr. DiRuggiero added, “This is a unique opportunity for a serious collector to own a complete collection, documenting an important moment in art and cultural history, one that will be available only as a complete and intact collection until September 5th.”

The sale price includes all 66 original Polaroids, each one signed and numbered by Corman (1-66), housed in a custom case by the noted book artist Sjoerd Hofstra, plus a copy of Madonna 66. The book was widely praised by The New York Times, New York Magazine, Elle, Harper’s Bazaar, Vanity Fair and other newspapers and magazines. Corman signed the copy being sold. 

In the photos, Madonna (full name, Madonna Ciccone) is dressed in full Material Girl regalia, a look that launched a fashion revolution among young women of the time: white lace leggings under torn jeans, jean jacket with graffiti on the back and the sleeves cut off, and rubber bangles (or friendship bracelets). She sports bright red lipstick and a fake mole on the side of her face.

The 66 images were taken as test shots for a movie that Corman’s mother, a casting director, was screen-testing actors for but never got made. She saw in the budding star potential, and she urged her son to photograph her. “I knew this was somebody special right away,” Corman said of their first meeting, which took place in Madonna’s apartment on East 4th Street in Greenwich Village.

He remembered, “She was funny in the most beguiling way. As soon as I walked up, she served me espresso and bubblegum on a silver plate and tray.” Over a period of months and for several sittings, Corman photographed his subject, usually at Madonna’s brother’s house in Manhattan. The end result is the trove of 66 Polaroids Corman used for his book and which is now for sale.

Corman had previously worked for legendary photographer Richard Avedon (Am., 1923-2004), but observed that even with all of his experience around the celebrities who would parade in and out of Avedon’s studio, the Madonna spark was special. “When you look at somebody through a camera you either see behind somebody’s eyes or you don’t,” he said. “With her it was, ‘wow’.”

Corman said there is a looseness to the Madonna Polaroids that would be difficult to orchestrate today. “Now, we’d have 20 bodyguards and 30 assistants,” he said. “They’d have to cordon off the street. Beyoncé, Rihanna, Nicki Minaj - people like that, who I’d love to spend time with - it would be a much different experience nowadays. But Madonna was accessible. And it was raw.” 

Also for sale through Manhattan Rare Books is a set of three silver gelatin prints of photographs Corman took of the late boxing legend Muhammad Ali. It is the only set in which all three of the 11 inch by 14 inch prints is signed by Ali, in silver marker on the front of the image. Each image is also signed by Corman on the verso and marked (“1 of 1”). The set is priced to sell at $22,500.

Two autobiography books about the life Richard Avedon, Richard Corman’s mentor, are also for sale. One is a signed limited first edition copy (#44 of only 250 copies signed by Avedon), with a special engraver’s proof of his iconic image of the late Marilyn Monroe laid-in. The book, which is lavishly illustrated with 285 of Avedon’s most celebrated photographs, is for sale at $4,900.

The other book, titled Richard Avedon, An Autobiography, with: Evidence, 1944-1994, is a special limited edition boxed set, with two original hand-stamped engraver’s proofs. Although the limitation states 250 copies, only about 100 were actually produced. Signed and numbered in the box by Avedon, and chronicling his career over a 50-year span, the book is for sale at $6,500.

Manhattan Rare Books specializes in outstanding and rare books in fine condition. The firm only offers books that have been carefully selected to meet its stringent standards of high quality and importance. Anyone interested in discussing their collecting interests is encouraged to visit the gallery (hours by appointment); call (212) 326-8907; or, visit www.manhattanrarebooks.com

Image: Up on the roof and soon-to-be on top of the pop culture world, little does Madonna know in this devil-may-care shot the riches and fame that await her. Courtesy of Manhattan Rare Books. 

The Center for Book Arts, the nation’s first institution dedicated to teaching and promoting the art of the book and related arts, is pleased to announce that it is the recipient of a New York City Cultural Tourism Grant, presented on August 9, 2017 by Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer. The grant program promotes culture and the arts across all of New York City’s five boroughs by supporting the promotion of cultural events and exhibits and increasing visitor awareness of each borough’s cultural offerings.

Stephen Bury, Board Chair of the Center for Book Arts and Chief Librarian at the Frick Reference Library, remarked that “we are especially pleased to see these funds awarded to the Center as a way to encourage New Yorkers to re-discover one of this city’s cultural jewels-the only organization offering instruction and exhibitions in book art is a short walk from Penn Station and the Flatiron building. This is good news for culturally curious New Yorkers and all lovers of the book.”

“Funds from the Cultural Tourism Grant are vital to marketing book art and the Center to New Yorkers,” said Alexander Campos, Executive Director & Curator of the Center. He added, “On our busy New York City block, our visitors, who are amazed by our exhibitions and antique equipment, tell us that our street banner convinced them stop by. Funds from this award will replace the banner and pay for a new stanchion and for printing program inserts.”

Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer presented a check for $2,000 to Mr Bury, Mr Campos, and other members of the Center’s board on August 9. Ms Brewer thanked the Center for its contributions to New York’s cultural life.

“Manhattan’s greatest wealth is its array of cultural gems, and not just our massive institutions known all over the world but our neighborhood museums, studios, and cultural institutions that both preserve old traditions and incubate innovative new works and artists,” said Manhattan Borough President Gale A. Brewer. “The Center for Book Arts does exactly this important work. I know that exposing visitors to the true diversity of experiences in our borough’s neighborhoods increases tourism, enhances local neighborhoods and businesses, and reveals the true breadth of what our city has to offer the world.”

Fred Dixon, President and CEO of the NYC & Company Foundation added that, “Supporting new cultural opportunities keeps New York City exciting and vital. Encouraging cultural tourism increases visitor spending and job creation essential to the local economy.”

About the Center for Book Arts

The Center for Book Arts is dedicated to exploring and cultivating contemporary aesthetic interpretations of the book as an art object, while preserving the traditional practices of the art of the book. The Center seeks to facilitate communication between the book arts community and the larger spheres of contemporary art and literature through exhibitions, classes, public programming, literary presentations, opportunities for artists and writers, publications, and collecting. Founded in 1974 and still located in Manhattan, it was the first not-for-profit organization of its kind in the nation, and has since become a model for others around the world. Visit our website for up-to-date details on all events and programs:  www.centerforbookarts.org

About New York City Cultural Tourism Development Grants

New York City Cultural Tourism Development Grants are privately funded by donations to the NYC & Company Foundation, the mission of which is to support tourism in all five boroughs by promoting local cultural events and institutions. The grant program is administered by the Borough President’s Office, and cultural groups are invited to apply for funding annually through the Borough President’s online grant portal. Recipients are selected by the Borough President based on the merit of the program.

 

CHICAGO, August 3, 2017 - The Chicago Tribune today announced Marilynne Robinson as the recipient of its prestigious 2017 Literary Prize.

Robinson will receive the award and open the 28th Annual Chicago Humanities Festival on Saturday, October 28. She will appear in conversation with Chicago Tribune columnist Heidi Stevens. The recipients of the Heartland Prize for Nonfiction and the Heartland Prize for Fiction, Matthew Desmond and Colson Whitehead, will also appear at the Humanities Fest, receiving their awards on Saturday, November 11. The Heartland awards were announced earlier this year. 

Chicago Tribune Literary Prize

Marilynne Robinson will be honored with the 2017 Chicago Tribune Literary Prize at 11 a.m. Saturday, October 28, at Alice Millar Chapel, 1870 Sheridan Road, in Evanston.

One of the most revered writers in America, Robinson transcends genre in her fiction and essays, speaking to the arc of history and the ambiguities of the human connection. 

When Rev. Clementa Pickney died tragically in South Carolina, President Barack Obama quoted his friend Marilynne Robinson in the eulogy, calling on others to find “that reservoir of goodness, beyond, and of another kind, that we are able to do each other in the ordinary cause of things.”  

Through her astonishing powerful use of language, with its special cadences, Robinson eloquently segues between the magisterial and the quotidian. 

Robinson’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel Gilead, was previously awarded the Tribune’s Heartland Prize. She has also won the National Humanities Medal, the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction, and two National Book Critics Circle Awards.

In addition to her fiction, Robinson’s far-ranging, insightful essay collections deal with subjects ranging from the relationship between science and religion, to nuclear pollution and American politics.

“Marilynne Robinson, like many of the winners of the Chicago Tribune Literary Award, has international stature and deep ties to the Midwest,” said Chicago Tribune publisher and editor-in-chief Bruce Dold, who will make introductory remarks at the event on Oct. 28. “She’s a wonderful fiction writer and a brilliant essayist. She challenges every reader to respect the deep mystery of faith. We’re honored to recognize her with this award.” 

The Chicago Tribune Literary Prize was established to honor a great writer whose work has had a great impact on American society. First awarded in 2002, previous recipients of the Literary Prize include the late Arthur Miller, Elie Wiesel, August Wilson and E.L. Doctorow. More recently, the award has gone to Margaret Atwood, Joyce Carol Oates, David McCullough, Stephen Sondheim, Patti Smith, Salman Rushdie, and last year, Philip Glass. 

Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize for Nonfiction and Fiction

Matthew Desmond will be honored with the 2017 Heartland Prize for Nonfiction for Evicted: Power and Profit in the American City at 11 a.m. Saturday, November 11 at the First United Methodist Church at the Chicago Temple, 77 W. Washington St.

In Evicted, Desmond followed the lives of eight Milwaukee families to show how mass evictions are less a consequence of poverty than a cause of it. Through his immersive reporting, Desmond transforms our national understanding of poverty and the profoundly devastating process of losing a home, and offers solutions to this widespread problem.

Evicted won the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Nonfiction, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Non-Fiction, and the Andrew Carnegie Medal.

Colson Whitehead will be honored with the 2017 Heartland Prize for Fiction for his novel, The Underground Railroad, at 3 p.m. Saturday, November 11 at the Art Institute of Chicago’s Rubloff Auditorium, 230 S. Columbus Drive. 

Whitehead’s novel uses both realism and allegory to reimagine the Underground Railroad as a train through American history, and recounts the horrors of slavery and the elusive search for freedom that still echoes today.

The Underground Railroad won the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, National Book Award and the Carnegie Medal. 

“Evicted and The Underground Railroad reset the conversation about poverty and race. They are written with eloquence that elevates them into great literature,” said Elizabeth Taylor, Chicago Tribune literary editor at large. “These are ambitious, brave books that speak to American promise in profoundly resonant ways.”

Chicago Tribune established the Heartland Prizes in 1988 to annually recognize a novel and work of nonfiction that reinforce and perpetuate the values of heartland America. 

The Literary and Heartland Prizes are a part of the Tribune's steadfast support of literacy and the written word.

These awards, along with the Nelson Algren Short Story Award and Young Adult Literary Prize, reflect the Tribune's ongoing commitment to inspiring reading and readers through literary coverage in the Chicago Tribune, on chicagotribune.com, and at the annual Printers Row Lit Fest.

(CONCORD -July 2017) The Concord Museum recently announced Doris Kearns Goodwin as the Honorary Chair of the public phase of Revolution: The Campaign for the Concord Museum, which will support a new 13,000 square foot Education Center and courtyard, a new Gateway to Concord Orientation Center, and expanded Museum gallery space to showcase the Museum’s extensive collections. Goodwin, a world renowned presidential historian, Pulitzer Prize-winning author, and Concord resident, is known as “America’s historian-in-chief.”

We are thrilled that Doris Kearns Goodwin is serving as Honorary Chair of the Campaign for the Concord Museum,” said Executive Director Margaret Burke. “Doris is a strong advocate for the value of history and history education. Her leadership signals the importance of what we are trying to achieve at the Museum.” 

The new Education Center and Museum expansion is being developed to address the Museum’s burgeoning needs. Over 12,000 students and teachers participated in the Museum’s curriculum-based school programs last year - nearly double the number of students served in 2011. The Museum through its Paul Reveres Ride program provides free transportation to the Museum and waives program fees for more than 3,000 students from Lowell, Lawrence, and Everett.

Doris explained, “For someone who has loved history for as long as I can remember, to enjoy and share the riches of the Concord Museum is such a pleasure. I’m proud to be involved in helping expand the physical space and the reach of this museum that tells not only the history of Concord, my home town for the last 40 years, but also the history of this country.”

To date the Campaign for the Concord Museum has raised $11.7 million towards the $13 million goal. Approximately $10 million of the Campaign funds will support the new Education Center and Museum renovations. The remaining $3 million will be added to the Museum’s endowment to support enhanced programs. Visit https://concordmuseumcampaign.org/ Revolution: The Campaign for Concord Museum for more information. Any size donation is greatly appreciated.

Minnesota Center for Book Arts (MCBA) is proud to announce the winner of the 2017 MCBA Prize, The Book of Disquiet by London-based book artist Tim Hopkins.

For the 2017 competition, a three-member jury reviewed over 100 submissions representing 12 nations around the world, and narrowed the field to five finalists. These five works were judged at MCBA during Book Art Biennial 2017 (BookArtBiennial.org), a program series including exhibitions, workshops, and a two-day symposium. The winner was announced at a gala award ceremony on Saturday, July 22. 

Hopkin’s 2017 edition of Fernando Pessoa’s The Book of Disquiet takes a recognized classic and builds out from that book’s unique history, form, and content to create a viable reading experience that adds to the feeling and atmosphere of the novel itself. The texts that make up The Book of Disquiet were found in a box in Pessoa’s room after his death, in bundles of manuscript and typescript fragments and in no fixed order. It consists of the everyday thoughts of a single character, Bernardo Soares. The Half Pint Press edition of The Book of Disquiet takes 61 of the hundreds of fragments and presents them on a variety of paper and non-paper ephemera (some found, some made). Each fragment was typeset by hand and printed by hand on an Adana Eight-Five tabletop letterpress in an edition of 80. The fragments are presented unbound and with no fixed order in a hand-printed box. 

This edition responds to the original’s form, or lack of form, by restoring disorder to The Book of Disquiet: the fragments are to be picked out as the reader pleases. This reflects the origin of the text itself and also makes possible connections between fragments which may be less available in a bound, ordered edition; Soares was prone to letting his mind wander during long nights in his room and the book gives a sense of that wandering mind.

In addition to the title, Tim Hopkins receives a $2,000 cash prize. The four finalists each receive a $500 cash award.

The MCBA Prize 2017 jury consists of: 

Steven Daiber, of Red Trillium Press/ Aqui en la lucha in Massachusetts;

Simon Goode, co-founder of London Centre for Book Arts;

Karen Kunc, of Constellation Studios, and Cather Professor of Art at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Finalists for The MCBA Prize 2017 included:

Hannah Batsel (Chicago, IL ), Maneater

Tim Hopkins (London, England), The Book of Disquiet

Ines von Ketelhodt (Flörsheim, Germany), Alpha Beta

Ellen Knudson (Gainesville, FL ) Ingress / Egress

Nader Koochaki (Beasain, Guipúzcoa, Spain), Soineko Paisaia / Dorsal Landscape 2009-2015

The jury also awarded three Special Recognitions of Merit:

Ann Kalmbach & Tatana Kellner (Rosendale, New York), The Golden Rule

Christine McCauley (London, England), Mist 

Sue Huggins Leopard (Rochester, New York), This Past Winter

View all of the entries for The MCBA Prize 2017 in MCBA's online gallery, MCBAPrize.org.

The MCBA Prize was presented in conjunction with Book Art Biennial 2017 (July 15-23), a series of events, exhibitions and workshops that explore contemporary practice in the book arts. This year's theme— Shout Out: Community Intervention, Independent Publishing, and Alternative Distribution—featured programming that amplifies individual and collective voice through grassroots artistic practice.

To learn more, visit BookArtBiennial.org.

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced today that Denis Johnson, author of the critically acclaimed collection of short stories “Jesus’ Son” and the novel “Tree of Smoke,” will posthumously receive the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction during the 2017 Library of Congress National Book Festival, Sept. 2.

The National Book Festival and the prize ceremony will take place at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C. The author’s widow, Cindy Johnson, will accept the prize.

Hayden chose Johnson based on the recommendation of a jury of distinguished authors and prominent literary critics from around the world.

“Denis Johnson was a writer for our times,” Hayden said. “In prose that fused grace with grit, he spun tale after tale about our walking wounded, the demons that haunt, the salvation we seek. We emerge from his imagined world with profound empathy, a different perspective—a little changed.”

In March the Librarian offered the prize to Johnson, and he enthusiastically accepted. He wrote, “The list of past awardees is daunting, and I'm honored to be in such company. My head's spinning from such great news!” After a long struggle with cancer, Denis Johnson died on May 24.

The annual Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction honors an American literary writer whose body of work is distinguished not only for its mastery of the art but also for its originality of thought and imagination. The award seeks to commend strong, unique, enduring voices that—throughout long, consistently accomplished careers—have told us something revealing about the American experience.

Previous winners of the prize are Marilynne Robinson (2016), Louise Erdrich (2015), E. L. Doctorow (2014) and Don DeLillo (2013). Under its previous name, the Library of Congress Creative Achievement Award for fiction, the awardees were Philip Roth (2012), Toni Morrison (2011), Isabel Allende (2010), and John Grisham (2009). In 2008, the Library presented Pulitzer-Prize winner Herman Wouk with a lifetime achievement award for fiction writing.

Johnson was born in Munich, West Germany, the son of an American diplomat, and spent his childhood in the Philippines and Japan before returning to spend the rest of his youth in the suburbs of Washington, D.C. He is the author of nine novels, as well as numerous plays, poetry collections, a short-story collection and a novella. Johnson won the National Book Award for his resonant Vietnam novel “Tree of Smoke” (2007), which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

His short novel “Train Dreams” (2012) was also a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. His most recent work, “The Laughing Monsters,” was published in 2014. Johnson’s many other honors include fellowships from the Guggenheim and Lannan Foundations and a Whiting Award.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

HOT SPRINGS, ARK. - Eric Bradley, international spokesman for Heritage Auctions and author of more than a dozen books including the “Antiques and Collectibles 2017 Price Guide” will be the headline guest at the inaugural Antique Appraisal and Re-Sale Parade July 15, 2017 in Hot Springs, Ark. The event will be held at Central Avenue Market Place (CAMP), located at 4330 Central Ave., Hot Springs, in Temperance Hill Square. 

“Bradley is coming to assess the quality and quantity of antiques and collectibles we have in and around Hot Springs,” said Reagen Megee, CAMP co-owner. “This is a great opportunity for the people in Hot Springs and across our region of the country,” she said. “Most people from Hot Springs or who have visited know we are a hub for antique and collectible shops and flea markets but we are also rich with private collections and family heirlooms.” 

Bradley is editor of the annual “Antique Trader Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide,” America’s number one selling price guide, and the author of the critically-acclaimed “Mantiques: A Manly Guide to Cool Stuff.” He also wrote the “Picker’s Pocket Guide: SIGNS - How to Pick Antiques Like a Pro” and “Picker’s Pocket Guide - TOYS: How to Pick Antiques Like a Pro.” Bradley also is author of the upcoming “Harry Potter - The Unofficial Guide to the Collectibles of Our Favorite Wizard.” He has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, GQ, Four Seasons Magazine, Bottom Line/Personal, USA Today and The Detroit News, among others.

The Appraisal Parade is free. The public is welcome to attend. People are welcome to bring their most unique antiques, collectibles and collections either to the parade or bring photos. Items don’t necessarily have to be appraised or sold. With pictures, please try to include any markings on the items such as names on pottery, jewelry, furniture, etc. Non-disclosure agreements will also be available upon request, Megee said. 

“We want Hot Springs to be this region’s “Hub for Antiques,” we want people to get top dollar for the valuables they’re looking to sell and we want our state and its treasures to be seen by the world,” Megee said.

Heritage Auctions (HA.com) has the distinction of being the largest collectibles auction house in the world. Founded in 1976, Heritage also is recognized as the undisputed leader in Internet auctions. 

A panel of local experts will sit under the veranda of Central Avenue Market Place to tell people about the origins and value of their artifacts. Bradley will be available to meet and greet visitors, too.

Parade lineup begins at 10 a.m. People with trucks that can display large items or collections in the truck bed or on trailers will line up on Central Avenue going north toward downtown. The public is welcome to stand under the verandas around the square at Temperance Hill. People with photos, collections to unload or individual items to walk will pull in the main parking lot and look for signs. At noon, there will be a brief opening ceremony before the parade begins on the square and the appraisal event begins.

For more information contact Reagen Megee at Central Avenue Market Place at (501) 623-4484 or visit 4330 Central Avenue in Temperance Hill Square, Hot Springs, Ark.

berman14 copy.jpgLOS ANGELES - The J. Paul Getty Museum announced today a major gift of photographs from collector and film industry executive Bruce Berman. The gift includes 186 works by 26 artists, seven of whom are entering the Getty’s collection for the first time. Reflecting Berman’s passion for both black and white and color photographs of the American landscape and built environment, the works feature the people, homes, cars, streets, churches, theaters, and bars that are evocative of 20th-century American life. Among the artists included in the gift are luminaries of the American documentary tradition, such as Harry Callahan (American, 1912-1999), Walker Evans (American, 1903-1975), Dorothea Lange (American, 1895-1965), and Camilo José Vergara (American, born Chile, 1944).

Berman, a founding member of the Getty Museum’s Photographs Council, is a Los Angeles resident who serves as chairman and CEO of Village Roadshow Pictures. He amassed his photograph collection based on an interest in the documentation of 20th-century architecture, design, and lifestyles in Southern California, and sought out photographers whose work underscores a growing appreciation of documentary photography as a uniquely American art form. Together with 550 photographs donated from 1998 to 2009, Berman has now donated more than 700 photographs to the Museum, which have greatly enhanced its holdings of 20th-century photography.

The gift also marks the ten-year anniversary of Where We Live: Photographs of America from the Berman Collection, the inaugural exhibition in the J. Paul Getty Museum’s Center for Photographs. Organized by former Senior Curator Judith Keller with donations and loans from the Berman collection, that exhibition and the related donations mark one of the most fruitful collaborations between a collector and curator.

“We are profoundly grateful to Bruce for his continued support of the Getty Museum’s photographs collection,” says Timothy Potts, director of the J. Paul Getty Museum. “This donation, coupled with his earlier contributions, will transform the quality and depth of our holdings of numerous photographers, while also introducing the work of important new artists. By focusing broadly on the theme of life in late-20th-century America, Bruce effectively created a photographic survey of the landscape, buildings, and lifestyles of the era. We are very fortunate in being able to draw upon such a rich archive for future exhibitions and look forward to showcasing the works in upcoming shows.”

“As an avid photographer in my teenage years, my appreciation for photographs has evolved into collecting unique snapshots of urban life. It gives me great pride to share these wonderful works with the Getty and future generations of Los Angelenos,” adds Berman.

The largest body of work included in the gift is 67 photographs by Camilo José Vergara, who has spent over 40 years recording poor, urban, and minority neighborhoods across the United States. His methodical approach to photography involves researching his subjects, often those living in the poorest neighborhoods in the country, and systematically documenting them over time. Berman’s gift includes the photographer’s work in neighborhoods of Los Angeles, New Jersey, and New York, complementing 19 works by Vergara already in the Museum’s collection.

Other areas of the country are represented in Birney Imes’ and Mike Smith’s portrayal of the rural south, Joel Sternfeld’s documentation of experimental utopias in America, William Larson’s Tucson Garden series, and Martin Parr’s photographs of Boring, Oregon. 

One of the new artists to enter the collection is Alice Attie (American, born 1950), who lives and works in New York City. Her work focuses on people and buildings in urban environments on the verge of change, producing a record of a world rapidly being lost as gentrification and an influx of chain stores replace small businesses. Another, Esko Männikkö (Finnish, born 1959), is based in northern Finland, where he captures deserted places and traces of human presence with his camera.

Berman’s gift to the Getty includes:

Artists new to the collection:

3 works by Alice Attie (American, born 1950)

3 works by Henry Horenstein (American, born 1947)

3 works by Esko Männikkö (Finnish, born 1959)

5 works by Michael C. McMillen (American, born 1946)

1 work by Alfred Seiland (Austrian, born 1952)

1 work by John Vachon (American, 1914-1975

1 work by Julian Wasser (American, born 1943)

Artists currently represented in the collection:

1 work by Frank Breuer (German, born 1963)

1 work by Harry Callahan (American, 1912-1999)

9 works by William Clift (American, born 1944)

2 works by Walker Evans (American, 1903-1975)

2 works by Steve Fitch (American, born 1949)

12 works by John Humble (American, born 1944)

16 works by Birney Imes (American, born 1951)

8 works by Dorothea Lange (American, 1895-1965)

8 works by William Larson (American, born 1942)

3 works by Russell Lee (American, 1903-1986)

1 work by Helen Levitt (American, 1913-2009)

1 work by Danny Lyon (American, born 1942)

1 work by Wright Morris (American, 1910-1998)

9 works by Martin Parr (British, born 1952)

11 works by Mike Smith (German, born 1951)

10 works by Joel Sternfeld (American, born 1944)

4 works by George Tice (American, born 1938)

67 works by Camilo José Vergara (American, born Chile, 1944)

3 works by Todd Webb (American, 1905-2000)

Image: Saint Peter's Pentecostal Deliverance Center, 937 Home Street, South Bronx, 2002. Camilo José Vergara (American, born Chile, 1944). Chromogenic print. 21.6 × 32.7 cm (8 1/2 × 12 7/8 in.). The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, Gift of Bruce Berman and Lea Russo © Camilo José Vergara

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden today announced the appointment of Tracy K. Smith as the Library’s 22nd Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry, for 2017-2018. Smith will take up her duties in the fall, opening the Library’s annual literary season in September with a reading of her work at the Coolidge Auditorium.

Smith, a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and a professor at Princeton University, succeeds Juan Felipe Herrera as Poet Laureate.

“It gives me great pleasure to appoint Tracy K. Smith, a poet of searching,” Hayden said. “Her work travels the world and takes on its voices; brings history and memory to life; calls on the power of literature as well as science, religion and pop culture. With directness and deftness, she contends with the heavens or plumbs our inner depths—all to better understand what makes us most human.”

“I am profoundly honored,” Smith said. “As someone who has been sustained by poems and poets, I understand the powerful and necessary role poetry can play in sustaining a rich inner life and fostering a mindful, empathic and resourceful culture. I am eager to share the good news of poetry with readers and future readers across this marvelously diverse country.”

Smith joins a long line of distinguished poets who have served in the position, including Juan Felipe Herrera, Charles Wright, Natasha Trethewey, Philip Levine, W.S. Merwin, Kay Ryan, Charles Simic, Donald Hall, Ted Kooser, Louise Glück, Billy Collins, Stanley Kunitz, Robert Pinsky, Robert Hass and Rita Dove.

The new Poet Laureate is the author of three books of poetry, including “Life on Mars” (2011), winner of the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry; “Duende” (2007), winner of the 2006 James Laughlin Award and the 2008 Essence Literary Award; and “The Body’s Question” (2003), winner of the Cave Canem Poetry Prize. Smith is also the author of a memoir, “Ordinary Light” (2015), a finalist for the 2015 National Book Award in nonfiction and selected as a notable book by the New York Times and the Washington Post.

For her poetry, Smith has received a Rona Jaffe Writers Award and a Whiting Award. In 2014, the Academy of American Poets awarded her with the Academy Fellowship, given to one poet each year to recognize distinguished poetic achievement. In 2015, she won the 16th annual Robert Creeley Award and in 2016 was awarded Columbia University’s Medal for Excellence.

In the Pulitzer Prize citation for “Life on Mars,” judges lauded its “bold, skillful poems, taking readers into the universe and moving them to an authentic mix of joy and pain." Toi Derricotte, poet and Academy of American Poets chancellor, said “the surfaces of a Tracy K. Smith poem are beautiful and serene, but underneath, there is always a sense of an unknown vastness. Her poems take the risk of inviting us to imagine, as the poet does, what it is to travel in another person’s shoes.”

Born in Falmouth, Massachusetts in 1972, and raised in Fairfield, California, Tracy K. Smith earned a B.A. in English and American literature and Afro-American studies from Harvard University and an M.F.A. in creative writing from Columbia University. From 1997 to 1999, she was a Stegner Fellow in poetry at Stanford University. Smith has taught at Medgar Evers College of the City University of New York, at the University of Pittsburgh and at Columbia University. She is currently the Roger S. Berlind ’52 Professor in the Humanities and director of the creative writing program at Princeton University.

Background of the Laureateship

The Library of Congress Poetry and Literature Center is the home of the Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry, a position that has existed since 1937, when Archer M. Huntington endowed the Chair of Poetry at the Library. Since then, many of the nation’s most eminent poets have served as Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress and, after the passage of Public Law 99-194 (Dec. 20, 1985), as Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry—a position which the law states “is equivalent to that of Poet Laureate of the United States.”

During his or her term, the Poet Laureate seeks to raise the national consciousness to a greater appreciation of the reading and writing of poetry. The Library keeps to a minimum the specific duties required of the Poet Laureate, who opens the literary season in the fall and closes it in the spring. In recent years, Laureates have initiated poetry projects that broaden the audiences for poetry.

For more information on the Poet Laureate and the Poetry and Literature Center, visit loc.gov/poetry/.  Consultants in Poetry and Poets Laureate Consultants in Poetry and their terms of service can be found at loc.gov/poetry/laureate-2011-present.html. To learn more about Poet Laureate projects, visit loc.gov/poetry/laureate-projects.html.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov, and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

Paris - Artcurial is pleased to announce the arrival of Louis Grandchamp des Raux, who has integrated the auction house team since 1st June 2017.  Henceforth, he will be Artcurial’s exclusive International Consultant, working in close collaboration with Matthieu Fournier, Artcurial’s associate director. 

While Louis Grandchamp des Raux is perfectly acquainted with the art market, in particular ancient paintings, his expertise goes beyond the speciality. Today, he places his experience and network of first-rate collectors in a position to promote Artcurial’s development. He thus achieves a 30-year-old dream, to move to the other side of the gavel, becoming a major player in the market. He will continue to nourish his passion for art by helping collectors to establish a collection, but also to separate from their paintings in the best conditions.

« It is with an immense pleasure that we welcome Louis to Artcurial ! We met him as a collector, while he was attending our exhibitions and our sales, then learned to know us more personally during the sale of his collection that we organised in 2015. He became our friend. What better ambassador for our House that an internationally recognised collector, passionate and scholarly, who can share his selling and buying experience with other collectors. » Matthieu Fournier, Associate Director, Ancient masters and 19th century department, Artcurial 

« By joining Artcurial, I finally reconcile my career as an entrepreneur and my love of art, which were cohabitating for 30 years!  To become a part of Artcurial’s prestige throughout Europe is an exciting challenge.  My foremost desire is to share my passion and my history, in particular by guiding collectors in their cultural and artistic endeavours. » Louis Grandchamp des Raux, International Consultant, Artcurial

Letters About Literature, a Library of Congress national reading- and writing-promotion program, has announced its winners for 2017. The program, now in its 25th year, asks young people in grades 4 through 12 to write to an author (living or deceased) about how his or her book affected their lives.

More than 43,700 young readers from across the country participated in the annual initiative, which aims to instill a lifelong love of reading in the nation’s youth and to engage and nurture their passion for literature. The contest is promoted by the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress through its affiliated state centers, state libraries and other organizations.

Research shows that students benefit most from literacy instruction when they are engaged in reading and writing activities that are relevant to their daily experiences. In addition, research supports the link between reading and writing: children who read will write better; children who write will read more. Letters About Literature provides this type of reading-writing experience and challenges students to identify a personal connection with the books they read. This year, nearly 1,700 educators and more than 1,500 schools used Letters About Literature in their classrooms.

The national program is made possible by a generous grant from the Dollar General Literacy Foundation, with additional support from gifts to the Center for the Book.

This year’s winners come from all parts of the country. They wrote to authors as diverse as R.J. Palacio, Lisa Genova, Sharon Draper, Laura Ingalls Wilder and Stephen Chbosky.

Top letter-writers are chosen for each state and in each of three levels: Level 1 (grades 4-6), Level 2 (grades 7-8) and Level 3 (grades 9-12). From within these pools a National Prize winner is chosen, and for each level, two National Honor winners are chosen.

Following are this year’s winners:

Level 1 National Prize

  • Claire Juip of Grosse Pointe, Michigan wrote to R.J. Palacio, author of “Wonder”

Level 1 National Honor Award

  • Isabella Reichard of Brookline, New Hampshire wrote to Esther Earl, author of “This Star Won’t Go Out”
  • Mark Leschinsky of Mahwah, New Jersey wrote to Lisa Genova, author of “Still Alice”

Level 2 National Prize

  • Maria Cheriyan of Farmington Hills, Michigan wrote to Ruta Sepetys, author of  “Salt to the Sea”

Level 2 National Honor Award

  • Sam Opinsky of Chesterfield, Missouri wrote to Sharon Draper, author of “Out of My Mind”
  • Madison Kelleher of Montoursville, Pennsylvania wrote to Robert Munsch, author of “Love Your Forever”

Level 3 National Prize

  • Apoorva Chauhan of Las Vegas, Nevada wrote to Stephen Chbosky, author of “The Perks of Being a Wallflower”

Level 3 National Honor Award

  • Brice Jansen of Leopold, Missouri wrote to Laura Ingalls Wilder, author of the “Little House” series
  • Samantha Lynn Kiss of Chesapeake, Virginia wrote to David Levithan, author of “Boy Meets Boy”

Letters About Literature is a dynamic educational program that promotes lifelong readers and helps develop successful writers. It is the Library’s signature national outreach program to young people. More than 1 million students have participated in the writing contest since it began a quarter of a century ago. An online teaching guide uses proven strategies for improving reading and writing proficiency and is aligned with the learning objectives recommended by the National Council of Teachers of English and the International Literacy Association. Learn more about the contest and read current and past winning letters at read.gov/letters/.

The Library’s Center for the Book, established by Congress in 1977 to stimulate public interest in books and reading, is a national force for reading and literacy promotion. A public-private partnership, it sponsors educational programs that reach readers of all ages through its affiliated state centers, collaborations with nonprofit reading-promotion partners and through its Poetry and Literature Center at the Library of Congress. For more information, visit read.gov.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov, and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

The Independent Online Booksellers Association would like to contribute to the continuing education of book collectors. Therefore, we are pleased to announce that we will again offer to a book collector a scholarship in the amount of $750 to be used at one of the several book seminars offered in the U.S. or the U.K. You are not required to be a bookseller or a member of any organization to apply.

Many of our members have been to the seminars listed below, and always find book collectors present among the booksellers and librarians. If you have ever thought of attending we hope to make it a bit easier for you.

IOBA awards scholarships to support the professional development of its member booksellers. We consider the scholarships to be an investment in the future of bookselling, and we would like to include you too!

The seminars eligible for scholarships include:

Colorado Antiquarian Book Seminar (CABS). CABS is an intensive program on all aspects of bookselling held in Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA for one week each summer.

Rare Book School (RBS, Charlottesville, VA, USA). RBS courses focus on specific aspects of book history, bibliography, printing and book arts. Most of these week-long courses are offered in the summer in Charlottesville, but others are offered at other venues around the East Coast and at other times of the year.

California Rare Book School (CALRBS, various locations in CA, USA). CALRBS courses are also similarly focused and are week-long courses covering a broad range of topics, from the history, identification and preservation of motion picture materials to the history of typography.

York Antiquarian Book Seminar (YABS), to be held in York, England in September. YABS is a three-day intensive seminar modeled after CABS but tailored for booksellers in the UK.

London Rare Books School (LRBS). Two week-long intensive sessions on specific topics about antiquarian material are offered each summer at the University of London, England. Courses have included A History of Maps and Mapping, The Medieval Book, and Children’s Books.

Financial need is not a criterion; IOBA will choose a winner based on merit. Please tell us a little about yourself, include contact information, and let us know about your collecting focus (not more than two pages, please). Tell us which seminar you would like to attend and why. We also ask that the recipient write about the experience following attendance for possible publication in The Standard, The Journal of the Independent Online Booksellers Association

Completed entries must be received via email no later than June 4, 2017. Applications should be sent to: scholarshipcontest@ioba.org. Please include “IOBA scholarship application” in the subject header of all emails. The winner or winners will be chosen by the IOBA Scholarship Committee, and will be notified by telephone and by email by June 15, 2017. More information can be found https://www.ioba.org/pages/members-area/scholarships-for-members/

The Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin announces its appointment of Aaron T. Pratt as Carl and Lily Pforzheimer Curator of Early Books and Manuscripts. Pratt, who begins May 30, will provide curatorial support for the Ransom Center’s early book and manuscript holdings and participate in a variety of activities that promote their teaching and research use.

The Center’s early book and manuscript holdings include the Carl H. Pforzheimer Library of English Literature, which is internationally known for first and important editions of plays, poems, novels, essays, polemical writings and translations of the most significant English writers from 1475 to 1700, including William Caxton, Edmund Spenser, William Shakespeare, John Milton, Andrew Marvell, John Donne, John Dryden, William Congreve, Christopher Marlowe and Francis Bacon, among many others. The Pforzheimer books are supplemented by 2,000 manuscript items. 

Pratt will also provide curatorial support for other early book and manuscript holdings, including the Gutenberg Bible, the Wrenn library, the Recusant collection, the Uzielli Aldine Press collection and incunabula. 

"From the Gutenberg Bible, to Shakespeare Folios, a manuscript of ‘The Canterbury Tales’ and editions of Galileo, the early print and manuscript holdings form one of the Ransom Center’s cornerstones, and they remain rich with untapped research potential,” says Pratt. “There's no hyperbole when I say that I am thrilled at the opportunity to develop the collection and support innovative research, teaching and outreach.”

Pratt will support researchers working with the Center’s early book and manuscripts collections and collaborate with colleagues to promote enhanced access to collections, including digital initiatives and exhibitions. He’ll also expand and strengthen the early book and manuscript holdings and will work closely with the Center’s conservation department on setting treatment priorities for collection materials.

“All of us are excited about the curatorial vision Aaron brings to this post,” says Stephen Enniss, director of the Ransom Center, “and we look forward to seeing the university’s most valuable cultural collections fully utilized in service to our teaching and research mission.”   

Pratt is a specialist in early modern literature and culture, bibliography and the history of the book. He was previously an assistant professor of English at Trinity University in San Antonio. He received a Ph.D. in English literature from Yale University and bachelor’s and master’s degrees in English from The Ohio State University.

At Yale, Pratt worked closely with David Scott Kastan, the celebrated expert in Shakespeare and the history of the book. He also served as a curatorial assistant at the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library and co-founded and organized the Yale Program in the History of the Book.

“Aaron seems to me the best young book historian in the country,” says Kastan. “He knows seemingly everything about early modern books and book production, but in addition to how much he knows and how smart he is, he is generous, kind, curious and flat-out fun.”

Pratt is a recipient of the prestigious Andrew W. Mellon Fellowship of Scholars in Critical Bibliography from Rare Book School. 

 

We are pleased to announce the appointment of David Wachtel as Senior Consultant for Rare Books at Kestenbaum & Company.

After fifteen years with Sotheby's, David looks forward to working alongside our longstanding chief scholar, Rabbi Eliezer Katzman, in researching and preparing our highly well-regarded auction catalogues of Fine Judaica. 

We trust David will be a tremendous asset as we continue to seek to provide our clients with an exceptional level of service and expertise.

David may be reached directly via his e-mail address: David@Kestenbaum.net

David will be hosting a gallery tour in advance of our forthcoming June 22nd Judaica auction (details to follow). 

Kestenbaum & Company

242 West 30th Street, New York NY 10001

Tel: (212) 366-1197 •  Info@Kestenbaum.net •  www.Kestenbaum.net

book-cover_remarkable-manuscripts-lower-res.jpgThe winner of this year’s Wolfson History Prize, awarded for excellence in accessible and scholarly history, has been announced as Dr Christopher de Hamel for his book, Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts. 

De Hamel, who receives the £40,000 prize, is Fellow and former librarian of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. He was one of six authors shortlisted for the Prize earlier this year. 

Awarded annually by the Wolfson Foundation for over forty years, the Wolfson History Prize has become synonymous with celebrating outstanding history. Established in 1972, it has awarded more than £1.1 million in recognition of the best historical writing being produced in the UK, reflecting qualities of both readability and excellence in writing and research.

Sir David Cannadine, Chair of the Prize Judges, said: “Christopher de Hamel's outstanding and original book pushes the boundaries of what it is and what it means to write history. By framing each manuscript of which he writes as the story of his own personal encounter with it, he leads the reader on many unforgettable journeys of discovery and learning. Deeply imaginative, beautifully written, and unfailingly humane, Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts distils a lifelong love of these astonishing historical treasures, which the author brings so vividly to life. It is a masterpiece.”

About the Prize-winning book: 

Part travel book, part detective story, part conversation with the reader, Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts conveys the fascination and excitement of encountering some of the greatest works of art in our culture which, in the originals, are to most people completely inaccessible.

Christopher de Hamel traces the elaborate journeys that these exceptionally precious artefacts have made through time and space; how they have been copied, owned or lusted after; how they have been embroiled in politics and scholarly disputes; and how they have been regarded as objects of supreme luxury and symbols of national identity. 

He introduces us to kings, queens, saints, scribes, artists, librarians, thieves, dealers, collectors and the international community of manuscript scholars, showing us how he and his fellows piece together evidence to reach unexpected conclusions. 

About the author:

In the course of a long career at Sotheby's Christopher de Hamel probably handled and catalogued more illuminated manuscripts and over a wider range than any person alive. He is Fellow and former librarian of Corpus Christi College, Cambridge. The Parker Library, which was in his care from 2000 to 2016, includes many of the earliest manuscripts in English language and history. He is a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries and the Royal Historical Society. 

Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts by Christopher de Hamel is published in hardback by Allen Lane at £30 

 

FALLS CHURCH, Va. - Quinn’s Auction Galleries Executive Vice President Matthew Quinn today announced the appointment of Catherine Payling, MBE, to the position of director of Waverly Rare Books, a Quinn’s subsidiary. Payling’s 25-year career in creative and nonprofit industries includes 15 years as curator/director of Keats House Museum in Rome and two years as an adjunct professor at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

A native of Newcastle upon Tyne, England, Payling earned both an undergraduate and master’s degree from Oxford University, with a major in English literature and language. Her post-university association with the arts began with a two-year stint as curator of printed books and manuscripts with the National Maritime Museum in London.

Also a chartered accountant with British and international credentials, Payling worked from 1988 to 1992 as an auditor with Ernst and Young in London. This was followed by two years as financial controller of London’s Royal Opera House. 

Payling’s next major management position was as chief operating officer of the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra in London. In that capacity, Payling oversaw all top-level business matters, including contracts, finance and personnel. 

In 1997, Payling began a 15-year tenure as curator/director of the Keats House Museum in Rome, one of Europe’s largest and most important research libraries devoted to British and European Romanticism. Payling’s responsibilities included managing the museum’s extensive collection of paintings, sculpture and other artworks, both for the benefit of the general public and specialized researchers. While in Rome, Payling discovered, authenticated and arranged for the publication of a Mary Shelley manuscript novella that had been lost for nearly two centuries. 

Working with museums, auction houses, scholars and collectors while curator/director of the Keats House Museum, Payling became an acknowledged expert in the authentication, conservation and preservation of manuscripts and other documents. She curated exhibitions with the American Academy in Rome and published numerous papers on Italy’s Anglo-American communities between 1790 and present day.

In 2003, His Royal Highness Prince Charles honored Catherine Payling with an MBE Award for her service to Anglo-Italian relations. 

After relocating to the United States, Payling accepted a position as adjunct professor at Georgetown University, where she taught marketing and fundraising. Since 2014, Payling’s broad expertise has benefited private design clients and several Washington-area nonprofits, including Georgetown Ministry Center and Grace Episcopal Church.

Payling is married to Duncan Wu, who is the Raymond Wagner Professor of Literary Studies at Georgetown University. Both have been lifelong collectors of fine and decorative art and previously attended Quinn’s sales, where Catherine, in particular, became acquainted with the company’s management and staff.

“Catherine used to attend our auctions and treasure-hunt. She loves the auction business,” Matthew Quinn said. “When the director’s position in our rare book division became available, there were several strong candidates. Before Catherine and I sat down to talk, I had no idea how impressive her background was, but it quickly became evident that she is an exceptional talent with an incredible work history. We’re very excited that she has joined us.”

Payling commented: “I am a long-time enthusiast for everything the Quinns do, and for the spirit and family values that drive the company forward. I am so lucky to have a position that allows me to sell books, work with all sorts of people, and anticipate new surprises coming through the gallery’s doors every single day of the week.”

The first Waverly Rare Books catalog sale supervised by Catherine Payling will be held on Thursday, June 1. For additional information, visit www.quinnsauction.com. Tel. 703-532-5632.

Leslie Hindman Auctioneers has hired Gretchen Hause as a specialist and the director of its Fine Books and Manuscripts department. Prior to joining the team, Ms. Hause worked as an associate specialist in the Books and Manuscripts Department at Christie's, New York.

"I enjoyed my 7 years at Christie's immensely, as they afforded me the opportunity to work with wonderful colleagues, collections and collectors," said Gretchen  Hause, Director of Fine Books and Manuscripts at Leslie Hindman Auctioneers. "I¹m thrilled to join Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, and to return to Chicago, which has a wonderful community of bibliophiles and incredible research institutions and libraries. I look forward to continuing my relationships with clients as well as meeting new clients and collectors."

Ms. Hause received a Masters Degree in English Literature from Loyola University Chicago and a Bachelor of Arts, Magna Cum Laude, in English Literature from Lycoming College. Ms. Hause spent numerous summers taking courses at the Rare Book School of the University of Virginia.

"My academic background is in literature, and I have taken both introductory and advanced courses in bibliography at Rare Book School, where I have also studied the history of bookbinding," said Hause. "I have experience handling and cataloging all types of books for sale, but my personal interests include literature, maps and atlases, travel and exploration, botany, science and medicine, and Chicago history."

Ms. Hause has also worked as a part-time instructor in the English department and an advisor to first and second year students at Loyola University Chicago.

"Gretchen's background is extremely thorough. Her impressive education and experience at Christie's will be of huge benefit to our clients," said Leslie Hindman, President and CEO.

The Fine Books and Manuscripts department is currently accepting consignments for its September auction. Gretchen Hause can be reached at  gretchenhause@lesliehindman.com or at 312.334.4229.  

Leslie Hindman Auctioneers is pleased to announce the appointment of Michael E. Shapiro as Senior Advisor, Museums and Private Collections. Mr. Shapiro recently retired from his role as Director at the High Museum of Art in Atlanta, Georgia. He will work closely with the firm's six locations, including its Chicago headquarters.

Shapiro joined the High's leadership team in 1995 and was the Nancy and Holcombe T. Green, Jr. Director of the High Museum of Art from March 2000 through July 2015. At the High, Shapiro oversaw unprecedented growth of the Museum's collection, developed numerous partnerships with national and international art institutions and increased the reach and impact of the Museum's education programming and accessibility for diverse audiences.

"It was a privilege to be at the helm of the High for the past 15 years and to help shape the vision and future of Atlanta's art museum," said Shapiro, "I now look forward to assisting the energetic and entrepreneurial team at Leslie Hindman Auctioneers." 

During his tenure at the High Museum of Art, Shapiro oversaw major initiatives such as a collaboration with former Director of the Musée du Louvre, Henri Loyrette, to found Louvre Atlanta, which brought nearly five hundred works of art from the Louvre's collections to the High over a three-year period. He regularly partnered with museums across the globe to organize similar exhibitions and bring masterpieces to the U.S.

In 2005 Shapiro was involved in a three-building campus expansion for the High. Renzo Piano was selected to design an addition to Richard Meier's iconic building, more than doubling its original size. These efforts, among many others, helped solidify the High as the leading museum of the Southeast and better serves its growing audiences from around the world.

"From leading the expansion and transformation of our campus in 2005 to developing groundbreaking collaborations, such as Louvre Atlanta, the High has been transformed from a regional powerhouse into a nationally and internationally recognized institution," said Shapiro.

Prior to his tenure at the High, Shapiro held positions as director of the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, chief curator at The Saint Louis Art Museum and as assistant professor in the Department of Art at Duke University, Durham, N.C. Shapiro holds a Ph.D. from Harvard University, a Master of Arts degree from Williams College and a Bachelor of Arts degree from Hamilton College. He received an honorary Doctor of Fine Arts degree from Hamilton College in 2016. He specializes in 19th century and 20th century painting and sculpture.

Last year Shapiro released a book titled "Eleven Museums, Eleven Directors: Conversations on Art and Leadership." The book interviews some of the museum industry¹s most innovative change agents and the mentors and events that led them to success in the field.  

"Michael and I have known each other for years. I have an enormous amount of respect for all that he has accomplished in the museum world," said Leslie Hindman, President and CEO of Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, "I¹m absolutely delighted that he will be joining our firm."

Shapiro¹s primary responsibilities will be museum outreach and assisting in collection review and the deaccession process, in conjunction with Leslie Hindman Auctioneers¹ business development and specialist teams.

"Leslie has created one of America's leading auction houses, and I look forward to helping Leslie Hindman Auctioneers continue to flourish."

Michael Shapiro can be reached at michaelshapiro@lesliehindman.com

About Leslie Hindman Auctioneers

Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, one of the world's foremost fine art auction houses, has been providing exceptional service and achieving record prices since 1982. With more salerooms in the United States than any other auction house, Leslie Hindman Auctioneers conducts over 60 auctions annually in categories such as fine jewelry and timepieces, contemporary art, 20th century design, rare books, furniture, decorative arts and more. The firm has seven locations that serve a global client base. The firm is also a founding partner of Bidsquare, a live auction platform formed by six leading auction houses, and owns a proprietary online bidding platform, LHLive, as well as LH Exchange, an e-commerce site specializing in high-end designer furniture and decorative arts. Visit www.lesliehindman.com for more information.

 

The Library of Congress is combining its two reading and writing programs for young people - A Book That Shaped Me and Letters About Literature. The move will enable the Library to better leverage its resources, to brand the programs more consistently and to encourage greater participation in these long-running programs.

The Library today kicks off its annual summer contest, now titled A Book That Shaped Me: Letters About Literature. The program will still target rising 5th- and 6th-grade students and will be managed in collaboration with libraries in six states as in past years. Winners will be honored at the 2017 National Book Festival, which will take place Saturday, Sept. 2.

Students will be asked to write a letter to their local librarian about a book that shaped their lives. The concept of letter-writing is adapted from the older program, Letters About Literature, which for 25 years has been asking students to write letters to an author whose book they read.

 “The two programs have very similar goals - getting kids to read and write about the books they love,” said Carla Hayden, the Librarian of Congress. “This integration will deepen the impact of the programs and enable the Library to market them more effectively.”

The A Book That Shaped Me summer writing contest is administered as part of summer reading programs at participating public libraries in Washington, D.C.; Maryland; Virginia; Delaware; Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Prizes will be awarded and top winners will be invited to present their essays during a special presentation at the 17th Library of Congress National Book Festival, Saturday, Sept. 2 at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C. (www.loc.gov/bookfest)

Students entering 5th and 6th grades in the fall of 2017 are eligible. Letters, focused on a single book, should be one page in length and must be submitted with an entry form, in person, at participating public library locations. The deadline for entries is Saturday, July 8, 2017.

A Book That Shaped Me will award prizes to five finalists and one winner per state, and to three overall grand-prize winners. The 30 finalists will be selected by a panel of scorers comprised of members of the American Association of School Librarians, a division of the American Library Association. The three grand-prize winners will be selected by a panel of judges assembled by the Library of Congress, including educators, children’s authors and Library of Congress staff.

Submission forms are available at the Library of Congress Young Readers Center in Room G-29 of the Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C., and at participating public library locations. The list of participating libraries and more information are available at www.loc.gov/bookfest/kids-teachers/booksthatshape/.

Launched in 2012 with DC Public Library, A Book That Shaped Me has since expanded throughout the Mid-Atlantic region with the help of public libraries in Washington, D.C.; Maryland; Virginia; Delaware; Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Nearly 300 public libraries are registered to participate in this, the sixth program year. Public library systems in these states may sign up through May 12, 2017, by contacting BooksShapeContest@loc.gov  for program details.

The Library kicked off the 2017 contest as part of Children’s Book Week, a celebration sponsored by the Children's Book Council, which is a reading-promotion partner of the Library of Congress Center for the Book.

The National Book Festival is made possible by the generous support of private and public sector sponsors who share the Library’s commitment to reading and literacy, led by National Book Festival Co-Chairman David M. Rubenstein. Charter Sponsors are the Institute of Museum and Library Services, The James Madison Council, The Washington Post and Wells Fargo; the Patron sponsor is the National Endowment for the Arts; the Contributor-level sponsors are Thomas V. Girardi, Beverly and Lyman Hamilton, the National Endowment for the Humanities and Scholastic Inc.; and, in the Friends category, Candlewick Press, John J. Medveckis and Mensa Education and Research Foundation. Those interested in supporting the National Book Festival can contact the Library at devofc@loc.gov.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office.  Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

Now in their 21st year, the New York City Book Awards are the only prizes exclusively for books about New York City. Since 1995-1996, the New York Society Library has sponsored these accolades to works of literary quality or historical importance that evoke the spirit or enhance appreciation of New York City. The Library is proud to announce the winners of the 2016 awards:

Tyler Anbinder, City of Dreams: The 400-Year Epic History of Immigrant New York (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt, October 2016)

David Oshinsky, Bellevue: Three Centuries of Medicine and Mayhem at America’s Most Storied Hospital (Doubleday, November 2016)

Roxane Orgill and Francis Vallejo, Jazz Day: The Making of a Famous Photograph (Candlewick Press, March 2016)

The Hornblower Award for a First Book: Corey Pegues, Once a Cop: The Street, the Law, Two Worlds, One Man (Atria Books, May 2016)

The 2016-2017 New York City Book Awards are generously underwritten by Ellen M. Iseman.

The Folio Society is proud to announce that two artists shortlisted for this year’s V&A Illustration Awards have been nominated for their work on Folio editions. The nominations for these prestigious awards come in two different categories - Book Illustration and Book Cover. 

Anna and Elena Balbusso have been nominated in the Book Illustration category for their work on Folio’s stunning new gift edition of Twelfth Night by William Shakespeare. 

Joe Ciardiello’s striking binding for Brief Lives by John Aubrey has been nominated in the Book Cover category. 

The winners will be announced at an exclusive awards ceremony at the V&A on 16 May 2017. 

Sheri Gee, Art Director at The Folio Society said: ‘I’m always so delighted when our illustrators gain industry recognition for the work they do on Folio Society titles. For my part, I’m constantly in awe of our illustrators’ visual interpretations of the text. I felt that Joe Ciardiello brought such vitality to Brief Lives through his pen and ink illustrations and Anna and Elena Balbusso really embraced our challenge, conveying so much of the play and its characters within two elaborate pieces.’ 

Previous Folio illustrators honoured at the V&A Illustration Awards include: David McConochie for Best Book Cover and inaugural winner of the Moira Gemmill Illustrator of the Year prize in 2016 for The Folio Book of Ghost Stories; Sterling Hundley, winner of the Book Illustration Award and Overall Winner in 2015 for Treasure Island; Anne-Marie Jones, winner of the Book Cover Award for Sons and Lovers in 2014; Anna and Elena Balbusso, winners of the Book Illustration Award for Eugene Onegin in 2013; Matthew Richardson, winner of the Book Cover Award with The Outsider in 2012; and Tom Burns, winner of the Book Illustration Award and Overall Winner in 2009 for The New York Trilogy.

2804.jpgAUSTIN, Texas - The Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin has obtained the archive of British theatre and film actor Peter O’Toole (1932-2013).

After eight Academy Award nominations for his roles in “Lawrence of Arabia” (1962), “Becket” (1964), “The Lion in Winter” (1968), “Goodbye, Mr. Chips” (1969), “The Ruling Class” (1972), “The Stunt Man” (1980), “My Favorite Year” (1982) and “Venus” (2006), O’Toole received an honorary Oscar from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences for his life-time’s work in film in 2002. O’Toole was also a distinguished stage actor who performed in the theatre from the 1950s through 1999.

The extensive archive contains theatre and film scripts along with O’Toole’s writings, including drafts, notes and working material for his multivolume memoir “Loitering with Intent.”

“It is with a respect for the past and an eye to the future that I recognize the importance of making my father’s archive accessible and preserving it for future generations,” said Kate O’Toole. “Thanks to the nature of film, my father’s work has already been immortalized. The Ransom Center now provides a world-class home for the private thoughts, conversations, notes and stories that illuminate such a long and distinguished career.”

The collection is rich with correspondence that offers insight into the relationships and workings of the theatre and film communities of which he was a part. Correspondents include Michael Blakemore, Marlon Brando, Michael Caine, John Gielgud, Peter Hall, Katherine Hepburn, Dustin Hoffman, Jeremy Irons, Spike Milligan, Paul Newman, Trevor Nunn, Laurence Olivier, Harold Pinter and Kevin Spacey, among many others.

The archive includes a rich photographic record documenting all periods of O’Toole’s personal and professional life. These include diaries and notebooks, theatre and film programs and memorabilia, audio recordings of his rehearsing lines and reciting poetry, awards, and a selection of iconic props and costume pieces, including his sword from the National Theatre’s inaugural production of “Hamlet” directed by Laurence Olivier.

Drafts of O’Toole’s unfinished third memoir dealing with his career on stage and screen will provide a valuable unpublished source for scholars, following upon his earlier memoirs “Loitering with Intent: The Child” (1992) and “Loitering with Intent: The Apprentice” (1997).

“Peter O’Toole was one of the most talented actors of stage and screen on either side of the Atlantic,” said Eric Colleary, Cline Curator of Theatre and Performing Arts at the Ransom Center. “People might be surprised to see his incredible talent with words in performance extended to dozens of published and unpublished writing projects represented in the archives. He was a brilliant writer, and his two published memoirs aside, this is an aspect of Peter O’Toole the world hasn’t yet seen.”

O’Toole began his career in theatre as a student at the Royal Academy of Dramatic Art from 1952 to 1954. He received early recognition as an actor with the Bristol Old Vic, the Royal Shakespeare Company and the National Theatre. His success in David Lean’s 1962 film “Lawrence of Arabia” made him a household name.

The O’Toole archive will also allow researchers and artists to interpret the entirety of his complex life and multifaceted career.

The materials join other collections at the Ransom Center that document the works of stage and screen performers, including Stella Adler; Robert De Niro; Edith Evans; Anne Jackson; George Bernard Shaw; Eli Wallach; Donald Wolfit, who appeared alongside O’Toole in several of his films; and strong holdings of British stage actors Henry Irving and Edmund Kean, whose life and works O’Toole studied and admired. The Ransom Center also holds a collection of T. E. Lawrence materials.

O’Toole is among that elite group of distinguished British actors honored with a memorial plaque in St. Paul’s Church, “the actors’ church,” in London’s Covent Garden.

The archive will be accessible once processed and cataloged.

Image: A studio photo of Elizabeth Taylor, Peter O’Toole, and Richard Burton (standing) on set of the 1964 film Becket. Photo courtesy of Harry Ransom Center

 

The Arcadian Library and Bloomsbury Publishing are delighted to announce the launch of Arcadian Library Online (www.arcadianlibraryonline.com) today, enabling all to discover how the Middle East and the West have interacted over a thousand year period –and how this relationship has directly resulted in the advancement of science, medicine and culture.

Collected over the last 40 years, The Arcadian Library has grown to become one of the world’s most significant private collections recording the historical interface between East and West, and is renowned in academic circles for its excellent and unique holdings. The Arcadian Library’'s collection is distinguished by its rarity, importance and quality, and includes manuscripts, early books and incunabula, documents, maps and printed books.

The Arcadian Library partnered with Bloomsbury Publishing to digitize this rich collection of books and publish them on a specially designed and expertly curated digital platform. Now the first module (History of Science and Medicine) of this treasure trove of scholarly and historically significant material is available in beautiful, high resolution digital form. Modern science and medicine owe a great deal to ideas, inventions, remedies and techniques developed in the Levant, Mesopotamia, Persia and Muslim Spain and the Arcadian Library’s collection focuses on this invaluable legacy. 

For the first time, Arcadian Library Online will enable individuals and institutions to gain exclusive access to the rich resources held in this private collection, previously accessible to scholars on an invitation-only basis. This creates a tremendous opportunity for research and learning, widening access for researchers to study the transmission, reception and circulation of early medical and scientific knowledge from the Arab and Islamic world. Users can search and view images from the Library’s holdings, and explore its documents, manuscripts and early books in detail.

The Arcadian Library is essential for anyone who wants to understand the relationship between the Middle East and the West; how it developed, and how it evolved to where it is today –at the forefront of our political, economic and social discourse.

BOSTON - April 19, 2017 [updated] Today Boston Public Library announced the return of three items from its Special Collections to the State Archives of Venice, Italy and the Library of Ludovico II De Torres in Monreale, Italy. During a repatriation ceremony with Mayor Martin J. Walsh and representatives from Homeland Security, the U.S. Attorney’s Office, and the Italian Carabinieri, Boston Public Library formally returned the Mariegola della Scuola di Santa Maria della Misericordiaa medieval manuscript dating to 1392; an illuminated leaf from the manuscript Mariegola della Scuola Grande di San Giovanni Evangelista, dating from between 1418-1422; and Varii de natvralibvs rebvs libelli, a  collection of works by Bernardino Telesio, published in 1590.

“These three items represent Italy’s rich history, and I’m pleased that through the cooperation of the Department of Homeland Security’s U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement and the U.S. Attorney’s Office, the Boston Public Library was able to ensure the safe return of these artifacts to their rightful homes in Italy,” said Mayor Martin J. Walsh. “I thank everyone involved in this successful process.” 

 “Boston Public Library took action upon learning of the claims and that the provenance of these historical treasures was incomplete, and we are very pleased to report that these items are returning home to Italy after being cared for by the BPL for decades,” said David Leonard, President of the Boston Public Library.

“Boston Public Library purchased these rare and important materials in good faith for the public to see and study and we took our stewardship of them seriously during the many years that they were in our care. We are fully committed to their safe return to Italy so they can continue to be utilized and appreciated by new researchers and scholars,” said Beth Prindle, Boston Public Library’s Head of Special Collections.  

Boston Public Library legitimately purchased all three items from well-known rare book dealers during the mid-twentieth century. Mariegola della Scuola di Santa Maria della Misericordia was acquired in 1960 from Philip Duschenes of New York, the illuminated manuscript leaf was obtained in 1955 from the Italian dealer Olschki, and the Bernardino Telesio volume was purchased in 1980 from Michael R. Thompson of Los Angeles. The medieval manuscript and leaf became part of the library’s Medieval and Early Renaissance Manuscripts Collection of Distinction,a notable collection which totals nearly 250 volumes and single leaves dating from the 10th through the early 16thcenturies. These special collections materials are administered through the BPL’s Rare Books & Manuscripts Department, which holds nearly 250,000 rare books and one million manuscripts.

Questions about the Mariegolas’ provenance emerged through new independent scholarship and a recent project funded by the library to research and describe its medieval manuscripts holdings in preparation for electronic cataloging and digitization. The Mariegola della Scuola di Santa Maria della Misericordia was written in Bologna in 1392 for the use of the scuola (confraternity) of Our Lady of Mercy at Valverde, a spiritual and charitable brotherhood.  It was part of the scuola’s collection until the confraternity was dissolved in 1803, at which point it passed into the collection of the State Archive of Venice. Beginning in 1879, the manuscript was on permanent display in the Archive’s Sala Diplomatica Regina Margherita. The manuscript was taken off exhibition in the late 1940s, at which time several manuscripts disappeared under unknown circumstances, including the Mariegola della Scuola di Santa Maria della Misericordia. The second mariegola, a single illuminated parchment leaf on vellum from Mariegola della Scuola Grande di San Giovanni Evangelista, had been removed at an unidentified date from a larger manuscript still held by the Archivio di Stato in Venice. 

The third item, Telesio’s Varii de natvralibvs rebvs libelli, is a rare printed collection of works by the Italian philosopher and natural scientist Bernardino Telesio. It bears the signature of Cardinal Ludovico II De Torres (1552-1609), who served as Archbishop of Monreale, Italy and donated his personal book collection. The BPL had recently digitized the volume and made it available through the Internet Archive; the Ludovico II De Torres Library curator recognized the Cardinal’s signature while viewing the book online and made inquiries about the book through government channels.

Boston Public Library and the City of Boston worked collaboratively with the U.S. Attorney’s office and Homeland Security to coordinate the effort to contact and return the items to the State Archives of Venice and The Library of Ludovico II De Torres in Monreale, respectively. 

About BOSTON PUBLIC LIBRARY 
Boston Public Library has a Central Library, twenty-four branches, map center, business library, and a website filled with digital content and services. Established in 1848, the Boston Public Library has pioneered public library service in America. It was the first large free municipal library in the United States, the first public library to lend books, the first to have a branch library, and the first to have a children’s room. Each year, the Boston Public Library hosts thousands of programs and serves millions of people. All of its programs and exhibitions are free and open to the public. At the Boston Public Library, books are just the beginning. To learn more, visit bpl.org.

Screen Shot 2017-04-17 at 8.37.47 AM.pngAs of April 26, 2017, Les Enluminures Chicago is open, by appointment, at our new premises located at One Mag Mile, 980 North Michigan Avenue, an award-winning building designed by Skidmore, Owings and Merrill. On Wednesday 26 April, from 6-9 p.m., Sandra Hindman and Keegan Goepfert will host a champagne and appetizers evening to mark the Grand Opening of the offices and showroom.

Les Enluminures is excited about the new premises at One Magnificent Mile, which will allow the gallery’s Founder and President, Sandra Hindman, and Vice-President and Director, Keegan Goepfert, to meet friends, associates, and clients in beautiful surroundings that combine the fine architecture of Chicago with medieval art. Chicago is one of the many locations of Les Enluminures. The gallery was founded by Dr. Sandra Hindman in 1991, and now boasts locations in the heart of Paris, the Upper East Side, New York, and Pall Mall, London. In addition to regular exhibitions in its galleries, Les Enluminures exhibits at many prestigious art and antique shows, including TEFAF Maastricht, TEFAF New York, Frieze Masters, London, and Masterpiece, London.

An exhibition of fine Books of Hours, illuminated manuscripts, miniatures and medieval rings will accompany the Chicago Grand Opening, with masterpieces by Simon Bening, Jean Pucelle, and Bartolomeo Caporali.

Contact Les Enluminures Chicago at : 

One Magnificent Mile, 980 North Michigan Avenue, Suite 1330 Chicago IL 60611
Tel. (773) 929 5986 chicago@lesenluminures.com 

Image: Histoire Ancienne jusqu’à César and Fait des Romains In French, illuminated manuscript on parchment. With 78 miniatures by the Master of the Coronation of Charles VI and a collaborator. France, Paris, c. 1370-80 $4,500,000 

 

es-cover-with-strokes-144.png(Ojai, CA, April 4, 2017)—Santa Barbara certified appraiser Dr. Elizabeth Stewart has been recognized as a finalist in the 19th annual Foreword INDIES Book of the Year Awards. Her book is one of 10 finalists in the Reference category. The awards will be announced and presented in June at the American Library Association annual meeting in Chicago.

In noting the qualities for selection, the INDIES Panel noted: "Collect Value Divest: The Savvy Appraiser delivers short, concise chapters so that any collector can easily learn how to value their paintings, books, artifacts, and treasured possessions. Dr. Elizabeth Stewart condenses her thirty years as a certified appraiser into easy-to-read anecdotes that cover commonly asked questions about value. She provides tips on how to buy, sell, insure, and auction, and explains how to bequeath pieces."

As part of Foreword Review’s mission to discover, review, and share the best books from small, university, and indie publishers (and authors), independent media company Foreword Reviews hosts its annual awards program each year. Finalists represent the best books published in 2016 that were submitted to Foreword Reviews for award consideration, and were narrowed down by Foreword’s editors from over 2,200 individual titles spread across 65 categories.

“Choosing finalists for the INDIES is always the highlight of our year, but the choice was more difficult this time around due to the high quality of submissions,” said Victoria Sutherland, publisher of Foreword Reviews. “Each new book award season proves again how independent publishers are the real innovators in the industry.”

“I am honored to be selected from the broad group of books published this year,” said Stewart. “My goal with the book was to bring useful information to collectors and to people entrusted with heirlooms. Being named a finalist acknowledges this goal.”

INDIES finalists are moved on to final judging by an expert panel of librarians and booksellers curated specifically for each genre, who will determine the books that will be named Foreword INDIES Book of the Year Award winners. Winners in each genre—along with Editor’s Choice winners and Foreword’s INDIE Publisher of the Year—will be announced during the 2017 American Library Association Annual Conference in Chicago on June 24, 2017.

A complete list of finalists can be found at: https://awards.forewordreviews.com/finalists/2016/

To learn more about Elizabeth Stewart and her book or popular blog, visit: www.ElizabethAppraisals.com.

 

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture and the Library of Congress today announced the joint acquisition of an album of 44 rare photographs, including a previously unrecorded portrait of abolitionist and Underground Railroad conductor Harriet Tubman and the only known photograph of John Willis Menard, the first African American man elected to the U.S. Congress.

The collaboration ensures these pieces of American history will be accessible to the public in perpetuity.

“It is a distinct honor to have these photographs that tell an important part of America’s history,” said Lonnie Bunch, founding director of the National Museum of African American History and Culture. “We are pleased and humbled to work with the Library of Congress to ensure that this rare and significant collection will be preserved and made accessible to the American public.”

“To have a new glimpse of such key figures in American history is rare indeed,” said Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden. “Through this extraordinary collaboration, these images will be forever part of our shared heritage and will be a source of inspiration for many generations to come.”

The images are part of the photo album of Emily Howland (1827-1929), a Quaker school teacher who taught at Camp Todd, the Freedman’s School in Arlington, Va. The album contains 44 images taken circa 1860s, including the Tubman and Menard images, as well as a print of a more commonly known Tubman portrait taken later in life, and images of Charles Sumner, Lydia Maria Child, Samuel Ely, William Ellery Channing, Colonel C.W. Folsom and Charles Dickens.

About the National Museum of African American History and Culture

The National Museum of African American History and Culture opened Sept. 24 on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Occupying a prominent location next to the Washington Monument, the nearly 400,000-square-foot museum is the nation’s largest and most comprehensive cultural destination devoted exclusively to exploring, documenting and showcasing the African American story and its impact on American and world history. For more information about the museum, visit nmaahc.si.edu or call Smithsonian information at (202) 633-1000.

About the Library of Congress

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office.  Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

pen_appeal.jpgAUSTIN, Texas — The Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin has received a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) to support a two-year, $195,000 project to arrange, describe, selectively digitize and share its PEN records. The Ransom Center holds the archives of PEN International and English PEN, who share the mission of promoting literature and defending freedom of expression around the world.

The NEH grant-funded project “Writers Without Borders: Creating Global Access to the PEN International and English PEN Records” includes cataloging and creating an online finding aid for the records. Spanning from 1912 to 2008, the collection contains administrative records and details international meetings, work of committees and undertakings of the organization. 

Also included are more than 100,000 pieces of correspondence revealing exchanges between members and documenting the association’s major issues and priorities. Some of the represented writers include Chinua Achebe, Elizabeth Bowen, T. S. Eliot, Robert Frost, Nadine Gordimer, Günter Grass, James Joyce, Arthur Miller, Octavio Paz, Salman Rushdie, Aung San Suu Kyi, Virginia Woolf and W. B. Yeats.

To expand access to the records, 4,400 images will be digitized and made freely available online.

Digitized images will include PEN newsletters, minutes, reports, scrapbooks and ephemera in the archive. A portion of the digitized images will be selected for the creation of an online teaching collection webpage, providing teachers and students the opportunity to engage with archival materials. Topics and teaching modules will explore global refugees and writers in exile, free speech, writing about World War II, the global Cold War and international human rights.

“These archives offer unique insight into human rights crises and document important cultural, historical and literary debates of the last century,” said Steve Enniss, director of the Ransom Center. “Increasing and broadening access to these materials offers an unparalleled resource for research. Because PEN International is not limited to a particular nationality or writing genre, no other archives of literary organizations offer similar content or comparable scope and chronology in a public repository.”

Founded in 1921 to foster friendship and intellectual cooperation among poets, essayists and novelists, the association quickly shifted focus as its membership challenged the rise of fascism across Europe. Today, the association self-identifies as the “world’s first human rights organization,” defending freedom of expression and promoting literature through programs implemented by its global network of 149 centers in more than 100 countries.

“At this time when freedom of expression is in peril all over the globe, the support from the NEH to safeguard PEN’s extraordinary history in defending literature and the right to speak and write freely is vital,” said Jennifer Clement, president of PEN International. “Over the past 100 years in every place where censorship has tried to quiet voices, PEN has worked to support both the individual and collective truth.” 

Nearly a century after its founding by British writer, poet and playwright Catharine Amy Dawson Scott, PEN has left an indelible mark on international politics, culture and literature, with a membership that now extends to journalists, publishers and editors.  

“This project will make PEN’s unique literary archive available for everyone,” said Jo Glanville, director of English PEN. “It will be a remarkable resource for anyone researching the history of literature and freedom of expression in the 20th and 21st centuries, from the modernists’ involvement in the early days of PEN to the new frontline in the battle against censorship, including the campaign for Salman Rushdie.”

The Ransom Center will complete the project by September 2019. 

The research value of the PEN records is enhanced by related collections at the Ransom Center, which document authors who were officers or active members, among them John Galsworthy (PEN’s first president), Sybille Bedford, Christine Brooke-Rose, Nancy Cunard, D. H. Lawrence, Norman Mailer, Arthur Miller, J. B. Priestly, W. Somerset Maugham, George Bernard Shaw, Tom Stoppard and H. G. Wells. 

Image: PEN. Appeal to All Governments, printed text in English, French, and German, 1931. Courtesy Harry Ransom Center.

The ILAB Breslauer Prize for Bibliography will be awarded again in 2018 and is one of the most prestigious prizes in the field of bibliography. 

A prize with tradition and a strong support for scholarship: The Breslauer Prize for Bibliography awarded by the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers, worth US $10,000, is one of the most important prizes in the field of bibliography. Every fourth year it detects and awards a particularly significant reference work within a selection of scholarly books about books. 

Famous scholars like Jean Peeters-Fontainas, I. C. Koeman and Anthony Hobson belong to the prize winners alongside Lotte Hellinga and Jan Storm van Leeuwen who were honoured with the 15th Prize in September 2010 and Jon Gilbert who received the 16th Prize in 2014 for his superb study "Ian Fleming. The Bibliography". These are shining examples for the enormous amount of knowledge - and work - which stands behind such brilliant studies in a scientific field that is essential for every kind of academic research, and for the rare book trade. The 17th ILAB Breslauer Prize for Bibliography will be awarded in 2018 to one or more books published in any language and in any part of the world between April 2013 and April 2017. Any work submitted to the Prize must be a published book available on the market.

The prize jury - consisting of Bettina Wagner (Bavarian State Library, Munich), Daniel de Simone (Folger Shakespeare Library, Washington DC), Yann Sordet (Bibliothèque Mazarine, Paris) and the antiquarian booksellers Fabrizio Govi (Italy), and Justin Croft (United Kingdom) - will admit all publications relating to bibliography in a very broad sense: textual bibliography, history of the book, bookbinding, papermaking, type-founding, library catalogues, short-title catalogues of a single author or typographer, etc. The jury will not take into consideration ebooks and catalogues of books intended for sale and translations of previously published works.

Writers, publishers, librarians, journalists, scholars, antiquarian booksellers, book collectors and all who are interested in bibliography and the history of the book are invited to submit books to the 17th ILAB Breslauer Prize for Bibliography!

The final deadline to submit titles for the 2018 ILAB Breslauer Prize for Bibliography is approaching. Please submit titles by the end of April 2017 to the Prize Secretary, Fabrizio Govi. 

To see recent submissions, please go here: http://www.ilabprize.org/eng/Prize_2018/Submitted_Books_2018.html

Please contact: Fabrizio Govi, Secretary ILAB Breslauer Prize for Bibliography, Libreria Alberto Govi - Via Bononcini, 24 - 41124 Modena (Italia) - Phone +39 059 373629 Email: info@libreriagovi.com

The international auction house Bonhams has appointed Laura Paterson as Head of Photographs in New York.

A graduate in History of Art from Edinburgh University, Laura joins Bonhams with more than 20 years’ experience as a photographs specialist at Christie’s New York, where she was Senior Specialist. She has also worked as the US Cultural and Print Sales Director at Magnum Photos New York, and as Photography Department Co-Head and Senior Specialist for online auctioneers Paddle 8. 

Bonhams Global CEO, Matthew Girling, said, “Photographs are an important part of Bonhams Fine Arts stable, and so we are delighted that someone as highly respected as Laura Paterson has arrived to lead the department. Laura will build on our strong track record of achievement in this area.”  

Laura Paterson commented, “I am excited at the prospect of joining a company with such a strong commitment to the world of photographs. I look forward to contributing my enthusiasm and experience to its future success.”  

The Library of Congress today announced the acquisition of the archives of Bob Adelman, one of the best-known photographers of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. The collection, containing 575,000 high-quality images, was given to the Library as a gift from an anonymous donor.

The materials, which represent a wide range of images covering the latter half of the 20th century, will be housed in the Library’s Prints and Photographs Division. Of the 575,000 images, 50,000 are prints and the rest, negatives and slides.

Adelman (1930-2016) photographed many of the important leaders and events of the Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King and the March on Washington. He also photographed people, events and other social issues of the day (1960-2000), including pop artists Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein and short-story writer and poet Raymond Carver.

Adelman said, “My life’s work, in addition to being about race relations, is about the many and diverse social concerns in the great tradition of American documentary photography:  poverty, mental illness, alcoholism, inadequate housing, the immigrant experience, prostitution, delinquency, illiteracy and on and on.”

Born in New York City in 1930, Adelman grew up on Long Island.  He earned a bachelor’s degree from Rutgers University and a master’s in philosophy from Columbia University and studied law at Harvard.

Adelman studied photography under Alexey Brodovitch, the famed art director of Harper’s Bazaar magazine.  As a working photographer and producer of photographic books, Adelman pursued an avid interest in social and political events.  This interest began with coverage of events related to civil rights, such as sit-ins by students across the American South and demonstrations by the Congress of Racial Equality (C.O.R.E.) in the early 1960s.  His engagement with issues of social justice continued until his death.

His mentor, Ralph Ellison, once said, “Adelman has moved beyond the familiar clichés of most documentary photography into that rare sphere wherein technical ability and social vision combine to create a work of art.”

Adelman, in an interview several years ago, said, “When I photographed, I was intent on telling the truth as best I saw it and then to help in doing something about it.  It was a constant effort not only to document in as honest a way as I could, and to make what I was seeing vivid, but to figure out how to change things.”

Adelman received many honors in recognition of his work, including a Guggenheim fellowship, Art Directors Club awards (New York, Washington and San Francisco), American Institute of Graphic Arts 50 Books awards and the University of Missouri’s School of Journalism Award.  He has taught at the International Center for Photography, the New School, the School of Visual Arts, Columbia University, Stanford University, Union College, the University of Minnesota, Ohio State University, the Museum of Fine Arts (Boston) and the Steamboat Falls Workshop.

The Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division preserves and provides access to nearly 16 million photographs, drawings and prints from the 15th century to the present day.  International in scope, these visual collections represent a uniquely rich array of human experience, knowledge, creativity and achievement, touching on almost every realm of endeavor: science, art, invention, government and political struggle, and the recording of history. For more information, visit loc.gov/rr/print/.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov, and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

13 March 2017: Over the past few months, ILAB has developed a new International Mentoring Programme which aims to help young or recently launched booksellers throughout the world by offering support and counsel on a one to one basis. The ILAB International Mentoring Programme gives experienced booksellers the opportunity to lend a hand in the early days of a bookseller’s career, when help is likely most needed. 

In this day and age communication between dealers across the world is easy and inexpensive. This has created an opportunity for the antiquarian trade to work together helping less experienced booksellers, wherever they may be located, to develop their businesses and become more confident and effective members of our trade, within a much shorter time than they might otherwise be able to without a mentor. 

“We can now envisage such situations as a Dutch mentor supporting a young American bookseller, an American mentor helping a young Russian bookseller or an Australian mentor chatting regularly with their mentee in Malaysia. It is also just as likely that the mentor and mentee might be within the same country or city - there are far fewer limitations than there have ever been. This programme harnesses the enormous good will of our members worldwide to offer a truly extraordinary range of expertise in, as this is written, no less than 9 languages, to support less experienced booksellers where ever they may be.” says ILAB Vice-President and Mentoring Programme Coordinator Sally Burdon. 

A comprehensive listing of mentors has been published on the Education section on the ILAB website, a diverse and impressive group of booksellers who reflect just some of the many different types of successful booksellers who comprise our trade. Prospective mentees are invited to visit the site. 

All of the mentors involved in the ILAB International Mentor Program are drawn from ILAB ranks and are acting in a voluntary capacity. The mentees will not be required to make any payment for mentoring. The booksellers who are being mentored will not be named on the ILAB site. The mentees may or may not be current ILAB members although we do expect those seeking to be mentored to be serious about pursuing a career in the trade. 

For information please contact the coordinators of the ILAB International Mentoring Programme: Sally Burdon (ILAB Vice President)
Stuart Bennett (ILAB Executive Committee)
Email: editor@ilab.org 

Website Link: https://www.ilab.org/eng/education/Mentor_Programme.html

 

merian-book-shapero-stand-TEFAF-web.jpgShapero Rare Books has announced their first major sale at TEFAF Maastricht prior to the official opening on 10 March 2017. One of the highlights on their stand is a lavishly illustrated folio Metamorphosis insectorum Surinamensium (Metamorphosis of the Insects of Surinam) by Maria Sibylla Merian (1647-1717) which has been sold to a European collector. Priced by Shapero at £125,000, this hand-coloured copy of the 1726 edition is a masterpiece of both art and science; the German born naturalist was the first to record the full life cycle of many species of butterflies and moths. 

A Study of Metamorphosis: More Than 300 Years Ago

At the age of 52, Merian, who settled in Amsterdam in 1691, set out for the Dutch colony now known as Surinam in South America. She spent two years studying and drawing the indigenous flora and fauna until forced to return after contracting malaria. Despite her illness, Merian published her Magnus Opus, Metamorphosis Insectorum Surinamensium, three years later, filled with paintings of Suriname's plants and animals, especially of moths and butterflies, as well as spiders, and even snakes and lizards. Many of these tropical species were unknown to Europeans at the time.


The exceptional group of her works in the Royal Collection formed the basis of the exhibition held last year at the Queen's Gallery at Buckingham Palace that travels to Holyrood Palace in Edinburgh. Exactly 300 years after her death, the Frankfurt-born botanist, zoologist and painter is finally being recognised as a pioneering woman of science at an international symposium in the Dutch capital this June.

Shapero Rare Books has exhibited at TEFAF for over 20 years. Other notable natural history books on stand 231 include a first edition folio of the Wunderkammer by Dutchman Albertus Seba. 

About Shapero Rare Books:

Shapero Rare Books is an internationally renowned dealer in rare books and works on paper. Its experts have over 100 years’ experience in the book world with particular expertise in fine illustrated books from the 15th to the 20th Century, particularly natural history, travel, guidebooks and Russian works. In 2014 it launched Shapero Modern, a modern and contemporary prints department.

AUSTIN, Texas — The Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin has acquired the papers of actors, and husband and wife, Eli Wallach (1915-2014) and Anne Jackson (1925-2016). Known as method actors and early members of the Actors Studio in New York, Wallach and Jackson had extensive and independent careers on stage and screen while also performing together in several productions.

The 40 boxes of the papers of Eli Wallach, a 1936 graduate of The University of Texas, and Anne Jackson cover the span of their lives and careers. The method actors’ collection of heavily annotated scripts — including theater premieres of Tennessee Williams’ “Summer and Smoke” (1948), “The Rose Tattoo” (1951), and “Camino Real” (1953) and film scripts of Arthur Miller’s “The Misfits” (1961) and the classic Spaghetti Western “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly” (1966) — document their unique approaches to developing a character. The collection also includes playbills, awards, clippings, posters, professional and candid photographs, correspondence, scrapbooks, home movies and interviews.

“Few actors documented their process like Anne Jackson and Eli Wallach did,” says Dr. Eric Colleary, Cline Curator of Theatre and Performing Arts at the Ransom Center. “They were absolute masters of their craft. Throughout their scripts you can find complex character sketches and marginal notes detailing why their characters behave the way they do. They bring an entirely new dimension to some of the most important plays and films of the 20th century.”

The papers have connections to several collections in the Ransom Center’s film and performing arts holdings, including those of Stella Adler, Robert De Niro, Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams and others.

“The collection will prove to be a rich and rewarding one for students and scholars as it also highlights one of the great strengths of the Ransom Center’s collections, the connections between artists — from Tennessee Williams to Arthur Miller to Norman Mailer to Magnum Photos,” says Ransom Center Curator of Film Steve Wilson. “We are proud to become the custodians of Wallach and Jackson’s remarkable legacy.”

Married for 66 years, Wallach and Jackson’s partnership mirrors similar relationships between actors Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne, Jessica Tandy and Hume Cronyn and Anne Bancroft and Mel Brooks. Wallach and Jackson, who met while performing in a 1946 production of Tennessee Williams’ “This Property is Condemned,” appeared multiple times together on Broadway and off Broadway.

Jackson, who was nominated for a Tony Award for “Middle of the Night” (1956) and won an Obie award for her performances in “The Tiger” and “The Typists” (1963), made her Broadway debut in “The New Moon” (1944). Jackson had film credits in Stanley Kubrick’s “The Shining” (1980), “How to Save a Marriage and Ruin Your Life” (1968) and “So Young, So Bad” (1950) while numerous roles in television series included “General Electric Theater” (1956-1962), “The Untouchables” (1962), “Gunsmoke” (1972), “Law & Order” (1997) and “ER” (2003).

Jackson’s memoir, “Early Stages” (1979), noted that she and Wallach had much in common: “Neither of us could sing; both of us loved to act; we were both ambitious and idealistic; and we endowed each other with the most extraordinary virtues.”

Wallach also penned a memoir, “The Good, the Bad, and Me” (2006), sharing his experiences on stage and his performances in more than 90 films, including “Baby Doll” (1956), “The Magnificent Seven” (1960), “The Misfits” (1961), “Lord Jim” (1965), “How to Steal a Million” (1966), “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly” (1966), “The Godfather: Part III” (1990) and “The Holiday” (2006).

Upon Wallach’s receipt of an honorary Academy Award for Lifetime Achievement, actor Robert De Niro said, “I’ve heard Eli referred to as a character actor, and I think that’s meant to describe an actor who customarily plays supporting roles. But really we’re all character actors — or at least striving to be one. It makes no difference whether his character is the lead or supporting. Eli brings the same craft, dedication and artistry to the challenge.”  

While attending The University of Texas, Wallach was a member of the university’s Curtain Club and performed alongside Walter Cronkite and Zachary Scott.

The papers will be accessible once processed and cataloged.

 

LOS ANGELES/WASHINGTON - The J. Paul Getty Museum and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, announced today major gifts of photographs from the collection of Daniel Greenberg and Susan Steinhauser. The Getty’s gift includes 386 works of art by 17 different photographers, including works by some of the most influential American practitioners of the 20th century, and 23 additional photographs as future gifts. The Gallery’s gift includes 143 gelatin silver prints by Dorothea Lange, with 10 additional photographs by Lange promised. These two gifts are the key elements of a broader initiative by Greenberg and Steinhauser that involved donations to a total of 13 leading art institutions. 

Greenberg and Steinhauser have been collecting photographs for over 20 years, largely by 20th-century American masters, but also by Latin American and Japanese makers. In keeping with their belief in sharing their collection with the public, they have previously donated very significant bodies of photographs, ceramics, turned wood, and contemporary studio glass to a number of institutions over the years.

“While collecting is a mysterious endeavor, and living with the art is profound, the act of gifting is a joyous and wonderful moment in time,” says Daniel Greenberg. “As Susan and I begin a new chapter in our lives, and after decades of acting as temporary stewards for these photographs, we are excited that now is the time that we can share some of the best works we have owned with the public.”

“These gifts, which are the largest we have made to date, are part of a larger personal commitment through which we are supporting many leading art museums around the country with gifts primarily from our photography collection,” says Susan Steinhauser. “Each photo reminds us of the circumstances under which we searched for, found, experienced and shared it with others. These photographs helped shape our lives and led to many long-lasting friendships. It is our hope that the public will embrace them as enthusiastically as we have.” 

The Getty acquisition:

Highlights of the Getty acquisition include the first works by Ruth Bernhard and Eudora Welty to enter the Museum’s collection. Best known for her studies of the female nude, the German-born Bernhard became one of the leading photographers on the West Coast. While Welty is better known as an American novelist, she also had a serious interest in photography, and her work conveys a similar connection with her subjects that can be seen in her books. The donation of 27 works by Imogen Cunningham complements the 66 prints already in the Getty’s collection, and sets the stage for a possible monographic exhibition of her work. The donation of Chris Killip’s Isle of Man portfolio of 12 prints comes as the Getty prepares for a major exhibition of the artist’s work opening May 23, 2017.

“This incredibly generous donation will complement and strengthen the Getty’s holdings of several major photographers, and provide a rich trove of images from which to organize future exhibitions,” says Timothy Potts, director of the J. Paul Getty Museum. “The gift to the Getty includes both individual prints and portfolios, with the latter giving us the opportunity to represent specific bodies of a photographer’s work in depth. We are extremely grateful to Dan and Susan for their generosity and continued support of the Getty’s Department of Photographs.”

The Getty Museum holds one of the world’s preeminent collections of photographs, and Los Angeles has become an important center for the study of the history and art of photography. Greenberg and Steinhauser are founding members of the Getty Museum Photographs Council, of which Greenberg is the current chairman and Steinhauser is a past chair. Since 2000, they have donated over 500 photographs to the Getty, including significant groups of works by Manuel Álvaraz Bravo, Graciela Iturbide, Abelardo Morell, Eliot Porter, and Minor White, all of which inspired exhibitions organized at the Getty Museum in recent years.

The Getty gift includes:

     12 works by Berenice Abbott (American, 1898-1991)

     29 works by Ruth Bernhard (American, born Germany, 1905-2006)

     18 works by Wynn Bullock (1902-1975)

     27 works by Imogen Cunningham (American, 1883-1976)

     57 works by Bruce Davidson (American, born 1933)

     14 works by William Eggleston (American, born 1939)

     1 work by Andreas Feininger (American, born France, 1906-1999)

     96 works by Mario Giacomelli (Italian, 1925-2000)

     5 works by André Kertész (American, born Hungary, 1894-1985)

     12 works by Chris Killip (British, born 1946)

     1 work by Dorothea Lange (American, 1895-1965)

     15 works by Mary Ellen Mark (American, 1940-2015)

     26 works by Richard Misrach (American, born 1949)

     18 works by Abelardo Morell (American, born Cuba, born 1948)

     9 works by Arnold Newman (American, 1918-2006)

     8 works by Milton Rogovin (American, 1909-2011)

     38 works by Eudora Welty (American, 1909-2011)

National Gallery of Art acquisition:

The Greenberg and Steinhauser gift establishes the National Gallery of Art as one of the major repositories of Lange’s work in the world, powerfully revealing why she remains one of the country's most acclaimed documentary photographers. An excellent and comprehensive holding of Lange’s photographs, this gift represents her entire career from the late 1920s to the early 1960s.

“With only two photographs by Lange previously in the Gallery’s collection, Dan and Susan’s donation is a truly transformative gift," said Earl A. Powell III, director of the National Gallery of Art, Washington. “The exceptional depth and breadth of this group of photographs will allow the Gallery to beautifully illustrate the full range of Lange’s art, from her early studio portraits and her profoundly moving documents of the impact of the Great Depression on the American people, to her later pictures featuring people and cultures she engaged with while traveling around the world.”

One of the best known American photographers working in the 1930s, Dorothea Lange was made famous by her 1936 portrait of an impoverished migrant farm worker and her children in Nipomo, California, called Migrant Mother. However, Lange began her career as a studio portraitist working in San Francisco with a mostly upper-class clientele. Between 1929 and 1933, the years bookended by the Stock Market crash and the start of the New Deal, Lange struggled to redefine her professional identity. Yet in 1933 as she looked for subjects outside her studio—from breadlines and homelessness to labor demonstrations and workers’ strikes—she found her voice, responding directly to what she saw and helping to define what would become known as social documentary photography.

Lange was a committed photographer whose works have been consistently received as compelling records of the human condition. But her carefully composed pictures, often closely cropped to increase their emotional intensity, also reveal her remarkable talent for marrying eye-catching formal compositions with captivating, socially charged subject matter. Of particular note, this collection contains multiple prints made over several years of some of Lange’s most celebrated photographs—such as Death in the Doorway, Migrant Mother, and Migratory Cotton Picker—which will help the Gallery elucidate to students and scholars alike the evolving nature of her practice.

Founded in 1990, the National Gallery of Art’s collection of photographs and its program for photography have become one of the most celebrated in the world, with large, in-depth holdings of work by such celebrated photographers as Eadweard Muybridge, Alfred Stieglitz, Walker Evans, Ilse Bing, Robert Frank, Harry Callahan, and Robert Adams, among others, and numerous award-winning exhibitions and publications. 

The first donation to the National Gallery by Greenberg and Steinhauser, this gift is a major addition to the Gallery’s large holdings of works by such social documentary photographers as Gordon Parks and Jim Goldberg. Several of the pictures donated by Greenberg and Steinhauser will be featured in The New Woman Behind the Camera (2019), as well as other forthcoming exhibitions. 

In addition to their generous gifts to the Getty and the National Gallery of Art,  Greenberg and  Steinhauser have recently made gifts to 13 other American art museums, including the Chrysler Museum of Art in Norfolk, Virginia; the Hammer Museum at UCLA; High Museum of Art, Atlanta; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Minneapolis Institute of Art; Museum of Modern Art, New York; The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City; New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe; and Peabody-Essex Museum, Salem, MA.

Ham Cat Group copy.jpgNew York - A unique collection of original letters, documents and imprints relating to the life and times of Alexander Hamilton—the orphan immigrant founding father who fought for independence, founded our financial system, and fostered a government capable of surviving internal factions and foreign foes—will be unveiled at the New York Antiquarian Book Fair, March 9-12, at the Park Avenue Armory, booths E 33-35.

The Alexander Hamilton Collection contains hundreds of documents from leaders, soldiers, citizens and the press, written when the Revolutionary War and Founding were current events. The Collection includes powerful letters and documents of Hamilton, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, and Aaron Burr, among many others.

Highlights include:

  • Hamilton’s documents relating to several duel threats, a habit that did not end well;
  • Hamilton’s greatest love letter to Eliza, laced with sexual innuendo;
  • Hamilton’s letter rallying to defeat Jefferson after Washington declined a third term (his tune changed four years later when his more dangerous nemesis Burr was on the stage);
  • a lock of Hamilton’s hair, preserved in his family for generations

The collection was assembled by two leading historic document experts, John Reznikoff of University Archives (Westport, CT) and Seth Kaller of Seth Kaller, Inc. (White Plains, NY).

According to Kaller, “Our aim was to bring together important documents that were part of the struggle to form a new nation, warts and all. The immense success of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s HAMILTON demonstrates how inspiring this story still is. It is comforting to look back, through the quills and presses of Hamilton and his contemporaries, to see upstart America overcoming challenges as great as any we face today.” Kaller added, “Now we look forward to finding a good home to preserve this museum-worthy collection.”

Arkham House Archive for Sale

Screen Shot 2017-02-27 at 11.11.20 AM.pngLloyd Currey and John Knott are pleased to offer the David H. Rajchel Arkham House Archive, one of the most impressive and important collections of material related to fantastic fiction to ever appear on the market.  Consisting of over 4,000 individual items, the archive is a virtual who’s who in fantasy, horror, and science fiction.

August Derleth’s contributions to the field of weird fiction as an editor and publisher are well known.  Derleth and his business partner, Donald Wandrei, established Arkham House to preserve the legacy of H. P. Lovecraft with the publication of The Outsider and Others in 1939. In addition to publishing the first collections of short fiction by such luminaries as Ray Bradbury, Robert Bloch, Fritz Leiber, Ramsey Campbell and others Arkham House also brought the work of William Hope Hodgson to an American audience with the publication of The House on the Borderland and Other Novels in 1945. The press also preserved the memory of Robert E. Howard with the publication of SKULL FACE AND OTHERS (1946). Derleth’s practice of introducing writers of weird fiction from the UK to a broader audience continued throughout his career and included Marjorie Bowen, J. S. Le Fanu, Margery Lawrence, M. P. Shiel, and H. R. Wakefield.

The David H. Rajchel Arkham House Archive illustrates how Derleth’s influence extended well beyond Arkham House.  Derleth’s landmark science fiction and fantasy anthologies of the 1940s and 1950s, many published by Pellgrini and Cudhay, brought Derleth into contact with most of the major authors of fantastic fiction of his day, such as Charles Beaumont, Robert Bloch, Robert Heinlein, Henry Kuttner, Frederik Pohl, Clifford Simak, Clark Ashton Smith, Theodore Sturgeon and many others.

The archive gives insight into Derleth as editor, publisher and writer and is a remarkable collection of materials of one of the most important twentieth century small publisher's archives offered for sale in the last several decades. The core of the archive is correspondence, often extensive, from several hundred authors whose work Derleth published under his own imprints or in his highly important non-Arkham House anthologies published in the 1940s and 1950s, as well as manuscripts, mostly typewritten (including fair copies and carbons), submitted by Arkham House authors.

For more details contact L.W. Currey, Inc. or John W. Knott, Jr., Bookseller.

Screen Shot 2017-02-24 at 8.55.30 AM.pngThe Folio Society and House of Illustration are thrilled to announce Darya Shnykina as the winner of the seventh annual Book Illustration Competition - a unique partnership between The Folio Society and House of Illustration. Darya was presented with her prize, a prestigious commission worth £5,000 to illustrate Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park by eminent historian Lucy Worsley, at an exclusive ceremony held at House of Illustration on Thursday, 23 February. 

Shnykina’s winning entry was selected from hundreds of other entries and her illustrations won high praise from the judging panel. Darya is a student of the Moscow State University of Printing Arts. The shortlisted artists, who each receive £500, are Natasa Ilincic (Italy), Katie Ponder (UK), Meizhen Xu (Germany), Alexandru Savescu (Romania) and Pedro Silmon (UK). 

At the ceremony, Lucy Worsley said ‘Darya did the perfect cover: fitting in beautifully with the rest of the series, charming to look at, clever with the layering, and bold. But we were equally charmed by her illustrations for inside which managed to suggest character and some of the powerful feelings in the novel, like anger and disappointment.’ 

Folio Society Art Director, Sheri Gee commented: ‘The winner was a hands down unanimous decision. Taking all things into account we found the binding design exquisite and were all very taken with the illustration style. It has a delightful palette without any saccharine overtones. The scenes are both original and forthright in their composition. I look forward to working with Darya on the rest of the commission.’ 

Colin McKenzie, Director of House of illustration, said: ‘Darya is a very worthy winner - the binding she produced had immediate impact, supported by extremely strong page illustrations. It is particularly exciting to have a student as the winner this year and I know that she has a really great career ahead of her’. 

2016 BIC winner and member of the 2017 judging panel, Alan Marks said: ‘As an entrant in last year’s competition I was really interested to be among this year’s judges and I enjoyed looking at and discussing the work of other illustrators. Darya’s elegant binding works beautifully with the series. She has a terrific technique and her illustrations evoke the period and the characters well; she also picked up on the caustic humour in the novel.‘ 

Colin also announced the winner of the first ever Visitors’ Choice Award, Katie Ponder. Selected by members of the public from the longlisted entries, she will receive books worth £100 from The Folio Society and a year’s membership to House of Illustration. 

The illustrations by all 23 longlisted entrants are exhibited at House of Illustration, King’s Cross, London until 12 March 2017. 

Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park, illustrated by Darya Shnykina, will be available from The Folio Society (www.foliosociety.com/austen) in October 2017. 

 

399845v_0001.jpgNew York, NY, February 15, 2017 — The Morgan Library & Museum announced today the acquisition of three major drawings by David Hockney, Martin Puryear, and Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot. Each is a valuable addition to a drawings collection at the Morgan that is considered one of the greatest in the world.

“We are delighted to announce the acquisition of these outstanding works,” said Colin B. Bailey, director of the museum. “The Hockney is a superb and iconic example of his precise, delicate style of the 1960s and depicts one of his muses, fabric designer Celia Birtwell. The Martin Puryear comes on the heels of the successful exhibition of his drawings we held in 2015, while the Corot is characteristic of the artist’s best portrait drawings of the 1830s. We are deeply grateful to the donors whose generous support made these acquisitions possible."

David Hockney (British, b. 1937) Celia, Paris, 1969, pen and ink on paper. The Morgan Library & Museum. Purchased as the gift of the Katherine J. Rayner Fund of the Anne Cox Chambers Foundation

One of the most popular British artists of the twentieth century, David Hockney has been a versatile and prolific painter since the 1960s. It is his talent as a draughtsman, however, that is at the core of his reputation, especially the drawings from life that he began making in the late 1960s. Celia, Paris is a superb example of such a drawing. Frequently reproduced in the literature on Hockney, it is particularly important on two counts: first, as an early and very refined example of the precise, delicate line drawing—indebted to Ingres and Picasso— that Hockney developed in the late 1960s, notably in portraits of friends and family; and second, as a portrait of Celia Birtwell, a British fabric designer who was Hockney’s most constant muse from 1968 on. (Celia and her husband, fashion designer Ossie Clark, are the subject of one of Hockney’s most famous paintings, Mr. and Mrs. Clark and Percy of 1970-71, in the Tate’s collection). Hockney depicted Celia in many colored pencil drawings in the early1970s. The present drawing, in which Celia’s relaxed pose conveys the intimacy between artist and sitter, is one of his earliest of her. 

Martin Puryear (American, b. 1941), Drawing for Untitled, 1990, black Conté crayon, with smudging, on ivory paper. The Morgan Library & Museum, Purchased with funds provided by Agnes Gund, The Ronald & Jo Carole Lauder Foundation, and Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin M. Rosen. 

American sculptor Martin Puryear is known for the elegance and refinement of his abstract, hand-made constructions, primarily in wood.  Drawing has always been essential to his practice, as the exhibition, Martin Puryear: Multiple Dimensions, shown at the Morgan in 2015, demonstrated. Drawing for Untitled—which was included in the exhibition—depicts a classic image in Martin Puryear’s repertoire, harking back to the heads he drew while in Sierra Leone in the 1960s and anticipating sculptures such as VesselFace Down, and the Getty’s That Profile of the late 1990s and 2000s. The sense of touch suggested by the blurry contours, smudges, and fingerprints on the sheet, conjures up Puryear’s hands-on approach to his sculpture as well as his prints and drawings. This  is the first work by Martin Puryear to enter the Morgan, where it joins many drawings by sculptors from the Renaissance to the present.  

Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot (French, 1796-1875), Seated Camaldolese Monk, 1834, graphite on paper. The Morgan Library & Museum. Gift of Jill Newhouse.                                                   

This finely observed, precisely rendered study of a seated monk in profile is characteristic of Corot’s best portrait drawings of the 1830s, and most probably dates from Corot’s second trip to Italy.  This was a relatively short, six-month trip in which the artist focused on picturesque sites, views and figures that would serve him in composing Salon paintings, and included Corot’s only visit to Tuscany and Florence.  The sitter’s white habit, leather belt (as opposed to a cord) and long beard confirm the inscription which identifies him as a member of the Camaldolese branch of the Benedictines.  An ascetic order founded by San Romualdo in 1046, their name derives from their 11th century hermitage in the Camaldoli mountains, located in the Casentino valley in Tuscany.  The setting of the hilltop convent and the magnificent views surrounding it would have been attractive to Corot, who may have spent the night there, as the hermitage offered free lodging to male visitors during this period. 

Image: Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot (French, 1796-1875), Seated Camaldolese Monk, 1834, graphite on paper. The Morgan Library & Museum. Gift of Jill Newhouse.         

10 February 2017 - The Bodleian Libraries have launched an innovative web-based resource that brings together the complete works of British photographic pioneer William Henry Fox Talbot, available to the public at foxtalbot.bodleian.ox.ac.uk. For the first time ever, users can discover and search through annotated digitized images of Talbot’s photographs gathered from collections around the world. The fascinating images show the emergence and development of photography while capturing moments of early Victorian life.  

SirWalterScottsMonument-BL+-+300dpi copy.jpgThis comprehensive online Talbot Catalogue Raisonné is an important new resource for scholars, educators, curators, conservators, photographers and historians in many fields, as well as anyone interested in photography. Catalogues raisonné encompass the entire corpus of an artist’s work and while they are common in art history, nothing of this scale has been attempted for photography - it is a record of both the invention of an art and of the art of invention. 

William Henry Fox Talbot (1800-1877), among the greatest polymaths of the Victorian age, is regarded as the British ‘father of photography’. He created some of the first photographs ever made. He also recognised that negatives, with their ability to make multiple prints on paper, would define the central path of photography right through to the digital age. During his career Talbot and his collaborators created more than 4,500 unique or distinct images; approximately 25,000 of his original negatives and multiple prints from them are known to survive worldwide and are held across a range of international institutions and private collections. These are now brought together for the first time in one place - the Talbot Catalogue Raisonné. 

‘There has been nothing like this before in the history of photography,’ said Professor Larry J Schaaf, Project Director for the Talbot Catalogue Raisonné and Visiting Professor of Art at the University of Oxford. ‘This catalogue raisonné of Talbot's work will help unlock the enormous artistic, documentary and technical information embodied in these images and allow researchers to find out even more about these works.’ Working closely with the Talbot family, Schaaf has been researching Talbot for more than four decades and has examined nearly all of Talbot’s originals held in collections worldwide.  

Talbot was a scientist who then became an artist. Unlike the case with most of his peers, much of his archive survives; in addition to the 25,000 photographs there are more than 10,000 letters, hundreds of notebooks and many related physical objects. In the early 1980s, before digital projects in the humanities were common, Professor Schaaf developed the pioneering databases of Talbot's work on which the new online catalogue is based. 

The Bodleian Libraries have spent the last two years translating these images into a modern online form. The catalogue integrates the holdings of more than 100 international public and private collections including items from the British Library, the National Media Museum, New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art, the J. Paul Getty Museum and the Smithsonian Institution, as well as smaller but significant holdings in Russia, Estonia, South Africa, Canada, France and others worldwide.

Launching with more than 1,000 images, these will be added to weekly until the entire 25,000 negatives and prints known worldwide have been published. They include: 

  • • Beautiful early cityscapes of Oxford, London and Paris and others, 
  • • Numerous images taken on and around the grounds of Lacock Abbey, Talbot’s family home in Wiltshire,  
  • • Some of Talbot’s best known images such as ‘The Open Door’ and ‘The Haystack’,
  • • Photographs by Talbot’s close circle of family and colleagues, with whom he collaborated - Nicolaas Henneman, Calvert R Jones, George Bridges and Henry Collen, along with Talbot’s wife Constance and his mother Lady Elisabeth Feilding.

In this new catalogue raisonné, images of prints and negatives are accompanied by notes, annotations and essays, with links to relevant publications and websites. Users can search images by photographer, title, collection, provenance, date, genre, geographic location and keywords then tag, save or compare images and create, annotate and store their own collections or search results, all free of charge. Since many of these primordial images survive in a faded state, they can be enhanced for study onscreen by simple tools that magnify the images and adjust the contrast and density. Negatives lacking a print will be accompanied by a digital positive. 

Importantly users can view surviving negatives alongside the prints that were made from them, making this the first online catalogue to make the connection between corresponding Talbot prints/images no matter where in the world the original print is held. This is critical since each negative and print was made by hand and each is unique. For example, users to the site can see an image of a negative held in the Smithsonian alongside salt prints made from it that are held in the J. Paul Getty Museum, the British Library and other private collections. 

The images are accompanied by extensive cross-referencing to other sources, such as Talbot’s notebooks held in the British Library and the 10,000 Talbot letters available online at foxtalbot.dmu.ac.uk, a project at De Montfort University also directed by Professor Schaaf. In 2014, the Bodleian acquired the personal archive of Talbot, which includes original manuscripts, correspondence, family diaries and scientific instruments. The archive is also rich in physical objects depicted in Talbot’s photographs, for example the actual glassware depicted in his famous ‘Articles of Glass’ published in The Pencil of Nature.

Richard Ovenden, Bodley’s Librarian said ‘The Talbot Catalogue Raisonné exemplifies the important role of the Bodleian Libraries and cultural institutions in creating digital resources that allow unprecedented virtual access to collections. This project also demonstrates the value of working in partnership, bringing together items now dispersed from across numerous collections. We are extremely grateful to the many institutions who contributed to this exciting new research tool, without whom this project would not have been possible.’

The Talbot Catalogue Raisonné has been developed with the support of the William Talbott Hillman Foundation, The Polonsky Foundation, the Charina Endowment Fund as well as numerous private donors.

Image: This photo of the Scott Monument, a monument to the Scottish author Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) and the largest monument to a writer in the world, was taken in mid-October 1844. Talbot travelled north to look for subjects for his second book of photography, Sun Pictures in Scotland. Talbot took several shots of the monument under construction. Salted paper print. Credit: The British Library. 

Kornblum1 copy.jpgMinnesota Center for Book Arts will formally rename its typesetting library in memory of Allan Kornblum, MCBA's first printer-in-residence, and a trailblazer in Minnesota's literary community and the publishing industry at large. In the early 1980s, Kornblum moved his Toothpaste Press to the Twin Cities from Iowa City, rechristening it as Coffee House Press. Kornblum continued to be a close friend and collaborator with MCBA throughout the years, donating a press and wood and metal type for use in MCBA’s studios.

A leading light in the literary community, Allan built his world, and ours, around the penned and printed word. His joy of literature, his skill at the press, and his passion for writers and readers was unmatched. -- Jeff Rathermel, MCBA Executive Director

MCBA Type Library Dedication

Saturday, February 25; 3-5pm

MCBA's Lower Print Studio

Join us as we honor Allan Kornblum’s legacy with commemorative broadsides printed on Kornblum's press, along with light refreshments. Remarks at 4pm.

About the Type Library

From Garamond to Goudy Light, the Type Library at Minnesota Center for Book Arts is filled with resources for writers, poets, artists, and printers to tell stories, one letter at a time. The tens of thousands of pounds of antique type, and over 500 unique typefaces support printers and artists of all disciplines in their creative work.

About Allan Kornblum

In 1973, Kornblum founded a small mimeograph periodical in Iowa City, Iowa that evolved into Toothpaste Press, a publishing house specializing in the production of high-quality poetry and short fiction letterpress chapbooks. Kornblum’s affiliation with the vibrant Minnesota publishing scene began in the mid-1980s, when he transferred operations from Iowa to Minneapolis. In addition to the change of venue, Kornblum renamed and reincorporated the organization as a non-profit, Coffee House Press. At a time when loose editing and production standards were the norm, Kornblum made strides toward the professionalism that typifies the industry today. That included shifting from letterpress to offset printing, using computerized typesetting, and improving the marketing and distribution of new titles. Those changes allowed Coffee House to reach a wider audience, which in turn allowed showcased authors - who may not have gained traction in the larger New York world of publishing - the opportunity to find the readers they deserved.

About Minnesota Center for Book Arts

A respected and dedicated champion of the field, Minnesota Center for Book Arts is the largest and most comprehensive center of its kind. We celebrate the book as a vibrant contemporary art form that takes many shapes. Our mission is clear: to lead the advancement of the book as an evolving art form.

MCBA is committed to book art, artists and appreciators. Our mission is achieved through quality programs that support a broad continuum of creators, learners and admirers. We lead the field by promoting innovation, sustaining traditions, educating new enthusiasts, inspiring creative expression and honoring artistic excellence. From the traditional crafts of papermaking, letterpress printing and bookbinding to new methods of art-making and communication, MCBA supports the limitless creative development of book arts.

Minnesota Center for Book Arts at Open Book, 1011 Washington Ave S, First Floor, Minneapolis MN 55415.

Phone 612.215.2520 . Fax 612.215.2545 . mcba@mnbookarts.org

A very scarce, privately printed work by Mark Twain fetched over $4,000 at National Book Auctions's February 4, 2017 sale. Only four other copies of this volume have sold at auction over the last four decades.

The volume was number five of one hundred copies of Twain's "1601" published by the Derrydale Press in New York in 1926. Bearing the long-winded subtitle "Being a Fireside Conversation in ye Tyme of ye Goode Queene Bess in Which Divers Persons of Reknown Hold Converse on Concerns Personal and Intimate," this satirical squib purported to be an extract from the diary from one of Queen Elizabeth's ladies-in-waiting. Due to its scatological and sexual content, "1601" was considered unprintable by mainstream publishers prior to the 1960s and was circulated clandestinely in privately printed limited editions such as this.

The sale, held at the auction house's Freeville, New York saleroom and simulcast via Invaluable, also featured a sizeable private library of decorative antique leather bindings; sets of note included "Naturalis Historiae Libri XXXVII" by Pliny the Elder (1685), "The Posthumous Works of Frederic II King of Prussia" translated by Thomas Holcroft (1789), and "Novels of George Eliot" collected by William Blackwood (c. 1890). Other lots included antique billheads, magazine compilations, and books and correspondence from the estate of a colleague and purported muse and mistress of "Lolita" author Vladimir Nabokov.

National Book Auctions is a specialist auction house focusing almost exclusively on rare and collectible books and ephemera since the 1990s. Its sister company, Worth Auctions, handles a broad variety of personal property including fine and decorative art, furnishings, jewelry, coins, antique arms and armor, and more. For more information, contact mail@nationalbookauctions.com or mail@worthauctions.com.

London, 1 February 2017: Today, The Folio Society and House of Illustration are thrilled to announce the longlist for the annual Book Illustration Competition (#BIC2017).

Now in its seventh year, The Book Illustration Competition is a partnership between The Folio Society and House of Illustration. To date, the competition has distributed nearly £45,000 worth of prizes and has received thousands of entries.

From hundreds of excellent entries, 23 have been selected for the longlist for 2017. The winner will receive a prestigious £5,000 commission from The Folio Society to illustrate their new edition of Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park, and the five other entrants who complete the shortlist will each receive £500. As part of the Book Illustration Competition’s committment to nurturing new talent, the judging panel ensures that students form part of the shortlist.

The difficult task of selecting the longlist fell to Sheri Gee, Art Director at The Folio Society, and Colin McKenzie, Director of House of Illustration.

Sheri Gee noted the skill of this year’s entrants in fitting with Folio’s other Austen titles: ‘The entrants did a fantastic job of working with our existing series style, producing binding designs that would work seamlessly in our Jane Austen series. It’s no mean feat to adapt to a 2-colour, graphic style for a binding, particularly when the illustration style is more fluid or painterly. Well done, all.’

‘The process of judging the longlist was, as ever, a fascinating one,’ said Colin McKenzie. ‘We particularly enjoyed the wide range of different approaches taken and have a very strong longlist.’

Entries were received from 26 countries including the USA, Malaysia, Latvia and India, and 30% of them were from students. All 23 of the longlisted entries will be on display at House of Illustration, Kings Cross, London, alongside an exhibition of ten artists’ work already published by The Folio Society from 11 February to 12 March 2017.

This year also sees the introduction of a stand alone Visitors’ Choice award, voted for both at the exhibition and online (www.houseofillustration.org.uk/BIC-visitors-choice-award). The Visitors’ Choice can be selected from any of the longlisted entries.The winning artist and one member of the public who voted for them will select £100 worth of books from The Folio Society and a one-year membership to House of Illustration.

The winner and shortlist will be selected from the longlist by eminent historian and authority on all things Austen, Lucy Worsley; Sheri Gee, Art Director and Tom Walker, Editorial Director both from The Folio Society; Colin McKenzie, Director and Olivia Ahmad, Curator both from House of Illustration and Alan Marks, winner of the 2016 Book Illustration Competition. The awards will be announced and presented by Lucy Worsley at an exclusive ceremony at House of illustration on 23 February 2017.

LCC17_870.jpgSAN MARINO, Calif.—The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens announced today that it has acquired a unique 10-volume edition of The Life and Writings of John Muir (1916-1924) that incorporates 260 original photographs—most by Herbert W. Gleason (1855-1937), a nature photographer who inspired the work of Ansel Adams. The items were purchased at The Huntington’s 20th annual Library Collectors’ Council meeting held last month.

The Council also purchased A Monograph on the Genus Camellia (1819), an outsize volume containing sumptuous hand-colored aquatint plates after watercolors by Clara Maria Pope (d. 1838), one of a small number of women in England who pursued an artistic career in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

Additional purchases included manuscripts by a close member of Galileo’s circle and by a U.S. Revolutionary War officer, as well as a genealogical roll of arms from the Elizabethan era.

“During the past two decades, the Library Collectors’ Council has helped us acquire more than 100 significant items—including rare books, individual manuscripts, archival collections, and photographs—and spent nearly $3.9 million doing so,” said David Zeidberg, Avery Director of the Library at The Huntington. “We are enormously grateful to the Council for their generous support over the years.”

The Library Collectors’ Council is a group of 43 families who assist in the development of the collections by supporting the purchase of important works that the Library would not otherwise be able to afford.

Highlights of the newly purchased materials:

John Muir, Herbert W. Gleason, and the portrayal of American landscapes

William F. Badé (1871-1936), extra illustrated 10-volume edition of The Life and Writings of John Muir (1916-1924), incorporating 10 color frontispieces, 10 handwritten manuscripts and 260 original photographs by Herbert W. Gleason (1855-1937). New York: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1916-1924. 

The Huntington’s deluxe, one-of-a-kind edition of The Life and Writings of John Muir includes an original Muir manuscript and a color frontispiece in each of the set’s 10 volumes, as well as 260 original photographs, most of them by Gleason. It is an important addition to The Huntington’s extensive collections in early environmentalism and in early California photography, which include works by Carleton E. Watkins, Edward Weston, and Ansel Adams, and sets the stage for the role of fine art photography in service to the preservationist cause.

Throughout his life, Scottish-born naturalist and philosopher John Muir possessed an unquenchable passion for nature. By the time of his death in 1914, many Americans sympathized with his vision of the everlasting unity of all living things and endorsed the necessity of preserving wild spaces. Muir’s tireless championing of the Yosemite Valley and California’s Sierra Nevada contributed to securing them as part of the Golden State’s legacy of natural wonders.

“Muir was an assiduous student of all things living and poet laureate of California’s forests, lakes, and mountains—as well as an unswerving advocate of wilderness,” said Peter J. Blodgett, H. Russell Smith Foundation Curator of Western American History. “He exemplified a radical transformation in the perspective through which humans envisioned the natural world.”

Herbert W. Gleason (1855-1937) A Snow-Banner, ca. 1911, platinum print in William Frederic Badè’s The Writings of John Muir, The Mountains of California, pt. 1, vol. 4. New York: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1916-1924.

Following Muir’s death, his daughters asked his good friend William F. Badé, a faculty member at the University of California, to prepare an edition of their father’s principal literary works. Published by Houghton Mifflin between 1916 and 1924, the 10-volume set involved the collaboration of Gleason, another close friend of Muir’s. 

Gleason was based in Massachusetts but spent much of his adult life traveling around North America with a camera and notebook. An extended visit to California and the High Sierra in the summer of 1907 brought him into contact with Muir, and a meaningful association was born. Gleason went on to become one of the most capable and prolific nature photographers of the early 20th century.

“While this unique assemblage of The Life and Writings of John Muir was perhaps created at the behest of a subscriber, research suggests that its inspiration came from Gleason himself,” said Jennifer Watts, curator of photography and visual culture. “The photographer’s imagery influenced a range of early practitioners, including a young Ansel Adams, and its eloquence is on powerful display.”

The grandest of camellia books 

Samuel Curtis (1779-1860), A Monograph on the Genus Camellia, with illustrations by Clara Maria Pope (d. 1838). London: John and Arthur Arch, 1819. 

A Monograph on the Genus Camellia is a landmark work of horticultural literature that contains what are probably Clara Maria Pope’s best-known botanical illustrations.

Pope’s first husband, Francis Wheatley (1747-1801), was a portrait, landscape, and genre painter, and his debts prompted Pope herself to turn to art to support their family. She taught drawing and sold her own art as well, sending her first painting to the Royal Academy in 1796 and continuing to exhibit there until the year of her death. After 1812, she devoted herself almost exclusively to flower painting and botanical art, in which she excelled.

Pope’s vivid watercolors of camellias were engraved for A Monograph on the Genus Camellia, with text by Samuel Curtis (1779-1860), the son-in-law of William Curtis (1746-1799), founding editor of Botanical Magazine. The plant had been cultivated in England since before 1739, and the monograph lists the 29 camellias known there at the time of publication. Curtis discusses in full the 11 varieties of Japan Rose illustrated in Pope’s five flamboyant yet scientifically informative plates, as well as the propagation and culture of camellias. Sitwell and Blunt’s Great Flower Books, 1700-1900 calls the publication “one of the earliest and probably the best of all the great camellia books.”

“Curtis and Pope’s splendid volume exemplifies The Huntington’s trinity of books, art, and gardens,” said Claudia Funke, chief curator and associate director of library collections.

The Huntington has one of the most comprehensive collections of camellia plants in the world, including nearly 80 species and 1,200 cultivars. Extensive library holdings enhance the plant’s study, most notably more than 100 rare camellia books.

Pope’s achievements are also in context with The Huntington’s outstanding British art collection, which holds more than a dozen works by her first husband, Francis Wheatley, including a pair of group portraits on display in the dining room of the Huntington Art Gallery.

Scientific manuscript by a close member of Galileo’s circle

Philosophia Naturalis, manuscript consisting of lectures delivered by Carlo Rinaldini (1615-1698) at the University of Padua, ca. 1680. 

Philosophia Naturalis (ca. 1680) consists of the texts of lectures given by Galileo’s friend and colleague Carlo Rinaldini (1615-1698) at the University of Padua. The manuscript contains discussions of Galileo’s work as well as an account of Rinaldini’s own important discoveries, including that of the convection of heat.

“Rinaldini is an important transitional figure, presenting Aristotelian ideas alongside those of the ‘new science’ of Galileo and his supporters,” said Daniel Lewis, Dibner Senior Curator of Science, Medicine, and Technology. “He was intellectually bold—no easy task in the political climate of the era in Italy, which just a few decades earlier had seen Galileo placed under house arrest.”

The manuscript, Lewis added, provides deep and rich content for scholars studying the 17th century, astronomy, experimentation, the social and cultural ramifications of the Copernican revolution, Italian science, lecture notes, and watermarks.

The text covers scientific experiments, the nature of the heavens, and an analysis of other competing worldviews. Among the authors Rinaldini cites and discusses are Brahe, Barrow, Borelli, Boyle, Copernicus, Descartes, Gassendi, Kepler, Riccioli, and Torricelli.

16th-century Palmer family genealogical roll of arms

Palmer Family Genealogical Roll of Arms signed by Robert Cooke, Clarenceaux King of Arms, ca.1575-1584, parchment, 8.5 feet in length. 

This parchment roll—composed of four membranes pasted together to form a document 8.5 feet long—claims to display the ancestry of the Palmer family from the 11th or 12th century into the Elizabethan period.

“While English families liked to take heraldic sources as gospel, scholars are far less trusting, understanding these pedigrees were frequently inventions of the imagination,” said Vanessa Wilkie, William A. Moffett Curator of Medieval Manuscripts and British History. “Historians are taking new interest in heraldic documents, family pedigrees, and family archives to better understand the complex relationship between family honor, family image, and political authority.”

In 1555, Queen Elizabeth re-established the College of Arms by royal charter. She appointed three kings of arms and six heralds empowered to verify the ancestral claims of aristocratic families and their rights to display arms. Heraldic shields were the symbols of elite power, and in the second half of the 16th century, rising gentry families were eager to prove that they, too, had these rights.

In the 1570s, the Palmer family of Gloucestershire were the model rising gentry family. William Palmer served as the Gentleman Pensioner to King Henry VIII, and by 1575, his nephew, 25-year-old Edward Palmer, was the patriarch of the family. Edward was a wealthy landowner and is likely the person who commissioned his family’s heraldic roll in the 1570s, but it was given elevated status when the controversial Clarenceaux King of Arms Robert Cooke signed the bottom of it, thus giving Palmer the documentation he needed to solidify his family’s place in the social order.

“Perhaps not surprisingly, families were willing to forge pedigrees, and many kings of arms and heralds were all too easily bribed to lend their endorsements to fabricated rolls,” said Wilkie.

In 2005, the Library Collectors’ Council purchased another one of Robert Cooke’s heraldic manuscripts—the pedigree book of the Earls of Leicester, which celebrates an established nobleman, Robert Dudley. In contrast, the Palmer family roll demonstrates Cooke’s validation of a rising country family. When combined, these two manuscripts expand scholarly understanding of the work of one of the most notorious heralds of the 16th century.

The Huntington has one of the most important collections of English heraldic sources, both print and manuscript, outside of the United Kingdom.

18th-century American manuscript regarding the divinity of Jesus

Lewis Nicola (1717-1804), Divinity of Jesus Christ, ca. 1794-1795. 

Divinity of Jesus Christ (ca. 1794-95) is an unpublished and previously unknown manuscript by Lewis Nicola (1717-1807), the founder of the Continental Army’s Corps of Invalids. In 1781, Nicola became beset by religious doubts. At the time, he was stationed at West Point, which he described as “a small country town,” and had with him only his copy of the Bible; having read it twice, he came to doubt the divinity of Jesus Christ.

“This manuscript, an extremely rare example of a theological study penned by an American man of the Enlightenment, is a new and untapped source for the studies of the rich religious and intellectual life of the Early Republic,” said Olga Tsapina, Norris Foundation Curator of American History. “It adds a new dimension to the history of American 18th-century religiosity, which mostly relies on the writings of ministers or religious testimony generated by religious revivals. The manuscript capped an important if largely unknown debate that involved Joseph Priestly, the world-famous scientist and founder of the Unitarian Church. It is a rational examination of scripture predating another example of such an endeavor, Thomas Jefferson’s Bible.”

During the Revolutionary War, Nicola served as the commander of Philadelphia’s garrison and published military manuals “calculated for the use of Americans.” After Congress accepted his proposal to establish a corps that would employ veterans unfit for active duty, Nicola spent the next five years as the commander of the Corps of Invalids in charge of guarding hospitals and military stores and collecting intelligence.

Nicola’s claim to fame stems from his controversial letter to George Washington on May 22, 1781, suggesting that because the Continental Congress was so dysfunctional, veterans should be governed by a British-style “mixed government.” The letter, which received a sharply worded rebuke from Washington, was the first episode in the wave of discontent that culminated in the Newburgh conspiracy in March 1783. It also overshadowed the rest of Nicola’s remarkable career.

“Amazingly, there is no known body of Nicola’s papers, apart from his Revolutionary War correspondence in the George Washington papers at the Library of Congress and some military papers left with the War Department,” said Tsapina. “Divinity of Jesus Christ is the only manuscript of Nicola’s that has come to light since he died, destitute, in August 1807.”

Image: From L-R: Herbert W. Gleason (1855-1937) A Snow-Banner, ca. 1911, platinum print in William Frederic Badè’s The Writings of John Muir, The Mountains of California, pt. 1, vol. 4. New York: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1916-1924; Samuel Curtis (1779-1860), A Monograph on the Genus Camellia, with illustrations by Clara Maria Pope (d. 1838). London: John and Arthur Arch, 1819. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

Interior 02.jpegDaniel Crouch Rare Books will mark the opening of their New York Gallery at 24 East 64th Street with a launch party on Burns Night (25 January 2017). A small selection of Celtic cartography will be on display, in keeping with the traditional Scottish celebration, as well as the gallery’s reputation as specialist dealers in fine and rare antique maps, plans, sea charts and voyages.

Daniel Crouch and Nick Trimming, partners in Daniel Crouch Rare Books, have appointed Noah Goldrach and Kate Hunter to manage the New York gallery. Noah studied Medieval History at the Wesleyan University, CT, and has worked both at Sotheby’s, and as a bookseller specializing in Continental, English and American early printed books. Kate graduated from Cambridge Univeristy, and joins Daniel Crouch Rare Books having worked previously for Christies, Maggs Bros, and Graham Arader. The launch is timed to coincide with the Winter Antiques Show (20 - 29 January) and Bibliography Week (23 - 28 January). The gallery is open Monday to Friday, 10am to 6pm.

In keeping with the Burns Night theme, James Dorret's 1750 map of Scotland and Macdonald Gill’s 1928 Agricultural Map of Scotland will be on display during the launch. Dorret’s map has been described as "a landmark map which was used directly or indirectly for nearly all Scottish maps for the next 40 years", (National Library of Scotland). Although little is known about Dorret, he served as the valet to the Duke of Argyll, and was tasked with mapping first Argyll, and then the whole of Scotland.

Macdonald Gill’s agricultural map of Scotland, dated 1928, provides a fascinating and detailed representation of the country’s natural produce. The map is illustrated with livestock such as pigs, sheep and cows which adorn the counties of Roxburgh, Lanark and Dumfries. Drawings of deer are shown in the highlands, with raspberries and strawberries marked in the regions of Ayr and Peebles, fishing fleets off the east coast labelled haddock, cod and lobsters as their bounty, with hake and herrings off the west coast. In the border, a table shows statistics for the local agriculture and fisheries including figures for the annual catch or crop and the value of the produce.

Image: The New York Gallery at 24 East 64th Street. 

 

READING, Pa. - Berks Community Television (BCTV) is bringing live auctions to television with the debut airing of a new show called Auction Action On BCTV on Monday evening, January 30th, at 6 pm, with the first item up for bid at 7 pm. The program will be hosted by Bill Howze, the owner of The Renaissance Auction Group in Reading, Pa., and host of the popular BCTV show All That Stuff.

In the first hour of the show, Mr. Howze will explain how the auction works and preview featured lots. All bidding is online. Individuals can bid from anywhere in the world on their desktop or mobile devices beginning Monday, January 16th. 

Auction previews will be held at 1251 Chestnut Street on two Saturdays and Sundays - January 21st, 22nd, 28th and 29th, from 9 am to 1 pm each day. Berks County residents who have BCTV as part of their cable package will be able to view the show live. Bidding will be driven through The Renaissance Auction Group website at www.auctionhowze.com. The show will be fast-paced - averaging one item closing per minute.

Starting at 7 pm, the auction will officially kick off. The debut program will feature many items in a broad range of categories, many of them specific to Berks County. These will include a circa 1775 Berks County tall case clocks, a Reading Trolley fare counter, a Philadelphia & Reading Railroad platform sign and original works by artists with ties to the Berks County area.

“The merchandise mix will include multiple categories of antiques collectibles and fine art,” Mr. Howze said. “We expect a strong and enthusiastic viewership in our first show, especially with the many interesting items relating to Berks County. I’m pleased that my auction firm will be conducting this event  in conjunction with BCTV. Part of the proceeds will benefit our public access channel.”

Heather Adams, executive director of BCTV, echoed those words. “Bill Howze’s All That Stuff show consistently ranks in the top ten programs viewed online at bctv.org, so we’re excited to have him host a second show with such a unique auction concept,” she said. “As for the partnership, it’s a win-win. Plus it widens our audience by attracting antiques and collectibles enthusiasts.”

Ms. Adams said BCTV has benefited from fundraiser auctions for 25 years, but not in this way. She added that Auction Action On BCTV is scheduled from 6 pm to 10 pm, but because of the nature of an auction, it may run shorter or longer. The show will be telecast live from the BCTV studio. BCTV is seen in 100,000 homes in Berks County, through Comcast and Service Electric cable.

The regional artists represented in the auction will include Christopher Shearer (1846-1926), Victor Shearer (1872-1951), W. Eugene Burkhardt, Jr., M.B. (Mary) Leisz and Hazel Feltman (1947-2012) among others. All had direct ties to Reading and Berks County. The Christopher Shearer is a 1925 oil on canvas, three Victor Shearer works date from 1935-1941. Two W. Eugene Burkhardt, Jr., works are beautiful cut flower collages.

Christopher Shearer was born in Reading and was best known for his landscape, coastal and wildlife paintings. His father encouraged his artistic side by building him a studio in the back yard of his Shearertown farm. At age 21, he opened a studio in Reading and was quite successful in selling his paintings. Shearer exhibited his works at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts.

Victor Shearer made a name for himself by becoming a landscape and seascape painter in the traditional style. He often sold his artworks for a few dollars apiece on the streets of Reading. He lived in Reading nearly his entire life and before pursuing art he had a basket making business.

W. Eugene Burkhardt, Jr. was an internationally known dried flower artist and the author of Pressed Flower Art: Tips, Tools and Techniques for Learning the Craft. In September 2015, at Renninger’s Market in Kutztown, an auction of Burkhardt’s work. framed and unframed prints, awards and Philadelphia Flower Show entries - was held. Mr. Howze officiated the sale, in fact. 

Additional items in the auction specific to Pennsylvania will include a Chippendale tall case clock, a period Chippendale side chair, a 1909 photo lithograph showing the Mayor of Reading and members of the Reading Police Department, photos of Civil War soldiers from Fleetwood, Pa. and Reading and a watercolor painting by Jack Coggins (1911-2006), who was born in Great Britain but emigrated to the US and lived in New York and Pennsylvania.

Items in the auction not connected to Reading will include an original work by pop art icon Peter Max (N.Y., b. 1937), a Tiffany sterling silver cake stand weighing 38 troy silver ounces, portrait miniatures of the Emperor Napoleon and his Empress Josephine, and a pair of original oil on canvas studies by Lord Frederick Leighton (Great Britain, 1830-1896).

Leighton received his training in Brussels, Paris and Frankfurt, unlike most major artists of the 19th century, who studied at the Royal Academy of Schools. He was blessed with golden good looks and led a charmed life. He was also the only painter ever to be raised to the English peerage, but it was short-lived; one day after being designated a Lord, Leighton died at age 66.

Berks Community Television can be seen on Comcast Reading channel 15; Comcast-Southern Berks channel 965; and Service Electric channel 19. The Municipal Access Channel (MAC) is Comcast Reading channel 99. BCTV.org is a 501c3 nonprofit corporation committed to providing live programming produced and hosted by members of the community on cable TV and its website.

The Renaissance Auction Group is located at 1404 Friedensburg Road in Reading. The firm assists clients in the liquidation of tangible property, including antiques, collectibles, business inventories and commercial equipment, as well as residential, historic, commercial and agricultural real estate. Benefit auction consultation and production services are also provided.

To learn more about The Renaissance Auction Group, visit www.auctionhowze.com. To learn more about Berks County Television, visit www.BCTV.org.

The National Library of Israel announced today that it has acquired the finest private collection of Hebrew books and manuscripts in the world, the renowned Valmadonna Trust Library, through a private sale arranged by Sotheby’s. The acquisition, made jointly with Archaeology, Books and Judaica collectors Dr. David and Jemima Jeselsohn, will be housed and highlights will go on show in the National Library of Israel’s landmark new building in Jerusalem, designed by award-winning architects Herzog & de Meuron, due to open to the public in 2020.  

Founded in 1892, The National Library of Israel (NLI) is unique among the great libraries of the world. It is the primary institution of national memory of the State of Israel and of Jewish people throughout the world and it is the home of the largest collection of works concerned with Jewish life and Israel, as well as a leading collection for Islamic and Middle Eastern studies.

Tasked with collecting, preserving and providing access to the cultural treasures of both the State of Israel and the international Jewish community, the NLI has recently embarked upon an ambitious initiative to transform itself into a cutting-edge global centre at the forefront of knowledge dissemination and cultural creativity.  This process is being driven by the principle of creating unprecedented public access to its priceless collections. The transition is taking place in the realm of content, with a wide range of cultural, educational, and technological initiatives already underway, as well as in the physical realm, with the construction of its new library building in the heart of Jerusalem adjacent to the Knesset.

The Valmadonna Trust Library was assembled over a period of more than six decades by visionary collector Jack Lunzer. It comprises a wide-ranging group of more than 10,000 works that chart the spread of Hebrew printing and the global dissemination of Jewish culture. Among the highlights of the collection are an incunabula of the Pentateuch, printed in Lisbon in 1491; one of only two surviving copies of a Passover Haggadah printed in Prague in 1556; The Plantin Polyglot or “King’s Bible,” printed in Antwerp between 1568 and 1573; and more than 550 broadsheets dating from the 16th to the 20th centuries. The acquisition is an important and exciting addition to the NLI’s collection. The printed works in the collection are in superb condition and the acquisition has enabled NLI to gain in one acquisition what would have taken decades to collect. The acquisition is made possible by a generous gift from the Haim and Hana Solomon Fund.

Throughout its renewal process, NLI has expanded its collections, while investing significant resources to make them available online. As part of its collection development, NLI has partnered with hundreds of institutions in Israel and across the world to provide access to cultural treasures, including many that are not among the National Library's physical holdings. The new NLI building will address the needs of leading scholars, while also opening access to intellectual and cultural treasures for the general public.

Says David Blumberg, Chairman, National Library of Israel: "The National Library of Israel is currently in the midst of a comprehensive renewal process by which it is fast becoming the most significant cultural institution in Israel and the Jewish world. Its new home, designed by Herzog and de Meuron, is currently being constructed adjacent to the Knesset and will be completed in less than four years' time. In this context, the Library continues to expand its collections tremendously, acquiring cultural and intellectual treasures ranging from ancient Jewish and Islamic manuscripts to contemporary music. The Valmadonna Trust Library represents an historic addition to our leading collection of Jewish manuscripts, prints and books, which reflect and embody the cultures of the Jewish people around the world and across the ages." 

Says Oren Weinberg, Director, National Library of Israel: "The acquisition of the Valmadonna and its arrival in Jerusalem present a tremendous opportunity for the National Library of Israel to further realize the vision of its renewal, as we will open access to these exquisite cultural treasures for researchers and the general public in Israel and across the globe."

Philadelphia, PA - January 17, 2017 - Today, Howell Rosenberg, Esq., Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Library Company of Philadelphia announced the election of Dr. Michael J. Barsanti as the Edwin Wolf 2nd Director effective February 20, 2017.  Dr. Barsanti succeeds Dr. Richard Newman as the company's Chief Executive Officer. This appointment was made following a national search conducted by a leading executive search firm who worked in conjunction with trustees and staff of the Library Company, who have enthusiastically and unanimously endorsed this appointment.

Mr. Rosenberg stated that, "We are thrilled to have Mike join the Library Company's highly acclaimed staff of scholars, curators, and professional administrators. Mike's business and academic work will be among the keys to success that he will bring to us and we are thankful that we were able to attract such a high level professional. "

Dr. Barsanti holds a bachelor's degree from Williams College, a Master's degree from University of Miami, and a PhD in English Literature from the University of Pennsylvania.  He has led a distinguished career in the Philadelphia cultural community that includes positions at the Rosenbach Museum and Library, the Pew Center for Arts and Heritage, and the Free Library of Philadelphia Foundation. He is also an Adjunct Professor at Drexel University and serves on the Board of Trustees of the Independence Charter School.  His experience has been broad:  in fundraising, program development, membership, marketing, and operations. Additionally, he founded Throwaway Horse, a company devoted to fostering a deeper understanding of literary masterworks by joining the visual aid of graphic novels with the aid of the internet and social media. He has worked closely on its flagship project ULYSSES "SEEN,"  a graphic novel adaptation of James Joyce's ULYSSES that brings the novel's deeper mysteries to a new set of readers.  Dr. Barsanti lives in the Mount Airy section of Philadelphia with his wife, Erin Mooney, and their three children. 

According to Dr. Barsanti, "I am deeply honored to be chosen to be the next Edwin Wolf 2nd Director of the Library Company of Philadelphia.  On Ben Franklin's 311th birthday, we can take pride in how his library has endured, and the idea it is based upon --improving a community through the sharing of knowledge -- has never been more relevant.  I am eager to carry forward Dr. Franklin's great experiment and bring it to new learners from all walks of life, ensuring its continued relevance and its adaptation to a changing world."

About the Library Company of Philadelphia

Founded in 1731 by Benjamin Franklin, the Library Company is America's oldest cultural institution and served as the Library of Congress from the Revolutionary War to 1800. It was the largest public library in America until the Civil War and remains one of North America's most important research repositories. Today, the Library Company of Philadelphia is an independent research library and educational institution specializing in American and global history from the 17th through the early 20th centuries. Open to the public free of charge, the Library Company houses the world's largest holdings of early American collections with approximately one million rare books, manuscripts, broadsides, ephemera, prints, photographs, and works of art. The collections reflect the country's many faces and varied interests including African American history, economic history, women's history, the history of medicine, and visual culture. The Library Company promotes access to these collections through fellowships, exhibitions, programs, and online resources.

The mission of the Library Company is to foster scholarship in and increase public understanding of American history before 1900 by preserving, interpreting, making available, and augmenting the valuable materials in our care, thus providing meaningful stewardship of the legacy of founder Benjamin Franklin. To find out more, please visit www.librarycompany.org

BOSTON, MA, January 17, 2017--ANTIQUES ROADSHOW, PBS's most-watched ongoing series, has released its summer 2017 production tour, including first-time visits to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania and Green Bay, Wisconsin, along with return visits to St. Louis, Missouri; New Orleans, Louisiana and Portland, Oregon. 

Episodes recorded in those cities will be included in the 14-time Emmy® Award nominated production's 22nd broadcast season, to air in 2018.

"ANTIQUES ROADSHOW is so excited to hit the road again in our enduring search for the country's hidden treasures," said ROADSHOW executive producer Marsha Bemko. "This year we travel to two never-before-visited cities: Harrisburg and Green Bay. I can't wait to explore these new areas, and see what local items we uncover in all the cities!"

Admission to ANTIQUES ROADSHOW is free, but tickets are required and must be obtained in advance. Fans can apply for a chance to receive one pair of free tickets per household. The 2017 Tour ticket application process opens Tuesday, January 17 at 3pm ET. To enter the drawing for free tickets to a summer ROADSHOW event and to see complete application rules, go to pbs.org/antiques/tickets For more information you may also call toll-free 888-762-3749.

Deadline for applications is Monday, April 10, 2017 at 11:59 PM PT.

At each appraisal event, approximately 5,000 ticketed guests will receive free valuations of their antiques and collectibles from specialists from the country's leading auction houses and independent dealers. Each guest is invited to bring two items for appraisal. To see FAQs about ANTIQUES ROADSHOW events, go to: pbs.org/wgbh/roadshow/tickets/faq.

From each of the events, three episodes of television per city will be created for inclusion in ANTIQUES ROADSHOW's 22nd season, airing in 2018. 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW 2017 Summer Tour Dates:

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania                                       June 3

Green Bay, Wisconsin                                            June 17

St. Louis, Missouri                                                 July 8

New Orleans, Louisiana                                         July 22

Portland, Oregon                                                  August 12

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW, produced by WGBH Boston, is seen by an average of 8 million viewers each week. ANTIQUES ROADSHOW's 21st  broadcast season is currently airing Mondays at 8/7c PM on PBS.

Hitler and Mussolini Patching Together Nazi Soldier.jpgBoston, MA — January 17, 2017 — Elizabeth E. Barker, Ph.D., Stanford Calderwood Director of the Boston Athenæum, announced today the donation to the Athenæum of the collection of WWII visual materials of architectural photographer, author, and Athenæum Proprietor Richard W. Cheek. The Richard W. Cheek World War II Graphic Arts Collection contains over 2,000 posters and war maps, 189 linear feet of books, 4,000 magazines, and approximately 6,500 pieces of WWII ephemera, including patriotic envelopes, board games, playing cards, and pin-ups.

“We couldn’t feel more grateful—or more honored—to become the repository of such a discerning collector’s lifelong passion,” stated Barker. “Richard Cheek’s gift provides fresh insight into a critical moment in world history. The value of this archive for scholars—and, indeed, for any curious person—is incalculable. The collection elevates the Athenaeum’s ability to serve as an essential research center for three of our nation’s greatest conflicts. ”

The Cheek collection complements the Athenæum’s existing Civil War and WWI-related holdings: together, these visual records provide a valuable resource for the study of 19th- and 20th-century American society and culture. The acquisition reflects the institution’s mission to serve its members, the broader community, and scholars throughout the world by preserving and augmenting its collections, providing library services and cultural programming, and preserving and enhancing the unique atmosphere of its landmark building.

Of the collection’s remarkable breadth, Catharina Slautterback, the Athenæum’s Curator of Prints and Photographs, explains that “part of its value lies in its sheer numbers,” adding that the collection “conveys, in a way that a smaller collection could not, the pervasiveness of propaganda in American society during the war.” Both Slautterback and collector Richard Cheek emphasize the role of the collection’s graphic and visual elements in communicating persuasive wartime narratives. “To understand why Americans were willing to engage in another global conflict while still suffering from the consequences of the Great War,” Cheek says, “we need to know the pictures and symbols that motivated them.” He adds, “In a society that was becoming increasingly visual in its orientation, images were more important than words in persuading people to fight again.”

The son of a WWII veteran and the grandson of a renowned Civil War historian, Richard Cheek began collecting WWII ephemera as a young boy. Fascinated by the “panoply of war,” he received an early gift of several signal flags, rescued from a U.S. destroyer that sunk off the coast of Okinawa. “Torn, dirty, and redolent of desperate action,” as he describes them, these symbolic objects were the first of what was to become a vast collection.

Cheek, a longtime member and Proprietor of the Boston Athenæum, was inspired to donate his graphic arts collection to the Athenæum after viewing its 2014-2015 exhibition, Over Here: World War I Posters from Around the World and attending a gallery talk led by Slautterback, the exhibition’s curator. An exhibition featuring selections from the Cheek collection is planned for 2020, the 75th anniversary of the war’s conclusion, to be curated jointly by Cheek and Slautterback. A fully illustrated catalog will accompany the exhibition.

About the Boston Athenæum:

The Boston Athenæum, a membership library and fine art museum, first opened its doors in 1807 as a sanctuary of arts and letters for Boston intellectuals. Today, it continues to serve its members and the community with a vast circulating collection, rich and varied special collections, extensive archives, comprehensive electronic resources, handsome reading spaces, and a dynamic programming schedule. The exhibition gallery and many events are open to the public. Membership is open to all. For more information, visit bostonathenaeum.org.

Image: Artist Unknown, [Hitler and Mussolini Patching Together Nazi Soldier], ca. 1943. Silkscreen poster. Richard W. Cheek WWII Graphic Arts Collection. Gift, December 2016.

PJS6647_large.jpgAUSTIN, Texas—The archive for the acclaimed drama "Mad Men," one of television's most honored series in history, has been donated to the Harry Ransom Center, a humanities research library and museum at The University of Texas at Austin.

The donation was made by Matthew Weiner, the series creator, executive producer, writer and director; and Lionsgate, which produced the critically acclaimed series. The donated materials include script drafts and notes, props, costumes, digital records and video relating to the creation, production and marketing of the series.

"Mad Men," which followed the professional and personal lives of Madison Avenue advertising men and women during the 1960s, has been praised worldwide as much for its brilliantly drawn characters and artistic originality as for its historical authenticity. "Mad Men" premiered in 2007, going on to join an elite group in 2011 when it became only the fourth drama to be awarded four consecutive Emmy® Awards for Outstanding Drama Series. Additional honors for the series include: three Golden Globe® Awards for Best Television Drama Series; a Peabody Award; three Producers Guild Awards; six Writers Guild Awards; two BAFTA Awards; five Television Critics Association Awards, including Program of the Year; and being named on AFI's Top 10 Outstanding Television Programs for seven consecutive years in addition to receiving a special award at last year's luncheon for the show's final season.

"'Mad Men' is a groundbreaking program, noteworthy for the high quality of its writing, acting and design, as well as for the insightful depiction of American culture through the lens of the past," says Steve Wilson, the Ransom Center's curator of film. "Through the 'Mad Men' holdings, students and scholars will gain new insights into the creative decisions that shaped the series and a greater understanding of the evolution of motion pictures."

The series archive is rich in information about the work of actors, designers, writers, producers and creative direction, which aligns with the strengths of the Ransom Center's film holdings. The archive complements the film collection at the Ransom Center, including its collections of David O. Selznick, Gloria Swanson and Robert De Niro.

"It's our hope that the 'Mad Men' archive can satisfy academic curiosity and also provide creative inspiration," says Weiner. "Both artists and scholars can retrace our steps and see how we became interested in the parts of the story we were interested in, and how the creation of the physical world as well as the characters and storylines in the show were the work of many talented people." Read more from Weiner about the donation (PDF).

Materials from the series' 92 hour-long episodes include inspiration boards and lookbooks of period fashion and home and office design, set and costume drawings, scripts, shooting schedules and call sheets. Production footage includes dailies, screen tests, gag and demo reels, trailers and publicity material.

The donation includes a selection of costumes and small props, including materials for several of the show's fictional ad campaigns and characters' personal effects such as Joan's pen necklace, Betty's medical file and Don's terms of re-employment letter.

"'Mad Men' is more than a great show—it is part of American and television history, a ground-breaking classic worthy of the scholarly research the Ransom Center supports," says Lionsgate Television Group Chairman Kevin Beggs. "From its dramatization of gender roles in the workplace to its attention to historical detail in costume, set design and music, 'Mad Men' set standards that will be emulated for decades to come. We're proud to join with the show's brilliant creator, Matthew Weiner, in making this archive available to students who want to explore a cultural touchstone."

Scholarly and popular interest in "Mad Men" is already strong, and the Ransom Center is confident that there will be enduring research interest in this landmark series. The depth and breadth of the archive allows researchers to see the full scope of the "Mad Men" team's work.

"With this acquisition, the Ransom Center becomes a must for researching television," says Alisa Perren, associate chair and associate professor in UT Austin's Department of Radio-Television-Film. "The Center's acquisition of the 'Mad Men' materials represents an exciting moment for television and media industry scholars. This collection will be vital for those wishing to learn about modern television development, research, writing and production processes, 1960s-era advertising practices and shifting gender roles in American society."

The Ransom Center will conserve and catalog the materials, which will then be made available for exhibition, teaching and research. The Ransom Center also awards fellowships to scholars to conduct on-site research in its collections.

A selection of materials from the archive will be on view in the Ransom Center's lobby through Feb. 1.

Script from "Mad Men." Photo by Pete Smith.

Dallas - Following the death of former astronaut and Senator John Glenn, experts at Heritage Auctions - the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer - caution collectors about fake and forged autographs entering the marketplace. 

“Whenever a celebrity or historical figure passes, we quickly see spurious signatures and counterfeit memorabilia being offered online and at flea markets,” said Michael Riley, director of Space Collectibles at Heritage Auctions. “Legendary astronaut John Glenn’s passing is an opportunity for fraudsters to trick the public with forged autographs and other fake items purportedly from him.”

Glenn, the man author Tom Wolfe called “the last true national hero America has ever made” died Dec. 8. The former war hero, astronaut and United States Senator was revered across the country, and his death elicited an outpouring of sentiment to his family from around the globe he once circumnavigated.

Following his history-making achievement as the first American to orbit the Earth to his career in the U.S. Senate and even a bid for the U.S. Presidency, Glenn lent his autograph often on objects as diverse as baseballs, book signings of his memoir, publicity photographs and many other keepsakes. 

If the price is too low to be believed, there is a chance the item is fake, forged or stolen. Consider that in October 2009, a photo with a mat signed by 28 astronauts - including Glenn - sold for $15,535. In October 2008, a pair of Mercury 7 Type M Test Gloves Glenn wore sold for $7,170. In May 2016, a Glenn-autographed photo of himself in an orange spacesuit that was taken for his STS-95 mission in 1998, when at 77 he became the oldest person to fly in space, sold for $750. 

Genuine Glenn autographs usually sell for $50-$100, and higher for special items, such as an authentic signature on a genuine item related to his career as an astronaut, like a Mercury-Atlas 6 (Friendship 7) Space Flown One Dollar Bill, which sold for more than $20,000 at auction, according to Riley.

Hopefully, the market will not be flooded with Glenn-signed memorabilia. He has been in the public eye since 1959 as an astronaut and U.S. Senator and has willingly signed items, so there is no shortage of his mementos on the market.

“The ideal method of authenticating an autograph is to get it in the hands of a knowledgeable expert,” Riley said. “Those extremely familiar with his signature can determine if it is real or a fake. 

Nonetheless, there are steps people can take to reduce the risk of getting lured into a transaction that is done dishonestly, priced unfairly, or even both:

·         Always make sure to buy and sell through a reputable dealer.

·         Beware of Autopen Signatures. The Autopen (a machine that produces mechanized replicas of autographs) can appear authentic, but there is a website that allows collectors to check signatures against known machine patterns.

Heritage Auctions is the largest auction house founded in the United States and the world’s third largest, with annual sales of more than $800 million, and over one million online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and receive access to a complete record of prices realized, with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com.

Want to get the up-to-the-minute updates and breaking news stories about Heritage Auctions? Follow us on HA.com/Facebook and HA.com/Twitter. To view an archive of Heritage press releases go to: HA.com/PR. To link to this release on your blog or Website: HA.com/PR-3086.

December 2016, Boston, MA - Everyone loves ANTIQUES ROADSHOW, the iconic reality series entering its 21st season! The enduring appeal of PBS's most-watched ongoing series is the collection of moments that make up each season - the footnotes to history, the family stories, the astounded reactions. Beginning Monday, January 2 at 8pm an all-new season premieres including this season's top find when an Auguste Rodin bronze is discovered in Fort Worth, Texas.
 
Along with that masterpiece, more amazing items are revealed in the 14-time Emmy® Award nominated series' new season, including three one-hour episodes produced from each of six cities: Fort Worth, Texas; Indianapolis, Indiana; Palm Springs, California; Salt Lake City, Utah; Virginia Beach, Virginia and Orlando, Florida.
 
"As Executive Producer, my best moment each year is the start of a new ANTIQUES ROADSHOW season where we unveil a diverse collection of America's hidden treasures," says Marsha Bemko. "As a fan, my most memorable moment from the 2016 summer tour was the chance to try on Archie Bunker's jacket, which was brought to ROADSHOW by a guest in Palm Springs, CA."
 
Across the 29-episode new season, fans will see memorable appraisals and stories including:
  • An unforgettable reaction in Palm Springs when a guest brings in his late husband's 1966 Roy Lichtenstein screenprint and learns he was always right about owning a treasure. 
  • An incredible family story in Salt Lake City around 1970 Robert Smithson "Spiral Jetty" plans acquired from the owner's father, a contractor who worked with the artist on the project.
  • A heartrending history lesson in Orlando from a 1918 peach can label with a letter from a World War I soldier penned on the back.
  • A favorite unique item in Indianapolis comprised of autographs from President Nixon's 1972 trip to China brought to ROADSHOW by the AP photographer during Nixon's time in office.
  • A new-generation definition of antique in Fort Worth with a rock and roll poster collection, ca. 1968, featuring images promoting Jimi Hendrix, the Grateful Dead and more!
  • A hidden treasure that was revealed in Virginia Beach after being found in the crawl space of the guest's uncle's home, which turned out to be a rare John Needles games table. 
As ANTIQUES ROADSHOW appeals to viewers across generations, interactive ways to experience the 21st season include live tweeting with producers and appraisers Mondays at 8pm ET during new episodes, after-the-show AR Extras Live short-form social broadcasts, bonus footage and more through the weekly AR Extras newsletter and our second-screen Appraise it Yourself play-along game.
 
ANTIQUES ROADSHOW, a production of WGBH Boston, puts the reality in reality television! Part adventure, part history lesson and part treasure hunt, the series is seen by an average of 8 million viewers each week in 2016.

pnin_pjs2410_300dpi.jpgAUSTIN, Texas — The Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin has acquired books from Gabriel García Márquez’s library. The collection will reside alongside the author’s literary archive, which the Ransom Center acquired in 2014. The selection of more than 180 books includes those that are inscribed, signed and sometimes annotated. 

This selection from the Gabriel García Márquez library reveals expected and unexpected friendships and varied connections between the Nobel laureate and others. The collection includes books inscribed to García Márquez and to his wife, Mercedes, by friends and prominent political and cultural figures such as Isabel Allende, Richard Avedon, Fidel Castro, Bill Clinton, J. M. Coetzee, Carlos Fuentes, Pablo Neruda, Toni Morrison and Mario Vargas Llosa, among others. Also within the library are a number of García Márquez’s own works with annotations by the author.

“I was García Márquez’s official biographer and knew him for 20 years, until his death,” said Gerald Martin, the Andrew Mellon Professor Emeritus of Modern Languages at the University of Pittsburgh. “Few have had access to his library. I am thrilled by this extraordinary acquisition. … I would like nothing better than to take a flight from London tomorrow and spend a year (or more) among the riches of the Harry Ransom Center — my current American dream!”

One of the oldest presentation books is an inscribed first edition of Augusto Monterroso’s “Obras Completas (y otros cuentos)” (“Complete works (and other stories)”). García Márquez once said of one of Monterroso’s works, “This book should be read with your hands in the air: Its danger is based on its sly wisdom and the deadly beauty of its lack of seriousness.” The most recent books are Fidel Castro’s “La contraofensiva estratégica” and “La Victoria estratégica,” published in 2010. In a 1983 interview in Playboy, García Márquez said of Castro, “Ours is an intellectual friendship.”

With 15 books, Colombian poet and author Álvaro Mutis has the largest representation in the library. Authors in the collection come from more than 15 countries including Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Guatemala, Mexico, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela.

Many authors associated with the Latin American Boom are represented in the collection with inscribed editions including Julio Cortázar’s “Rayuela” (“Hopscotch”), José Donoso’s “El obsceno pájaro de la noche” (“The Obscene Night Bird”), and works by Carlos Fuentes, Mario Vargas Llosa and Juan Rulfo.

While processing and cataloging the collection, Amy F. Brown, the Ransom Center’s cataloging librarian, noted that “The García Márquez library is unique in its depth and variety. These books took me through a veritable Latin American ‘republic of letters.’”

Some of the books from the García Márquez library and their inscriptions can be seen online. The collection is open and accessible for research at the Ransom Center.

Image: Pablo Neruda's "Nueva odas elementales" (1963). Photo by Pete Smith.

WB16 image1.jpgMinnesota Center for Book Art’s twenty-sixth Winter Book features poetry and prose by Heid E. Erdrich exploring the complex conversations between artists and viewers. every-blest-thing-seeing-eye imagines the varied experiences of viewing art in a gallery. Curation is meant to direct viewers, but every viewer comes to each artwork in a distinct manner—from myriad intellectual, emotional, and spiritual starting points. When an Ojibwe poet acts as curator, her statements on the work of indigenous artists become part of a larger, non-linear narrative in which characters and emblems, just like the artists who create them, cannot be fully fathomed. And yet, we must look. We must see every blest thing. 

every-blest-thing-seeing-eye was designed by Jeff Rathermel and Todd Thyberg, with Thyberg serving as Master Printer. Printing of the deluxe edition portfolio of prints was directed by Tom Spence. every-blest-thing-seeing-eye features poetry and prose by Heid E. Erdrich, a poet, writer, and faculty mentor at Augsburg College. The twenty-sixth Winter Book was produced in two editions, with illustrations by Jim Denomie, Aza Erdrich, Eric Gansworth, Dyani Whitehawk, Louise Erdrich, Adrea Carlson, and Jonathan Thunder.

The Standard Edition (100 numbered copies; $40) contains letterpress printed text and images on Arches Platine papers. The accordion structure features die cuts, a Cave Paper banded closure, and ochre accents throughout. 

The Deluxe Edition (26 lettered copies; $295 / $235 before December 31) is also letterpress printed on Arches Plantine paper, is accompanied by a portfolio of seven prints and various physical artifacts referenced in the text, all housed in a custom glass top case.

Minnesota Center for Book Arts wishes to thank Wet Paint Inc., Smart Set, and Angel Bomb Design + Letterpress for their generous support. Special thanks to the many Winter Book volunteers for their gifts of time and talent. 

Join MCBA in celebrating the handmade book at our annual Winter Book publication celebration! 

Saturday, December 10, 2016

7pm: Reading by Heid E. Erdrich

Followed by a book signing and public reception with light refreshments in MCBA’s Studios and Gallery.

Free and open to the public.

For more information, visit mnbookarts.org/winterbook



2015.27.14_The_Second_Coming_email.jpgKansas City, MO. Nov. 15, 2016-A manuscript internationally recognized as one of the greatest Armenian illuminated manuscripts by artist Mesrop of Xizan has been acquired by The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City through the generosity of late donor Lee Lyon. The acquisition of the London Book of Gospels allows the Nelson-Atkins to present, for the first time, a magnificently illustrated 17th-century Armenian Christian manuscript. The London Book of Gospels is an important cultural and historical document that provides valuable insight into the religious beliefs and related artistic practices of Armenian communities in West Asia.

“This single gift transforms the collection of the Nelson-Atkins with its luxuriousness and its scholarship,” said Julián Zugazagoitia, Menefee D. and Mary Louise Blackwell CEO & Director of the Nelson-Atkins. “It allows us to create a new focus on manuscript painting, Armenian culture, and greatly enriches our presentation of important works from around the world. We are deeply grateful to Lee Lyon for his generosity.”

Several pages of the manuscript will be on view through February 27, 2017 in the Treasury, the area in the Nelson-Atkins behind Rozzelle Court in which  works of ancient and medieval art are displayed.

Mesrop of Xizan is recognized as one of the greatest painters of his generation, and visitors to the museum will be experience the intimate impact of his paintings, which combine bold colors and inventive and powerful imagery to illustrate the stories of the Gospels. 

The manuscript was commissioned for the Church of the Holy Mother of God in New Julfa, Isfahan by 1618, which was destroyed by fire centuries later, making it a rare primary source documenting the lives and activities of Armenians living in Isfahan in the age of Shah Abbas I.

“This amazing manuscript creates connections to other artworks across the collection that demonstrate related religious themes and imagery,” said Kimberly Masteller, Jeanne McCray Beals Curator of South and Southeast Asian Art. “It also fills an important niche that allows the Nelson-Atkins to more fully present the history of medieval, Armenian and West Asian art, and also represents manuscripts as a major art form. The paintings in this manuscript are striking. They carry on early Christian imagery, combined with Persian elements and personal inventions.”

Image: Mesrop of Xizan, painter and scribe, and Yovhannes, scribe, The Second Coming from The Four Gospels, New Julfa, Isfahan, Iran, Armenian culture, 1618-1622, Oriental paper, ink, egg tempera, wax, and gold paint, 8 1/2 × 6 1/2 × 2 1/2 inches (21.59 × 16.51 × 6.35 cm). The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri. Gift of Lee Lyon in Memory of Joanne Lyon, 2015.27.14.

PP15815.jpgNew York, NY, November 15, 2016 — In June, 1943, upon completion of his freshman year of art school at the Carnegie Institute of Technology in Pittsburgh, Philip Pearlstein was drafted into the U.S. Army and sent to Alabama for basic training. Given his artistic background, he was subsequently assigned to the visual-aids shop which was charged with producing charts, map keys, and manuals for use by army personnel. Pearlstein would learn various commercial art skills, silk-screening, and printing techniques in this work, and he would use his spare time both in the U.S. and after his transfer overseas to make sketches and watercolors of everyday army life. 

This unusual and surprising cache of works by the celebrated artist—better known today for his depictions of nudes in the studio— would survive the war and recently had a showing at New York’s Betty Cuningham Gallery. More than ninety of the drawings and sketches have come to the Morgan through a generous donation from Jane and David Walentas and Bruce Weber and Nan Bush. The museum retains one of the world’s greatest collections of works on paper and has been building its holdings of modern and contemporary drawings. These are the first works by Pearlstein to come into the museum’s collections. 

”Philip Pearlstein has said he learned much about himself and his future career during his time in the service,” said Colin B. Bailey, director of the Morgan. “While stationed in Italy, he was able to visit palaces and churches where great works of art were on view. Upon his return to his native Pittsburgh, inspired by what he saw and with his portfolio of army work in hand, he was hired to be an assistant in the Carnegie Institute art department. His long and distinguished career had begun.”

“The Morgan is deeply grateful to Jane and David Walentas and to Bruce Weber and Nan Bush for this exceptional gift. The museum is not only recognized for its superb collection of drawings, but also for work that speaks to an artist’s process and growth. This gift is a fine example of that.”

Among the works coming to the Morgan are a number of items undertaken for the army visual-aids shop, including a deck of silkscreened flashcards of map symbols. The majority of the collection involves drawings done by Pearlstein during more casual moments, recording the reality of life as a G.I. in basic training, the crossing of the Atlantic in a ship convoy, and landscapes and civilians the artist encountered in his travels.

After the war, Pearlstein would graduate from the Carnegie Institute on the G.I. bill and move to New York to begin a career as a graphic artist. His companion on his move was a younger friend named Andy Warhola. They became roommates and both began work in catalog and magazine illustration. Their careers in the fine arts would blossom in the 1950s and 1960s, with Pearlstein becoming a major representative of the figurative tradition in postwar American art.

Image: Philip Pearlstein, Soldiers Resting (study for bayonet practice), 1943, Pen and ink on paper, 10 5/8 x 13 9/10 in. The Morgan Library & Museum. © Philip Pearlstein.

ALA_144665587411.jpgThe Folio Society is delighted to announce that their Limited Edition Alice in Wonderland won both Best British Book and Book of the Year, and their Folio Collectables series won best Brand/Series Identity at The British Book Design & Production Awards, 2016 presented in London last night.

Danny Arter of The Bookseller said ‘The hat-trick of gongs meant the 69-year-old publisher was the most decorated of the evening, edging out Penguin Random House and Pan Macmillan.’

The British Book Design & Production Awards is one of the most prestigious and popular literary events of the year, the awards recognise and promote excellence in the British book design and production industry by celebrating the best books of the year.

The judges said of Alice in Wonderland, ‘No detail has been left as standard; every element in creating this book has been endowed with the highest specification.’ They also commented on its ‘flawless execution’ saying ‘every page is a delight. It’s a perfect piece of typography combined with timeless illustrations. Presented in a perfect package.’

In awarding the Brand/Series Identity prize to the Folio Collectables, the judges said the ‘collection of vibrant books stood out immediately’ and they ‘showed real thought from both a production and design perspective’.

Lolita and The Grasmere Journal were also finalists in the Literature category, with Lolita being Highly Commended.

Kate Grimwade, Production Director at The Folio Society said: ‘We are extremely proud to have won in three categories and received Highly Commended in a fourth. It is wonderful to see The Folio Society’s dedication to excellence in design, production and illustration recognised by such a prestigious organisation.’

Lambertville, NJ: Rago Arts and Auction Center, a full service auction house with annual sales of $33 million, is expanding its reach into Westchester County and Connecticut by adding a dedicated representative to the region.

David Rago, founder of the New Jersey-based firm, recently outlined his vision for growth: “Since the rise of the internet, Rago has been serving clients that were once only the domain of the largest houses. We built our reputation on world class 20th and 21st century design, but we handle it all, and well. We’re market focused and innovative.

It’s astounding to think how quickly we’ve grown - my first New Jersey auction was in 1996, and twenty years later we’re selling pearls for $800,000, tiles for $600,000, Cartier for $500,000, Calder for $200,000 and more masterworks by Nakashima and Paul Evans than any auction house in the world. New York City has long been one of our key markets and the natural next step is to invest in reaching our existing and new clients in Westchester and Connecticut, both sellers and buyers. A critical component of that effort is an experienced auction professional dedicated to driving this expansion.”

Jennifer Pitman, formerly Head of Sale, Silver at Christie’s, New York and a 20-year auction veteran, will spearhead the expansion. Pitman, a Westchester county resident, sees a bright future for smaller firms like Rago: “Over the years we’ve seen the larger auction houses move away from a number of traditional collecting categories and increase the minimum value for property they will take. This shift leaves clients with fewer options and a lot of property up for grabs. The simplicity and competitiveness of Rago’s fee structure, their diverse sale categories, and their nimbleness and flexibility in working with clients makes them a very appealing option for clients”.

Pitman says she’s eager to expand Rago’s loyal following by building the firm’s profile and client base in the region, embracing the firm’s entrepreneurial spirit and having fun doing it. Plans are afoot for lectures, sponsorships and valuation days, and a wide range of innovative ways to assist clients with appraisals, buying and selling. 

The Library of Congress, the Royal Collection Trust and King’s College London today signed a memorandum of understanding in which they agree to share resources to aid in the digitization of the papers of King George III (1738-1820), the English monarch in power when the American colonies declared independence, creating a new nation.

Some 85 percent of the items in the archive, based at England’s Windsor Castle, have never before been examined by scholars. They include correspondence, maps and royal household ledgers.

The Library of Congress is supporting a National Digital Stewardship Residency Program fellow who will analyze the existing and proposed metadata for historical materials from this era, including the King George papers at Windsor Castle.

Work to be done under the MOU will also include making the materials available to scholars; holding a conference at the Library of Congress about using collections at various institutions in a synergistic manner; and laying the groundwork for an exhibition at the Library of Congress, currently planned for 2020/2021.

The Library of Congress holds the papers of numerous United States founders (of both genders), including those of George Washington, making an exhibition combining aspects of the U.S. and British collections a promising opportunity to provide historical context.

The MOU is the first international agreement by new Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden, who noted, "This collaboration will take us right to the beginning of our nation, linking for the first time materials from the English perspective and the perspective of its rogue colony— the new United States of America. I am so pleased for the Library of Congress to provide personnel in our digital stewardship program to assist in this important work. We are also very interested in the prospect of a joint exhibition that would allow our great institutions to provide context and content in a collaborative fashion. The public can benefit greatly from this joint effort."

"We are delighted to be signing this agreement with the Library of Congress and King's College London to work together to address some of the major challenges facing archives in the 21st century in transforming access to historic collections, supporting research and encouraging public enjoyment of our shared past," said Librarian Oliver Urquhart Irvine of the Royal Library.

"We’re delighted to welcome the Library of Congress as a partner to the program, as their papers and archival knowledge are certain to shed new light on the life and work of a famous monarch," said Dr. Joanna Newman, MBE, vice president and vice-principal (International) at King’s College London. "Discoveries and insights from this project will span scholarly interests in the history, culture, economy and politics of early American history and world politics of the time."

King George III ruled England from 1760 until 1820, a period that encompassed not only the American Revolution, but Britain’s encounter with Napoleon. While history has often viewed George’s reign as heavy-handed—especially when authored by historians from the United States —researchers writing in the late 20th century have been more sympathetic, attributing some of the policy that inflamed the colonies to the king’s ministers. George’s episodes of mania, possibly resulting from a disease called porphyria, have also been the subject of study, a stage play and a film in popular release.

With the memorandum of understanding, the Library of Congress will join the Georgian Papers Programme, a partnership of the Royal Library and Royal Archives and King’s College, London. This five-year project aims to build an open online collection containing nearly 350,000 digitized items from the Royal Archives, including the papers of King George III. The Omohundro Institute of Early American History and Culture is the primary program partner in the U.S. Other stateside partners include Mount Vernon, the historic site that was the home of U.S. President George Washington; Virginia’s College of William and Mary and the Sons of the American Revolution.

The Royal Collection Trust is a registered charity in the United Kingdom with the objective of presenting and providing access to the Royal Collection, which includes the Royal Library. The Royal Library serves as the Sovereign's official library. The Royal Archives is a private archive which offers public access to historical papers for educational purposes and academic study.

King's College London is one of the top 25 universities in the world (2016/17 QS World University Rankings) and among the oldest in England. King's has more than 27,600 students (of whom nearly 10,500 are graduate students) from some 150 countries worldwide, and some 6,800 staff.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov, and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

vcsPRAsset_534765_123973_7366aade-9f29-4ac8-a209-a6d12e56d99a_0.jpgIt’s the story you love to hear in the antiques world. Rare maps found in garage sell for $24,000. Two dark, ripped images in poor condition in the Kaminski Auctions October 1 auction turned out to be just that. Several astute collectors on the phones and Internet recognized the pair of panels for what they really were: two panels of a map produced for the Korean market of Matteo Ricci's derivative map.  

Through a series of unlikely events the pair have found a temporary home with Barry Lawrence Ruderman Antique Maps at RareMaps.com in La Jolla, California. The two panels were first described as “two 19th century hand colored prints of the world" on closer inspection an astute cataloger recognized they were in fact maps and changed the description on all of the Internet bidding platforms. The maps were purchased twenty years ago at the Brimfield Antiques Show and were found in the garage of a Palm Desert home.  

“We only spotted the map about 24 hours before the sale doing a routine search for maps in upcoming auctions. My gallery manager, Alex Clausen, brought it to my attention, and the two of us quickly worked out that it was a "Matteo Ricci derivative map." “We researched the map for about an hour, before concluding it was the 1708 "Korean edition" of Ricci. Twenty five hand painted copies were reported to have been done between 1605 and 1608, one of which survives in the Nanjing Museum.”

Matteo Ricci was an Italian Jesuit missionary and one of the founding figures of the Jesuit Missions in China.  Arriving in Macau in 1582 he began his missionary work. He was the first European to enter the Forbidden City of Beijing in 1601. His skills in astronomy and calendrical science caught the attention of the Wanli Emperor who granted Ricci a stipend in 1601, which allowed him to begin creating maps for the Emperor.

In 1602 Matteo Ricci's published a World Map (Kunyu wanguo quantu), or Map of the Ten Thousand Countries of the Earth. It is the oldest surviving map in Chinese to show the Americas. 

The last example of the Ricci map to come to market was sold by Bernard Shapero Rare Books to the James Ford Bell Library for $1,000,000 around 2008. There are approximately six known complete examples of the Ricci World Map.  

In 1708 the Ricci map was copied for the Korean market. The Gonyeomangukjeondo is a Korean hand-copied reproduction by painter Kim Jin-yeo. This map represents the world in an ellipse.

A copy of the 1708 Korean Ricci map is owned and displayed at the Seoul National University Museum and was designated National Treasure No.849 on August 9, 1985.  There are only a few known surviving examples of the Korean copies and it appears they are more rare than the 1602 Ricci. Two are located in Korea and one in Edinburgh, Scotland.

“The map sheets we purchased at Kaminski are Sections 1 (far left side) and 6 (far right side) of a 6 sheet World Map. The 1708 Korean Ricci map is noteworthy for its addition of sea monsters, sailing ships and other decorative embellishments, which is how we were able to identify what we were looking at from the images provided on line by Kaminski”.

“Our intention is to restore the map clean, stabilize, de-acidify, etc. and offer it for sale by December 2016.  We suspect there should be considerable institutional and private interest, given the rarity and importance of the Ricci map.” ”

The maps were shipped to the consignor immediately after the auction and in a subsequent phone call Mr. Ruderman stated that  “Now, on closer inspection, we are leaning toward original Ming Dynasty hand painted copies. If these do prove to be originals from 1605-1608, it would be an even more exciting find.  We are not aware of any of these maps appearing at auction or otherwise.  A printed Ricci is obviously an exciting thing, but one of the hand painted Ming Dynasty era copies, extra illustrated with sea monsters and sailing ships, would be an even more extraordinary find."
 
After a call alerting the Boston Symphony Orchestra press office that a large collection of drawings and paintings with assorted correspondence, all relating to the BSO by the artist Donald Carlisle Greason were coming up for auction, the collection sold for $7,200 and found a permanent home in the BSO archives.  

A 19th century Italian classical marble sculpture marble unsigned of a male torso from a Rome estate was hotly contested on the phones and Internet and was finally hammered down at $14,400.

A circa 1920 Art Deco ladies diamond, emerald and platinum Jabo pin, from a New York collection, sold for $10,200. Jewelry as a category did well in the sale with a ten carat ladies platinum and diamond bracelet selling for $5700, and a fourteen carat yellow gold, diamond and ruby necklace, with forty-nine natural step cut oval and pavilion rubies selling for $4,800. 

Signed mid century modern furniture continues to bring in the buyer’s. A Frank Gehry for Knoll bentwood table with four chairs stamped 06/19/93/, had numerous Internet bids and was finally hammered down at $4,800.

All prices include twenty per cent buyer’s premium. For more information and to view our upcoming schedule go to www.kaminskiauctions.com and sign up to bid with KaminskiLIVE.

 

2009_178_v1_TW_201606_o4 copy.jpgThe Virginia Museum of Fine Arts has recently completed a year-long project to conserve, stabilize, and digitize 60 works on paper from the Ludwig and Rosy Fischer Collection of German Expressionist Art. The conservation efforts were made possible by a grant from the Bank of America Art Conservation Project.

VMFA was among only thirteen institutions selected in 2015 to receive funding from the Bank of America Art Conservation Project, which seeks to preserve culturally significant works of art from around the world. “Our Art Conservation Project is designed to not only conserve artworks and shine a light on the need for the preservation of artistic and historic treasures, but also to educate communities, and convey respect for the varied cultures and traditions throughout the world,” said Victor Branch, Richmond market president, Bank of America.

Works by key German Expressionists—Max Beckmann, Peter August Böckstiegel, Otto Dix, Conrad Felixmüller, Erich Heckel, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, and Emil Nolde—have received complete restoration as part of the project. The first selection of newly restored pieces—seven works on paper by Ernst Ludwig Kirchner—have recently opened in the museum’s European Modernism Galleries.

“Thanks to generous support from Bank of America, we have successfully stabilized and preserved these fragile works, ensuring they will be available for public display and inclusion in educational programming for generations to come,” VMFA Director Alex Nyerges said. “The digitization of these works from The Fischer Collection advances our ongoing efforts to share our encyclopedic collection and tell more in-depth stories about the artists and artistic movements represented throughout the museum.”

The Ludwig and Rosy Fischer Collection has garnered national and international attention, standing among other noteworthy holdings of German Expressionist art at the Museum of Modern Art (New York), the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Saint Louis Art Museum. The Fischer Collection also represents an important asset to the academic communities based in Richmond. These newly preserved works will join those already on display, further strengthening a collection that provides countless learning opportunities for both scholars and the general public.

The History of the Ludwig and Rosy Fischer Collection
Known for containing many significant examples of Die Brücke, the Fischer Collection’s evolution reflects the history of early 20th-century Europe. Between 1905 and 1925, Ludwig and Rosy Fischer of Frankfurt, Germany, amassed a collection of art created by a group of radical young artists. The forward-thinking couple acquired examples of German Expressionist paintings, sculpture, drawings, prints, and illustrated books, but their collection did not survive the Third Reich intact. Upon their deaths in the mid-1920s, the collection was divided between their sons, Max and Ernst. In 1934 as the Nazi party gained power, Ernst and his wife Anne left Germany for the United States with their half of the collection packed among their household goods. The couple settled in Richmond where the art was preserved in their home for more than 70 years. When Max Fischer fled Germany a year after his brother, he had to leave his portion of the collection behind and it was presumed lost, stolen or destroyed during World War II. In 2009, the Ludwig and Rosy Fischer Collection of German Expressionist Art became part of VMFA’s permanent collection. Through a gift-purchase agreement with Anne Fischer (1902-2008), the widow of Ernst (1896-1981), the museum acquired approximately 200 works from one of the 20th century’s most significant movements. Earlier this year, Ernest Ludwig Kirchner’s Sand Hills in Grunau (1913)—one of the paintings from Max’s portion of the collection that had been presumed lost—was returned to the Fischer family and acquired by VMFA through a gift-purchase agreement.

With works dating just before World War I through the 1920s, the collection has a strong emphasis on Die Brücke—“the Bridge”—a pivotal movement within German Expressionism. Responding subjectively to the changing world around them, members of Die Brücke often used distorted forms and a vivid palette of bold colors. Printmaking was also a central practice for German Expressionists; woodcuts, etchings, and lithographs allowed wider distribution and accessibility of their work. As a founder and leader of the Die Brücke movement, Kirchner developed a particularly expressive style with woodcuts. The handwritten notes addressed to Herr and Frau Fischer on the bottom of many of the Kirchner prints in the museum’s collection attest to his personal relationship with the Fischer family. The Fischers owned more paintings by Kirchner than any other artist, and his work, including the exceptional group of prints on display now in the first installation of works conserved with funds from the Bank of America grant, form the core of their collection. One of the woodcuts included in this group, Three Boys, Fehr's Sons, 1915 was likely based on a painting Kirchner made of the same subject, which Ludwig and Rosy Fischer also acquired. However, it was among the paintings that Max Fischer left behind when he fled Nazi Germany in 1935, and it remains lost.

Bank of America Conservation Project
Bank of America’s Art Conservation Project provides grants to nonprofit museums to conserve historically or culturally significant works of art, including works that have been designated as national treasures.  Since 2010, Bank of America has provided grants to museums in 28 countries for 85 conservation projects.  Works conserved in 2015 include a marble figure of the Buddha Amitābha (585 C.E. Sui dynasty)at the British Museum, London; four paintings and one mural at the OCA Museum, São Paulo; Uemura Shōen’s Jo-no-Mai (Noh Dance Prelude) at The Tokyo University Art Museum and Manet’s Woman in Evening Dress at the Guggenheim in New York. VMFA’s grant supported the physical and chemical stabilization, as well as digitization, of works by seven key artists in the Die Brücke movement.

Bank of America Conservation Project: VMFA’s Fischer Collection video
https://youtu.be/clX4Aq7PTj8

About the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts
The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (VMFA) in Richmond, Virginia, is one of the largest comprehensive art museums in the United States. VMFA, which opened in 1936, is a state agency and privately endowed educational institution. Its purpose is to collect, preserve, exhibit, and interpret art, and to encourage the study of the arts. Through the Office of Statewide Partnerships program, the museum offers curated exhibitions, arts-related audiovisual programs, symposia, lectures, conferences, and workshops by visual and performing artists. In addition to a wide array of special exhibitions, visitors have the opportunity to experience the museum’s global collection of art that spans more than 5,000 years. VMFA’s permanent holdings encompass more than 35,000 artworks, including the largest public collection of Fabergé outside of Russia, the finest collection of Art Nouveau outside of Paris, and one of the nation’s finest collections of American art. VMFA is home to important collections of English silver and Impressionist, Post-Impressionist, British sporting, and modern and contemporary art, as well as renowned South Asian, Himalayan, and African art. In May 2010, the VMFA opened its doors to the public after a transformative expansion, the largest in its eighty-year history. The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts is the only art museum in the United States open 365 days a year with free general admission. For additional information, telephone 804-340-1400 or visit www.vmfa.museum.

Image: Ernst Ludwig Kirchner (German, 1880-1938). Three Boys, Fehr’s Sons, 1915. Woodcut on wove paper, 22 ¾ x 16 15/16 in. (57.79 x 43.02 cm.) Virginia Museum of Fine Arts; The Ludwig and Rosy Fischer Collection, Gift of the Estate of Anne R. Fischer (Photo: Virginia Museum of Fine Arts)

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