Stefano Rogino.jpgNew York— An exhibition of Italian postwar photography will be on view at Howard Greenberg Gallery from September 12 through November 10, 2018. Through the lens of neorealism, The New Beginning for Italian Photography: 1945-1965 explores how photographers documented daily realities during the two decades after World War II. The exhibition at Howard Greenberg is in conjunction with NeoRealismo: The New Image in Italy, 1932-1960, which opens in September in two exhibitions at New York University. Also in September, the Metropolitan Museum of Art is featuring a selection of postwar images from their permanent collection. In addition, a new book, NeoRealismo: The New Image in Italy 1932-1960 (Prestel) by Enrica Viganò, with a foreword by Martin Scorsese will be published in September. An opening reception at Howard Greenberg Gallery will be held on Wednesday, September 12, from 6-8 p.m. 

Associated with cinematic and literary depictions of postwar conditions, photography’s embrace of neorealism illuminated the here and now of a country emerging from ruins, alive with vitality and hope. With print media outlets on the rise, photographers and their reportage played an integral role in picturing the postwar period when 1945, later termed “year zero,” was time for a new beginning. In graphic compositions that master line and shape, the images on view capture fleeting moments that become the seeds of longer imagined narratives. Humanist in nature, the beautifully printed images in the exhibition convey a concern with finding unusual stories in quotidian scenes. 

Among the photographers in the exhibition are Carlo Bavagnoli, who photographed in working-class neighborhoods in Rome, and later contributed to Life magazine; Mario de Biasi, who began taking pictures in 1944 with a camera found in the rubble of Nuremberg; Sante Vittorio Malli, who dedicated himself to portraits and landscapes, and established the photo group, Il Naviglio, in 1956; Franco Pinna, who took his first photographs in Rome in 1944, during the  arrival of the Allied troops; and Stefano Robino, an artist and designer known for his cultured and elegant style.

Independent curator and journalist Enrica Viganò has spent over a decade researching the phenomenon of Italian neorealism in photography and identifying important works and artists of the period. As she writes in an essay in the new book NeoRealismo: The New Image in Italy 1932-1960, “This period of the country’s rebirth was characterized by an attempt at collective identification, a venture in which photography could play an essential role. The vision of the photographers dealt with genuine people, real landscapes, collective stories that vibrated with skin and soul.”

Image:  Stefano Robino, Paolo e Fernando Gavi, 1958 © Archivio Stefano Robino, courtesy Howard Greenberg Gallery, New York

Screen Shot 2018-09-06 at 8.31.33 AM.pngKansas City, MO- Napoleon: Power and Splendor marks the first examination of the majesty and the artistic, political and ideological significance of Napoleon’s imperial court, from Napoleon’s coronation in 1804 to his final exile in 1815. The exhibition opens at The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City Oct. 26 and aims to capture the spirit that prevailed in the French imperial court and to recreate the sumptuous ambiance of Napoleon’s reign.

A selection of more than 200 works, most of which have never before been exhibited in North America before this tour, will reveal the power and splendor of the Imperial Household and its role in fashioning a monarchic identity for the new emperor, his family and loyal entourage. The exhibition is organized and circulated by the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA) with the participation of the Nelson-Atkins, the Musée national du château de Fontainebleau, and the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts. It was curated by Sylvain Cordier, Curator of Early Decorative Arts at MMFA.

“I find it extraordinary that 200 years after his demise, the geopolitics of our world bear so much of Napoleon’s legacy,” said Julián Zugazagoitia, Menefee D. and Mary Louise Blackwell CEO & Director of the Nelson-Atkins. “He emerged from the French Revolution and fought to impose his order on the rest of the word until his bitter end. The fact that his story resonates and fascinates today reflects his talent in harnessing the arts and the power of images.”

The Imperial Household was a key institution during Napoleon’s reign. It included 3,500 members in its retinue who were responsible for managing the daily lives of the imperial family and the day-to-day existence of former general Bonaparte, who became Emperor Napoleon in 1804. They also helped craft Napoleon’s image as Emperor and modern hero.

Napoleon’s household relied on complex everyday functions in which the Emperor himself played an integral part. The exhibition installation will follow the six departments that made up the Imperial Household including the grand equerry, grand master of the hunt, grand chaplain, grand marshal of the palace, grand master of ceremonies, and the grand chamberlain.

Interpretive elements throughout will unpack for visitors the socio-historical significance of the household’s functions. Innovative scenography re-creates the splendor of palace life. The integration of immersive projection technologies will further enhance the spectacle and provide salient historical, cultural, and personal context that is immersive and engaging.

“The rich collection of objects that form this exhibition highlights the degree to which Napoleon harnessed the arts not only to strengthen his image, but also to bolster the French economy,” said Aimee Marcereau DeGalan, the Louis L. and Adelaide C. Ward Senior Curator of European Arts. “More than anything, this exhibition provides a portal into the exquisite breadth and level of skill of the artists and artisans in Napoleon’s employ.”

Napoleon: Power and Splendor brings together nearly 200 works of art. They are featured thanks to more than 40 distinguished lenders, including such institutions as the Louvre, the Château de Fontainebleau, the Mobilier national de France, the Musée national des châteaux de Malmaison et de Bois-Préau, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and the Art Institute of Chicago.

Napoleon: Power and Splendor offers a unique opportunity to discover paintings, sculptures, furniture, silver and porcelain, tapestries, silk hangings, and court dress illustrating the opulence characteristic of the Empire in service of Napoleon’s spectacle of power.

The exhibition closes at the Nelson-Atkins March 10, 2019. It can be seen at Musée national du Château de Fontainebleau in France from April 13-July 15, 2019.

Image: Andrea Appiani, Italian (17541817). Portrait of Napoleon Bonaparte, First Consul, in the Uniform of a General in the Army of Italy, 1801. Oil on canvas, 39 x 31 4/5 inches. Montreal, private collection. Photo MMFA, Christine Guest.

The Folio Society is delighted to announce that eight of their titles have been selected as finalists in three categories of the prestigious British Book Design & Production Awards. This is a record number for Folio and the most from an independent publisher this year. In the Literature category, five of the six shortlisted titles are Folio editions. 

The shortlisted titles are: 

The Kama Sutra of Vatsyayana (illustrated by Victo Ngai) and The Wanderer and Other Old-English Poems (illustrated by Alan Lee) in the Limited Edition and Fine Binding category 

The Anglo-Saxons (a two-volume set) in Scholarly, Academic and Reference Books category. 

I Am Legend (illustrated by Dave McKean), We (illustrated by Kit Russell), Japanese Tales (illustrated by Yuko Shimizu), The Hundred and One Dalmatians (illustrated by Sara Ogilvie) and The Little Prince (illustrated by Antoine de Saint-Exupéry) in the Literature category 

Kate Grimwade, Production Director at The Folio Society said: ‘The Folio Society is delighted that a record number of our books have been shortlisted for the BBDPA this year. This is a recognition of Folio’s continued commitment to design and production excellence.’ 

The British Book Design & Production Awards is one of the most prestigious literary events in the world of publishing. The awards recognise and promote the excellence of the British book design and production industry by celebrating the best books of the year. The judges look for exceptional production and design, free of typographical errors, with particular emphasis given to excellent layout and standards of typography. The winners will be announced in London on 22nd November. 

4efb8270-1f23-4c31-8c07-efc3721801ef.jpgBoston, MA — On Friday, September 21, Skinner presents an outstanding two-session auction of Prints, Multiples & Photographs and Paintings & Sculpture with over 350 lots spanning Old Masters through contemporary offerings. Robin S. R. Starr, Vice President and Director of American & European Works of Art, notes, "We're excited about the depth and breadth of the works in the September auction, from a rediscovered Gérôme masterpiece to a considerable number of fresh to the market works from private collections, including of the composer, lyricist, author, playwright, recording artist, and performer, Dory Previn." 

Paintings & Sculpture

The marquee lot of the sale is by Jean-Léon Gérôme. This newly rediscovered orientalist painting called Evening Prayer (Lot 266, Estimate: $400,000-600,000) has been described as a "perfected" version of one of Gérôme's most evocative compositions, showing Muslim men at prayer on a Cairo rooftop. With all of the technical hallmarks and intellectual nuances of his art, it has recently been confirmed as an original work by his hand, and returned to the artist's oeuvre. It has not appeared at auction since it was sold at the Christie, Manson and Woods, London, Modern Pictures auction on May 5, 1888. 

Other notable 19th-century works include Twilight on the Terrace by Julius Leblanc Stewart (Lot 219, Estimate: $150,000-250,000).  From a private collection, this major painting by expatriate artist Julius Stewart, dated 1877, shows elegant figures at leisure on a terrace with a twilight view of Paris in the distance. The three women wear handsomely painted dresses of satin and lace, and exotic details such as the colorful parrots and Japanese parasol add to the opulence of the scene. Stewart studied for a time with Jean-Léon Gérôme and accompanied him on a trip to Egypt in 1874. Starr notes, "The rediscovered Gérôme is such a rare and wonderful find; and to be able to present it with Stewart’s work - also previously hidden away in private hands - gives us a fascinating glimpse into the relationship between master and student.”

A highlight among the offerings of Modern & Contemporary works is by Louise Nevelson, a leading figure in 20th-century American sculpture. Nevelson is represented by a maquette for the monumental sculpture Sky Landscape I (Lot 373, Estimate: $50,000-70,000). The 30-inch tall welded steel piece displays the elegance of Nevelson's smooth opaque black surfaces and the balanced fusion of her geometric angles and anthropomorphic curves. The monumental version of Sky Landscape I is currently on view at the Seattle Art Museum's Olympic Sculpture Park.

Other featured works include:

Prints & Multiples

Features work from the old masters to the 21st century, and is especially strong in 20th-century works. Leading the group is Andy Warhol’s Portraits of the Artists (Lot 108, Estimate: $25,000-35,000); a group of 100 colorful screen printed polystyrene boxes depicting a veritable who’s who of New York’s 1960s art scene. The auction features two groups of prints - one by Joan Miró and the other by Rockwell Kent. Both show the broad ranges and talents of these two artists. The collection of Miró prints includes lithographs and intaglios from small, intimate compositions like the plate from the Ubu Roi suite (Lot 75, Estimate: $2,500-3,500) and large-scale iconic images with heavy carborundum like Le matador (Lot 77, Estimate $25,000-35,000) and La fronde (Lot 76, Estimate: $20,000-30,000). The Kent works likewise feature a variety of media, and include Starlight (Lot 24, Estimate $2,500-3,500) and Forest Pool (Lot 21, Estimate $1,500-2,500), two of his most highly coveted wood engravings.

Other featured works include:

Photographs

A range of 20th-century and contemporary works by such masters as Ansel Adams, Lewis Baltz, Manuel Álvarez Bravo, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Nan Goldin, Kenneth Josephson, Daido Moriyama, and others are on offer. Highlights include:

Previews, Gallery Events, and Catalogs

Previews for the auction will be in our Boston Gallery on Wednesday, September 19: 12pm-5pm and Thursday, September 20: 12pm-8pm.  Free and open to the public, department specialists will be available to answer questions about the material and participating at auction. Join us for an EVENT... The fully illustrated print catalog may be purchased on the Skinner website or by phone order at 508-970-3234.

Image: Andy Warhol (American, 1928-1987) Portraits of the Artists (Lot 108, Estimate: $35,000-35,000)

Three organizations working to expand literacy and promote reading in the United States and worldwide were awarded the 2018 Library of Congress Literacy Awards at the National Book Festival gala, Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced tonight.

Hayden and philanthropist David M. Rubenstein awarded the top prizes to: Reading Is Fundamental of Washington, D.C.; East Side Community School of New York City; and Instituto Pedagógico para Problemas del Lenguaje of Mexico City.

The Literacy Awards, originated by Rubenstein in 2013, honor organizations doing exemplary, innovative and replicable work, and they spotlight the need for the global community to unite in working for universal literacy.

“Literacy empowers people around the world, giving them the chance for learning, fulfillment and participation in civic life,” said Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden. “Thanks to the generosity of David Rubenstein, the Library of Congress is proud to honor these innovative and exemplary organizations working to raise reading levels. We look forward to their ongoing progress in building a culture of reading.”

Prizes and Recipients

David M. Rubenstein Prize ($150,000)

Reading Is Fundamental, Washington, D.C.

Reading Is Fundamental (RIF) works to create a literate America by inspiring a passion for reading among all children, by providing quality content and engaging communities in the solution to give every child the fundamentals for success. Founded in 1966, RIF is a national nonprofit focused on children’s literacy and, in partnership with a grassroots network of volunteers in schools and communities nationwide, has distributed more than 415 million books and affected the lives of more than 40 million children. Signature programs and resources include: Books for Ownership, enabling children to select age-appropriate books to own; Read for Success, an intervention program addressing literacy backslide during the summer months; Literacy Central, a free digital site for supplemental learning resources aligned with favorite children’s books; Literacy Network, a portal for local literacy partners; and the Reading Log App, used to track and share time spent reading.

American Prize ($50,000)

East Side Community School, New York City

East Side Community School is a 6-12th-grade Title I public school in New York City. During a time when the national focus on high-stakes standardized tests has caused many schools to focus on test prep and quick fixes that may affect students’ interest in reading, East Side has responded differently by creating and sustaining an independent reading program where students read on average over 40 books each year, improve literacy skills, address their social-emotional and political needs through literature, and fall in love with reading. Strong reading instruction, daily extended time to read inside and outside of school, exposure to appealing books and choice, book clubs, author visits, constant conversations around books and a full commitment from all stakeholders has made East Side a national model for the capacity of schools to create a powerful culture of reading.

International Prize ($50,000

Instituto Pedagógico para Problemas del Lenguaje, Mexico City

Instituto Pedagógico para Problemas del Lenguaje (IPPLIAP) is a nonprofit organization founded 50 years ago that is dedicated to supporting deaf children and children with language and learning disabilities, primarily from impoverished families, through educational programs and after-school support. IPPLIAP carries out its mission through specialized programs that guarantee full access to education for these children with literacy at their core, by holding continual reading and writing workshops with children and striving for them to learn the joys of reading, writing and how to become lifelong learners. IPPLIAP believes that literacy is the vehicle to guide any child, to build rational and critical thinking, and to reach a better understanding of themselves and of the complex world in which they live.

The Library of Congress Literacy Awards program also is honoring 15 organizations for their implementation of best practices in literacy promotion. These organizations are:

  • America SCORES, New York City
  • Fundación A Mano Manaba, Jama, Ecuador
  • Learning Ally, Princeton, New Jersey
  • Mango Tree Literacy Lab, Lira, Uganda
  • Minnesota Literacy Council, St. Paul, Minnesota
  • Philadelphia Office of Adult Education, Philadelphia
  • Project Read, Provo, Utah
  • ProLiteracy Worldwide, Syracuse, New York
  • Reach Education, Inc., Washington, D.C.
  • Resources for the Blind, Quezon City, Philippines
  • Sesame Workshop India Trust, New Delhi, India
  • Transformemos Fundación Para El Desarrollo Social, Cundinamarca, Colombia
  • Umuhuza, Kigali, Rwanda
  • Visual Language and Visual Learning (VL2), Washington, D.C.
  • World Possible, Irvine, California

Rubenstein is the co-founder and co-executive chairman of The Carlyle Group. He is a major benefactor of the Library of Congress and the chairman of the Library’s lead donor group, the James Madison Council.

The Library of Congress Literacy Awards are administered by the Library’s Center for the Book, which was created in 1977 by Congress to “stimulate public interest in books and reading.” A public-private partnership, the center sponsors educational programs that reach readers of all ages, nationally and internationally. The center provides leadership for affiliated state centers for the book and nonprofit reading-promotion partners and plays a key role in the Library’s annual National Book Festival. More information on the awards is available at: read.gov/literacyawards.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States - and extensive materials from around the world -both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

Book lovers of all ages came together by the tens of thousands to celebrate reading and meet their favorite authors Saturday at the 18th annual Library of Congress National Book Festival, held at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center. Thousands more watched the festival’s Main Stage streamed live on the Library’s Facebook page.

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden interviewed U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor, who launched a children’s book on the festival’s 2,500-seat Main Stage. Hayden also interviewed Jacqueline Woodson, the National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature, who is debuting two new books this fall.

Hayden announced the 19th National Book Festival will be held Aug. 31, 2019.

“The National Book Festival is a thrilling, immersive experience that gives so many readers a unique opportunity to reflect on great books all day long,” Hayden said. “We are so proud to feature a diverse lineup of more than 100 authors who give visitors a new reading list for the year ahead.”

In total, 13 authors launched new books at the festival - the most new books in the festival’s history - including Sotomayor’s “Turning Pages: My Life Story,” Doris Kearns Goodwin’s “Leadership: In Turbulent Times;” Girl Scouts of the USA CEO Sylvia Acevedo’s “Path to the Stars: My Journey from Girl Scout to Rocket Scientist;” Kate DiCamillo and Harry Bliss’ “Good Rosie!” Meg Medina’s “Merci Suárez Changes Gears;” Jennifer Nielsen’s “Resistance;” David Shannon’s “Grow Up David!” Suzanne Slade’s “Countdown: 2979 Days to the Moon;” David Ezra Stein’s “Interrupting Chicken and the Elephant of Surprise;” Woodson’s “The Day You Begin” and “Harbor Me;” Ellen Hopkins’ “People Kill People;” Hank Phillippi Ryan’s “Trust Me;” and U.S. Poet Laureate Tracy K. Smith’s selections for “American Journal: Fifty Poems for Our Time.”

On the festival’s Fiction Stage, Hayden awarded the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction to acclaimed writer Annie Proulx, author of the Pulitzer Prize-winning novel “The Shipping News” and the short story “Brokeback Mountain.” The prize, one of the Library’s most prestigious awards, honors an American literary writer whose body of work is distinguished for its mastery of the art, originality and imagination.

Proulx urged the crowd to make literacy a top priority for children.

"You can never introduce your child to reading too early," Proulx told the crowd, adding that they should start reading to babies before they're born and as often as possible. "If you repeat this recipe every day ... you will have a smart, intelligent, involved person in your life."

On Friday, Hayden also announced the winners of the 2018 Library of Congress Literacy Awards, honoring organizations for their exemplary, innovative work to confront illiteracy, raise reading levels and promote reading. The top prizes were awarded to: Reading Is Fundamental of Washington, D.C.; East Side Community School of New York City; and Instituto Pedagógico para Problemas del Lenguaje of Mexico City.

The festival’s celebration of reading and writing kicked off earlier in the week with a pinning ceremony for the 2018 National Student Poets, who represent five regions of the country and presented their work on the festival’s Parade of the States Stage.

The National Book Festival is made possible by the generous support of private- and public-sector sponsors who share the Library’s commitment to reading and literacy, led by National Book Festival Co-Chairman David M. Rubenstein. Charter sponsors are the Institute of Museum and Library Services, The Washington Post and Wells Fargo; Patron sponsors are The James Madison Council, the National Endowment for the Arts and the National Endowment for the Humanities; the Champion-level sponsor is PBS; Contributor-level sponsors are National Geographic and Scholastic Inc.; and, in the Friends category, AARP, Booklovers Circle members, Bookshare - a Benetech initiative, Buffy Cafritz, Marshall B. Coyne Foundation Inc., Joseph and Lynn Deutsch, Dollar General Literacy Foundation, Harper Lee Prize for Legal Fiction administered by The University of Alabama School of Law, The Hay-Adams, The Junior League of Washington, Leon Levy Center for Biography (CUNY), Library of Congress Federal Credit Union, J.J. Medveckis Foundation, Mensa Foundation, Lissa Muscatine and Bradley Graham, Timothy and Diane Naughton, Pizza Hut BOOK IT! Program, Reading Is Fundamental, Small Press Expo (SPX), Split This Rock and the Whittle School & Studios. Media Partners are C-SPAN2’s Book TV, The New York Times, NPR and PBS Books. Those interested in supporting the National Book Festival can contact the Library at devofc@loc.gov.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States - and extensive materials from around the world -both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

Sanders-D Duck.jpegLos Angeles - A signed hand-drawn Walt Disney sketch of Donald Duck was auctioned tonight by Nate D. Sanders Auctions for $11,949.

In the early 1930’s, Disney created Donald Duck to be Mickey Mouse’s companion. Disney signed his name at the bottom of his pencil drawing of the beloved duck character. The sketch measures 5.5 by 8.5 inches. 

Nate D. Sanders auction manager Michael Kirk remarked, “It's rare to find a Donald Duck illustration hand drawn and signed by Walt Disney himself. Disney famously delegated almost all animation work to his team of talented animators, making this piece very unique and collectible."  

Additional information on the Sketch can be found at 
https://natedsanders.com/Walt_Disney_Hand_Drawn_Sketch_of_Donald_Duck__Sign-LOT50054.aspx

About Nate D. Sanders Auctions

An industry leader in documents and autographs, Nate D. Sanders Auctions has conducted auctions in Los Angeles since 1990 and now holds major auctions on a monthly basis. Owner Nate Sanders is recognized for his knowledge of sports, historical and Hollywood memorabilia. To learn more visit natedsanders.com

The Library of Congress today announced the winners of its “A Book That Shaped Me”: Summer Writing Contest, a program that asks rising fifth- and sixth-graders to reflect on a book that has made a personal impact in their lives.

More than 300 young readers submitted essays to participating public libraries in the Mid-Atlantic region in this seventh year of the contest. Launched in 2012 with the DC Public Library, “A Book That Shaped Me” expanded with the help of public libraries in Washington, D.C., Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. The local libraries offered the contest as part of their summer-reading programs.

Thirty finalists total, from the states that received entries, were chosen in an initial round of judging. The finalists each will receive a $50 gift-card prize.

Judging was conducted by members of the American Association of School Librarians (AASL), a division of the American Library Association (ALA). The AASL works to ensure all elementary- and secondary-school librarians participate as collaborative partners in the teaching and learning process.

The grand-prize judging round, which selected state and grand-prize winners from the pool of state finalists, was conducted by a panel assembled by the Library of Congress that included educators, children’s authors and Library of Congress staff.

Each state winner will receive another $50 gift-card prize. The first-, second- and third-place grand-prize winners will be awarded additional gift-card prizes in the amounts of $200, $150 and $100 respectively.

Grand-prize winners will read their essays during the “A Book That Shaped Me” awards presentation at the Library of Congress National Book Festival. The contest presentation will take place at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, Sept. 1, 2018 at 11:50 a.m. at the Children’s Green Stage and will be emceed by Eun Yang, NBC4 Washington television anchor. 

Grand Prize & State Winners

1st Place Grand Prize & Pennsylvania State Winner
Tyler Williams, Spring City Free Library - Chester County Library System, who wrote about the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling.

2nd Place Grand Prize Winner & Virginia State Winner
Aria Patnaik, Reston Regional Library - Fairfax County Public Library, who wrote about “One for the Murphys” by Lynda Mullay Hunt.

3rd Place Grand Prize & Washington, D.C. Winner
Zuri Kenyatte, Anacostia Neighborhood Library - DC Public Library, who wrote about “Lucky Broken Girl” by Ruth Behar.

Delaware State Winner
Sarah Jane McMann, Hockessin Library - New Castle County Libraries, who wrote about “Harry Potter and The Chamber of Secrets” by J.K. Rowling.

Maryland State Winner
Alyssa Yu, Germantown Library - Montgomery County Public Libraries, who wrote about “Amina’s Voice” by Hena Kahn.

State Finalists (winners indicated by asterisks)

District of Columbia Finalists
Safya Biswal, Chevy Chase Neighborhood Library - DC Public Library
Raphael Fox, Tenley-Friendship Neighborhood Library - DC Public Library
*Zuri Kenyatte, Anacostia Neighborhood Library - DC Public Library
Ben Smith, Chevy Chase Neighborhood Library - DC Public Library
Brooke Talbott, Shaw (Watha T. Daniel) Neighborhood Library - DC Public Library
Miles Walters, Chevy Chase Neighborhood Library - DC Public Library

Maryland Finalists
Brea Ampaw, Montgomery County Public Libraries
Ellyce Butuyan, Connie Morella (Bethesda) Library - Montgomery County Public Libraries
Grace Hollenbach, White Oak Library - Montgomery County Public Libraries
Julliette Mamalian, Potomac Library - Montgomery County Public Libraries
Joseph K. Mathew, Germantown Library - Montgomery County Public Libraries
*Alyssa Yu, Germantown Library - Montgomery County Public Libraries

Virginia Finalists
Bella DeFilippi, Central Library - Arlington Public Library
Deven Hagen, Arlington Public Library
Eleanor G. Hoopengardner, Central Library - Arlington Public Library
Julienne Lim, Montclair Community Library - Prince William County Public Library
*Aria Patnaik, Reston Regional Library - Fairfax County Public Library
Landon Pollard, Bedford Central Library - Bedford Public Library

Delaware Finalists
Maggie Clarke-Fields, Brandywine Hundred Library - New Castle County
Reese Corbett, Dover Public Library
Tianyu Mao, Hockessin Library - New Castle County Libraries
*Sarah Jane McMann, Hockessin Library - New Castle County Libraries
Amrita Rai, Kirkwood Library - New Castle County Libraries
Michelle Ratanraj, Hockessin Library - New Castle County Libraries

Pennsylvania Finalists
Sienna Camlin, Perkasie Branch Library - Bucks County Free Library
Michaela Clement-St. Louis
Brayden Samuelsen, Oley Valley Community Library - Berks County Public Library
Hannah Strawhecker, Avon Grove Library - Chester County Library
Annabelle Troup, Quakertown Library - Bucks County Free Library
*Tyler Williams, Spring City Free Library - Chester County Library

The detailed list of current and previous winners, along with more information about the "A Book That Shaped Me" program, is available at loc.gov/bookfest/kids-teachers/booksthatshape/. For further details, contact booksshapecontest@loc.gov.

The 18th National Book Festival will be held Saturday, Sept. 1 from 9 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. (doors open at 8:30 a.m.) at the Washington Convention Center. The event is free and open to everyone.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States - and extensive materials from around the world -both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

Betty Crocker copy.jpgWashington, D.C. - Visitors have the rare chance to flip through and purchase a piece of history at the 43rd annual Washington Antiquarian Book Fair: September 28­-29, 2018 at Holiday Inn Rosslyn. 

WABF is the D.C. region’s only curated festival of rare and collectible books, manuscripts, autographs, maps, drawings and other fine ephemera. 

Among this year’s highlights:

­

  • 1st edition of Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897): bound in publisher’s original cloth
  • ­ Limited­ edition copy of Betty Crocker’s Picture Cook Book: signed by the author
  • ­ 1st edition of Thunderball (1961): Ian Fleming’s first novel featuring notorious James Bond villain Ernst Stavro Blofeld
  • ­ 1st printing of Thomas Pynchon’s 1973 novel, Gravity’s Rainbow 

You needn’t be a veteran collector - or a gazillionaire - to enjoy WABF. More than 60 exhibitors will offer items for all budgets and interests. 

WABF director Beth Campbell says the personal nature of WABF is something worth celebrating, especially “with the advent of doing business online.” She calls WABF “an active museum, a forum to access diverse knowledge gathered in one place.”

WABF is “about connectedness and discovery,” Campbell says. “The exhibitors are connected to their collections, each other and the fairgoers. The fairgoers are connected to a particular genre, author or time. We all discover more when we connect and converse with one another.”

Special features at the 43rd annual WABF include personalized impromptu haikus from “wordsmith minimalists” Haiku Gals, and the chance to make bookmarks and bind pamphlets with renowned bookbinder and conservator Jill Deiss of Cat Tail Run Hand Bookbinding.

What: 43rd Annual Washington Antiquarian Book Fair (www.wabf.com) 

When: Friday, September 28, 2017: 5pm - 9pm; Saturday, September 29, 2017: 10am - 5pm

Where: Holiday Inn Rosslyn: 1900 Fort Myer Dr., Arlington, VA, 22209

Tickets: Fri. + Sat.: $15. Sat. only: $10 ($5 for students & librarians w/valid ID). Children 12 & under free. Purchase tickets at wabf.com or at the door. 

Find Us: Twitter: @theWABF (#WABF18) / Facebook: facebook.com/thewabf 

Contact: Beth Campbell: bcampbell@wabf.com / (202) 363­4999

20180829094534.jpgMontreal - The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA) is presenting, for the first time, remarkable Books of Hours conserved in seven Quebec collections. The result of extensive research, the exhibition Resplendent Illuminations is a unique opportunity to admire some fifty works primarily from illuminated manuscripts - in this priceless legacy of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance in Europe. 

Books of Hours were works of private devotion that first appeared in the thirteenth century. They were the most popular prayer books made for the laity and were used as primers for learning to read. Often given as wedding gifts, they were “bestsellers” until the sixteenth century. Over time, they evolved in a variety of ways both textually and iconographically, adapting to the regional differences in devotions, languages and artistic styles of European Christianity.

The 59 artefacts presented here for the first time belong to the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, McGill University, the arts library of the Université du Québec à Montréal, the Séminaire de Saint-Sulpice, the Archives of the Jesuits in Canada, to Concordia University and the Musée de l’Amérique francophone in Quebec City. 

Three curators present new findings

“My hope is that the public can appreciate the singular beauty of these artefacts, which come from across medieval and Renaissance Europe and enrich our collective heritage. Perhaps they will be spurred to delve deeper into the past by leafing through the new Catalogue raisonné des livres d’Heures conservés au Québec,” said Brenda Dunn-Lardeau, associate professor, department of literary studies, UQAM, who edited the scholarly work. 

“One of the remarkable aspects of this exhibition is that we have assembled entirely from publicly accessible collections in Quebec such a breathtaking range of Books of Hours, some independent leaves but most of them still bound, with exquisitely beautiful illuminations.  These works bring vividly to life both the evolving internal religious experiences and their outward expressions over the course of four centuries. Our evocative installation is intended to permit the visitor to appreciate each work intimately,” added Hilliard T. Goldfarb, Senior Curator - Collections, and Curator of Old Masters, MMFA.

“The most surprising discovery in this exhibition is how many Books of Hours have been in Quebec for more than two hundred years. Unlike most collections of Books of Hours in North America, which have been assembled in the late 19th and 20th centuries, here there are books that are truly part of Quebec's religious and cultural heritage. The other remarkable feature of this exhibition is the successful identification of artists and schools that link these manuscripts to others held around the world,” concluded Richard Virr, chief curator (retired), Rare Books and Special Collections, McGill University. 

Priceless treasures from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance

The works on display show the exquisite elegance of some Gothic and Renaissance illuminations from France, the Southern Netherlands, Italy and Southern Germany, as well as other contemporaneous expressions of popular piety. These small images, carved into wood or hastily painted, were probably produced for clients of more modest means and feature decorations similar to decorative folk art. Seven books come from the early days of printing, an innovation that made it possible to reach a much wider readership than did manuscripts. These books illustrate the development of woodcuts and metal cuts that gradually replaced the art of illumination.

Little-known contribution by women

Contrary to popular belief, women were more than just pious readers of Books of Hours. As the works in the exhibition eloquently demonstrate, women contributed their expertise at various stages of production. Thus, in the Rhodes Hours, the patron is painted kneeling right in the middle of the Annunciation, combining the sacred and the profane. The Heures de Nostre Dame of Pierre Gringore, published in 1525, were dedicated to Renée de Bourbon, Duchess of Lorraine, who commissioned the French translation. Lastly, a pocket-sized manuscript Book of Hours, was illuminated around 1500 to 1510 by Cornelia van Wulfscherchke, a Carmelite nun in Bruges.

An outstanding heritage conserved in Quebec

In comparison with other collections of early books in North America, what is special about the Books of Hours held in Quebec is the fact that they were first and foremost devotional works of New France. This is evidenced in the Jesuit Relations as of 1653 and in requests made by the Hospitalières (nursing sisters in Quebec) between 1664 and 1668 to their benefactors in France. In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, these devotional books found a new vocation, becoming collectible artefacts. Whether complete or fragmentary, Books of Hours came into Quebec by way of inheritances or purchases in Europe.

Over time, a number of Books of Hours entered public institutions following private donations and also thanks to purchasing policies that encouraged public education. Thus, in the 1920s and 1930s Gerhard R. Lomer, one of McGill University’s earliest librarians, launched an original project, creating a small Museum of Books inside the university library open to the general public. In his purchasing trips, especially to London, Lomer was helped by F. Cleveland Morgan, the great patron who also acquired works for the Art Association, later to become the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. The detached folios in Quebec collections are among the most representative specimens of the early history of both manuscripts and printed books down through the centuries.

Credits and curatorial 

The exhibition is organized by the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, in collaboration avec Université du Québec à Montréal and McGill University. Its curators are Brenda Dunn-Lardeau, associate professor, department of literary studies, UQAM, Hilliard T. Goldfarb, Senior Curator - Collections and Curator of Old masters, MMFA, and Richard Virr, chief curator (retired), Rare Books and Special Collections, McGill University.

Publication

The exhibition is accompanied by the Catalogue raisonné des livres d’Heures conservés au Québec, published by Presses de l’Université du Québec and edited by Brenda Dunn-Lardeau. The Books of Hours, manuscripts for the most part, are remarkable for their textual and iconographic diversity. The catalogue presents this priceless European heritage from 1225 to 1583 and conserved in North America. Special attention was paid to their complex history and to identifying the artists who created them, since these miniatures elevate Books of Hours to the ranks of unique, high-quality works of art. 

Available at the Museum Boutique and Bookstore. In French.

Softcover $48, ISBN: 978-2-7605-4975-3; hardcover, $55, ISBN: 978-2-7605-4978-4.

Activities in connection with the exhibition 

September 27, 2 to 5 p.m.

Workshop-masterclass: 

Le nombre d’or et la recherche des harmoniques du sens caché du texte with Jean-Luc Leguay

Michal and Renata Hornstein Pavilion for Peace, Studio 11, 2075 Bishop St.

 One of the last master illuminators, Jean-Luc Leguay spent 10 years under the tutelage of an Italian Franciscan. For this workshop, participants will need to bring a set square, compass, paper and pencil to apply the teachings, which are based on the study of geometry, and prepare a parchment for illumination. Space is limited. 

September 28, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Symposium: Discovering Books of Hours held in Quebec Collections

Maxwell Cummings Auditorium, 1379-A Sherbrooke Street West

The aim of this symposium is to present diverse facets of Books of Hours - pigments, decorated manuscripts and prints, original bindings and unique elements of particular works (e.g. sheet music inserts) - to gain an appreciation of the production and aesthetics underlying Books of Hours from the thirteenth to the sixteenth century in Europe. The experts at the symposium, organized by the MMFA, in collaboration with the Groupe multidisciplinaire de Montréal sur les livres anciens (XVe-XVIIIe siècles), include Geneviève Bazinet (University of Ottawa), Sarah Cameron-Pesant (Université de Montréal), Brenda Dunn-Lardeau (UQAM), Madeleine Jeay (McMaster University), Helena Kogen (Université du Québec à Montréal), Sylvie Poirier (Université de Sherbrooke), Geneviève Samson (Library and Archives Canada and Richard Virr (McGill University).

Information and reservations: mbam.qc.ca/calendrier

Acknowledgements 

The Museum acknowledges the vital contribution of Air Canada to the presentation of this exhibition and extends its thanks to Quebec’s Ministère de la Culture et des Communications and the Conseil des arts de Montréal for their ongoing support. Research for the preparation of the exhibition was made possible with financial support from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

Images (from left to right): Workshop of the Master of the Échevinage of Rouen, The Annunciation to the Shepherds, Hours of Pellegrin de Remicourt and Madeleine Symier, about 1470-1475, Rouen. Université du Québec à Montréal, arts library, special collections, Montreal School of Fine Arts Bequest, 1969. Photo Gilles Saint-Pierre. | Simon Bening (1483-1561), Saint Sebald of Nuremberg, about 1515-1525, Flanders, Southern Netherlands, manuscript leaf from a Book of Hours, a prayer book or a breviary. MMFA, Horsley and Annie Townsend Bequest. | A late follower of Robert Boyvin, The Adoration of the Magi, about 1500 (1495-1505), Rouen, leaf from a manuscript Book of Hours in Latin for the use of Rouen. McGill University Library, Rare Books and Special Collections, Catherine Rhodes Tudor-Hart Bequest, 1972. Photo Gregory Houston.

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