On June 10, 2017, National Book Auctions presented a signature sale comprising an extensive and carefully curated group of rare and collectible books, maps, and ephemera.

One of the standout lots was a scarce volume from the first French edition of Frans Balthazar Solvyn's "Les Hindous." Profusely illustrated with colored engraved plates that captured the mysterious beauty of the Indian subcontinent, this seminal ethnographic text sold for $5,000.

This sale is also exceptionally strong in natural history works, including two first-edition octavo volumes of Audubon's iconic "Birds of America," which fetched $5,000 and $4,062, as well as Griffith's "Natural History of Barbados," which brought $3,375. 

Numerous desirable emblem books from the sixteenth through eighteenth centuries were also showcased, such as "Omnia Andreae Alciati" from circa 1574, which sold for $1,000.

While this sale was focused principally on antiquarian titles, a select few collectible volumes from the twentieth century were offered as well, like an author-signed pre-publication presentation copy of Charles Lindbergh's "Spirit of St. Louis," which was hammered down for $1,187.

For more information about consigning or bidding at National Book Auctions, email mail@nationalbookauctions.com or call 607-269-0101.

827db244fafdb748a3010343ea70399cc996e38e copy.jpgBOSTON, MA (June 15, 2017) A rare Isaac Newton signed document sold for $53,805 according to Boston-based RR Auction.  

The one-page document signed “Is. Newton,” and dated November 15, 1721. The pay order issued to "the Accountant General of the South Sea Company," John Grigsby. In full: "Pray pay to Dr. Francis Fauquier the four per cent Dividend due at Midsummer last upon sixteen thousand two hundred & seventy-two pounds four shillings & nine pence South Sea stock in my name & his Receipt shall be your sufficient discharge."

In the spring of 1720, the South Sea Company, created as a public-private partnership to stabilize and reduce the cost of national debt, witnessed an incredible boom in company stock. Newton, a stockholder and the current Master of the Royal Mint, wisely sold off his South Sea shares in late April after nearly doubling his initial investment of around £3,500.

However, with prices still rising heading into the fall, Newton reentered with an even higher investment and was soon caught up in the first major ‘bubble’ in stock-market history, losing an estimated £20,000— equivalent to more than $3 million in today’s terms.

Unlike many others, Newton survived the crash on the strength of his position at the Royal Mint, but the experience prompted the scientist to famously note that he 'could calculate the motions of the heavenly bodies, but not the madness of the people.'

“It’s an extremely rare and attractively penned document with an association to one of Newton’s most questionable experiments,” said Bobby Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction. 

The winning bid came from a science and technology enthusiast from New England, who wishes to remain anonymous. 

Highlights from the sale include, but are not limited by:

Project Apollo and Skylab Series Maurer Data Acquisition Camera, sold for $48,914. 

Michael Collins's Apollo 11 Flown Robbins Medal, sold for $37,056.

Dave Scott's Apollo 15 Lunar Flown Star Chart, sold for $24,500. 

The Fine Autographs and Artifacts Auction from RR Auction began on May 19 and concluded on June 14. More details, including results, can be found online at www.rrauction.com

berman14 copy.jpgLOS ANGELES - The J. Paul Getty Museum announced today a major gift of photographs from collector and film industry executive Bruce Berman. The gift includes 186 works by 26 artists, seven of whom are entering the Getty’s collection for the first time. Reflecting Berman’s passion for both black and white and color photographs of the American landscape and built environment, the works feature the people, homes, cars, streets, churches, theaters, and bars that are evocative of 20th-century American life. Among the artists included in the gift are luminaries of the American documentary tradition, such as Harry Callahan (American, 1912-1999), Walker Evans (American, 1903-1975), Dorothea Lange (American, 1895-1965), and Camilo José Vergara (American, born Chile, 1944).

Berman, a founding member of the Getty Museum’s Photographs Council, is a Los Angeles resident who serves as chairman and CEO of Village Roadshow Pictures. He amassed his photograph collection based on an interest in the documentation of 20th-century architecture, design, and lifestyles in Southern California, and sought out photographers whose work underscores a growing appreciation of documentary photography as a uniquely American art form. Together with 550 photographs donated from 1998 to 2009, Berman has now donated more than 700 photographs to the Museum, which have greatly enhanced its holdings of 20th-century photography.

The gift also marks the ten-year anniversary of Where We Live: Photographs of America from the Berman Collection, the inaugural exhibition in the J. Paul Getty Museum’s Center for Photographs. Organized by former Senior Curator Judith Keller with donations and loans from the Berman collection, that exhibition and the related donations mark one of the most fruitful collaborations between a collector and curator.

“We are profoundly grateful to Bruce for his continued support of the Getty Museum’s photographs collection,” says Timothy Potts, director of the J. Paul Getty Museum. “This donation, coupled with his earlier contributions, will transform the quality and depth of our holdings of numerous photographers, while also introducing the work of important new artists. By focusing broadly on the theme of life in late-20th-century America, Bruce effectively created a photographic survey of the landscape, buildings, and lifestyles of the era. We are very fortunate in being able to draw upon such a rich archive for future exhibitions and look forward to showcasing the works in upcoming shows.”

“As an avid photographer in my teenage years, my appreciation for photographs has evolved into collecting unique snapshots of urban life. It gives me great pride to share these wonderful works with the Getty and future generations of Los Angelenos,” adds Berman.

The largest body of work included in the gift is 67 photographs by Camilo José Vergara, who has spent over 40 years recording poor, urban, and minority neighborhoods across the United States. His methodical approach to photography involves researching his subjects, often those living in the poorest neighborhoods in the country, and systematically documenting them over time. Berman’s gift includes the photographer’s work in neighborhoods of Los Angeles, New Jersey, and New York, complementing 19 works by Vergara already in the Museum’s collection.

Other areas of the country are represented in Birney Imes’ and Mike Smith’s portrayal of the rural south, Joel Sternfeld’s documentation of experimental utopias in America, William Larson’s Tucson Garden series, and Martin Parr’s photographs of Boring, Oregon. 

One of the new artists to enter the collection is Alice Attie (American, born 1950), who lives and works in New York City. Her work focuses on people and buildings in urban environments on the verge of change, producing a record of a world rapidly being lost as gentrification and an influx of chain stores replace small businesses. Another, Esko Männikkö (Finnish, born 1959), is based in northern Finland, where he captures deserted places and traces of human presence with his camera.

Berman’s gift to the Getty includes:

Artists new to the collection:

3 works by Alice Attie (American, born 1950)

3 works by Henry Horenstein (American, born 1947)

3 works by Esko Männikkö (Finnish, born 1959)

5 works by Michael C. McMillen (American, born 1946)

1 work by Alfred Seiland (Austrian, born 1952)

1 work by John Vachon (American, 1914-1975

1 work by Julian Wasser (American, born 1943)

Artists currently represented in the collection:

1 work by Frank Breuer (German, born 1963)

1 work by Harry Callahan (American, 1912-1999)

9 works by William Clift (American, born 1944)

2 works by Walker Evans (American, 1903-1975)

2 works by Steve Fitch (American, born 1949)

12 works by John Humble (American, born 1944)

16 works by Birney Imes (American, born 1951)

8 works by Dorothea Lange (American, 1895-1965)

8 works by William Larson (American, born 1942)

3 works by Russell Lee (American, 1903-1986)

1 work by Helen Levitt (American, 1913-2009)

1 work by Danny Lyon (American, born 1942)

1 work by Wright Morris (American, 1910-1998)

9 works by Martin Parr (British, born 1952)

11 works by Mike Smith (German, born 1951)

10 works by Joel Sternfeld (American, born 1944)

4 works by George Tice (American, born 1938)

67 works by Camilo José Vergara (American, born Chile, 1944)

3 works by Todd Webb (American, 1905-2000)

Image: Saint Peter's Pentecostal Deliverance Center, 937 Home Street, South Bronx, 2002. Camilo José Vergara (American, born Chile, 1944). Chromogenic print. 21.6 × 32.7 cm (8 1/2 × 12 7/8 in.). The J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, Gift of Bruce Berman and Lea Russo © Camilo José Vergara

LOS ANGELES—June 14th, 2017—Profiles in History is proud to announce, the Movie Star News archive of over 1,000,000 Hollywood and entertainment photographs, will be going up for auction during their three day Hollywood Auction 89 in Los Angeles.

Movie Star News was a New York City institution for over 70 years. The photographs are primarily gelatin silver 8 x 10 in. single and double wright glossy and matte photographs, as well as RC prints, color photos, color gloss stills and color mini lobby cards. It began as a used book store owned by siblings Irving and Paula Klaw. It contains photos of almost any entertainer you could think of. Also up for auction is Irving Klaw's Movie Star News Pin-Up Archive with over 10,000 negatives, offered with copyright, representing the best in vintage cheesecake, kink and erotic photography. The "notorious" Bettie Page is pictured above. The Movie Star News archive is estimated to sell for $180,000 - $350,000. The Pin-Up archive and estimated to sell for $80,000 - $150,000.

Next up is William Peter Blatty's signed and annotated original manuscript adaptation of The Exorcist. William Peter Blatty was the author of The Exorcist novel and Warner Bros. hired him to write the screenplay and produce the film. Blatty ultimately won the Oscar for Best Screenplay. It is pictured right and estimated to sell for $40,000 - $60,000.

Then Edgar Wallace's personal film typescript for King Kong with Wallace's handwritten revisions. This is the January 1932 carbon-copy typescript of the full scenario, comprising 303 "shots," with his autograph alterations and annotations on many pages. The script was written one month before his death and is presented with it's original title of "Kong." Wallace died before he could see his vision on screen. It is pictured left and estimated to sell for $100,000 - $150,000. 

And the personal collection of pioneering film director Tod Browning. Offered here are many rare set photos, behind the scene photos and production photos, along with character portraits. Some of these photos are resurfacing for the first time in 100 years. Highlights include the unprecedented wealth of material on two of Browning's films that were tragically destroyed in the 1967 MGM vault fire, The Big City, as well as one of the most coveted lost films in history, London After Midnight,which starred Lon Chaney (pictured below). There are also an exceptional amount of photos from Browning's passion project, Freaks.

The historical importance of these photos cannot be overstated. The 157 lots range from being estimated to sell for $200 to being estimated to sell for $2,500.

Finally, an extraordinary The Wizard of Oz presentation book signed by all the major cast members including Toto's paw prints and a lengthy inscription by Judy Garland. It is a hardcover edition with color plates and is 208 pages. The front original end leaf is penned with all the characters' names and signed to the right byt the respective cast member. Along with the Ruby Slippers this represents the pinnacle of Oz memorabilia. It is pictured below and estimated to sell for $20,000 - $30,000.

ABOUT PROFILES IN HISTORY

Founded in 1985 by Joseph Maddalena, Profiles in History is the world's largest auctioneer & dealer of original Hollywood Memorabilia, historical autographs, letters, documents, vintage signed photographs and manuscripts. Born into a family of antiques dealers in Rhode Island, Joseph "Joe" Maddalena learned early on how to turn his passion of collecting historical autographs into a career. Upon graduation from Pepperdine, Joe pursued his passion to become a full-time dealer of historical documents, and opened his first office in 1985. Profiles in History has held some of the most prestigious and successful auctions of Hollywood memorabilia and own virtually every Guinness Book record for prices of original screen-used memorabilia.  Highlights from their previous auctions include the "Cowardly Lion" costume from The Wizard of Oz ($805,000); Steve McQueen's "Michael Delaney" racing suit from Le Mans ($960,000); From the history-making Debbie Reynolds Auction in June 2011, Profiles in History sold the Marilyn Monroe "Subway" Dress from The Seven Year Itch for $5.52M and the Audrey Hepburn Ascot Dress from My Fair Lady for $4.44M. In February 2012, Profiles in History arranged the sale of a pair of Judy Garland screen-used Ruby Slippers from The Wizard of Oz  to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences. In addition, Joe Maddalena was the star of Hollywood Treasure, which aired on Syfy. Hollywood Treasure took viewers into the fascinating world of showbiz and pop culture memorabilia.

For more information visit www.profilesinhistory.com

 

159-Szyk copy.jpgNew York—Swann Galleries’ June 13 auction of Art, Press & Illustrated Books offered a spectrum of books that doubled as objets d’arte, with records for important twentieth-century works celebrating art and typography.

The top lot of the sale was a signed and inscribed first edition Arthur Szyk’s Haggadah, 1939, printed on vellum with 14 full-page sumptuous color plates. The tome was purchased for $17,500*.

A rare first edition of Grapefruit, 1964, Yoko Ono’s first “event score,” doubled its high estimate to sell for $13,750, a record for the work. Another auction record was achieved for Helen West Heller’s woodcut poetry book Migratory Urge, 1928, which included an introduction by Llewellyn Jones; the signed association copy sold to a collector for $8,750. Specialist Christine von der Linn noted, “The interest in hotly contested lots including Ono's Grapefruit and Heller's Migratory Urge spoke to current political and artistic sensibilities.”

She added, “I was thrilled to see that important art-historical material was sought-after, as evidenced by the great interest in the Masters of Abstract Art exhibition book,” referring to the only known signed copy of the exhibition catalogue for Masters of Abstract Art: An Exhibition for the Benefit of the American Red Cross, 1942, which included such artists as Fernand Léger, Jacques Lipchitz, Piet Mondrian. The book was purchased by an institution. “As we move further into the twenty-first century, these time capsules of twentieth-century art movements are becoming ever more valued and understood.”

Several classic works printed with stunning illustrations by Salvador Dalí were offered, led by a limited special edition of Dante’s La Divina Commedia, bound in sculptural copper covers and printed on paper salvaged from the flood of Florence in 1966, and a 1969 signed limited edition of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, each of which sold for $5,250.

Specialist Christine von der Linn said of the sale, “In a diverse sale celebrating visual printed works spanning five centuries, it was clear throughout the exhibition that American works dominated the scene. As interest in typography and visual expression explodes in the printing world, the contemporary artist's books and works on design drew viewers' excitement.”

The next sale of Art, Press & Illustrated Books at Swann Galleries will be held in Spring 2018. For more information or consign quality materials, contact Christine von der Linn at cv@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 159 Arthur Szyk, The Szyk Haggadah, limited first edition on vellum, signed, London, 1939. Sold June 13, 2917 for $17,500. (Pre-sale estimate $15,000 to $25,000)

DALLAS, Texas (June 13, 2017) - Heritage Auctions’ June 11 Arms & Armor, Civil War & Militaria Auction in Dallas sold $1 million with Lieutenant William L. Willhoit’s D-Day Battle-Scarred Flag taking top lot honors at $55,000. The exceedingly rare Operation Overlord and Neptune “Situation Map” owned and used by Gen. Omar Bradley made its auction debut and hammered for $43,750. The auction was 93 percent sold by lot.

“This flag is not only memorable because of the pivotal days it was flown, it is momentous because of the story that comes with it.” said Jason Watson, Arms & Armor Consignment Director at Heritage. “Ensign Wilhoit, a true American hero, assumed command of the LCT 540 after his officer-in-charge was killed in the first moments of the assault. Despite his young age, Wilhoit persisted and continued to fight and lead for the next four days of the landing.”

Additional flags highlighted at the auction included a 34-Star, Battle of Antietam, Blood-Stained Flag that realized a high-flying $27,500 following interest from three bidders and a 35-Star Company K Silk Cavalry Guidon which sold for $8,750. 

A unique assortment of guns were offered led by a Fine Colt Model 1860 Army Revolver, which ended at $16,250. A Colt with original blued finish, a Colt Single Action Army 45 realized $15,000 and was offered in the original Colt black box that was numbered to the gun. A stunning Fine & Engraved L.C. Smith Crown Grade Double Barrel Shotgun sold for $12,500, a scarce and highly-desirable Smith & Wesson .357 Magnum with original box and certificate realized $11,562 and a Colt Bisley Model Single Action Revolver from 1907 saw $10,000.

Historical pieces from the Civil War and both World Wars included an M4 Enigma Enciphering Machine from the wreck of the German submarine Ammerland. The elusive enciphering machine realized $21,875. A fantastic, painted Type A-2 Leather Flight Jacket decorated with the word “Mac’s High Hats” sold for $4,250 and a WWI Service Jacket with Belt and Overseas Hat reached $3,500.

A selection of Civil War memorabilia included a “Stonewall” Jackson V.M.I. Diploma Signed and Virginia Dialectic Society of Cadets Certificate, which sold for $5,750, a copper Battle of New Market: V.M.I. Cadet Award Medal realized $10,625 and Lt. Elisha Hunt Rhodes’ Union Officers’ Frock Coat hammered for $4,750.

Additional highlights include, but are not limited to:

·         Cased 12-Guage Beretta S0-5 Sidelock Over-and-Under Shotgun: realized $10,000

·         Cased Colt 1849 Pocket Revolver with Damascene Work: realized $8,125

·         Barrett Model 82A1 Semi-Automatic Rifle and Nightforce 8-32x56 Scope: realized $8,125

·         American Silver-Hilted Small Sword: realized $4,750

·         J. Jarre of Paris, France Harmonica Pinfire Pistol: realized $4,750

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

Screen Shot 2017-06-14 at 10.46.46 AM.pngGiven the importance of Micrographia, it is extraordinary that there has been no satisfactory edition since the 18th century. The new Folio Society edition, limited to 750 copies, aims to rectify this by presenting a handsome and very readable edition of Hooke’s seminal text in its entirety, and doing full justice to the stunning illustrations that are the source of the book’s enduring fame. The text is based on the first edition of 1665, printed by John Martyn and James Allestry for the Royal Society. Hooke’s engagingly inconsistent approach to spelling and punctuation has largely been retained, although for ease of reading spellings, punctuation and italicisation have been discreetly modernised. 

What Robert Hooke achieved in Micrographia, as he only hints at in his delightfully fastidious subtitle ‘Some physiological descriptions of minute bodies made by magnifying glasses with observations and enquiries thereupon’, was to bring to light what previous philosophers could only glimpse or theorise about. Combining his supreme talents as a technician and a draughtsman, Hooke constructed powerful new lenses, isolated specimens - in one case, plying an ant with brandy to keep it still - and described what he saw in words and pictures, in the nest detail. Readers in 1665 began to see the world with fresh eyes. 

The breathtakingly detailed illustrations of insects and plants - the largest of which is nearly two feet across - have been reproduced at full size from copies of the rst and second editions of Micrographia held at the Bodleian Library and the Museum of the History of Science, Oxford. The Folio edition is the only one in modern times to present Hooke’s illustrations in their original form as large-scale foldouts. No other edition has presented Hooke’s work in a format so worthy of its content. 

Robert Hooke’s status as one of England’s most eminent scientists - or ‘natural philosophers’, to use the contemporary term - has not always enjoyed due recognition. As historian Lisa Jardine (to whom this Folio edition of Micrographia is dedicated) argues in her biography The Curious Life of Robert Hooke: The Man Who Measured London, Hooke’s pioneering achievements were frequently obscured by his puzzling personality. 

Born in 1635 on the Isle of Wight, Hooke moved to London and then studied at Christ Church College in Oxford, joining a coterie of experimental philosophers under the tutelage of John Wilkins. Hooke’s influential allies included his school friend Christopher Wren and the chemist and physicist Robert Boyle, whose assistant Hooke became in 1656, building the air pumps for the gas experiments which were to immortalise his name. When the Royal Society was created after the Restoration, Hooke was appointed its Curator of Experiments and in 1664 became Professor of Geometry at Gresham College. It was in this position of considerable eminence that he produced Micrographia and achieved renown as one of the new breed of empirical thinkers. 

Yet, despite a reputation for great loyalty among his friends, Hooke came to be regarded by his competitors as a man of odd and unfathomable temper, prone to public displays of pique. The most notorious instance of this trait was his argument with Isaac Newton, in which Hooke accused Newton of appropriating his ideas on gravity. The dispute escalated so bitterly that Newton is said to have attempted to dismantle Hooke’s reputation, and perhaps even to have destroyed the Royal Society’s only portrait of Hooke. When Hooke died in 1703 he left no will, and no building is named in his honour. His reputation today rests largely, if not solely, on his achievements in Micrographia

The Folio edition is supplemented by two important texts which elucidate Micrographia and provide different perspectives of its prodigious but controversial author. A Brief Life by John Aubrey (1626-97) - itself a work firmly in the empiricist tradition of research and observation. A close friend of Robert Hooke, Aubrey helped him with some of his experiments and lived for a period in his lodgings at Gresham College. Aubrey paints an affectionate portrait of ‘a person of great virtue and goodness’, voracious for knowledge from the earliest age, and defends him in his famous dispute with Isaac Newton. 

Aubrey’s Life is preceded by a newly commissioned essay on Hooke’s career and achievements, and the enduring importance of Micrographia, by historian and literary critic Ruth Scurr. 

Production Details

  • Limited to 750 numbered copies 
  • 400 pages set in Caslon type 
  • Printed on Munken Pure paper 
  • 38 plates including 5 fold-outs  
  • Illustrations reproduced from copies of the first and second editions held at the Bodleian Library and the Museum of Science, Oxford 
  • Quarter-bound in leather with cloth sides blocked in silver with a design by Neil Gower based on the eye of a grey drone-fly. Silver top edge 
  • Introduced by Ruth Scurr and with a Brief Life by John Aubrey 
  • Cloth covered slipcase blocked in silver 
  • Book size 131⁄2”× 83⁄4” 

The facsimile is limited to 750 copies. UK £225 US $360 Can $450 Aus $450

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden today announced the appointment of Tracy K. Smith as the Library’s 22nd Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry, for 2017-2018. Smith will take up her duties in the fall, opening the Library’s annual literary season in September with a reading of her work at the Coolidge Auditorium.

Smith, a Pulitzer Prize-winning poet and a professor at Princeton University, succeeds Juan Felipe Herrera as Poet Laureate.

“It gives me great pleasure to appoint Tracy K. Smith, a poet of searching,” Hayden said. “Her work travels the world and takes on its voices; brings history and memory to life; calls on the power of literature as well as science, religion and pop culture. With directness and deftness, she contends with the heavens or plumbs our inner depths—all to better understand what makes us most human.”

“I am profoundly honored,” Smith said. “As someone who has been sustained by poems and poets, I understand the powerful and necessary role poetry can play in sustaining a rich inner life and fostering a mindful, empathic and resourceful culture. I am eager to share the good news of poetry with readers and future readers across this marvelously diverse country.”

Smith joins a long line of distinguished poets who have served in the position, including Juan Felipe Herrera, Charles Wright, Natasha Trethewey, Philip Levine, W.S. Merwin, Kay Ryan, Charles Simic, Donald Hall, Ted Kooser, Louise Glück, Billy Collins, Stanley Kunitz, Robert Pinsky, Robert Hass and Rita Dove.

The new Poet Laureate is the author of three books of poetry, including “Life on Mars” (2011), winner of the 2012 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry; “Duende” (2007), winner of the 2006 James Laughlin Award and the 2008 Essence Literary Award; and “The Body’s Question” (2003), winner of the Cave Canem Poetry Prize. Smith is also the author of a memoir, “Ordinary Light” (2015), a finalist for the 2015 National Book Award in nonfiction and selected as a notable book by the New York Times and the Washington Post.

For her poetry, Smith has received a Rona Jaffe Writers Award and a Whiting Award. In 2014, the Academy of American Poets awarded her with the Academy Fellowship, given to one poet each year to recognize distinguished poetic achievement. In 2015, she won the 16th annual Robert Creeley Award and in 2016 was awarded Columbia University’s Medal for Excellence.

In the Pulitzer Prize citation for “Life on Mars,” judges lauded its “bold, skillful poems, taking readers into the universe and moving them to an authentic mix of joy and pain." Toi Derricotte, poet and Academy of American Poets chancellor, said “the surfaces of a Tracy K. Smith poem are beautiful and serene, but underneath, there is always a sense of an unknown vastness. Her poems take the risk of inviting us to imagine, as the poet does, what it is to travel in another person’s shoes.”

Born in Falmouth, Massachusetts in 1972, and raised in Fairfield, California, Tracy K. Smith earned a B.A. in English and American literature and Afro-American studies from Harvard University and an M.F.A. in creative writing from Columbia University. From 1997 to 1999, she was a Stegner Fellow in poetry at Stanford University. Smith has taught at Medgar Evers College of the City University of New York, at the University of Pittsburgh and at Columbia University. She is currently the Roger S. Berlind ’52 Professor in the Humanities and director of the creative writing program at Princeton University.

Background of the Laureateship

The Library of Congress Poetry and Literature Center is the home of the Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry, a position that has existed since 1937, when Archer M. Huntington endowed the Chair of Poetry at the Library. Since then, many of the nation’s most eminent poets have served as Consultant in Poetry to the Library of Congress and, after the passage of Public Law 99-194 (Dec. 20, 1985), as Poet Laureate Consultant in Poetry—a position which the law states “is equivalent to that of Poet Laureate of the United States.”

During his or her term, the Poet Laureate seeks to raise the national consciousness to a greater appreciation of the reading and writing of poetry. The Library keeps to a minimum the specific duties required of the Poet Laureate, who opens the literary season in the fall and closes it in the spring. In recent years, Laureates have initiated poetry projects that broaden the audiences for poetry.

For more information on the Poet Laureate and the Poetry and Literature Center, visit loc.gov/poetry/.  Consultants in Poetry and Poets Laureate Consultants in Poetry and their terms of service can be found at loc.gov/poetry/laureate-2011-present.html. To learn more about Poet Laureate projects, visit loc.gov/poetry/laureate-projects.html.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov, and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

Paris - Artcurial is pleased to announce the arrival of Louis Grandchamp des Raux, who has integrated the auction house team since 1st June 2017.  Henceforth, he will be Artcurial’s exclusive International Consultant, working in close collaboration with Matthieu Fournier, Artcurial’s associate director. 

While Louis Grandchamp des Raux is perfectly acquainted with the art market, in particular ancient paintings, his expertise goes beyond the speciality. Today, he places his experience and network of first-rate collectors in a position to promote Artcurial’s development. He thus achieves a 30-year-old dream, to move to the other side of the gavel, becoming a major player in the market. He will continue to nourish his passion for art by helping collectors to establish a collection, but also to separate from their paintings in the best conditions.

« It is with an immense pleasure that we welcome Louis to Artcurial ! We met him as a collector, while he was attending our exhibitions and our sales, then learned to know us more personally during the sale of his collection that we organised in 2015. He became our friend. What better ambassador for our House that an internationally recognised collector, passionate and scholarly, who can share his selling and buying experience with other collectors. » Matthieu Fournier, Associate Director, Ancient masters and 19th century department, Artcurial 

« By joining Artcurial, I finally reconcile my career as an entrepreneur and my love of art, which were cohabitating for 30 years!  To become a part of Artcurial’s prestige throughout Europe is an exciting challenge.  My foremost desire is to share my passion and my history, in particular by guiding collectors in their cultural and artistic endeavours. » Louis Grandchamp des Raux, International Consultant, Artcurial

Bonhams is pleased to announce that longtime Christie’s rare book specialist Ian Ehling will join the New York office as Director of Fine Books & Manuscripts, beginning June 1.  Ian has more than 34 years of bookselling experience, and has appraised and catalogued thousands of the rarest and most exquisite books to come to market in the last three decades. Ian is joined in the New York office by Senior Specialist Darren Sutherland, longtime head of the rare book room at the venerable NYC institution, the Strand Bookstore. Together, the two men bring more than 50 years of bookselling experience to Bonhams.

“I’m so pleased to be working with both Ian and Darren,” said Catherine Williamson, US Director of Fine Books and Manuscripts for Bonhams.  “Each brings a tremendous depth of experience to Bonhams.  But more than that, they are great guys, the kind of colleagues you are lucky to have in the office.”

(Ian’s career began as an apprentice in a Munich bookstore in 1982.  By 1986 he had relocated to Berlin where he worked for an antiquarian bookseller advising collectors, cataloguing books and representing the company at auction in Germany and abroad.  In 1993 Ian was awarded a prestigious Bertelsmann Foundation fellowship that sponsored his work at Swann Galleries in New York.  Later that same year he joined the staff at Christie’s, where he rose through the ranks to become a Senior Specialist.  He was with Christie’s for 23 years before leaving to assume the directorship of the Bonhams Books & Manuscripts department in New York). 

In his long career, Ian has worked on more than 150 auctions, many of them record-breaking, including The Haskell F. Norman Library of Science and Medicine ($18 million, 1998); Masterpieces of Modern Literature: The Library of Roger Rechler ($7 million, 2002); the Sachsen-Meiningen Set of Audubon's The Birds of America ($5.8 million, 2004); Important Books and Atlases: The Library of Kenneth Nebenzahl ($12 million, 2012); Arthur and Charlotte Vershbow collection of illustrated books ($16 million, 2013); Jean R. Perrette: Important Travel, Exploration and Cartography ($9.5 million, 2016).

Ian has also overseen numerous successful consignments and institutional sales including the three-part single-owner sale of The Detective Fiction Library of Richard M. Lackritz ($780,000, 2002), setting a world record for a single-owner sale in that genre;  A Vitruvius collection consigned by the Metropolitan Museum of Art that included a copy of the first edition of De architectura, Rome, 1487, a world record for a book on architecture ($881,000, 2007); and the sale of Newton’s Philosophiae naturalis principia mathematica (London, 1687), the presentation copy to King James, ($2.5 million, 2013).

Ian has lectured for New York University and the Appraiser Association of America. He has been a member of the Grolier Club, the oldest existing bibliophilic club in North America, since 1999. 

During Darren Sutherland’s ten years at the Strand Bookstore, he has seen and handled valuable and interesting material in all fields. With a degree in English Literature from the University of California at Berkeley, he began his career in the book trade as the first employee of Iconoclast Books, a vibrant retail bookshop in Sun Valley, Idaho. Over the course of a decade he helped grow the fledgling store into multiple locations, with a particular focus on first edition Hemingway, books on fishing, and western Americana.  He has provided commentary on the book markets for numerous publications, including Esquire and the Wall Street Journal.

Auction Guide