DALLAS, Texas - Heritage Auctions, the largest collectibles auctioneer and the third-largest auction house in the world, has announced it is expanding its San Francisco office to accommodate its growing staff and services. The new office, located at 603 Battery Street, is within walking distance to the city’s Embarcadero and eastern waterfront and financial district.

“This expansion will allow us to grow our staff immediately,” said Alissa Ford, Director of Fine & Decorative Arts in the San Francisco office. “We already offer an array of services and we are now seeking more specialists to serve our growing clientele in the region.” 

The new space will allow Heritage San Francisco to hold larger exhibitions of fine art by well-known artists as well as frequently-changing displays.

The office already offers clients specialists in the areas of Arms & Armor, Fine & Decorative Arts, including California and Western Art, Modern & Contemporary Arts, Entertainment and Music Memorabilia, Fine Jewelry and European Art. Growth areas will target Comics and Original Comic Art and U.S. Coins. 

A Grand Opening is scheduled for 6 to 8 p.m., Oct. 26 and will coincide with a special preview of the firm’s American Art Signature® Auction.

“We are growing to enhance and accommodate more specialists and services,” Ford said. “We are pleased to be San Francisco’s go-to auction house.” 

MEDFORD/SOMERVILLE, Mass.—Tufts University will be the only institution in Massachusetts to host “Robert Frank: Books and Films, 1947-2017,” a bold exhibition of the life’s work of one of the preeminent figures in 20th century photography. The exhibit will be held at the Tisch Library on Tufts' Medford/Somerville campus, 35 Professors Row, Medford, from Oct. 6 to Nov. 5. The exhibit show is free and open to the public.

Despite Frank’s significant influence on photographers of his own and subsequent generations, there are only few exhibitions of his work. This traveling exhibition to be chiefly shown at universities and schools, seeks to remedy that. Frank’s original silver gelatin prints are today fragile objects, and most are not on public display. Galleries, museums and investors lend Frank originals only under limited conditions of display with exorbitant insurance costs, which makes organizing traditional exhibitions very difficult.

Conceived by Robert Frank and Gerhard Steidl, this exhibition shows Frank’s work in photos, books and films in a direct accessible manner. Frank’s images are printed on sheets of newsprint and hung on the walls or from the ceiling. Frank’s films and videos, which are so often overshadowed by his photographic work are shown on small portable “beamers”, projecting them directly onto the walls. Each exhibition is to be disposed of after display, thus circumventing the normal cycle of speculation and consumption in the art market. When the idea for this pop-up show first reached Frank in his small, crooked house in the Canadian village of Mabou, he said: “Cheap, quick, and dirty, that’s how I like it!”

“We are honored to bring this installation of Robert Frank’s extraordinary work - in photos, books and film - not only to the Tufts community, but also to the rest of New England to experience,” said Dorothy Meaney, interim director of Tisch Library.

The exhibition at Tufts University is made possible by the generous support of Tufts alumnus Steve Tisch, and the Steve Tisch Foundation, Steidl, and the Richard Ehrlich Family Foundation.

The exhibition hours are 10a.m. to 11:30p.m. The installation is located in Tisch Library on the main level; the Tower Café; the level 1 main stairwell; and the level 2 & 3 stairwells.

The exhibition’s next venues will be the Houston Center for Photography (December 9, 2017-January 5, 2018) and Blue Sky Gallery, Portland (January 5-February 25, 2018), before continuing to visit about 30 further cities around the globe. Previous venues include the Art Institute of Chicago (12.5.-26.5.17), the Tokyo University of the Arts (10.11.-24.11.16), Kunsthalle Ziegelhütte, Appenzell, Switzerland (15.5.-30.10.16), and NYU/Tisch School of the Arts (29.1.-11.2.16).

 

Chicago--The American Writers Museum (AWM) will open two new special exhibits this fall in its changing galleries: Captured Stories: American Writers Through the Lens of Art Shay showcasing Shay’s landmark images of Nelson Algren and other notable writers, and Laura Ingalls Wilder: From Prairie to Page focusing on Wilder’s lifelong relationship with language and writing that shaped her Little House series.

Featured in the Meijer Gallery October 27, 2017 - March 31, 2018, Captured Stories is a collection of American writer portraits by award-winning photojournalist Art Shay, the author of nearly 70 books. For more than 50 years, Shay’s photographs recorded the bombast and energy of postwar America, finding unique angles on the moments and personalities for magazines such as Life, Time, Ebony and Sports Illustrated. But Shay started out as a reporter and he shot with a writer’s eye; his images are stories just waiting to be told. It’s not surprising that he captured the literary world with such unusual sensitivity and insight, from the clarity in the eyes of Gwendolyn Brooks and the weary look of an aging Ernest Hemingway, to Allen Ginsberg teaching a rapt crowd in Grant Park during the 1968 Democratic Convention. A world-class street photographer, Shay wandered countless miles throughout the 1950s exploring Chicago with author and close friend Nelson Algren. On October 29, 2017, Shay will join Gordon Parks, Henri Cartier-Bresson and William Klein as winner of the Lifetime Achievement Award from the Lucie Foundation.

Special programs offered in conjunction with Captured Stories are gallery talks about the writers featured in the exhibit; Gwendolyn Brooks by Quraysh Ali Lansana of Our Miss Brooks 100 & Revise the Psalm on Saturday, November 18, Ernest Hemingway by Nancy Sindelar of The Ernest Hemingway Foundation of Oak Park on Saturday, December 9, and Nelson Algren by Sue Rutsen of the Nelson Algren Museum of Miller Beach on Saturday, January 13. Gallery talks are from noon to 12:30 p.m. and are free with museum admission.

Featured in the Roberta Rubin Writer’s Room November 18, 2017 - February 1, 2018, Laura Ingalls Wilder: From Prairie to Page details Wilder’s lifetime of writing and explores various themes including Educated on the Move, which shows how the formal and informal education young Laura Ingalls received shaped the style of her writing, subject matter, and the values embedded in the Little House series. The popularity of the novels shaped American understanding of the time period, but often obscured the real woman behind the books. The first book in the Little House series was published when Wilder was 65 years old, but she had been writing since her adolescence. The exhibit will display the longhand manuscript of The Long Winter from the Detroit Public Library, reproduced typed Long Winter pages with handwritten notes by Laura Ingalls Wilder, merchandise, and memorabilia contributed by AWM Affiliates, Laura Ingalls Wilder Museum, Walnut Grove in Walnut Grove, Minnesota and Laura Ingalls Wilder Historic Home and Museum in Mansfield, Missouri.

Museum admission includes special exhibits and programs. For tickets and more information, please visit americanwritersmuseum.org/visit.

ishigurok_uncat_orphans_001_300dpi-copy_0.jpgThe Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin holds the archive of novelist Kazuo Ishiguro, the recent recipient of the Nobel Prize in literature for 2017.

Ishiguro was recognized by the Swedish Academy that awards the prize as a writer “who, in novels of great emotional force, has uncovered the abyss beneath our illusory sense of connection with the world.”

Ishiguro joins other Nobel laureates represented in the Ransom Center’s collections including Samuel Beckett, Pearl Buck, J.M. Coetzee, T.S. Eliot, William Faulkner, Gabriel García Márquez, Ernest Hemingway, Doris Lessing, George Bernard Shaw, Isaac Bashevis Singer, John Steinbeck and W.B. Yeats.

“It is one thing for the Ransom Center to collect the papers of Nobel laureates and another thing entirely to collect the papers of future Nobel laureates,” said Stephen Enniss, director of the Ransom Center.  

Acquired in 2015 with the support of then-university President Bill Powers and then-Provost Gregory L. Fenves, the archive provides a meticulous record of Ishiguro’s writing projects, including his seven published novels. Ishiguro kept his notes and multiple drafts for each of his novels.

Prior to the archive’s arrival at the Ransom Center, Ishiguro spent months organizing the materials and making substantial explanatory comments, including a document he titled “HOW I WRITE,” which reveals his drafting process, and page-long documents titled “ARCHIVE NOTES.” These notes elaborate on materials in the archive, ranging from Ishiguro’s one attempt to keep a diary to two early unpublished novels. Throughout the collection are notes with Ishiguro’s annotations, providing a further commentary from the author about his papers and his career.

“The papers offer a deeply intimate glimpse of Ishiguro’s creative process and his struggle to fashion each of his critically acclaimed novels. Rarely does an archive dramatize so fully the play of memory and its ties to the novelist’s art,” Enniss said.

The collection is already accessed frequently by international scholars, students and faculty members, including Fenves (now UT Austin’s president), who led a session on Ishiguro’s “Never Let Me Go” with incoming first-year students in fall 2015. Fenves engaged students in a discussion about the book’s themes while exploring Ishiguro’s papers.

“I am so pleased that Kazuo Ishiguro has won the Nobel Prize in literature,” Fenves said. “His archive is a source of tremendous inspiration for our students and scholars. He has a gift for crafting narratives that are at once haunting, imaginative and emotionally vital. He is one of the great authors living today.”

A selection of materials from Ishiguro’s archive, including early items that showcase how Ishiguro found his voice and developed into a writer, are on view in the Ransom Center’s galleries through Oct. 31.

Image: Kazuo Ishiguro's chapter 1 plan for "When We Were Orphans." Courtesy of Harry Ransom Center

304-Hopper copy.jpgNew York—An outstanding auction of Old Master Through Modern Prints at Swann Galleries on Thursday, November 2 offers seven lots with an estimate at or above $100,000, more than any from the house’s Prints & Drawings department in nearly ten years. Rare and museum-quality prints from the fifteenth- to twentieth centuries act as an overview of the evolution of Western printmaking, and chronicle the dramatic changes of the latter half of the millennium.

A powerful section of works by American artists in the first half of the twentieth century is led by Edward Hopper’s scarce and haunting etching, The Lonely House, 1923, with an estimate of $150,000 to $200,000. Gritty, iconic views of working-class Manhattan by Hopper’s mentor Martin Lewis, including Snow on the El, 1931, and Relics (Speakeasy Corner), 1928 (each with a value of $40,000 to $60,000), are complemented by works executed during his Depression-era stay in the suburbs with friend and fellow artist Armin Landeck. Regionalists Thomas Hart Benton, Grant Wood and Paul Landacre are well-represented with pastoral scenes evoking the anxiety of encroaching technology.

A run of works by Pablo Picasso includes myriad media from all periods of his decades-long career. The aquatint and etching Faune dévoilant une femme, 1934, is valued at $80,000 to $120,000, while La Grande Corrida, aven Femme Torero, an etching of the same year, is expected to sell between $70,000 and $100,000.           

Seminal works from the dawn of printmaking in Europe include such iconic works as Israel van Meckenem’s engraving, The Dance of the Daughters of Herodias, circa 1480, with an estimate of $80,000 to $120,000. A run of scarce and powerful works by the master of engraving Albrecht Dürer is led by The Nemesis, circa 1501-02, estimated at $80,000 to $120,000. Additional early prints by the visionary include Coat-of-Arms with a Skull, 1503, and The Sea Monster, before 1500 ($50,000 to $80,000 and $40,000 to $60,000, respectively). An after-print of Heironymus Bosch’s engraving The Temptation of St. Anthony, 1561, replete with distended frogs and damned souls, is valued at $40,000 to $60,000. Works by Pieter Bruegel, Hans Baldung Grien, Augustin Hirschvogel and Lucas van Leyden—the latter’s 1510 engraving Ecce Homo is valued at $40,000 to $60,000—will also be available.

Etchings covering a variety of subjects by Rembrandt van Rijn, with portraits, nudes and landscapes, are led by the 1633 etching Self Portrait in a Cap and Scarf with the Face Dark: Bust, at $30,000 to $50,000.

Francisco José de Goya is well-represented in the sale with lithographs and portfolios, including the limited first edition of Los Caprichos, circa 1799, complete with 80 etchings with aquatint, condemning the foibles of the aristocracy and clergy, which carries an estimate of $70,000 to $100,000. Also from the eighteenth century come two works by the master of English faunal portraits, George Stubbs: the 1788 mezzotint A Sleeping Cheetah, and an engraving with stippling, etching and roulette from the same year, A Horse Frightened by a Lion, each with an estimate of $20,000 to $30,000.

Nineteenth-century works include James Ensor’s hand-colored etching, La Vengeance de Hop-Frog, 1898, a macabre scene probably based on a short story by Edgar Allan Poe, in which Hop-Frog the jester hangs tarred, flaming noblemen on a chandelier. Ensor’s prints are often extensively hand-colored with watercolor and gouache, making each a unique work of art; this one has an estimate of $60,000 to $90,000. Another work by Goya, Picador Caught by a Bull, 1825, was likely an experimental lithograph for Los Toros de Burdeos ($80,000 to $120,000). Also available are works by Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Henri Toulouse-Lautrec and Odilon Redon, whose 1892 lithograph Arbre is expected to sell between $50,000 and $80,000.

A strong selection of works by German Expressionists is led by the 1912 woodcut Prophet, by Emil Nolde, and Edvard Munch’s 1902 etching Puberty, each with a value of $30,000 to $50,000. A rare woodcut by Karl Schmidt-Rottluff, Frau im Stuhl, 1913, carries an estimate of $25,000 to $35,000. Across the border in Austria, Egon Schiele created the drypoint Kümmernis in 1914; in this sale, it is valued at $12,000 to $18,000.

The complete catalogue and bidding information is available at www.swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 304: Edward Hopper, The Lonely House, etching, 1923. Estimate $150,000 to $200,000.

Dickens-portrait-by-Jeremiah-Gurney 2.jpgNew York, NY—It has been said that no single person is more responsible for Christmas as we know it than Charles Dickens (1812-1870). In 1843 he published A Christmas Carol, and the story and cast of characters—from Ebenezer Scrooge to Tiny Tim—immediately became part of holiday lore. Even today, almost 175 years after the debut of the book, it is unusual for a year to go by without a new stage or screen adaptation.

Beginning November 3, the Morgan Library & Museum explores the genesis, composition, publication, and contemporary reception of this beloved classic in a new exhibition entitled Charles Dickens and the Spirit of Christmas. On view through January 14, 2018, the show demonstrates how the enormous popularity of A Christmas Carol catapulted Dickens out of his study into international stardom, launching a career of public dramatic readings that the author heartily embraced.  The exhibition gathers together for the first time the Morgan’s treasured, original manuscript of A Christmas Carol and the manuscripts of the four other Christmas books Dickens wrote in the years following. Complementing these works are a selection of illustrations by Dickens’s artistic collaborators, photographs, letters, tickets and printed announcements for his public performances, and even the writing desk used by the author.

“For many years now the Morgan has exhibited the manuscript of A Christmas Carol every December,” said museum director Colin B. Bailey.  “Charles Dickens and the Spirit of Christmas is our most comprehensive look at the creation of this masterpiece and Dickens’s personal motivations. The success of A Christmas Carol was a turning point in the author’s career as he found himself in wide demand not only as a writer, but as a performer capable of captivating audiences with his public readings. Dickens himself, it could be said, was the most unforgettable of the countless actors who have brought the cast of A Christmas Carol to the stage.” 

The Exhibition

Christmas was Charles Dickens’s favorite holiday. Each year he celebrated exuberantly, entertaining family and friends with theatrical performances, dinners, dances, and games. For him, Christmas was a time for storytelling—particularly ghost stories—and each of his tales is based on an implicit belief in the supernatural and emphasizes the moral benefits of imagination and memory. As the author moved from his writing desk to the stage for public readings, A Christmas Carol became the most popular story in his repertoire and strongly influenced his decision to devote a considerable amount of his prodigious energy to theatrical performance up until his death in 1870. The exhibition brings together important holdings from the Morgan's permanent collection, the Charles Dickens Museum in London, the New York Public Library, and the Victoria & Albert Museum.

Why Dickens wrote A Christmas Carol

What inspired Dickens to write one of the most famous, enduring, and widely adapted stories in all of literature? First, he was in urgent need of money. His novel, Martin Chuzzlewit, brought out in monthly installments, was not selling well. The author had recently moved into a spacious London house to accommodate his growing family and his personal expenses were rising. Moreover, members of his extended family repeatedly sought him out for financial assistance. 

Coupled with these personal imperatives, Dickens was conscience-stricken at the appalling condition of the urban poor. Britain’s economic depression of the early 1840s—the so-called “hungry forties”—was a time of rising unemployment and widespread malnutrition. Following his September 1843 visit to Samuel Starey’s “Ragged School” for severely deprived children living in London’s slums, Dickens contemplated writing an article that would deliver a “sledge-hammer blow” for social justice.

Instant Bestseller, Enduring Classic

A Christmas Carol appeared in bookshops on December 19, 1843 and by Christmas Eve every one of the six thousand copies of the first print run had completely sold out. Dickens declared it “a most prodigious success—the greatest, I think, I have ever achieved.” Most reviews were laudatory. In Fraser’s Magazine William Thackeray proclaimed the book “a National Benefit,” while the Sunday Times called it “sublime.” One American industrialist, after reading the story, gave his employees an extra day’s holiday. In early 1844, second and third editions of three thousand copies were printed and, as its popularity continued to grow, a total of fifteen thousand had been sold by the end of the year. Because of a plethora of pirated editions, which infuriated Dickens, he earned considerably less in the short term from his instant bestseller than he had anticipated. Nevertheless, the book would endure—it has never been out of print to this day—and has been described as the most perfect of Dickens’s work. 

The Later Christmas Books

The popular and critical success of A Christmas Carol initiated the lucrative series of Christmas books that Dickens published over the next several years: The Chimes (1844), The Cricket on the Hearth (1845), The Battle of Life (1846), and The Haunted Man (1848). Each of these was written largely in response to public demand for a Christmas book unleashed by the success of A Christmas Carol, and also created the market for the later Christmas stories that Dickens wrote and published in his magazines Household Words and All the Year Round. In 1883 Vincent van Gogh wrote to his friend and fellow painter Anthon van Rappard: “This week I bought a new 6-penny edition of Christmas carol and Haunted man by Dickens . . . I find all of Dickens beautiful, but those two tales—I’ve read them almost every year since I was a boy, and they always seem new to me.” 

The Public Readings—A Second Career

Starting in 1853 Dickens gave public readings of A Christmas Carol in provincial English cities to raise money for local charities. The reaction of audiences was so rapturous that in 1858, he embarked upon a series of weekly paid readings in London. He went on to tour other cities in Britain and expanded his repertoire to include scenes from The Pickwick Papers, Martin Chuzzlewit and Oliver Twist. Dickens rehearsed intensively, memorizing his texts so that he could perform rather than read them, and improvise according to his enthralled audience’s reaction. In 1866 he gave a series of thirty readings in London and elsewhere, receiving a fee of fifty pounds per night. Prior to his reading tour of the United States Dickens embarked on another tour of England and Ireland between January and May 1867, and a so-called “Farewell Tour” in 1870, by which time his fee had risen to eighty pounds. At the end of his last reading, in March 1870, he said: “From these garish lights I vanish now for evermore with a heartfelt, grateful, respectful and affectionate farewell.” 

American Reading Tour, 1867-68

Dickens visited the United States twice, first traveling extensively in 1842. His experience of those travels is recorded in American Notes for General Circulation (1842) and his novel Martin Chuzzlewit (1843-44). Twenty-five years later, in 1867, he returned to the United States for an extensive—and exhausting—and exhausting reading tour. During both visits, he received an enthusiastic and extravagant welcome, as befitted the world’s first literary superstar. 

He began his reading tour in Boston in December 1867 and ended in New York on April 1868 and was lionized in every city he visited. In seventy-six public readings, he performed his work for more than one hundred thousand people and earned $95,000, equivalent to approximately $1.5 million in today’s money. The tour was a critical and financial success, but it accelerated the decline of the author’s health and he died two years later. 

Image: Jeremiah Gurney (1812­-1895), Charles Dickens, 1867, black and white photograph, The Morgan Library & Museum, MA 7793. Purchased for The Dannie and Hettie Heineman Collection as a gift of the Heineman Foundation, 2011.

166-Ponds.jpgNew York—Hoards of history-lovers came out to attend the preview for Swann Auction Galleries’ auction of Printed & Manuscript Americana on Thursday, September 28. The sale featured a trove of unique material, much of which had never previously been seen on the market. Department Director Rick Stattler said,  "This sale emphasized quality over quantity.  At 325 lots, it was one of the smallest Americana sales we've ever done, but the total hammer was the best of our past four Americana sales, and it finished above the top of its estimate range.”

            The top lot in the sale was an archive of 245 letters that spanned nearly a century by early frontier missionaries in Minnesota, which was sold to a private collector for $112,500—triple the pre-sale estimate, and the highest price ever realized for an archive at Swann. Collectors also won a first-edition Book of Mormon for $37,500, and a New Hampshire broadside proclaiming the end of the Revolution for $22,500.

            A burgeoning section of photographic works performed exceptionally well, with a set of cyanotype albums compiled by E. Radford Bascome, chronicling the construction of the Williamsburg Bridge, 1897-1903, reaching $30,000, above a high estimate of $6,000. McClees’ Gallery of Photographic Portraits… of the Thirty-Fifth Congress, 1859, was one of the first photographically illustrated books published in the United States; it was purchased for $11,250.

            Latin Americana successful in this sale, led by a pair of early manuscripts by Baja California missionaries that brought $27,500 and $11,250, respectively, and Fernando de Cepeda's rare 1637 book on Mexican engineering, which brought $12,500. Among the earliest examples of printing in the Americas are legal power-of-attorney forms printed in sixteenth-century Mexico. A previously unknown example, printed circa 1572, brought a record $2,000.All but one of the lots in this section found buyers, earning $115,272 and exceeding the high estimate for the run.

            Institutions bid actively throughout the auction.  The biggest prize was a medical journal kept aboard the frigate Deane during the American Revolution, which went to the Society of the Cincinnati. Other institutions purchased the papers of naval surgeon Pierre St. Medard, an early manuscript cookbook from Mexico and a logbook of an 1804-16 seal-hunting expedition off the coast of Antarctica.

            Mr. Stattler added, “Buyers seemed confident and we even noted a few impulse purchases by disciplined collectors on the sale floor. The market remains strong for unique and interesting material."

            The next auction of Printed & Manuscript Americana at Swann Galleries will be held in Spring 2018.

Image: Lot 166: Missionary archive of Samuel W. and Gideon H. Pond, Minnesota, 1833-93. Sold September 28, 2017 for $112,500. (Pre-sale estimate: $30,000 to $40,000).

DALLAS, Texas - The personal archives of activist Norman Cousins, who dedicated his life to nuclear disarmament and world peace, offers an historic look at his role as a private citizen in bringing about the Nuclear Test Ban treaty in 1963. Never before offered at auction, his correspondences with world leaders, including several American presidents, will be offered in Heritage Auctions’ Historical Manuscripts auction on Oct. 19 in Dallas. 

“The material shines a light on the immense accomplishments of this quiet hero,” said Sandra Palomino, Director of Historical Manuscripts at Heritage Auctions. “Cousins’ role behind the scenes of the negotiations of the Nuclear Test Ban Treaty cannot be overstated." 

Cousins’ response to the bombing of Hiroshima was immediate. He wrote an editorial for the Saturday Review on August 6, 1945, the same day the bomb was dropped on Hiroshima. He founded organizations, and one such effort, the American-Soviet Dartmouth Conferences, brought him to the attention of the Vatican.  In early 1962, Cousins was approached by Father Felix Morlian to act as an intermediary in getting a message to the Kremlin. Cousins stayed in touch with Morlian, but the Cuban Missile Crisis in October 1962, brought new urgency. Wary of potentially violating any U.S. laws, Cousins reached out to the White House to let them know of his communications with the Vatican, at which time President Kennedy asked him to convey messages to both the Kremlin and the Vatican. Cousins flew to the Vatican and then the Kremlin in December 1962; successfully establishing back channels with the Pope, the Kremlin, and President John F. Kennedy and facilitating communications among the three world leaders.

Through Cousins, the three world leaders could quietly communicate their goals without scrutiny, which served to build trust. Although the U.S. and Soviet Union had been negotiating a treaty since the Eisenhower administration, they repeatedly stumbled when it came to the issue of on-site inspections. The Kennedy administration hit the same road block during their negotiations, but via Cousins were able to successfully assure Soviet Chairman Nikita Khrushchev that on-site inspections would not be used as an opportunity for espionage.

The October auction includes an Inscribed News Wire Announcement Signed by President John F. Kennedy to Cousins dated July 23, 1963, which is expected to bring $7,500. “A more clear testament to the value of Cousins role cannot be found,” says Palomino.

Additional historically important items in the archive include:

·         In a 1961 Typed Letter Signed by Nikita Khrushchev, the Soviet leader responds to a proposal that Cousins and Clarence Pickett of the National Committee for a Sane Nuclear Policy made to address the increasing threat of nuclear warfare during the Cold War (est. $1,800). In the letter, Khrushchev admits "we also believe that the problem of disarmament is the most important, truly, the main problem that is currently facing the world."

·         Several Signed Letters to Cousins from Jawaharlal Nehru, the first Prime Minister of India, on his lingering concerns about the current state of the international crisis amidst the Cold War (est. $1,500+). 

·         Correspondence between Cousins and President Dwight D. Eisenhower, including a Signed, Typed Letter declining Cousins' assistance in arranging meetings with scientists on the topic of radio-active fallout but emphatically expressing his concerns regarding the dangers of nuclear armament ($1,500+).

·         Additional correspondence from historical figures such as President Harry Truman; President Ronald Reagan; First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy; Indira Gandhi; President George H.W. Bush; President Franklin D. Roosevelt; theoretical physicist Robert Oppenheimer; Robert F. Kennedy and President Lyndon B. Johnson, among others. 

·         United States Secretary of State Dean Rusk Signed Copy of Nuclear Test Ban Treaty, "a true copy of the United States original of the Treaty banning nuclear weapons tests..." presented to Cousins on Oct. 14, 1963.

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, London, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos. 

 

miles1.JPGAlbany Arts Communications is delighted to announce the publication of an illustrated limited edition of Barry Miles’s memoir, In the Sixties, on 5 October 2017, only at www.inthesixties.com.

In 1962, Miles was a student at Cheltenham art school. By 1969, he was running the Beatles’ Zapple label and living at the Chelsea Hotel in New York. In between, Miles was a major force in the UK’s nascent counterculture, and active in every significant underground event of the decade.

In the Sixties is Miles’s personal memoir of this turbulent period. A friend of Allen Ginsberg and William Burroughs, Miles helped to organise the pivotal International Poetry Incarnation at the Royal Albert Hall in June 1965. He co-founded and ran the Indica Bookshop in Mason’s Yard, the epicentre for the London underground scene, and published Britain’s first underground newspaper, International Times (IT), from Indica's basement.

Miles's partners in Indica were John Dunbar, then married to Marianne Faithfull, and Peter Asher. Through Asher, Miles became closely involved with the Beatles, particularly Paul McCartney. Other musicians who appear in the pages of In the Sixties include the Rolling Stones, Pink Floyd, Leonard Cohen and Frank Zappa; the book also includes memorable portraits of writers and poets such as Ginsberg and Burroughs, Charles Olson, Richard Brautigan and Charles Bukowski.

This expanded edition of In the Sixties illustrates Miles’s story using personal and long-unseen images of London in the 1960s, including photographs and drawings from pre-Beatles Britain through to the post-psychedelic era. Also included in this edition are exclusive sound recordings of interviews conducted by Miles with Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Pete Townshend in 1967, with Mick Jagger in 1968, and a previously unpublished interview with John Lennon in 1969.

Highlights of these unique and unexpurgated interviews include McCartney playing Miles the brand-new acetates of ‘Strawberry Fields Forever’ and ‘Penny Lane’; Mick Jagger talking about the Grosvenor Square riots he’d attended the day before; Pete Townshend on plotting for The Who to explode live on television; and John Lennon on making music without the Beatles.

In the Sixties is a record of Miles’s unique position in the history of 1960s and 1970s counterculture: as one commentator has written, ‘He really was there, man, and that is more than most of us can say.’

The book is published by Rocket 88 and will only be available via www.inthesixties.com and the Rocket 88 website. Pre-ordering before the end of June will enable buyers to get a discount on the purchase price, and the chance to have their name printed in the book. 

Image: Barry Miles, Indica Bookshop, Mason’s Yard, 1966

 

telegram copy.jpgDALLAS, Texas - An important telegraph from Ulysses S. Grant to Gen. William T. Sherman giving Sherman permission to destroy all of Georgia during his conquest of Confederate forces is expected to sell for at least $75,000 when it comes up for auction Oct. 19 at Heritage Auctions. The Oct. 12, 1864 letter marked a watershed event during the U.S. Civil War - a 285-mile march by roughly 60,000 soldiers designed to scare the civilians in Georgia into abandoning the Confederate cause - which went down in history as Sherman’s “March to the Sea.”

“This single military strategy had far-reaching effects, that hastened the end of the war and ensured Abraham Lincoln’s reelection,” said Sandra Palomino, Director of Historical Manuscripts at Heritage Auctions. “It was originally purchased by R. Douglas Stuart in 1932, and this is the first time it will be offered to the public since then.”

Stuart was the son of Robert Stuart, a founding partner of the Quaker Oats Company. President Eisenhower appointed Stuart as U.S. Ambassador to Canada in 1953, and he served in that post until 1956. After serving as ambassador, Stuart returned to Quaker Oats. He retired as chairman of the board in 1962. He died in 1975 at the age of 89.

Grant’s telegram authorizes Sherman to proceed with his strategy to storm Confederate-held territory with a “scorched earth” approach. In a previous letter to Grant, Sherman said, “I would infinitely prefer to make a wreck of the road and of the country from Chattanooga to Atlanta, including the latter City. Send back my wounded and worthless and with my effective Army move through Georgia smashing things to the sea.”

Sherman's “March to the Sea,” also known as the “Savannah Campaign,” was comprised of the Army of the Tennessee, the Army of Georgia and a cavalry division, was conducted from Nov. 15 to Dec. 21, 1864, when Sherman's forces captured the port city of Savannah, Georgia. After leaving the decimated city of Atlanta on November 16, Sherman led his troops on a bold and destructive campaign targeting both industrial and military targets, effectively crippling the Confederate's capacity to wage war. The March to the Sea was followed by Sherman's successful march through the Carolinas, ending April 26, 1865 with the surrender of Confederate General Joseph E. Johnston.

“Grant hesitated at first and did not initially agree with Sherman’s strategy,” Palomino said. “In the remarkable letter offered here at auction, Grant, confident in Sherman's ability, finally relented and gave his permission to Sherman to carry out his proposed march to the sea.”

Another interesting aspect of this Oct. 12 letter are Grant's comments concerning the arming of the black male population during Sherman's proposed campaign. Grant had long supported Union forces taking enslaved blacks from their Confederate-supporting owners and enlisting the now-freed men to serve in the Union Army as soldiers from the time of Lincoln's Jan. 1, 1863 Emancipation Proclamation. 

“This is one of the most significant Ulysses S. Grant letters to be offered on the market in recent memory,” Palomino said, “the communication that resulted in one of the most critical military operations of the Civil War. It greatly exemplifies the entire Stuart collection featured in this auction; it makes clear Grant’s humanity in bearing the weight of making such a tremendous decision.”

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, London, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

Auction Guide