[ITHACA, NY] National Book Auctions, located in Ithaca, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog.  

This catalog features rare, antique and decorative books as well as select additions of artwork and ephemera. We will offer another session of books and ephemera from a large estate Civil War collection being sold through National Book Auctions and Worth Auctions over the coming months.          

Antique and rare books in this catalog include numerous titles. Among the earliest examples are a paired binding of works by Lycosthenes and Wolffhart, "Apophthegmata ex Probatis Graecae Latinae'que Linguae Scriptoribus" and "Parabolarum siue Smiiltudinum," produced in 1602, the 1693 printing of Temple's "Observations upon the United Provinces of the Netherlands," and the 1762 first edition of Rousseau's "Emile ou de l'Education," Additional rare pieces include Cibot and Guignes' "Lettre de Pekin sur le Genie de la Langue Chinoise," comparing Egyptian hieroglyphics to Chinese characters, published in 1773 with plates, the 1610 printing of David's "Duodecim Specula Deum," and Basnage's "Annales des Provinces Unies," printed in two folio volumes in 1726.                      

Several pleasing collections will also be showcased. Highlighted is a substantial collection of volumes relating to the use of emblems, dating from the 17th century and led by examples such as Reinzer's "Meteorologia Philosophico-Politica," published in 1709, and the 1631 printing of Hugo and Bolswert's "Pia Desideria Lib III ad Urbanum VIII." Civil War-related works include the 1864 printing of "The Fort Pillow Massacre," and Cooper's "In and out of Rebel Prisons." Vintage and antique tomes also include subject areas such as travel & exploration, the American West, the American Revolution, Native American Indians, music & art, history of New York City & State, and medicine.   

Found throughout this catalog are interesting art and ephemera offerings. Ephemera includes a fine selection of Civil War-related items such as a signed carte-de-visite of General Philip H. Sheridan, an original 1864 ferrotype Lincoln campaign pin, Confederate state loan certificates with coupons and original signatures, and much more. Additional ephemera and art lots include original works, photographs, stereoviews, original Life magazine issues (including the first issue from 1936 with the Margaret Bourke-White front cover), rare prints of photogravure works by Yousuf Karsh, original issues of "Derriere le Miroir" with the original lithographs retained, maps, antique magazines, and other items.   

National Book Auctions is a public auction service specializing in books, ephemera, and art. National Book Auctions is a targeted service offering experience and expertise unique to marketing antique and modern books and ephemera for consignors and collectors alike. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of collectible, signed, and first edition books. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-269-0101 or email mail@nationalbookauctions.com.

 

 

124-Oraciones copy.jpgNew York— On Thursday, March 9, Swann Galleries offered a morning auction of Early Printed, Medical, Scientific & Travel Books, with examples from each section of the sale represented in the top 20 lots.

A leaf of the Gutenberg Bible, 1455, topped the sale. The remnant of the first book ever printed was hinged in a 1921 folio of A Noble Fragment; being, A Leaf of the Gutenberg Bible by A. Edward Newton. The leaf contains the text of Ecclesiasticus 16:14-18-29; it was purchased by a collector for $52,500*. Tobias Abeloff, the Senior Specialist for Early Printed Books at Swann, noted “While individual leaves from the Gutenberg Bible come to auction with some regularity, they are still sought after, considering the unlikelihood of a complete or even fragmentary copy coming on the market."

Nearly all of the offered bibles sold, including the first edition of the Geneva Bible, the most popular bible in Elizabethan England, which was printed in 1560; it sold for $22,500. The first English-language edition of Hans Holbein’s The Images of the Old Testament, 1549, with 94 woodcut illustrations by the artist, sold for $11,875.

Premier examples of English printing included a run of first editions by David Hume, led by Philosophical Essays Concerning Human Understanding, 1748, which brought $4,500, and the 1751 An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals, which was purchased for $4,000, double its high estimate.

From the Medical and Scientific sections of the sale came an archive of 21 letters from Harvey Cushing to Agnes Willard Bartlett, the great-niece of Elisha Bartlett, which was purchased for $13,750. Expositio super Antidotario Mesue, 1488, by Christophorus Georgius de Honestis, the second edition of a late 14th-century commentary on the Antidotarium ascribed to the Baghdad court physician Mesuë the Younger, tripled its high estimate to sell for $15,000.

The sale featured a strong selection of travel books, led by Jan Nieuhoff et al’s narratives of the Dutch East India Company’s missions to China, titled An Embassy from the East-India Company of the United Provinces, to the Grand Tartar Cham, Emperour of China, 1671, which sold for $7,500.

Each of the eight offered manuscripts found buyers, with the highlight being a collection of 15 illustrated prayers by Charles V of Spain, titled Oraciones de los SS. Mysterios Gloriosos y Dolorosos de la Santissima Virgen Maria, 1676, which was purchased for $9,375.

The next sale of Early Printed Books at Swann Galleries will be held in Fall 2017. For more information, contact Tobias Abeloff at tabeloff@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 124 Oraciones de los SS. Mysterios Gloriosos, manuscript in Spanish on vellum, with 15 engravings of gospel scenes, Brussels, 1676. Sold March 9, 2017 for $9,375. (Pre-sale estimate: $3,000 to $5,000)

merian-book-shapero-stand-TEFAF-web.jpgShapero Rare Books has announced their first major sale at TEFAF Maastricht prior to the official opening on 10 March 2017. One of the highlights on their stand is a lavishly illustrated folio Metamorphosis insectorum Surinamensium (Metamorphosis of the Insects of Surinam) by Maria Sibylla Merian (1647-1717) which has been sold to a European collector. Priced by Shapero at £125,000, this hand-coloured copy of the 1726 edition is a masterpiece of both art and science; the German born naturalist was the first to record the full life cycle of many species of butterflies and moths. 

A Study of Metamorphosis: More Than 300 Years Ago

At the age of 52, Merian, who settled in Amsterdam in 1691, set out for the Dutch colony now known as Surinam in South America. She spent two years studying and drawing the indigenous flora and fauna until forced to return after contracting malaria. Despite her illness, Merian published her Magnus Opus, Metamorphosis Insectorum Surinamensium, three years later, filled with paintings of Suriname's plants and animals, especially of moths and butterflies, as well as spiders, and even snakes and lizards. Many of these tropical species were unknown to Europeans at the time.


The exceptional group of her works in the Royal Collection formed the basis of the exhibition held last year at the Queen's Gallery at Buckingham Palace that travels to Holyrood Palace in Edinburgh. Exactly 300 years after her death, the Frankfurt-born botanist, zoologist and painter is finally being recognised as a pioneering woman of science at an international symposium in the Dutch capital this June.

Shapero Rare Books has exhibited at TEFAF for over 20 years. Other notable natural history books on stand 231 include a first edition folio of the Wunderkammer by Dutchman Albertus Seba. 

About Shapero Rare Books:

Shapero Rare Books is an internationally renowned dealer in rare books and works on paper. Its experts have over 100 years’ experience in the book world with particular expertise in fine illustrated books from the 15th to the 20th Century, particularly natural history, travel, guidebooks and Russian works. In 2014 it launched Shapero Modern, a modern and contemporary prints department.

BOSTON - March 09, 2017 - Boston Public Library honors William Shakespeare’s lasting legacy with its Shakespeare Unauthorized exhibition, on view through the end of the month in the McKim Exhibition Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square. The exhibition, with 54,735 visitors to date, is presented in conjunction with the ongoing BPL citywide initiative All the City’s a Stage: A Season of Shakespeare at the Boston Public Library, commemorating the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death in 2016 and connecting audiences to theater and the dramatic arts with programs throughout the library system.  Shakespeare programming continues through June, with upcoming performances by Seven Times Salt, “Sonnets and Soliloquies” by Carey and Gibson, a Lowell Lecture Series talk by Marjorie Garber, Shakespeare to Hip Hop, and more.

Boston Public Library holds one of the largest and most comprehensive publicly-held collections of Shakespeare, including the first four folios of his collected works, 45 early quarto editions of individual plays, and thousands of volumes of early source material, commentaries, translations, manuscripts, and more. Visit www.bpl.org/shakespeare to view the complete offerings of the initiative.

Shakespeare Unauthorized: Experience the original works of “The Bard”

Shakespeare Unauthorized, a major gallery exhibition on view from October 14, 2016 through March 31, 2017, includes extraordinarily rare first and early editions of familiar and beloved plays like A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Hamlet, and The Merchant of Venice, as well as all four Shakespearean folios, most notably the BPL’s own copy of the world-famous First Folio. Through the pages of these precious books, visitors can experience Shakespeare in his original language and spelling, just as he would have been read by book lovers and theater-goers hundreds of years ago.

Shakespeare Unauthorized is made possible through the financial support of Iron Mountain Incorporated (NYSE: IRM), the global leader in storage and information management services. Based in Boston, Iron Mountain provides charitable grants of funding and in-kind services to cultural and historical preservation projects like Shakespeare Unauthorized through its Living Legacy Initiative.

Shakespeare Unauthorized contains far more than just books of plays: this exhibition features surprising rarities and mysterious objects; scandalous forgeries made by con men and accomplished scholars; books from the luxurious private libraries of early English aristocrats; and memorabilia from four centuries of acting and stagecraft.

C&G Partners created the engaging exhibition design that showcases the extraordinary historic material on display in Shakespeare Unauthorized.

McM.jpegNEW YORK (March 9, 2017) — Collectors pounced on a pair of historic typewriters author Larry McMurtry used to write Lonesome Dove for $37,500 Wednesday, March 8, 2017 at a $1.8+ million public auction of rare books held by Heritage Auctions. The novel was a genre-defining opus and reinvigorated the western literature scene.

The Swiss-made Hermes 3000 is one of the world's finest typewriter models and the instrument of choice for thousands of writers. It was introduced in 1958 and was noted for its simplicity and ease of maintenance. The pair on offer is dated between 1963 and 1970 with pale green bodies and keys. Each has its original case and exhibits only light scuffs and handling marks. McMurtry stationed one at his home in Archer City, Texas, and the other in Washington, D.C., while writing Lonesome Dove. McMurtry still uses a Hermes 3000, writing five pages every day to avoid "the empty well."

Lonesome Dove follows a pair of Texas Rangers in a 1,500-mile cattle drive in the Old West. The 843-page epic was an instant success, earning McMurtry the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. CBS adapted the story into a miniseries starring Robert Duvall three years later. More than 28 million people watched the miniseries, which won seven Emmys. 

The auction rounded out with Neal Cassady's THE JOAN ANDERSON LETTER to Jack Kerouac selling for $206,250; Kerouac's original typescript for The Dharma Bums selling for $137,500; and Thomas Jefferson's own copy of The Laws of the United States of America, which sold for $156,250.

Screen Shot 2017-03-09 at 8.48.24 AM.pngWinner of multiple awards, including the Hugo and the Nebula, American Gods is Neil Gaiman’s sweeping exploration of story, myth and the shifting nature of belief itself. According to Mr Wednesday, gods travelled to the new world with their immigrant worshippers only to flounder in a land both too strange and too modern to nurture them. Although the story is rooted in the familiar - Gaiman gives us Egyptian deities who run funeral parlours, and gods who drive cabs to make a living - it tears back the veil to reveal the pulsing supernatural heart of America. Crammed with unconventional yet wholly engaging characters, this story of coin tricks, cons and misdirection is considered by many to be Gaiman’s masterpiece. 

For this special collector’s edition, the only colour illustrated hardback volume currently available, award-winning artist and illustrator, and Gaiman’s longtime creative partner, Dave McKean has created 12 extraordinary illustrations, including three double-page spread and a frontispiece, as well as designs for the binding and slipcase that complement and mirror each other. Like Gaiman’s stories, McKean’s multimedia pieces, with their layered meanings and half-monstrous creatures, capture the uneasy relationship between the real and the unreal. 

The text is the author’s preferred version and includes new revisions approved by the author. This edition also features both Gaiman’s original introduction and an afterword titled ‘How Dare You?’ on the particular challenges faced by an Englishman writing a novel about America. McKean has provided a revealing introduction on his approach to illustration - an essay exclusive to this edition - making this an essential volume for any enthusiast of the work of this legendary creative team. 

Product information

Bound in cloth blocked with a design by the artist. Set in Maxime with Wicked Grit display. 560 pages. 12 colour illustrations, including 3 double-page spreads.

Printed slipcase. 10" x 63⁄4".

UK £75.00 US $120.00 Can $155.00 Aus $160.00

RANKLIN, Mass. - A pair of drawings on white paper by the renowned Russian-born French artist Marc Chagall (1887-1985) combined for over $25,000 in an online-only fine art auction held February 22nd by The Woodshed Gallery, based in Franklin. The sale featured nearly 200 prints and drawings by Old and Modern Masters representing four centuries of artwork on paper.

The Chagalls were the top two selling lots of the auction. Village Berger Descending (aka Dream of the Dance), a sanguine figural drawing on white Arches paper, sold for $16,250, while another drawing, titled Violinist and Family, unframed and on white paper, finished at $9,600. Both were done in the poetic and figurative style that made Chagall one of the most popular modern artists.

Both drawings were previously owned by the Ashkenazy Gallery in Los Angeles. A flood in 1990 resulted in a large portion of the gallery’s inventory to be compensated by its insurer and subsequently sold on the secondary market. The drawings were never appraised by a third party but the gallery was paid for the damaged inventory. Neither Chagall suffered any flood damage.

Nearly 700 registered bidders participated in the auction via the platforms LiveAuctioneers.com and Invaluable.com. Bidding traffic was also driven through The Woodshed Gallery website, at www.woodshedgallery.com. “The Chagalls marked an increase in the quality of our offerings and in our ability to attract better consignments,” said Bruce Wood of The Woodshed Gallery. 

Following are additional highlights from the auction. All prices quoted include a 25 percent buyer’s premium.

An ink drawing on toned paper by Man Ray (Am., 1890-1976, born Emmanuel Radnitzky), titled Female Nude on a Bridge, signed and dated 1917, gaveled for $1,800; while a much later Man Ray work, an ink drawing on tan paper with abstract watercolor underpainting titled Female Figure, signed and dated 1951, brought $9,375. Both had identical estimates of $8,000-$12,000.

A blue ink drawing with water wash on heavy art paper, signed by Jean Cocteau (Fr., 1889-1963), and titled Mermaids, with just a few light handling marks its only flaw, went for $720. Also, an ink drawing on heavy-weight tan art paper by Fernand Leger (Fr., 1881-1955), titled Group of Women, signed (“F.L.”) and dated (1951), went to a determined bidder for $1,875.

A pair of male nude sculptures, unsigned but by a follower of Auguste Rodin, each one 11 ¼ inches tall, sold as one lot for $1,750. They might not have brought nearly as much without the connection to Rodin (Fr., 1840-1917), widely regarded as the progenitor of modern sculpture. His iconic work The Thinker remains one of the most recognizable works of art ever produced.

An ink on white bond paper drawing by the one and only Dr.Seuss (Am., born Theodor Seuss Geisel, 1904-1991), depicting a scene from his classic children’s book Green Eggs and Ham, signed by the artist, realized $480. The same amount was the winning bid for a drawing by Dr. Seuss of the classic book character The Cat in the Hat, signed, with “Best wishes, Dr. Seuss.”

A signed drawing by Hans Erni (Swiss, 1909-2015), titled Minotaur, newly matted and housed in a 33 inch by 23 inch frame, in good condition, rose to $500; while a mixed media work by Cy Twombly (1928-2011), titled Abstract Floral, signed, hit $2,250. Also, a personal note of thanks written in blue ink on buff paper by President John F. Kennedy, unframed, topped out at $375.

The Woodshed’s next big online-only auction is scheduled for Wednesday, March 29th. Already consigned are an original drawing by Vincent Van Gogh, with a minimum bid of $20,000; several interesting pieces by South American artists; two circa 1930s French posters from Noveltex; a Rodolfo Morales collage; and three portraits by Chicago’s very own Lee Godie.

The Woodshed Gallery is a family-owned art gallery specializing in oil painting restoration, art auctions and custom picture framing. The firm holds online and live auctions and is always accepting quality artworks for future auctions. To inquire about consigning a single piece or a collection, call Bruce Wood at (508) 533-6277; or, e-mail him at bruce@woodshedgallery.com

To learn more about The Woodshed Gallery and the online-only auction on March 29th, please visit www.woodshedgallery.com. Updates are posted often.

d70911ea-b2e5-4b8b-b20c-72836bf3918e.jpgAmerican photographer Todd Webb (1905-2000) was born and raised in Detroit, Michigan. After losing all his money in the Stock Market Crash of 1929, he embarked on a seven-year adventure prospecting for gold and working as a fire ranger but had little success. After returning to Detroit in 1938, Webb bought his first camera and joined the Chrysler Camera Club where he met photographer Harry Callahan. In 1940 he and Callahan completed a 10-day workshop with Ansel Adams and Webb's fascination with the medium flourished. 

After honing his skills as a Navy photographer in the South Pacific during World War II, Webb moved to New York in 1946 where he dedicated himself to photographing the everyday life and architecture of a city that captivated him. He enjoyed significant support from the New York photo community including luminaries Alfred Stieglitz, Georgia O'Keeffe, Walker Evans and Berenice Abbott, to name a few.  Stieglitz introduced him to Beaumont Newhall who helped arrange his first major solo exhibition of his New York City photographs curated by Grace Mayer. I See A City opened at the Museum of the City of New York in September 1946 to glowing notices.

This spring, over seventy years later, the Museum of the City of New York will present its second solo exhibition with Webb entitled A City Seen: Todd Webb's Postwar New York, 1945-1960 which will open on Thursday, April 20 and remain on view through September 4, 2017. Curated by Sean Corcoran, Curator of Prints and Photography at the Museum, the show features more than 100 vintage prints as well as excerpts from Webb's journal writings. 

On Thursday, April 20, an exhibition curated by former LIFE magazine editor-in-chief Bill Shapiro, entitled Down Any Street: Todd Webb's NYC Photographs 1946-1960 will open at The Curator Gallery, a commercial gallery space located in the heart of New York's Chelsea art district. The gallery show will include vintage prints as well as modern prints made by John Hill who printed some of Walker Evans' negatives. 

Both shows reveal Todd Webb's intimate and wonderfully rich exploration of New York while providing an expansive document of the city in the years following World War II. Armed with a large format camera and tripod, Webb walked around New York engaging with the people and the landscape surrounding him. He captured in his candid and inimitable way a city of contrasts -- Midtown skyscrapers, the elevated tracks along Third Avenue, signs and storefronts, food vendors and open air markets, and the bustling street life in the Bowery, Harlem near 125th Street, and old ethnic enclaves in Lower Manhattan. The museum show also features Webb's portraits of his intimate circle of friends, including Alfred Stieglitz, Harry Callahan, Berenice Abbott, Helen Levitt, and Lisette Model.  

In the press release for the 1946 exhibition, Newhall wrote: "[Todd Webb] has seen our city not as a glittering megalopolis, but as a community. He has chosen to focus mainly upon Third Avenue and those blocks where the shops are small and living quarters crowded. He works with swift precision, directly and honestly recording what he sees. His straightforward, un-manipulated contact prints convey a maximum sense of authenticity and are historical records of obvious documentary value. More than this, they are personal interpretations, through which he has imparted to us warmth of appreciation and the excitement of visual discovery. He brings out the human quality even when the people are absence."

About the Artist: 

Todd Webb is best known for his photographs of New York, Paris and the American West. His Paris series earned him comparisons to the French photographer Eugene Atget. In the 1940s and 50s, Webb worked for Roy Stryker and Standard Oil and Fortune magazine while simultaneously pursuing his personal projects. In 1955 and 1956, he was awarded a John Simon Guggenheim fellowship to document the emigrant trails that the early settlers followed to Oregon and California. He spent these years walking across the country not unlike his contemporary, Robert Frank. From 1961-1971, Webb and his wife Lucille lived in New Mexico where they became an integral part of the local arts community and Webb made a series of portraits of Georgia O'Keeffe at her home there. In 1970, Webb moved to the South of France where he continued to photograph regularly, and in 1975 he retired in Maine where he would live until his passing at age 94.

Over a period of more than fifty years, Todd Webb produced a unique body of work which attained an important place in the annals of American photographic history. Webb's humanistic approach to documentary photography infuses his images with a sense of intimacy and a curiosity in the relationship between history, place, and people. His life was like his photographs; at first they seem very simple, without obvious tricks or manipulation, but on closer examination, they are increasingly complex and marvelously subtle. For more information about the artist, visit www.toddwebbarchive.com.

A comprehensive monograph of Webb's New York photographs will be published by Thames & Hudson in the early fall of 2017. (Details coming soon.) Webb's portraits of O'Keeffe taken in New Mexico between 1961-1971 are currently on view in George O'Keeffe: Living Modern at the Brooklyn Museum through July 23, 2017. 

Image: "LaSalle at Amsterdam" 1946 / © Todd Webb Archive

IMG_5213 copy.jpgSymposium will feature leading scholars in the field and an inaugural exhibit of antique books of Mesoamerica and Colonial Mexico

What: 

Cal State LA’s Art History Society, in partnership with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, presents the 2017 Mesoamerican Symposium titled  “The Foundation of Heaven: The Great Temple of the Aztecs. The symposium will feature leading scholars in the field, as well as an inaugural exhibit of antique books of Mesoamerica and Colonial Mexico.

Who: 

The symposium is dedicated to the life and work of Eduardo Matos Moctezuma, a prominent Mexican archaeologist. Matos Moctezuma is recognized for his work directing the massive, multidisciplinary Templo Mayor Project (1978-2001). The project was to excavate the Great Aztec Temple of the island capital of Tenochtitlan, next to the Metropolitan Cathedral and the Zócalo, Mexico City’s famous central plaza. He also conducted field work in such revered places as Tula, Comalcalco, Cholula, Teotihuacan, and Tlatelolco. Matos Moctezuma has published more than 500 articles, exhibition catalogues, and monographs.

When:  

Friday, April 21, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., at Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Bing Theater.

Saturday, April 22, 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., at Cal State LA, Golden Eagle Ballroom.  

Where:

Cal State LA is located at the Eastern Avenue exit, San Bernardino Freeway, at the interchange of the 10 and 710 Freeways. The address is 5151 State University Drive, Los Angeles, 90032. Public (permit dispensers) parking is available on the top level of Parking Structure C. Click here for a campus map and directions.

More: 

The symposium will culminate on April 22 at 5 p.m. in the University Library with a special exhibit of antique books, entitled “Transcultural Dialogues: The Books of Mesoamerica and Colonial Mexico. This exhibit will showcase the  Ruwet, Glass and Nicholson collections of Cal State LA that are an integral part of a proposed center for the advancement of Mesoamerican Studies. The collections of books from the 17th to the 21st Centuries, include most of the facsimiles of Mesoamerican Codices and historical chronicles of Colonial Mexico. This makes Cal State LA’s library one of the top repositories in the world in the fields of Pre-Columbian and Colonial History of the American Continent.  The exhibit is curated by Cal State LA’s Art History Professor Manuel Aguilar-Moreno, along with Azalea Camacho and Angelene Campuzano.  

Symposium speakers include Elizabeth Boone, of Tulane University; David Carrasco, of the Harvard Divinity School; John D. Pohl, of the Anthropology Department at Cal State LA; Karl Taube, of the University of California, Riverside; and more. For a listing of speakers, refer to the program online.

Info: 

General admission to the symposium is $25, $15 for college students with ID, and $10 for Cal State LA students with ID. To register, please email ahscsula@gmail.com. For additional symposium information, call (818) 926-7635 or visit http://www.calstatela.edu/arthistorysociety/events.

551-Chagall copy.jpgNew York— On Thursday, March 2, Swann Galleries’ sale of 19th & 20th Century Prints & Drawings exceeded $3M and broke ten auction records. The house, which is celebrating it diamond anniversary this year, has enjoyed several record-breaking sales already in their spring 2017 season.

The rare deluxe edition of Marc Chagall’s 1948 portfolio Four Tales from the Arabian Nights, of which only 11 were printed, topped the sale. The set belonged to the publisher of Pantheon Books, Kurt Wolff. The vibrant color lithographs include the 13th plate denoting the deluxe edition; still in the original case, the set sold to a collector for $269,000*.

Early twentieth-century American prints saw competitive bidding and high prices. Edward Hopper’s rare 1921 etching Evening Wind sold for $149,000, nearly doubling its high estimate of $80,000. The American master was also represented in the sale by the 1921 etching Night Shadows, which went for $33,800. A premiere selection of prints by Hopper’s mentor Martin Lewis was led by the extremely rare aquatint Which Way?, 1932, which was purchased for $42,500, a record for the work. Further highlights by Lewis included the 1929 drypoint Bay Windows and 1916’s etching The Orator, Madison Square, each of which went for $27,500. 

Another highlight of the sale was Männlicher Akt (Selbstbildnis I), 1912, Egon Schiele’s first attempt at a printed self-portrait; the work brought $30,000. A 1914 drypoint by the artist, Kümmernis, was purchased for $15,000.

Orologi Molli, a watercolor by Salvador Dalí featuring one of his famous melting clocks, surpassed its high estimate to sell for $112,500. Another original, a pen and ink drawing by Paul Klee of prancing bulls, titled Drama in der Kuhwelt, 1915, reached $25,000. 

All four offered works by Mary Cassatt found buyers, including the rare circa-1902 drypoint Crocheting Lessons, which sold for $27,500. Another Cassatt, the color drypoint and soft-ground etching The Coiffure, circa 1891, broke its previous auction record to sell for $81,250.

Etchings made by James A.M. Whistler during a 1879-80 trip to Venice performed well, including the luminous Upright Venice, at $70,000. Two further prints from the same period each broke their previous auction records: The Garden reached $70,000, while San Biagio sold for $62,500.

The complete set of 14 lithographs in Henri Toulouse-Lautrec’s Mélodies de Désiré Dihau, 1895, was sold for $30,000, a record for the work. The set was previously in the collection of Eric Carlson.

Todd Weyman, Director of Prints & Drawings, said of the sale, “This has been one of our strongest sales to date in terms of bidder registration. We are pleased with the continued growth in our dynamic market.”

The next sale of Prints & Drawings at Swann Galleries will be Old Master Through Modern Prints on May 2, 2017. For more information, contact Todd Weyman at tweyman@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 551 Marc Chagall, Four Tales from the Arabian Nights, complete deluxe portfolio with 13 color lithographs, 1948. Sold March 2, 2017 for $269,000. (Pre-sale estimate: $250,000 to $350,000)

 

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