159-Szyk copy.jpgNew York—Swann Galleries has announced highlights from their June 13 auction of Art, Press & Illustrated Books, which will feature premier examples of printing that elevate the humble book to a noble art form.

The sale is led by an inscribed limited first edition on vellum of Arthur Szyk’s Haggadah, 1939, with 14 jewel-like full-page color plates by the artist. The work was illustrated by Szyk in Poland in the mid-1930s, and has been called the most celebrated modern Haggadah; it carries an estimate of $15,000 to $25,000.

An outstanding selection of press books by Bernhardt Wall from the Natalie Williams Collection features a number of presentation copies, including the 85-volume magnum opus Following Abraham Lincoln 1809-1865, with over 900 signed etchings ($10,000 to $15,000), as well as the signed complete set of The Etcht Miniature Monthly Magazine, 1948, ($3,000 to $4,000). A selection of Wall’s personal sketchbooks from the 1920s offers a glimpse into the mind of the artist. Further editions by fine private presses of the twentieth century include works from Doves and Gemini to Granary, Limestone and the Limited Editions Club.

A collection of French livres d'artiste includes a signed limited first edition of Henri Matisse’s Cinquante Dessins, 1920, with 50 images of his work, valued at $3,000 to $4,000, as well as Amour, 1899, by Maurice Denis, a complete set of 13 color lithographs illustrating a poem by the author to his wife ($10,000 to $15,000). Also available are works by Jean Cocteau, Jean Dubuffet and Raoul Dufy.

There is a fine selection of art journals and magazines, most notably the complete set of 12 volumes of the Art Deco periodical Feuillets d'Art, 1919-22, estimated to sell between $3,000 and $4,000. Portfolios include Salvador Dalí's limited edition Le Quête du Graal, 1975, with 12 color drypoints ($12,000 to $18,000). Also by Dalí is a limited special edition of Dante’s La Divina Commedia, bound in sculptural copper covers and printed on paper salvaged from the flood of Florence in 1966, valued at $6,000 to $9,000.

Mexican surrealist Nahui Olin (pseudonym of Carmen Mondragón) was a muse of Diego Rivera and an accomplished artist in her own right. In collaboration with her lover, Dr. Atl (a pseudonym meaning the Aztec word for water), she produced Optica Cerebral: Poemas Dinámicos, 1922, here offered in the exceedingly rare first edition, signed and inscribed to publisher, writer and politician José Martinez Sotomayor ($6,000 to $9,000).

Three volumes of the influential French fashion magazine Gazette du Bon Ton, 1912-14, featuring several single- and double-page pochoir plates, as well as seven original watercolor vignettes by George Barbier, are together valued at $8,000 to $12,000.

Several nineteenth-century American manuscript folios will be available, including Miss Ann Postley's Album, 1828, with six illustrations by Charles A. Baudouine—considered the first “interior designer”— and Gathered Blossoms, 1853, a handmade book of poems and illustrations by Pennsylvanian Thomas Lloyd Bailey for his fiancé, Caroline A. Smith (each $1,000 to $2,000). A group of 13 drawings on vellum for a German calendar titled Das Jahr une siene Kinder (“The Year and Her Children”), 1880s, by Frau Allwine Schroedker, accompanies the published calendar; together they are valued between $4,000 and $6,000.

The contemporary selection will feature a May 1970 issue of Gay Power, the cover of which is illustrated by what is believed to be Robert Mapplethorpe's first published photograph, valued at $2,000 to $3,000, and a limited edition catalogue, encased in a briefcase with assorted accoutrements, released in celebration of the thirtieth anniversary exhibition at the Walker Art Center, titled In the Spirit of Fluxus, 1993 ($1,000 to $1,500). Another scarce exhibition catalogue makes an appearance: Masters of Abstract Art: An Exhibition for the Benefit of The American Red Cross, 1942, features essays by noted artists including Stuart Davis, Fernand Léger, Jacques Lipchitz, and Piet Mondrian. On offer is a copy of the catalogue, signed by several of the contributors and artists, expected to sell between $5,000 and $7,000.

A signed and inscribed limited first edition of Grapefruit, 1964, one of Yoko Ono’s scarce performative and conceptual “event scores”—written instructions or suggestions for acts for the “viewer” to recreate—is valued at $4,000 to $6,000.

The auction will be held Tuesday, June 13, beginning at 1:30 p.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Friday, June 9, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, June 10, from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.; Monday, June 12, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Tuesday, June 13, from 10 a.m. to noon.

An illustrated auction catalogue is available for $35 at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information and to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Christine von der Linn at 212-254-4710, extension 20, or via e-mail at cv@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 159 Arthur Szyk, The Szyk Haggadah, number 22 of 125 copies on vellum, signed by Szyk and editor Cecil Roth, London, 1939. Estimate $15,000 to $25,000.

Screen Shot 2017-05-22 at 9.42.35 AM.pngBloomsbury Auctions will be hosting a sale of Vintage Posters at their new London base, 16-17 Pall Mall on 15th June 2017, from 11am. The auction comprises 216 lots, with estimates ranging from £500-£6,000.

Sale highlights include posters from the iconic spaghetti westerns, A Fistful of Dollars (est. £500-£800) and The Good, The Bad and The Ugly (est. £400-£600), as well as rare posters from the perennially popular James Bond films: Dr No (est. £3,000-£5,000), From Russia With Love, Goldfinger (est. £1,500-£2,500) and Thunderball (est. £1,200-£1,400).

The 1960s is also well represented with posters for the critically-acclaimed films, The Graduate, 1967 (est. £800-£1,200) and They’re Off (est. £1,500-£2,500) with the American thriller, Bullet from 1968 and starring Steve McQueen, estimated at £800-£1,200.

Posters for The Beatles’ films, Help! (est. £500-£700), Yellow Submarine (£400-£600) and Let It Be (est. £400-£600) feature in the auction. Alongside the Fab Four, The Who also appear in a poster of psychedelic design, (est. £200-£400).

Rare London Underground posters, signed by Henry Charles Beck, known more commonly as Harry Beck, will be on offer, one dating back to 1945 (est. £400-£600) and the other to 1948 (est. £300-£500). Beck’s London Underground tube map was produced in 1933, and was initially rejected by the publicity department as it was considered too radical in design. However, a successful trial print run proved it was just what the public needed. Today the map is regarded as a design classic and Beck is recognised globally for his work. 

Another well-loved London Underground poster is The Wonderground map of London by MacDonald Gill, first produced in 1914 (est. £2,000-£3,000). This comic depiction of London is said to have amused passengers so much that they would miss their trains! 

Further London Underground posters include a Wimbledon Championships poster by Leonard Appelbee from 1939 (est. £600-£800), a Davis Cup Wimbledon poster from 1936, designed by Walter Goetz (est. £500-£700) and a 1936 New Zealand cricket poster designed by Lancaster Gill (est. £600-£800). 

Continuing the transport theme is a nostalgic North Eastern Airways poster from 1930 (est. £300-£500), as well as a very rare East Coast LNER poster by Stanislaus Brien (£1,200- £1,400), depicting a beautifully painted beach scene, and a 1947 French travel poster by Henri Matisse (est. £800-£1,200). 

Signed works by iconic British artist, David Hockney, feature in the auction: Spoleto Festival USA 1997 (est. £300-£500) and Retrospective David Hockney (est. £200-£400). 

 

NEW YORK—The Museum of Modern Art announces Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive, a major exhibition on Frank Lloyd Wright (American, 1867-1959) that critically engages his multifaceted practice, on view from June 12 to October 1, 2017. Wright was one of the most prolific and renowned architects of the 20th century, a radical designer and intellectual who embraced new technologies and materials, pioneered do-it-yourself construction systems as well as avant-garde experimentation, and advanced original theories with regards to nature, urban planning, and social politics. Marking the 150th anniversary of the American architect’s birth on June 8, 1867, the exhibition will comprise approximately 450 works made from the 1890s through the 1950s, including architectural drawings, models, building fragments, films, television broadcasts, print media, furniture, tableware, textiles, paintings, photographs, and scrapbooks, along with a number of works that have rarely or never been publicly exhibited. Structured as an anthology rather than a comprehensive, monographic presentation of Wright’s work, the exhibition is divided into 12 sections, each of which investigates a key object or cluster of objects from the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives, interpreting and contextualizing it, as well as juxtaposing it with other works from the Archives, from MoMA, or from outside collections. The exhibition seeks to open up Wright’s work to critical inquiry and debate, and to introduce experts and general audiences alike to new angles and interpretations of this extraordinary architect. Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive is organized by MoMA in collaboration with the Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library, Columbia University, New York, and organized by Barry Bergdoll, Curator, Department of Architecture and Design, MoMA, and the Meyer Schapiro Professor of Art History and Archaeology, Columbia University; with Jennifer Gray, Project Research Assistant, Department of Architecture and Design, The Museum of Modern Art.

The transfer of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives in 2012 to MoMA and to Avery Architectural & Fine Arts Library at Columbia University presented an unprecedented occasion to reveal the extent to which the Archives still has new perspectives, themes, and connections to offer on Wright’s work and legacy. Often construed as a regional architect, Wright in fact moved among international networks, traveling extensively in Europe, the Soviet Union, Japan, and South America. He designed over 1000 projects throughout the United States and the world, including countries such as Japan and Iraq. His design practice encompassed all scales and building types, from light fixtures, rug patterns, and furniture, to residences, museums, and skyscrapers, as well as landscape designs, and community and regional plans. This is in addition to the hundreds of articles and numerous books that he published during his lifetime. Wright also established an architectural school that functioned as a laboratory of innovative design, progressive educational practices, and collective living. His politics and architectural philosophies challenged existing social and economic structures, even as he pioneered radical engineering solutions and prefabricated construction systems that challenged the building industry. 

Frank Lloyd Wright at 150 is organized around a central chronological spine highlighting the major events in Wright’s life and career, which will be illustrated with some of his finest drawings and include key works such as Unity Temple (1905-08), the Robie House (1908-10), Fallingwater (1934-37), the Johnson Wax Administration Building (1936-39), and Beth Sholom Synagogue (1953-59). Unfolding from this orienting spine are 12 subsections, covering themes both familiar and little explored, that highlight for visitors the process of discovery undertaken by invited scholars, historians, architects, and art conservators. These include Wright’s proposed design for a Rosenwald School for African American children, as well as his engagement with the imagery and form of Native American design in his quest for an original American architecture of the future. A section exploring Wright’s design for a model farm—preserved in a rarely seen model from the archive—is juxtaposed with a section that explores his lifelong interest in projecting an urbanism appropriate to an era of new technologies of transportation and communication. 

Wright’s ongoing preoccupation with ornament is the subject of another section, together with sections that investigate Wright’s understanding of the relationships between nature, landscape, and architecture at the scale of the individual organism, the garden, and the community, and his fascination with circular geometries that likewise range in scale from ornamental forms, to the building, to site planning. Wright was not only a builder for others, but a master of self-construction. To this end, a section centered on Wright’s attempt to democratize his vision through DIY building systems dialogues with another that argues Frank Lloyd Wright was one the first celebrity architects, a savvy manipulator of mass media such as television, radio, and magazines, who used these outlets to advance his ambitions. His celebrity status is illustrated through print media, including the Time magazine election of Wright as Man of the Year, and television broadcasts of his famous interview with Mike Wallace and an episode of What’s My Line? in which Wright is described as “world famous architect.” The last thematic section considers the archive itself as an object of study and will include the painstakingly conserved model of St. Mark’s, a radical but ultimately unbuilt design for a skyscraper residence for New York, the model of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, an analysis of Wright’s drawings as they evolved over time, and a data-visualization project illustrating Wright’s global network of clients, professional relationships, and buildings.

MoMA will publish an exhibition catalogue reflecting the scholarship generated in the process of unpacking the Wright Archives, to be illustrated with new photography of his drawings, models, and buildings that will offer the public high-quality images of materials in the Archives. The publication mirrors the exhibition in that it will be an anthology of essays authored by the guest scholars and MoMA curators.

The contributors include:

-Barry Bergdoll (MoMA and Columbia University)

-Michael Desmond (Louisiana State University)

-Carole Ann Fabian (Avery Library, Columbia University)

-Jennifer Gray (MoMA)

-Elizabeth Hawley (CUNY Graduate Center and MoMA)

-Juliet Kinchin (MoMA)

-Neil Levine (Harvard University)

-Ellen Moody (MoMA)

-Therese O’Malley (National Gallery, Washington, D.C.)

-Ken Oshima (University of Washington)

-Michael Osman (University of California, Los Angeles)

-Spyros Papapetros (Princeton University)

-Janet Parks (Avery Drawings & Archives, Columbia University)

-Matthew Skjonsberg (Swiss Federal Institute of Technology)

-David Smiley (Columbia University)

-Mabel Wilson (Columbia University)

SPONSORSHIP:

The exhibition is made possible by Hyundai Card.

Generous funding is provided by Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III and by the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts.

Additional support is provided by the Annual Exhibition Fund.

RELATED EXHIBITION:

Living in America: Frank Lloyd Wright, Harlem and Modern Housing

September 8 - December 17, 2017

Miriam and Ira D. Wallach Art Gallery, Columbia University

In fall 2017, to celebrate the joint acquisition of the Frank Lloyd Wright Foundation Archives by The Museum of Modern Art and Columbia University’s Avery Architectural and Fine Arts Library, the Wallach Art Gallery is partnering with Columbia’s Temple Hoyne Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture to present Living in America: Frank Lloyd Wright, Harlem and Modern Housing, which will consider Wright’s well-known designs for Broadacre City and other largely suburban housing projects in dialogue with important housing projects in Harlem, designed simultaneously. The Wallach Art Gallery’s exhibition will overlap and be presented in correlation with Frank Lloyd Wright at 150: Unpacking the Archive.

A celluloid of Snow White from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.jpgNew York - On June 5, Bonhams and Turner Classic Movies (TCM) present An Important Animation Art Collection, The Property of a Gentleman, which features more than 290 original Disney animation drawings, storyboards, posters, concept art and celluloids. The collection, accumulated over 25 years, comprises a wide range of titles and items from over 60+ years of Disney animation, a fascinating history lesson on the studio’s changing styles and focus from its early 1930s shorts through to comic strips to the studio’s revival in the 1980s including Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Sleeping Beauty, and Pinocchio to The Little Mermaid and Aladdin.

The collection will be on preview at Bonhams Los Angeles from May 19-21 and then will be on display at Bonhams New York from June 2-5.

Highlights include:

  • An animation drawing from The Mail Pilot, Walt Disney Studios, 1933. Graphite and colored pencil on paper, matted and framed. Estimate: US$ 1,000-1,500.
  • A celluloid of Mickey Mouse from The Brave Little Tailor, Walt Disney Studios, 1938. Gouache on celluloid, multi-cell set-up, applied to Courvoisier wood veneer background, Walt Disney label on reverse, matted and framed. Estimate: US$ 4,000-6,000.
  • A celluloid of the Queen from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Walt Disney Studios, 1937. Gouache on trimmed celluloid, applied to a Courvoisier watercolor paper background, matted and framed. Estimate: US$ 10,000-15,000.
  • An animation drawing of Maleficent from Sleeping Beauty, Walt Disney Studios, 1959. Graphite on paper, matted and framed.. Estimate: US$ 500-700.
  • A celluloid of Geppetto, Figaro, and Pinocchio from Pinocchio with watercolor production background, Walt Disney Studios, 1940. Gouache on trimmed celluloid, applied to its matching watercolor production background, annotated, "F3 / 2 / 39 Oct 01 1939 Thor OK for / 10-18-39," and someone's initials, matted and framed. Estimate: US$ 20,000-25,000.
  • A Gustaf Tenggren original concept painting from Pinocchio. Walt Disney Studios, 1940. Black ink and watercolor on heavyweight paper, inscribed "Pinocchio" to upper left corner in watercolor in an unknown hand, matted and framed. Estimate: US$ 30,000-40,000.
  • A celluloid of Dumbo and Timothy Mouse from Dumbo, Walt Disney Studios, 1941. Gouache on celluloid, applied to a Courvoisier airbrushed background, stamped "WDP" lower right, matted and framed. Estimate: US$ 2,000-3,000.
  • A Mary Blair concept artwork from Cinderella, Walt Disney Studios, 1950. Gouache on board, matted and framed. Estimate: US$ 4,000-6,000.
  • A celluloid of the fairies from Sleeping Beauty, Walt Disney Studios, 1959. Gouache on trimmed celluloid, applied to an Eyvind Earle watercolor production pan background of the royal throne room, matted and framed. Estimate: US$ 20,000-30,000.

Image: A celluloid of Snow White from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs Walt Disney Studios, 1937. Gouache on celluloid, multi-cell set-up with an overlay, applied to its matching watercolor production pan background of the cottage, Estimate: US$ 25,000-30,000.

BOSTON, MA (May 19, 2017) — John F. Kennedy's Senate ID Card sold for $20,000 according to Boston-based RR Auction.

The one-of-a-kind historically significant official US Senate personal identification card issued to John F. Kennedy, featured an image of the young senator, neatly signed in full in fountain pen, "John F. Kennedy."

Accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Kennedy's longtime secretary Evelyn Lincoln on US Senate memorandum letterhead, April 27, 1987, to noted JFK collector Robert L. White, stating in part: “The I.D. card issued to the late John F. Kennedy, was carried by him in his wallet while he was a United States Senator." 

After serving three terms in the House of Representatives, Kennedy was elected to the Senate in 1952. His term began on January 3, 1953, and he served as the junior senator from Massachusetts until December 22, 1960, just before entering the presidency.

“This personal ID card is an absolutely amazing relic from this important stage in his political life,” said Bobby Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction. 

An additional highlight from the online offering was an incredible assortment of historic Kennedy photographs from The Ronnie Paloger Collection.

"Among the collection were rare seldom-seen photographs of a youthful-looking JFK during his first foray into politics from his 1946 congressional campaign— his 1952 senatorial race, and gorgeous wedding photos of Jack and Jackie,” said Tricia Eaton, Specialty Auction Director at RR Auction.  

Highlights from the sale include, but are not limited by:

Handsome set of gold-and-black eagle bookends displayed by John F. Kennedy in his Senate office and then later in the White House, sold for $19,500.

John F. Kennedy original portrait artwork by Louis Lupas, sold for $12,240.

John F. Kennedy family's china tea-cup used aboard the presidential yacht, the 'Honey Fitz,' sold for $6,063.

John F. Kennedy 1951 letter to a constituent, sold for $4,961.

The John F. Kennedy Auction from RR Auction began on May 11 and concluded on May 18. More details can be found online at www.rrauction.com.

61-Cruikshank copy.jpgNew York—First editions and inscribed copies filled the shelves at Swann Galleries’ May 16 auction of 19th & 20th Century Literature. The sale broke several auction records and encompassed a variety of genres, dates and media. The trifurcated Books department (specializing in Art Books and Early Printed Books as well as Literature), is the oldest at Swann Galleries, which celebrated its 75th anniversary in March.

The top lot of the sale was a complete privately printed edition of Seven Pillars of Wisdom, 1926, by T.E. Lawrence, the inspiration for the classic film Lawrence of Arabia. The stunning tome, bound in green leather, boasts 65 plates and color illustrations by contemporary artists. The present copy was inscribed by Lawrence and given to his dentist, Warwick James; it was purchased by a collector for $62,500*.

An auction record was achieved for the complete set of 12 volumes of The Scourge; or Monthly Expositor of Imposture and Folly, 1811-16, illustrated by George Cruikshank. This was only the third complete set ever to appear at auction; the final, twelfth volume is extremely scarce due to the dwindling subscriber numbers towards the end of the periodical. The set was especially unusual because it contained the rare suppressed plate of A Financial Survey of Cumberland, or Beggars Petition, 1815, which overtly suggested the disgraced Duke of Cumberland had murdered his valet, in both its censored and uncensored state. After breakneck bidding, a collector made the winning bid of $11,250.

The auction debut of the first American edition of Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov, 1912, set a strong precedent, exceeding its high estimate of $7,500 to reach $10,000.

Half of the highest prices in the sale went to first editions of cornerstones of American literature. Twentieth-century authors performed especially well, with William Faulkner’s first novel, Soldiers’ Pay, leading the pack at $21,250. The first edition of Main Street, 1920, by Sinclair Lewis, achieved a new auction record of $6,500. Harper Lee’s monumental To Kill A Mockingbird, 1960, sold for more than five times its high estimate of $1,000, finally finishing at $5,750. Similarly, a first edition with the dust jacket of The Pastures of Heaven, 1932, charmingly inscribed by author John Steinbeck to his friend Louis Paul, reached $13,750.

Works by American modernist author Ernest Hemingway were well received, with 100% of the 14 offered lots going to buyers after frenzied bidding. An inscribed first trade edition of A Farewell to Arms, 1929, reached $6,750, while a first edition of Death in the Afternoon, 1932, was purchased for $2,125.

Another highlight was a rare limited first edition on handmade paper of James Joyce’s magnum opus Ulysses, 1922, which exceeded its high estimate to sell for $33,750.

Specialist John D. Larson said of the sale, “The robust sell-through rate of 87% demonstrated the strength of the market and continued interest in historic literature from the last two centuries, especially, as always, well preserved examples. Multiple institutional purchases underline the importance of the material we’re handling, and the record achieved for the Cruikshank set typifies the appeal of exceedingly rare material.”

The next sale of 19th & 20th Century Literature at Swann Galleries will be on November 14, 2017. For more information or consign quality materials, contact John D. Larson at jlarson@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 61 George Cruikshank, The Scourge, first edition, complete set of 12 volumes, London, 1811-16. Sold May 16, 2017 for $11,250, a record for the work. (Pre-sale estimate $4,000 to $6,000)

 

Screen Shot 2017-05-18 at 8.42.12 AM.pngThe birth of the modern horror story can be traced to the dark visions that crept from the febrile imagination of H. P. Lovecraft at the beginning of the last century. 

This new edition from The Folio Society marries Lovecraft’s best-known fiction with two modern masters of the macabre, the acclaimed artist Dan Hillier and author Alan Moore. In his beautifully crafted new preface, Moore finds Lovecraft at once at odds with and integral to the time in which he lived, ‘the improbable embodiment of an estranged world in transition’ yet, despite his prejudices and parochialisms, he ‘possessed a voice and a perspective both unique in modern literature’. 

Also available as a 750 copy limited edition in a presentation box with a print signed by the artist each edition shimmers with Lovecraft’s ‘unknown colours’, purple and greens akin to both the ocean depths and mysteries from outer space - each features a mystical design by Hillier. 

This collection spans Lovecraft’s literary career, his ‘cosmicist’ philosophy and the belief that behind the veil of our blinkered everyday lives lies another reality, too terrible for the human mind to comprehend. Writing in the gothic tradition, narrators recount their descent into madness and despair. Through their investigations into the unexplained, they tug at the thin threads that separate our world from another of indescribable horror. The alien gods, death cults and forbidden tomes that cast their maddening shadows over of his fictitious New England would introduce the world to a new set of terrors, reflecting the strange, uncaring universe being unraveled by physics and cosmology. These ‘weird’ tales, and their vast influence, have since carved their creator a tentacle-shaped throne among the monoliths of American literature. 

Product information 

Bound in cloth blocked with a design by the artist. Set in Italian Old Style with Goudy Forum as display. 472 pages. Title page spread plus 6 black and white illustrations. Endpapers spot varnished with a design by the artist. Gold gilt page tops. Printed metallic slipcase. 10”x 6 3⁄4“ 

UK £75.00 US $120.00 Can $155.00 Aus $155.00 

Limited Edition is bound in eco simulated leather blocked with a design by the artist. Set in Italian Old Style with Goudy Forum as display. 472 pages. Title page spread plus 6 black and white illustrations printed with 8 black and gold mandalas on the reverse. Hand-marbled endpapers. Coloured edges. Magnetic presentation box covered in blocked cloth and lined in blocked metallic paper. Limited print signed by the artist. Book 10"x 63⁄4“, box 121⁄4" x 91⁄2" x 2". 

UK £345.00 US $575.00 Can $695.00 Aus $695.00 

 

NANTUCKET, MA—The Nantucket Book Festival, a summer destination for booklovers, features a stellar line-up of authors and events for its upcoming Festival, June 16-18. Readers will gather in historic Nantucket venues for author readings, panel discussions, and social events that provide unique opportunities to engage with their favorite authors—a hallmark of the Festival. Most events are free with the exception of ticketed social events.

The Opening Night Celebration, Open Books, Open Minds: Writing to Cross Borders, on Friday evening features Diane Rehm, Will Schwalbe, and Kevin Young, speaking on the role of writing as a way to interpret and clarify personal, political, and global divisions.

Throughout the weekend, which begins on Friday morning, authors of many genres and subjects will present, highlighted by: Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist Isabel Wilkerson (The Warmth of Other Suns); US Poet Laureate Robert Pinsky; Diane Rehm (On My Own) who will discuss her memoir about reconstructing her life after the death of her husband; Ruth Reichl, former editor in chief of Gourmet Magazine whose latest book, My Kitchen Year: 136 Recipes that Saved My Life, extols the power of cooking to cure many of life’s ills; and New York Times Best Selling authors Amor Towles (A Gentleman in Moscow), Carl Safina (Beyond Words), and Marie Arana (American Chica).

Two New England poets will be featured through their biographers: Megan Marshall (Elizabeth Bishop: A Miracle for Breakfast) and Kay Redfield Jamison who will discuss her psychological portrait of Robert Lowell (Robert Lowell: Setting the River on Fire). Crowd favorites Alice Hoffman and Jodi Picoult will be returning to the Festival. A complete listing of authors is at www.nantucketbookfestival.org.

For younger readers, the Festival offers an exceptional line-up, including a breakfast with Laurie Halse Anderson (The Seeds of America Trilogy) and Nathaniel Philbrick, who will discuss his new book, Ben’s Revolution: Benjamin Russell and the Battle of Bunker Hill, written from a child’s perspective. Other authors for younger readers include Lynda Mullaly Hunt, Bill Konigsberg, James Sulzer and Wendy Rouillard. For the youngest set, there will be story times in the Atheneum Garden tent on Friday from 9:00-1:00pm in seven languages.

To highlight the active literary community on the island, the Festival will feature local authors under the tent outdoors at the Nantucket Atheneum selling and signing their books during the day on Saturday. The ever-popular Typewriter Rodeo will be on hand to write free poems on-demand on their vintage typewriters.

Tickets are now on sale for author-hosted social events, which include:

  • Friday: breakfast with Nathaniel Philbrick and Laurie Halse Anderson (kids free); luncheon with Michelle Gable, Mary Alice Monroe and Nancy Thayer; and the Nantucket Book Festival Authors Dinner at the Brant Point Grill at the White Elephant Inn, a fundraiser for the Festival.
  • Saturday: luncheon hosted by Sarah Leah Chase (sold out), and James Gleick will host Tea and Time Travel at the Community School. 
  • Sunday : breakfast with Ruth Reichl; a wine tasting with Bianca Bosker (sold out) and the annual Cisco Brewers Send Off event in the afternoon (free) will feature music, food, author mingling, and of course brews. An evening closing event, Wild Places and Human Dignity, with PBS host Carl Safina at the NHA Whaling Museum will wrap up the Festival in the evening. 

A complete listing of all authors and tickets for all ticketed events are available at www.nantucketbookfestival.org.

AntiquarianAuctions.com is an online auction site dedicated to the sale of rare and out-of print books, maps & prints, documents, letters, ephemera and vintage photography.

All pricing is done in US$. No buyer’s premium is charged.

Screen Shot 2017-05-17 at 12.23.15 PM.pngLot 1

Fitzpatrick (Sir Percy) Jock of the Bushveld (This is the first copy of “Jock” - “belongs to the Likkle People”

Published: London, 1907 Estimate: $12,500/15,000

5000 copies of the first impression were printed at a total cost to Longmans of £416. 7s. 11d.

Signed on the title page by J Percy Fitzpatrick. His full name was Sir James Percy Fitzpatrick.

Inscription on the front paste-down end paper reads: This is the first copy of “Jock”- “ belongs to the Likkle People” and the mere narrator desires to acknowledge that fact in proper form. J Percy Fitzpatrick Hohenheim October 1907 The dedications page reads: It was the youngest of the High Authorities who gravely informed the Inquiring Stranger that “Jock belongs to the Likkle People!” That being so, it is clearly the duty, no less less that the privilege, of the mere Narrator to dedicate the Story of Jock to those Keenest and Kindest critics, Best of Friends, and Most Delightful of Comrades The Likkle People.

Fitzpatrick's adventures during this time of his life, when he was pioneering in the Bushveld, are vividly described in his book Jock of the Bushveld, which is generally accepted as a South African classic.

Lot 3

[Bay Psalm Book] The Psalms, Hymns, and Spiritual Songs of the Old and New Testament... For Use ... especially in New-England

Published: Edinburgh, 1759-1771

Estimate: $5,000/8,000

The very large and decorative title cartouche, copied from Jailot, includes a lion, an ostrich, an elephant, a crocodile as well as classical and native figures. William Berry changed the coat of arms to that of the Royal Arms and included a dedication to the then recently restored King Charles II. There is also a cartouche that includes five distance scales.

William Berry was a bookseller, geographer and engraver, who was active between about 1670 and 1703. His most enduring partnership was with map-maker Robert Morden and, together, they dealt in topographical works, prints, maps, charts and globes. In the title of the map, Berry added detail for his English audience.

Provenance: Thomas Hewston (inscription at front "Thomas Hewston was born May 18th 1757 at eleven o'clock in the forenoon", one possibility is a Thomas Hewston, of Bedford Co., Penn. who is listed amongst the 'new levies' in a list of 'Rangers on the Frontiers - 1778-1783' [see W.H. Egle (editor). 'Muster Rolls of the Navy and Line, Militia and Rangers 1775-1783.' Harrisburg, Pa.: 1898 p.353].

A very rare late edition of the famous Bay Psalm book (possibly the last edition to be published without the Rev. Prince's revisions of 1757/8), bound with an apparently unrecorded issue of the Bible. In addition, there are two further possibilities that would add considerably to the book's interest:

1. the binding may be by Scottish/American binder Andrew Barclay: the blind roll on the cover is an apparent match for roll 'T5' as pictured in Hannah French's 'Bookbinding in Early America' (Worcester, 1986) p.39, and see images.

2. the inscription at the front may refer to a Thomas Hewston who served as a 'Ranger on the Frontier' in Pennsylvania sometime between 1778 and 1783, raising the possibility that the present work, in its 'travelling binding' accompanied him during his service. Although there were apparently 22 editions of the Bay Psalm book published in Scotland, they are rare on the market: the records show just two examples, in 1938 Goodspeed's offered a 1741 18th edition with the upper cover of the binding missing, and in 1896 Littlefield offered a 1737 16th edition. None are listed as having been offered at auction.

Lot 4

Jefferson (Thomas), Wilberforce (William), Chatterton (Thomas) &c. - Barbour (John G.): Dialogues of the Dead, chiefly of the Moderns ... by the Author of "Evenings in Greece"

Published: Edinburgh, 1836

Estimate: $1,500/2,000

First and only edition - completely unrecorded in any of the standard bibliographies. There is one other copy known (which I used to own). See images for list of contents. The Wilberforce / Jefferson dialogue is particularly interesting, and of its time: Wilberforce berates Jefferson for allowing slavery to continue.

It is not clear why this work is so rare, Barbour was the author of a number of other works that do show up from time to time. The present work's politics sail quite close to the wind on occasion - was it perhaps banned or withdrawn or destroyed?

Lot 134

Kinza (Hirai), Piscator, [A Japanese writer writes, in English, on Japanese customs -] a 10pp. autograph manuscript article, titled ‘Visiting’

Published: New York?, 1893/94

Estimate: $1,500 /2,000

Hirai Kinza was an influential figure at the cultural crossroads between Japan and the United States during the final decade of the 19th century and into the early-20th century. In the present manuscript article, he offers a ‘modern’ view of the bow: the feature of Japanese etiquette that is still the best-known outside Japan.

Born in Kyoto in 1859, Hirai studied English from an early age. An interest in the west went hand-in-hand with his interest in religion. Initially, he quite vigorously opposed Christianity in general and its missionaries proselytizing in particular. In 1885 he set up an English school in Kyoto called ‘The Oriental Hall’ (Orientaru Horu), with the backing of Buddhist groups, and with the aim of countering the Christian influence of the Doshisha school established by Niijima Jo.

Lot 203

Churchill (Winston) The World Crisis, (First Editions Inscribed to Sir Abe Bailey)

Published: London, 1923 - 1929

Estimate: $7,500/9,000

Inscribed by Winston Churchill on a preliminary blank flyleaf of Volume 5 “Abe / from / Winston / with every good wish / 6th Mar 1929”. It is also signed by Abe Bailey on the front free endpaper in pencil and dated May 1929. Volume 1 is signed by Abe Bailey in ink and dated May 1923. Volume 2 has a presentation inscription from Bailey’s wife Mary “With Mary’s love to Abe/Nov 6th. 1923” on a preliminary blank flyleaf. (Presumably a birthday gift as he was born on November 6th 1864). Volumes 3 and 4 are signed in pencil by Abe Bailey on the front free endpapers.

The recipient Sir Abraham Bailey, 1st Baronet, KCMG

(1864-1940), known as Abe Bailey, was a prominent South African Randlord, diamond tycoon, politician, financier and cricketer. He was a good friend and sometime financial sponsor of Churchill and his son John married Churchill’s eldest daughter Diana in 1932. He was also active in the First World War, serving as Deputy Assistant Quartermaster-General to the South African forces and was involved in recruiting men for the army. He was awarded the Croix de Guerre by the French government and a baronetcy by the British one in recognition of these services. These features make the set an association copy of considerable importance and of especial interest to South African collectors.

Lot 5

Rackham (Arthur) The Arthur Rackham Fairy Book - De-Luxe Signed Edition

Published: London, 1933

Estimate: $2,000/2,500

No. 420 of a total of 460 copies of this limited de-luxe edition signed by Rackham. 287pp. In the original full vellum gilt decorated binding. Top edge gilt, fore and lower edges uncut and a few pages unopened. With 8 full page colour plates and numerous black and white illustrations including many wonderful silhouettes. A very fine (as new) unmarked and unfoxed sparkling copy with no flaws whatsoever. In the original publisher's cardboard slipcase which has some wear. Scarce in this pristine condition.

Lot 149

Fries (Laurent) Tabu Nova Partis Aphri

Published: London, Lyons, 1535

Estimate: $2,000/2,750

The map was printed from a woodblock and was one of the first printed maps of Southern Africa reasonably available to collectors.

The map is the Laurent Fries reduction of the map by Martin Waldseemüller, a German priest and cartographer who contributed to 16th century editions of Ptolemy’s Geographia. The map was printed from a woodblock; the title and scrollwork above the map make this the 1535 publication of the Geographia by Melchior & Gaspar Treschel in Lyons (there are four states of the map, 1522, 1531, 1535 & 1541).

This map is considered to be “one of the most important maps in the Ptolemy ....; the coastal detail on the map indicates that the map was “evidently based on the surveys undertaken during the first two voyages of Vasco de Gama”, The map now has three kings on their thrones, an elephant and two serpents next to a sugar loaf mountain, while the King of Portugal rides a bridled sea monster on the Mare Prassodum, holding the banner of Portugal in his right hand and the sceptre in his left. Mountains have been added and rivers appear south of the Mountains of the Moon.” (Norwich)The Latin text near the equator states that "this part of ancient Africa remains unknown". Above this text are the Mountains of the Moon (still so named today, AKA the Rwenzori Mountains), from which the Nile was thought, at that time, to arise.

AntiquarianAuctions.com is an online auction site dedicated to the sale of rare and out-of print books, maps & prints, documents, letters, ephemera and vintage photography.

Dealers and collectors worldwide have been selling and bidding on the site since 2010.

Only established booksellers who are members of major national trade associations such as ABA, ABAA, PBFA or SABDA or are of good standing in the trade are permitted to sell on the site.

Auctions are held every five weeks and run on the model of a timed auction for one week.

All pricing is done in US$. No buyer’s premium is charged.

Contact: Antiquarian Auctions: Paul Mills P.O. Box 186 7848 Constantia, Cape Town South Africa E-mail: support@antiquarianauctions.com Tel: +27 21 794 0600

24642333-1-1 copy.jpgA signed collection of images picturing the late cultural legend, David Bowie, are to be offered as part of Bonhams Entertainment Memorabilia sale on 28 June, the month which marks the 50th anniversary of the release of Bowie’s first ever album, David Bowie. The images are thought to be one of the last items signed by Bowie before his passing in 2016.

The images were taken by Geoff MacCormack, a close friend of Bowie and travelling companion, whilst on a worldwide tour with the star in the early 1970s. MacCormack was a singer, percussionist, dance/mime member in several of Bowie’s bands. The journey took in New York, LA, San Francisco, Hawaii, Canada, Japan and a voyage on the Trans-Siberian express, which provides the backdrop to several of the photographs. The informal photographs show Bowie at his most relaxed and informal, a world away from the glamorous and outlandish personae he regularly adopted on stage.

Geoff commented on the image above; ‘I’d only just acquired a Nikkormat. I didn’t really know the camera at the time, and I pride myself on having got the composition right. I love that, although David clearly strikes a pose, the image still seems unguarded and natural. David later reciprocated by taking one of me in exactly the same sport. Believe me, mine is better!’

David Bowie, who had his breakthrough in 1969 with Space Oddity, won countless accolades and irrevocably changed the landscape of music, performance and fashion both in the UK and across the world. He was named as ‘the greatest rock star ever’ by Rolling Stone in 2016, and is estimated to have sold 140 million records worldwide.

Speaking of his friend, Geoff said: ‘For me, these images, which David loved, almost feel as if they belong in a family album. They capture the sense of two mates - one of whom just happened to have become a rock star - having the time of their lives.’

This carefree revelry is perfectly captured in one of the photographs, which depicts a slightly worse for wear Bowie asleep in their train berth aboard the Trans-Siberian Express. MacCormack explained: ‘We had drunk cheap Riesling and beer with a bunch of soldiers we’d met the night before. They were friendly and inquisitive as to what life was like in the West. In this image, you can just make out the bleak Siberian landscape through the window.

The photographs, signed by Bowie himself, provide a rare and honest glimpse in to the, then, life of arguably the world’s most influential artist.

The images will be on view at Bonhams Knightsbridge saleroom, Montpelier Street, from 25th June till the sale on 28th accompanied by a never-before-seen film of the journey from Japan to Moscow, for the ‘May Day Parade’, shot by Bowie himself and seen through his eyes, interspersed with MacCormack’s photographs. 

For more information and examples of Geoff MacCormack’s work, visit www.geoffmaccormack.com

Image: Heading back to London…the long way. Captured by Geoff MacCormack (£2,000-3,000).

 

Auction Guide