Screen Shot 2017-02-16 at 3.50.16 PM.pngMichaan’s is pleased to announce the sale of a prominent San Francisco Library consisting of over 14,000 hardcover books that have been accumulated over a period of fifty years by one family and kept in their Pacific Heights Estate since the 1920’s.

The collection is strong in history with great emphasis on American Presidential and Constitutional history but also a strong gathering of British and French including major collections of Napoleon, Abraham Lincoln, World War I and II.  A lovingly assembled collection of all aspects of Irish History including many 19th Century Works.  

There are over 50 sets of high quality leather-bound books.  As well as over 100 sets of cloth and lesser beauty.  

The family stopped buying books circa 1965 and one seldom sees so many vintage titles that have been aged and preserved so well.

In addition there are large quantities of books on Catholicism, Communism, Russian and California History with a strong emphasis on the history of the missions.

Do not miss the opportunity to preview and inspect this massive private collection - only once or twice in a generation does one see an accumulation of this size and content.

Image: The Savoy Cocktail Book, Original Edition, circa 1930 with Brilliant Art Deco Cover. Estimate: $200 / 300

NEW YORK — The first of Bonhams' Kennedy offerings, is a section titled the "Kennedy Years" in the Fine Books & Manuscripts sale in New York 10:30 am on March 9. From several consigners, items up for sale tell the story of JFK's days as a young senator arriving in Washington D.C. with his beautiful young bride, his rise to seize the Democratic ticket, and his presidential campaign and presidency. 

Leading the sale is the original plaster maquette from the bust of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, modeled by renowned sculptor Felix De Weldon, most known for his Marines Corps Memorial, in the mid to late 1963, estimated at $150,000-200,000. After the president was assassinated on November 22, 1963, Jackie worked closely with the sculptor to ensure the truest depiction of the fallen president. Most notably she re-shaped the mouth so the bust portrayed him smiling. Completed in 1964, the bronze cast of this bust stood nobly in the cabinet room in the North East corner of the White House, before Jackie moved it in 1979 to the new John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston.

Prominently featured in the sale, are groups of photos shot by Orlando Suero from Three Lions pictures, which offer a rare glimpse into JFK and Jackie's first year of marriage in 1954, a junior senator from Massachusetts and a political history student at Georgetown University. From a five-day shoot with the couple in and around their first home in Georgetown, the first group shows Jackie in class and around the campus of Georgetown (estimate $3,000-5,000). The second presents JFK relaxing at home discussing a senate bill with Jackie and playing a friendly game of football with brother Robert while his wife and sister-in-law watch (estimate $4,000-6,000).

Additional highlights include items from Jackie's personal assistant, Mary Gallagher, who served JFK when he was a young senator before working for his wife. Gallagher met Jackie in her bedroom at 9:30 am each morning, and liaised between her, designers, artists, and the president, whom she reported Jackie's personal expenses. Jackie's famed relationship with Paris-born designer Oleg Cassini comes to life in a collection of notes to be delivered to her exclusive couturier, estimated at $3,000-5,000, including her hand drawn sketches of dresses on White House stationary. Up for sale, jewelry and a goodbye note from Jackie at the end of Gallagher's employment reads "please accept this with memories of so many happy days", estimated at $3,000-5,000. 

The friendship of JFK and British Ambassador David Ormsby Gore is conveyed through personal possessions at Bonhams London sale of Glyn Cywarch on March 29.

Bonhams London is to sell the contents of Glyn Cywarch, the Welsh seat of Jasset Ormsby Gore, the 7th Lord Harlech. The Contents of Glyn Cywarch - the property of Lord Harlech sale will take place at Bonhams, New Bond Street, London on 29 March 2017. Some of the most fascinating objects tell the story of the close friendship between Lord Harlech's grandfather, David Ormsby Gore (5th Lord Harlech), and President Kennedy.

In 1961, David Ormsby Gore was appointed by the British Prime Minister, Harold Macmillan, as the UK's Ambassador to the United States. He served until 1965, the year after he assumed the title on the death of his father. David Ormsby Gore played a key role as adviser to Kennedy during the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962 and was once referred to by the President as one of the two brightest men he ever knew. Ormsby Gore and his wife Sissy formed a particularly close personal bond with President Kennedy and his wife Jackie.

Up for sale, gifts from the Kennedys to the Harlechs include:

• A copy of JFK's copy of The Poetical Works of Shelley from Jackie Kennedy to David Ormsby Gore on his birthday accompanied by a handwritten note from Jackie, estimated at £1,000-2,000.

• A copy of Inaugural Addresses of the Presidents of the United States... to John F. Kennedy 1961 given to Ormsby Gore in 1963 by Jackie Kennedy a few weeks after the President's assassination with inscription in her handwriting, estimated at £3,000-5,000.

• An American Sterling Silver Cigar Box given by Jackie Kennedy in 1965 to Lord and Lady Harlech engraved and inscribed to David and Sissy (Harlech), estimated at £800-1,200. 

butler_working-draft.jpgSAN MARINO, Calif.—A new exhibition opening this spring at The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens examines the life and work of celebrated author Octavia E. Butler (1947-2006), the first science fiction writer to receive a prestigious MacArthur “genius” award and the first African-American woman to win widespread recognition writing in that genre. “Octavia E. Butler: Telling My Stories” opens April 8, 2017, in the West Hall of the Library and continues through Aug. 7. Butler’s literary archive resides at The Huntington.

“Octavia E. Butler: Telling My Stories” On view April 8-Aug. 7, 2017
Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens
Library, West Hall

“She was a pioneer—a master storyteller who brought her voice, the voice of a woman of color, to science fiction,” said Natalie Russell, assistant curator of literary manuscripts at The Huntington and curator of the exhibition. “Tired of stories featuring white, male heroes, she developed an alternative narrative from a very personal point of view.”

A Pasadena, Calif., native, Butler told the New York Times in a 2000 interview: "When I began writing science fiction, when I began reading, heck, I wasn't in any of this stuff I read. The only black people you found were occasional characters or characters who were so feeble-witted that they couldn't manage anything, anyway. I wrote myself in, since I'm me and I'm here and I'm writing."

Butler would have been 70 in 2017; she died an untimely death at age 58, apparently of a stroke at her home in Seattle.

“Octavia E. Butler: Telling My Stories” follows a roughly chronological thread and includes approximately 100 items that reveal the writer’s early years and influences, as well as highlight specific themes that repeatedly commanded her attention.

After Butler’s death, The Huntington became the recipient of her papers, which arrived in 2008 in two four-drawer file cabinets and 35 large cartons. “She kept nearly everything,” said Russell, “from her very first short stories, written at age 12, to book contracts and programs from speaking engagements. The body of materials includes 8,000 individual items and more than 80 boxes of additional items: extensive drafts, notes, and research materials for more than a dozen novels, numerous shorts stories and essays, as well as correspondence and other materials. By the time the collection had been processed and catalogued, more than 40 scholars were asking to get access to it. In the past two years, it has been used nearly 1,300 times—or roughly 15 times per week, said Russell, making it one of the most actively researched archives at The Huntington.

Butler was born June 22, 1947, to a maid and a shoeshine man. Her father died when she was quite young; an only child, she was raised primarily by her mother. “She discovered writing very early, in large part because, she said, it suited her shy nature, and it was permitted in her strict Baptist household,” said Russell. The exhibition will feature samples of her first stories.

But, says Russell, it was a 1954 science fiction film called Devil Girl from Mars that inspired Butler to take on science fiction. “She was convinced she could write a better story than the one unfolding on the screen,” Russell said.

Butler enrolled in every creative writing course she could find and was active in the Afro-relations club at Pasadena City College, an early indication of her interest in current events and Civil Rights issues. In the early 1970s, at a workshop for minority writers, she met the science fiction author Harlan Ellison, who introduced her to the Clarion Science Fiction Workshop, where Butler learned to hone her craft among other like-minded writers; it was then that she sold her first story. Following Clarion, she took odd jobs to support herself—even trying to establish her own laminating business, documents show; she wrote in the early morning hours before work.

But the road to success was long and slow. "In fact,” she once said, “I had five more years of rejection slips and horrible little jobs ahead of me before I sold another word.”

On display in the exhibition will be a page of motivational notes in which she writes, “I am a Bestselling Writer. I write Bestselling Books . . . . Every day in every way I am researching and writing my award winning Bestselling Books and short stories . . . . Every one of my books reaches and remains for two or more months at the top of the bestseller lists . . . So Be It! See To It.”

In 1975, she sold her first novel, Patternmaster, to Doubleday, quickly followed by Mind of My Mind and Survivor; the trio comprise part of her “Patternist” series, depicting the evolution of humanity into three distinct genetic groups. A review on display in the exhibition lauds Patternmaster for its especially well-constructed plot and progressive heroine, who is “a refreshing change of pace from the old days.”

And her following continued to grow.

By the late 1970s, Butler was able to make a living on her writing alone. She won her first Hugo award in 1985 for the short story “Speech Sounds,” followed by other awards, including a Locus and Nebula.

“Octavia E. Butler: Telling My Stories” will include examples of journal entries, photographs, and first editions of her books, including Kindred, arguably her best-known work. The book is less science fiction and more fantasy, involving an African-American woman who travels back in time to the horrors of plantation life in pre-Civil War Maryland. “I wanted to reach people emotionally in a way that history tends not to,” Butler said about the book. Published in 1979, Kindred continues to command widespread appeal and is regularly taught in high schools and at the university level, as well as chosen for community-wide reading programs and book clubs.

Beyond race, Butler explored tensions between the sexes and worked to develop strong female characters, a hallmark of her writing. “Being a woman in a male-dominated genre lent Butler’s stories a unique voice,” said Russell. “She would, for instance, depict women as resolving their problems through means other than violence—using flexibility, nurturing, and sensitivity instead.”

Butler once remarked, “Girls become women by giving life, and boys become men by taking it.” But she also challenged traditional gender identity, said Russell. Bloodchild, for example, is a story about a pregnant man, and in Wild Seed, the plot develops around two shape-shifting—and sex-changing—characters, Doro and Anyanwu. The exhibition will include notes Butler made about the two characters as she worked to develop them.

Butler sought to meticulously research the science in her fiction, traveling to the Amazon to get a firsthand look at extreme biological diversity in an effort to better incorporate biology, genetics, and medicine in her work. On display will be photographs from that research trip, as well as a small notebook of plant sketches. Climate change concerned her, as did politics, the pharmaceutical industry, and a variety of social issues, and as a result, she wove them all into her writing. “What’s striking,” said Russell, “is her ability to tease out and focus on issues that have had and likely will have currency for decades. She was amazingly prescient and given that, her stories resonate in very powerful ways today. Perhaps even more so than when they were first published.”

Related Programs

To complement “Octavia E. Butler: Telling My Stories,” The Huntington will present curator tours as well as “Octavia E. Butler Studies: Convergence of an Expanding Field,” a conference on June 23 with scholars Ayana Jamieson and Moya Bailey.

Image: Octavia E. Butler, working draft of Kindred (formerly titled To Keep thee in All Thy Ways) with handwritten notes by Butler, ca. 1977. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

 

13-Muybridge copy.jpgNew York—On Tuesday, February 14, Swann Galleries offered Icons & Images: Photographs & Photobooks, an auction featuring masterworks spanning the lifetime of the medium. The Valentine’s Day auction was well-timed, precisely 65 years to the day after Swann held the first U.S. auction dedicated to photographs, The Marshall Sale, on February 14, 1952.

The auction house, which is also celebrating its diamond anniversary this year, has continued to honor that historical pedigree with such innovations as the first auction dedicated to vernacular photography, a field that Vice President and Director of Photographs & Photobooks Daile Kaplan has helped to bring into the main stream. Tuesday’s sale offered premier examples of both vernacular and fine art photography, earning more than $1.5M in an auction that lasted nearly five hours.

The sale featured a run of lots related to the moon landing and space exploration in the second half of the twentieth century. There was heated bidding for a group of 22 large cibachrome prints from NASA missions, 1965-84, leading to a final price of $43,750*, above a high estimate of $25,000. A related archive of approximately 280 photographs of various Apollo missions, 1969-72, earned $5,460, while a set of ten contemporary assemblages depicting the moon was sold for $6,250.

Though twentieth century works commanded most of the highest prices, the top lot of the sale was a collection of 50 plates from Eadweard Muybridge’s Animal Locomotion, 1887, which sold to a private collector for $62,500. All five offered lots by Muybridge sold.

One highlight of the sale was a rare sixth-plate tintype of Edgar Allan Poe, taken after a daguerreotype captured just three weeks before this death, which more than doubled its high estimate of $15,000 to sell to a collector after competitive bidding for $37,500.

A run of nine works by Edward S. Curtis all found buyers, led by Chief of the Desert, Navajo, a 1904 orotone portrait in its original frame, which sold for $23,750. Bidding moved swiftly, especially for rare scenes such as The Rush Gatherer, a 1910 orotone also in its original frame ($20,000).

Both offered lots by Roy DeCarava sold above their estimates, with the 1956 silver print Dancers earning $40,000, above a high estimate of $25,000, and setting a new auction record for the image. Empire State Building, circa 1930, a dramatic silver print by Lewis W. Hine, sold for $37,500, above a high estimate of $18,000.

An album of approximately 265 photographs depicting the 1906 San Francisco earthquake was purchased by an institution for $13,750, more than twice its high estimate of $6,000.

The sale closed with a selection of photobooks. A maquette by Lucien Clergue for his unpublished book Picasso en Provence, featuring 150 candid, intimate and rarely seen photographs of Pablo Picasso, was purchased for $15,000. An early travelogue by Scottish photographer John Thomson, titled Illustrations of China and its People, Volumes I and II, 1873, went to a collector for $15,000. Several editions of Camera Work, the photograph magazine published by Alfred Sieglitz at the dawn of the twentieth century, were offered with a 100% sell-through rate.

Swann Galleries Vice President and Director of Photographs & Photobooks Daile Kaplan said, “Our Valentine's Day auction was a sweet success, with an impressive roster of new buyers actively bidding.  The relationship between science and art told a fascinating story, given the success of the Muybridge and NASA sets. Overall, the sale featured a selection of fine art and vernacular photographs that offered choice opportunities to better understand photography's growing role in visual culture."

The next photographs sale at Swann Galleries will be held April 20, 2017. For more information, contact Daile Kaplan at dkaplan@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 13 Eadweard Muybridge, 50 plates from Animal Locomotion, collotypes, 1887. Sold February 14, 2017 for $62,500. (Pre-sale estimate: $30,000 to $45,000)

399845v_0001.jpgNew York, NY, February 15, 2017 — The Morgan Library & Museum announced today the acquisition of three major drawings by David Hockney, Martin Puryear, and Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot. Each is a valuable addition to a drawings collection at the Morgan that is considered one of the greatest in the world.

“We are delighted to announce the acquisition of these outstanding works,” said Colin B. Bailey, director of the museum. “The Hockney is a superb and iconic example of his precise, delicate style of the 1960s and depicts one of his muses, fabric designer Celia Birtwell. The Martin Puryear comes on the heels of the successful exhibition of his drawings we held in 2015, while the Corot is characteristic of the artist’s best portrait drawings of the 1830s. We are deeply grateful to the donors whose generous support made these acquisitions possible."

David Hockney (British, b. 1937) Celia, Paris, 1969, pen and ink on paper. The Morgan Library & Museum. Purchased as the gift of the Katherine J. Rayner Fund of the Anne Cox Chambers Foundation

One of the most popular British artists of the twentieth century, David Hockney has been a versatile and prolific painter since the 1960s. It is his talent as a draughtsman, however, that is at the core of his reputation, especially the drawings from life that he began making in the late 1960s. Celia, Paris is a superb example of such a drawing. Frequently reproduced in the literature on Hockney, it is particularly important on two counts: first, as an early and very refined example of the precise, delicate line drawing—indebted to Ingres and Picasso— that Hockney developed in the late 1960s, notably in portraits of friends and family; and second, as a portrait of Celia Birtwell, a British fabric designer who was Hockney’s most constant muse from 1968 on. (Celia and her husband, fashion designer Ossie Clark, are the subject of one of Hockney’s most famous paintings, Mr. and Mrs. Clark and Percy of 1970-71, in the Tate’s collection). Hockney depicted Celia in many colored pencil drawings in the early1970s. The present drawing, in which Celia’s relaxed pose conveys the intimacy between artist and sitter, is one of his earliest of her. 

Martin Puryear (American, b. 1941), Drawing for Untitled, 1990, black Conté crayon, with smudging, on ivory paper. The Morgan Library & Museum, Purchased with funds provided by Agnes Gund, The Ronald & Jo Carole Lauder Foundation, and Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin M. Rosen. 

American sculptor Martin Puryear is known for the elegance and refinement of his abstract, hand-made constructions, primarily in wood.  Drawing has always been essential to his practice, as the exhibition, Martin Puryear: Multiple Dimensions, shown at the Morgan in 2015, demonstrated. Drawing for Untitled—which was included in the exhibition—depicts a classic image in Martin Puryear’s repertoire, harking back to the heads he drew while in Sierra Leone in the 1960s and anticipating sculptures such as VesselFace Down, and the Getty’s That Profile of the late 1990s and 2000s. The sense of touch suggested by the blurry contours, smudges, and fingerprints on the sheet, conjures up Puryear’s hands-on approach to his sculpture as well as his prints and drawings. This  is the first work by Martin Puryear to enter the Morgan, where it joins many drawings by sculptors from the Renaissance to the present.  

Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot (French, 1796-1875), Seated Camaldolese Monk, 1834, graphite on paper. The Morgan Library & Museum. Gift of Jill Newhouse.                                                   

This finely observed, precisely rendered study of a seated monk in profile is characteristic of Corot’s best portrait drawings of the 1830s, and most probably dates from Corot’s second trip to Italy.  This was a relatively short, six-month trip in which the artist focused on picturesque sites, views and figures that would serve him in composing Salon paintings, and included Corot’s only visit to Tuscany and Florence.  The sitter’s white habit, leather belt (as opposed to a cord) and long beard confirm the inscription which identifies him as a member of the Camaldolese branch of the Benedictines.  An ascetic order founded by San Romualdo in 1046, their name derives from their 11th century hermitage in the Camaldoli mountains, located in the Casentino valley in Tuscany.  The setting of the hilltop convent and the magnificent views surrounding it would have been attractive to Corot, who may have spent the night there, as the hermitage offered free lodging to male visitors during this period. 

Image: Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot (French, 1796-1875), Seated Camaldolese Monk, 1834, graphite on paper. The Morgan Library & Museum. Gift of Jill Newhouse.         

A diverse range of fine art and antiques was featured at Worth Auctions' February 12, 2017 sale in Freeville, New York. A cadre of devoted collectors were undeterred by a lake effect snowstorm, and further enthusiastic bidding activity took place on three online bidding platforms: Invaluable, LiveAuctioners, and eBay.

Among the fine art offerings were numerous natural history plates by John James Audubon and John Gould, signed lithographs by twentieth-century black-and-white masters Stow Wengenroth and John McClellan, and plein air paintings by William R. Davis. A quintet of canvases by the versatile painter George Rhoads exceeded their high estimates, with one sunset image bringing $2,000 and setting an auction record for the artist. A suite of complete issues of the deluxe French periodical "Derriere le Miroir" fetched $4,000.

In the antiques department, a pleasing group of artifacts collected along the Sepik River in Papua New Guinea brought $1,100; a collection of vintage dolls sold for $1,900.00; and a set of Capodimonte porcelain figurines realized $2,000. A handsomely restored Ithaca Calendar Clock fetched $875. An Austrian gold and opal bracelet sold for $900.00.

The cataloging staff at Worth Auctions is already busy preparing for its March sales, which will showcase rare and desirable Civil War firearms and edged weapons, fine and costume jewelry, modern and contemporary art, and more.

For more information about bidding or consigning, contact evan@worthauctions.com.

[2] copy.jpgNEW YORK —Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s 1835-1837 notebook containing drafts for every poem featured in her first significant collection of poetry The Seraphim and Other Poems (1838) leads Bonhams’ Fine Books & Manuscripts sale (10:30 am on March 9). Revealing her journey from Romantic poet to Progressive political voice, the notebook is estimated at $400,000-600,000.

Barrett Browning was a prominent English poet of the Victorian era whose liberal stances on slavery and child labor resonated with readers throughout Britain and the United States.

This significant collection of drafts includes extensive additions, deletions, and emendations, reflecting her search and discovery of the incipient strength of her developing voice. Often referring to the Greek tragedies, this first collection of poems, speaks to her early Christian sentiments which she described as “not the deep persuasion of the mild Christian but the wild visions of an enthusiast.”

Born in Coxoe Hall, Durham, England in 1806, Barrett taught herself Hebrew, Greek, and Latin, while still a young girl, read Mary Wollstonecraft's A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, and later paired her love for the classics with activities at the Bible and Missionary Societies of her church. 

In her later works, Barrett reveals her long held political beliefs, speaking against slavery—her father owned a slave-run plantation in Jamaica—, child labor, and the paternal bidding to control women. Also up for auction, is an autographed manuscript and working draft of Poems Before Congress, estimated at $180,000-250,000. In the last and most controversial of Barrett Browning’s published works, seven of the poems discuss local politics and call for the independence of Italy, where she was a longtime resident. The eighth poem, "A Curse for a Nation," is an attack on American slavery, was largely seen as anti-British. A rarity in her time as an outspoken female political poet, Barrett Browning prefaces this collection: "What I have written has simply been written because I love truth and justice quand meme 'more than Plato' and Plato's country.”

Other highlights include:

  • An autographed manuscript and draft of her revised translation the Aeschylus play Prometheus Bound, which was included in her lauded 1850 book Poems, is estimated at $200,000-300,000.
  • An early autographed Barret Browning manuscript from early English poets, including Geoffrey Chaucer, Edmund Spencer, John Fletcher, estimated at $40,000-60,000.

Bonhams’ Business Development Director of the Books & Manuscripts, Tom Lamb, said, “Rarely seen on the market, these Barrett Browning notebooks and manuscripts would be an excellent addition to any literary collection. Her layered edits and re-edits reveal nuances of her working methods and influences, and further illuminate her dexterity as a shining female voice of early 19th century Europe.”

Image: Elizabeth Barrett Browning 1806-1861 autograph manuscript, a working draft of Poems Before Congress is estimated at $180,000-250,000

73-Gutenberg-leaf copy.jpgNew York— On Thursday, March 9, Swann Galleries will hold an auction of Early Printed, Medical, Scientific & Travel Books, featuring a premier selection of early English material.

The top lot of the sale is a leaf from the Gutenberg Bible, Mainz, 1455, with the text of Ecclesiasticus 16:14-18:29, estimated at $40,000 to $60,000. Further doctrinal material includes the fourth edition of the first volume of Petrus Berchorius's Liber Bibliae moralis, Cologne, 1477, a thirteenth century encyclopedia of the Bible and the natural world ($10,000 to $15,000) and the first edition in English of Hans Holbein’s The Images of the Old Testament, 1549, featuring 94 woodcuts by the artist and valued at $10,000 to $15,000. A 1560 first edition of the Geneva Bible, the predominant bible in Elizabethan England, is expected to bring $10,000 to $15,000. The 1674 third edition of Baruch Spinoza’s Tractatus Theologico-Politicus, which includes the 1666 Philosophia S. Scripturae interpres by Spinoza’s friend and editor Lodewijk Meijer, a controversial work arguing for the philosophical interpretation of scripture, estimated at $2,000 to $3,000, also makes an appearance.

Early English books featured in this sale include Antonio de Guevara's manual of statecraft The Dial of Princes, 1568 ($3,000 to $5,000); the first English edition of Niccolò Machiavelli's The Florentine Historie, 1595 ($3,000 to $5,000); Michel de Montaigne's The Essayes, the precursor of the modern essay form, 1603 ($8,000 to $12,000); and Sir Philip Sidney's influential prose romance The Countess of Pembrokes Arcadia, 1598 ($3,000 to $5,000). Also available is the third edition of the English translation by Sir Thomas North of Plutarch’s The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romaines, London, 1603, from Jacques Amyot’s French version of the original Greek, as well as the first edition of Samuel Johnson’s 1755 Dictionary of the English Language, ($1,500 to $2,000 and $6,000 to $9,000, respectively).

From the travel section comes An Embassy from the East-India Company of the United Provinces, to the Grand Tartar Cham, Emperour of China, 1673, written by Jan Nieuhoff et al and originally published as part of John Ogilby’s series of travel atlases ($4,000 to $6,000). Several tomes recount exploration into the Middle East, including the first edition of Jean de la Roque’s Voyage de l’Arabie Heureuse, 1716-22, with three engraved folding plates of coffee plants, valued at $1,500 to $2,500.

A thirteenth-century noted ferial psalter and hymnal in Latin, with Western and Low German Saints’ Days ($3,000 to $5,000) is one of several rare manuscripts in the sale. Also available is a collection of 15 prayers composed by Charles V of Spain with engraved illustrations of gospel scenes, written in Spanish in Brussels in 1676; this volume, in an embellished red cloth binding, is expected to fetch $3,000 to $5,000.

Further highlights include the Italian translation by Leonardo Cernoti of Claudius Ptolemaeus's Geografia, Venice, 1598-97, with notes by the astronomer Giovanni Antonio Magini. This edition includes a double-hemisphere world map after Rumold Mercator, as well as 63 half-page maps; it is valued between $3,000 and $5,000. The second edition of Christophorus Georgius de Honestis’s Expositio super Antidotario Mesue, printed in Bologna in 1488, is also present. This late fourteenth-century commentary is based on the Antidotarium ascribed to the Baghdad court physician Mesuë the Younger, a popular pharmacopeia based on Muslim knowledge ($3,000 to $5,000).

In addition to a first edition of Paradise Lost by John Milton, 1668 ($6,000 to $9,000), there is also an extensive selection of philosophical works by important figures of the Enlightenment, including René Descartes, John Evelyn, Thomas Hobbes, David Hume, John Locke and François-Marie Arouet de Voltaire.

In the medical section is an archive of letters from Harvey Cushing to the great-niece of Elisha Bartlett, regarding the collection of Bartlett material he assembled with her help, estimated at $5,000 to $10,000.  A sizable offering of seventeenth- to early twentieth-century works from the philosophy library of Professor Jan Ludwig features first editions by David Hume and Immanuel Kant, including Kant’s Critik der reinen Vernunft, printed in Riga in 1781 ($8,000 to $12,000).

The auction will be held Thursday, March 9, beginning at 10:30 a.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Saturday, March 4 from noon to 5 p.m.; Monday, March 6 through Wednesday, March 8, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

An illustrated auction catalogue is available for $35 from Swann Galleries, Inc., 104 East 25th Street, New York, NY 10010, or online at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information or to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Early Printed Books Specialist Tobias Abeloff at 212-254-4710, extension 18 or tabeloff@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 73 Single leaf from a paper copy of the Gutenberg Bible, Mainz, 1455, in a copy of Newton's A Noble Fragment. Estimate $40,000 to $60,000.

Screen Shot 2017-02-13 at 8.38.25 AM.pngThe Van Gogh Museum is devoting itself this spring to Prints in Paris 1900: From Elite to the Street - a major exhibition of work from its own fin-de-siècle print collection, which is one of the finest of its kind in the world. Over 250 prints of the highest quality, including colourful works by Bonnard, Chéret, Steinlen and Toulouse-Lautrec will be on show, among them world-famous posters like Le Chat Noir and Le Moulin Rouge. The prints will be shown alongside paintings, historical photographs, furniture for collectors and decorative objects, and will take visitors on a sensual journey through the cosmopolitan life of the French fin-de-siècle (1890-1905). The exhibition has been designed by Maarten Spruyt.

The Van Gogh Museum manages one of the finest collections of fin-de-siècle printmaking in the world. As a centre of knowledge and expertise, the museum has been collecting prints intensively for sixteen years and has also carried out five years of in-depth research so that it can now present its print collection in magnificent fashion. Prints that, because of their sensitivity to light, are kept in storage and only displayed sporadically and on a small scale can now be seen in all their glory and in large numbers in the museum’s exhibition wing.

The most beautiful of all the graphic work produced by artists like Henri de Toulouse- Lautrec (1864-1901), Pierre Bonnard (1867-1947), Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen (1859-1923), Edgar Degas (1834-1917) and Jules Chéret (1836-1832) will be on show at the exhibition, which will feature the finest print series and the rarest impressions. Over 250 prints will be shown alongside paintings, historical photographs, furniture for collectors and decorative objects. There are little jewels like the dark lithographs of Odilon Redon (1840-1916), evoking nightmarish fantasies, and the still series of woodcuts by Félix Vallotton (1865-1925), showing musicians playing in shadowy interiors.

The overarching story of the world of printmaking in Paris - from elite (the private collector) to the street (the mass of the people) - has never previously been told in an exhibition. Prints in Paris 1900 takes visitors on a journey beginning with prints from fashionable art circles, which were kept and viewed in the intimacy of richly decorated interiors. They will see the imposing Bibliothèque - rarely loaned for exhibitions - designed by François-Rupert Carabin (1890, Musée d’Orsay), an exuberantly decorated bookcase several metres tall with carvings of nude women, in which costly books and prints were stored by a private collector.

We then enter an entirely different world - that of popular prints for the masses. Here we find the fleeting impressions of the visual spectacle of modern life in the public sphere, full of colour, light and pleasure. Artistic posters, sheet music and magazine illustrations with their bright colours, large letters and powerful silhouettes, vie for attention. The highlight is Steinlen’s poster The Street, which, with an area of no less than 7.5 m2, is a genuine ‘fresco for the masses’. The prints also tempt visitors into the magical world of Parisian nightlife.

We then see how the elite took public printmaking and pulled it back into their interiors, where posters were now also hung on the walls as decorations. The exhibition concludes by showing a variety of printing techniques, with the original lithography press of the printer Auguste Clot (1858-1936) as the main attraction. A selection of trial proofs and videos explains the techniques of etching, woodcuts and lithography.

Parisian fin-de-siècle

The fin-de-siècle (1890-1905) was the heyday of French printmaking. It was the time where avant-garde art blended with everyday life in cosmopolitan Paris. Artists no longer put their talent to work exclusively on the creation of ‘high’ art, but also threw themselves into what were considered ‘lower’ art forms, such as decorative designs, prints, posters and magazine illustrations, with the common theme of modern cosmopolitan life in Paris. Artists experimented intensively with different print techniques and decorated the whole of Paris with their provocative artworks.

Catalogue

The exhibition Prints in Paris 1900: From Elite to the Street is accompanied by a richly illustrated, large-format catalogue written by curator Fleur Roos Rosa de Carvalho and based on years of intensive research into the worlds of printmaking during the French fin-de-siècle: the closed circles of decadent print collectors, the sparkling poster art of the street and magazines on news-stands, and large prints as colourful decoration for the interiors of the beau monde. 194 pages, hardcover. Publisher: Mercatorfonds, Brussels. The book is available in Dutch, English, French and German editions, and will be distributed worldwide.

Prints in Paris 1900: From Elite to the Street

3 March - 11 June 2017

10 February 2017 - The Bodleian Libraries have launched an innovative web-based resource that brings together the complete works of British photographic pioneer William Henry Fox Talbot, available to the public at foxtalbot.bodleian.ox.ac.uk. For the first time ever, users can discover and search through annotated digitized images of Talbot’s photographs gathered from collections around the world. The fascinating images show the emergence and development of photography while capturing moments of early Victorian life.  

SirWalterScottsMonument-BL+-+300dpi copy.jpgThis comprehensive online Talbot Catalogue Raisonné is an important new resource for scholars, educators, curators, conservators, photographers and historians in many fields, as well as anyone interested in photography. Catalogues raisonné encompass the entire corpus of an artist’s work and while they are common in art history, nothing of this scale has been attempted for photography - it is a record of both the invention of an art and of the art of invention. 

William Henry Fox Talbot (1800-1877), among the greatest polymaths of the Victorian age, is regarded as the British ‘father of photography’. He created some of the first photographs ever made. He also recognised that negatives, with their ability to make multiple prints on paper, would define the central path of photography right through to the digital age. During his career Talbot and his collaborators created more than 4,500 unique or distinct images; approximately 25,000 of his original negatives and multiple prints from them are known to survive worldwide and are held across a range of international institutions and private collections. These are now brought together for the first time in one place - the Talbot Catalogue Raisonné. 

‘There has been nothing like this before in the history of photography,’ said Professor Larry J Schaaf, Project Director for the Talbot Catalogue Raisonné and Visiting Professor of Art at the University of Oxford. ‘This catalogue raisonné of Talbot's work will help unlock the enormous artistic, documentary and technical information embodied in these images and allow researchers to find out even more about these works.’ Working closely with the Talbot family, Schaaf has been researching Talbot for more than four decades and has examined nearly all of Talbot’s originals held in collections worldwide.  

Talbot was a scientist who then became an artist. Unlike the case with most of his peers, much of his archive survives; in addition to the 25,000 photographs there are more than 10,000 letters, hundreds of notebooks and many related physical objects. In the early 1980s, before digital projects in the humanities were common, Professor Schaaf developed the pioneering databases of Talbot's work on which the new online catalogue is based. 

The Bodleian Libraries have spent the last two years translating these images into a modern online form. The catalogue integrates the holdings of more than 100 international public and private collections including items from the British Library, the National Media Museum, New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art, the J. Paul Getty Museum and the Smithsonian Institution, as well as smaller but significant holdings in Russia, Estonia, South Africa, Canada, France and others worldwide.

Launching with more than 1,000 images, these will be added to weekly until the entire 25,000 negatives and prints known worldwide have been published. They include: 

  • • Beautiful early cityscapes of Oxford, London and Paris and others, 
  • • Numerous images taken on and around the grounds of Lacock Abbey, Talbot’s family home in Wiltshire,  
  • • Some of Talbot’s best known images such as ‘The Open Door’ and ‘The Haystack’,
  • • Photographs by Talbot’s close circle of family and colleagues, with whom he collaborated - Nicolaas Henneman, Calvert R Jones, George Bridges and Henry Collen, along with Talbot’s wife Constance and his mother Lady Elisabeth Feilding.

In this new catalogue raisonné, images of prints and negatives are accompanied by notes, annotations and essays, with links to relevant publications and websites. Users can search images by photographer, title, collection, provenance, date, genre, geographic location and keywords then tag, save or compare images and create, annotate and store their own collections or search results, all free of charge. Since many of these primordial images survive in a faded state, they can be enhanced for study onscreen by simple tools that magnify the images and adjust the contrast and density. Negatives lacking a print will be accompanied by a digital positive. 

Importantly users can view surviving negatives alongside the prints that were made from them, making this the first online catalogue to make the connection between corresponding Talbot prints/images no matter where in the world the original print is held. This is critical since each negative and print was made by hand and each is unique. For example, users to the site can see an image of a negative held in the Smithsonian alongside salt prints made from it that are held in the J. Paul Getty Museum, the British Library and other private collections. 

The images are accompanied by extensive cross-referencing to other sources, such as Talbot’s notebooks held in the British Library and the 10,000 Talbot letters available online at foxtalbot.dmu.ac.uk, a project at De Montfort University also directed by Professor Schaaf. In 2014, the Bodleian acquired the personal archive of Talbot, which includes original manuscripts, correspondence, family diaries and scientific instruments. The archive is also rich in physical objects depicted in Talbot’s photographs, for example the actual glassware depicted in his famous ‘Articles of Glass’ published in The Pencil of Nature.

Richard Ovenden, Bodley’s Librarian said ‘The Talbot Catalogue Raisonné exemplifies the important role of the Bodleian Libraries and cultural institutions in creating digital resources that allow unprecedented virtual access to collections. This project also demonstrates the value of working in partnership, bringing together items now dispersed from across numerous collections. We are extremely grateful to the many institutions who contributed to this exciting new research tool, without whom this project would not have been possible.’

The Talbot Catalogue Raisonné has been developed with the support of the William Talbott Hillman Foundation, The Polonsky Foundation, the Charina Endowment Fund as well as numerous private donors.

Image: This photo of the Scott Monument, a monument to the Scottish author Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) and the largest monument to a writer in the world, was taken in mid-October 1844. Talbot travelled north to look for subjects for his second book of photography, Sun Pictures in Scotland. Talbot took several shots of the monument under construction. Salted paper print. Credit: The British Library. 

The Art & Antiques Fair Olympia is set to return to London this summer in what will be its historic 45th year.  The prestigious Fair, which offers more choice than any other top European fair, has prices ranging from £100 to hundreds of thousands of pounds.  An audience of art and antique enthusiasts from across the globe are anticipated to descend on Kensington Olympia in search of one of a kind, rare and beautiful pieces.

Opening with an exclusive Preview day on Monday 26 June and closing on Sunday 2 July, the Fair is the definitive place for home owners, interior designers and collectors looking for inspiration.  The Fair is expected to attract around 25,000 visitors with more than 55,000 pieces for sale.  Each object will be individually vetted by independent experts, providing peace of mind for any buyer - whether a first-time visitor or a regular returnee.

Known for its diverse offering, the Fair features over 120 dealers, some of whom exclusively choose Olympia to display their pieces for sale in a  seven day only equivalent of a ‘pop up shop’.  

From diamond rings to dining tables, from antiquity to the modern day, the Fair will have works of art to cater to all tastes.

As well as the large variety of dealers present, the Art & Antiques Fair Olympia will boast an impressive line-up of speakers giving insight into current trends, interiors, history as well as exhibitions taking place across Europe today. 

Mary Claire Boyd, Fair Director says: “Olympia in June is the place to buy that elusive piece that so many of us dream of owning; the essential destination for interiors pieces. The 45th edition of this flagship fair includes exhibitors who can only be seen at this UK show, while others save and restore their best pieces for this seven day, keenly anticipated event.

“There is also an opportunity to learn a tremendous amount from the combined knowledge of some of the world's leading experts in their fields who are always happy to share their expertise with interested visitors and via the free talks programme.”

After a successful opening year in 2016, SOFA London will be making a welcome return in the Fair.  A version of the critically acclaimed Chicago-based show, The Sculptural Objects Functional Art and Design Fair (SOFA), it is an area dedicated to celebrating contemporary three-dimensional art and design - sure to make a big impact.

Located in the elegant National Hall in London Olympia means that the Fair is extremely easy to get to and there will be a free shuttle bus during the Fair between London Olympia and Sloane Square. 

A Preview held on Monday 26 June, late openings, champagne bar and a specially created menu at Mosimann’s restaurant all combine to make the Fair a prestigious and must-attend event in London’s summer calendar.

Tickets are priced at £15 in advance and £20 on the door and £60 on Preview day*. 

The Art & Antiques Fair Olympia takes place at the Olympia National, London, W14 8UX. 

For more information and to purchase tickets please visit www.olympia-art-antiques.com.

Screen Shot 2017-02-10 at 10.27.33 AM.pngLes Enluminures is celebrating its 24th year exhibiting at TEFAF Maastricht!

For this prestigious event, the leading specialists in medieval manuscripts will be presenting an array of important acquisitions. Notable highlights include a glittering unseen Book of Hours with 69 miniatures, an exceptional illuminated leaf by Sano di Pietro representing the Adoration of the Magi and a leaf from the illustrious Chester Beatty Hours.

Of the upmost importance, the Hours of Isabeau de Croix is one of the finest Books of Hours to have ever entered the Tefaf Maastricht fair. Dr. Sandra Hindman, CEO and President of Les Enluminures, claims “This is by far one of the best Books of Hours I have ever handled as a dealer, and it is certainly the most extensively illuminated with page after page of dazzling miniatures in perfect condition”. It is of exceptional size, in flawless condition, illustrated with nearly seventy large and astonishing pictures, by all three of the great-est artists working in Parisian the second quarter of the fifteenth century. Dr. Christopher de Hamel, Senior Vice-President, comments “It is only when one is familiar with routine Books of Hours that the supreme mas-terpieces stand out as being utterly exceptional. The Hours of Isabeau de Croix is one of those manuscripts which almost defies belief”.

Equally to be exhibited for the first time is a fine miniature by Sano di Pietro, one of the most influential and prolific artists in Siena in the middle of the fifteenth century. Thought to have been trained by Sassetta and to have been active in the workshop of the Master of the Osservanza, Sano inherited the gift for storytelling from his masters. His engaging narrative style was rich in decorative effects. Representing the scene of the Adoration of the Magi, his leaf is likely from the series of opulent choir books for the Hospital of Santa Maria della Scala, Siena.

The third highlight comes in the form of a leaf from the Chester Beatty Hours, one of the most important manuscripts associated with the Boucicaut Master Group. Contemporary with the Limbourg Brothers, the Boucicaut Master and his workshop were active in Paris and worked for some of the greatest patrons of the age, including Jean, Duke of Berry. Les Enluminures will present a leaf depicting St John the Baptist, in remarkable condition and with distinguished provenance.

March 10th to 19th
Preview: Thursday March 9th STAND 276

Image: THE HOURS OF ISABEAU DE CROIX France, Paris, circa 1425-50. In Latin and French, illuminated manuscript on parchment. With sixty-nine large miniatures by the Master of the Harvard Han- nibal (active circa 1415-1430), the Master of the Munich Golden Legend (active circa 1420-1460), and the Dunois Master (active circa 1435-1450’s).

Screen Shot 2017-02-10 at 10.06.12 AM.pngHeartfelt personal letters from Jackie Kennedy to David Ormsby Gore (the 5th Lord Harlech), Britain's Ambassador in the USA during the Kennedy Presidency are to be sold at The Contents of Glyn Cywarch - the Property of Lord Harlech Sale at Bonhams in London on Wednesday 29 March on behalf of Jasset, 7th Lord Harlech. They reveal for the first time that Ormsby Gore proposed marriage to Jackie Kennedy, why she turned him down and why, shortly afterwards, she married Aristotle Onassis.

The letters form part of a cache of papers that have been locked away unseen in two despatch boxes at Glyn Cywarch, the Harlech family house, since Lord Harlech's death in 1985, including personal correspondence from President Kennedy and from British Prime Ministers, Harold Macmillan, Sir Alec Douglas-Home and Harold Wilson. The archive is estimated at £100,000-150,000.

Bonhams Head of Fine Books and Manuscripts in the UK, Matthew Haley said, "For decades, biographers have speculated on the precise relationship between Jackie Kennedy and David Ormsby Gore. These letters now show without doubt how close they came to marriage and why Jackie decided to marry Onassis instead. The correspondence has been sitting in two official red Government despatch boxes for more than 40 years. The keys were nowhere to be found and in the end we had to call a locksmith to slice through the locks. It was one of those astonishing moments when you can't quite believe what you're seeing."

The 18 handwritten and one typed letters from Jackie Kennedy to David Ormsby Gore, 5th Lord Harlech, cover her days as First Lady from the assassination of President Kennedy until her marriage to Onassis in October 1968. They show a warm and very close relationship which deepened during 1967 after the tragic death in a car accident of Lord Harlech's wife, Sissy, in May of that year. At the time, Jackie Kennedy wrote to him movingly, "Your last letter was such a cri de coeur of loneliness - I would do anything to take that anguish from you - You want to patch the wounds & match the loose pairs - but you can't because your life won't turn out that way."

During the following months, the two spent an increasing amount of time together, often on private holidays, and in February 1968 Harlech proposed marriage. Among the newly discovered documents is a draft of his wounded response to her rejection of the proposal.

"All the pathetic plans I had brought with me for visits to Cyrenaica, holidays near one another and a whole variety of solutions to our marriage problem, including one for a secret marriage this summer - plans which I saw us eagerly discussing, calmly and with complete frankness as we did at the Cape and in Cambodia for the next wonderful ten days - all had become irrelevant trash to be thrown away within a few hours of my landing in New York. As for your photograph I weep when I look at it. Why do such agonizing things have to happen? Where was the need for it? I have tried for hours and hours to understand your explanation and I suppose I do in a way, without agreeing with it; but what I find unbearable and in a way, dearest Jackie, untrue is that you could come to such a categorical conclusion..."

Her reply to him, is tender and soothing. "We have known so much & shared & lost so much together - Even if it isn't the way you wish now - I hope that bond of love and pain will never be cut... You are like my beloved beloved brother - and mentor - and the only original spirit I know - as you were to Jack."

In June of that year Robert Kennedy was assassinated while seeking the Democratic Party nomination for the Presidency. Harlech was one of the pall bearers at the funeral. Shortly after the suppression of the Prague Spring by Soviet Forces in August, Jackie wrote to Harlech lamenting the state of the world, "I thought your speech about Czechoslovakia so beautiful - it brought tears to my eyes - Reading it you cant believe that the same things are being said - or rather done - all over again - and that as before, it is England who is the bravest... Ones private despair is so trivial now - because wherever you look there is nothing to not despair over - I keep thinking of what Jack used to say - 'that every man can make a difference & that every man should try."

In the final letter written from Aristotle Onassis's yacht Christina, Jackie tries to explain why she had married the billionaire Greek shipping magnate, "You and I have shared so many lives and deaths and hopes and pain - we will share them forever and be forever bound together by them... If ever I can find some healing and some comfort - it has to be with someone who is not a part of all my world of past and pain - I can find that now - if the world will let us."

Jasset, Lord Harlech, the grandson of David Ormsby Gore, said "Though he sadly passed away before I was born, I knew even from an early age that my grandfather had been British Ambassador to the United States. There is much history that binds the Kennedys and the Ormsby Gores together. The more I read or was told about David by other relatives, the more I wanted to know. He seems to have been a most insightful and intelligent man. He had a career spanning military service, politics and diplomacy; he set up his own television station and was chairman of the British Board of Film Classification; all impressive in their own right, but I am told his greatest attributes were his thoughtfulness, charm, and sense of morality."

Political letters revealed for first time in the Ormsby Gore despatch box

The strong personal and family links between John Kennedy and David Ormsby Gore influenced the decision of British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan to appoint the latter, a non-career diplomat, as Ambassador to Washington in 1960. (Ormsby Gore assumed the title of Lord Harlech in 1964 on the death of his father, a year before he ceased to be ambassador). Robert Kennedy described Ormsby Gore as being "almost a part of the government", recalling that his brother the President "would rather have his judgment than that of almost anybody else... He'd rather have... his ideas, his suggestions and recommendations than even anybody in our own government." This became especially important during the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962.

A handwritten letter from Kennedy to Ormsby Gore in the cache attests to this closeness. "...I appreciate as you know, in all these critical matters your judgment - which I have found to be uniformly good and true. The P.M was excellent this week - I do not like these stories which have as their object a disparagement of the real value of our alliance. I am sure Your government knows better"

Harold Macmillan had equal faith in Ormsby Gore's abilities, writing to him after his first year as Ambassador, ""I think your position is really something unique in the annals of the British Embassy in Washington and we are all really grateful for what you are doing".

Other letters in the archive include:

• a note from Prince Philip's uncle Lord Mountbatten promoting a film he wanted to be shown at the White House;

• a letter from Sir Alec Douglas-Home shortly after he succeeded MacMillan as Prime Minister in September 1963, "This is an unexpected responsibility, but I shall do my best. You know what a great help you are in Washington."

• and a note from the private secretary to UK Prime Minister Harold Wilson who came to power in 1964, passing on Wilson's request to prevent his notoriously erratic Foreign Secretary, George Brown, from meeting President Lyndon B. Johnson (who succeeded John Kennedy at US President in 1963).

Harvey Cammell, Deputy Chairman of Bonhams UK said, "Of all the many discoveries we have made in this wonderful collection, the Kennedy Harlech papers are surely the most remarkable.  I am expecting unprecedented interest in this unique auction, the contents of which has kept our team enthralled since our first visit to this incredibly beautiful and historic house.  It is, without doubt, one of the most fascinating private collections to come on the market in recent times."

David Ormsby Gore, 5th Baron Harlech

David Ormsby Gore was born in 1918. Educated at Eton and New College Oxford, he was elected to Parliament in 1950. He held a number of Government Ministerial positions in the Foreign Office, but resigned in 1961 in order to take up the post of British Ambassador to the United States. He became the 5th Lord Harlech on the death of his father in 1964. After his return to the UK in 1965, he had a successful career in television, founding the independent TV company, HTV. Lord Harlech died from injuries sustained in a car accident in 1985. Senator Edward Kennedy, Jacqueline Onassis and other Kennedy family members attended his funeral.

551-Chagall copy.jpgNew York—On Thursday, March 2, Swann Galleries will hold an auction of 19th & 20th Century Prints & Drawings, offering rare portfolios by masters of the last two centuries.

The sale is led by two vibrant lithograph sets, each with additional and complementary works. The publisher’s own set of the rare deluxe edition of Marc Chagall’s Arabian Nights, 1948, boasts an additional thirteenth lithograph showing the King and Scheherazade under the guardianship of a glowing bird; it is expected to sell between $250,000 and $350,000. Also available is the complete set of Édouard Vuillard’s 1899 Paysages et Intérieurs. Already scarce, this portfolio of 13 color lithographs is enhanced by additional impressions of two of the plates, bringing the total number of works to 15. The set in its entirety is estimated at $150,000 to $200,000.

There is an excellent selection of vibrant works by nineteenth-century masters led by Pierre Bonnard’s rare color lithograph, La Petite Blanchisseuse, 1896, and Mary Cassatt’s The Coiffure, circa 1891, a color drypoint and soft-ground etching ($50,000 to $80,000 and $40,000 to $60,000, respectively). A color lithograph by Pierre-Auguste Renoir titled Enfants Jouant à la Balle, circa 1900, is valued between $40,000 and $60,000. Also available is the fourth state of Edgar Degas’s lithograph, Femme nue debout à sa toilette, 1891-92, estimated at $50,000 to $80,000. The sale opens with 50 highlights from the collection of Eric Carlson, with works by masters including Eugène Delacroix, Paul Gauguin, Paul Signac and Félix Vallotton, as well as the complete set of Mélodies de Désiré Dihau, 1895, by Henri Toulouse-Lautrec ($30,000 to $50,000).

Of particular note is Egon Schiele’s first lithograph, the nude self-portrait Männlicher Akt (Selbstbildnis I), 1912, which is expected to fetch $20,000 to $30,000. Early twentieth century highlights continue with a charming pen and ink drawing by Paul Klee of bulls, titled Drama in der Kuhwelt, 1915, estimated at $25,000 to $35,000, and the rare woodcut Hafen Teufelsbrücke, 1911, by Kurt Schmidt-Rottluff, which has appeared at auction only three times in the last 30 years ($40,000 to $60,000).

A premiere selection of works by Pablo Picasso will be crossing the block: examples include the 1934 etching Femme torero, I, and the 1948 lithograph Femme au fauteuil, No. 1 ($50,000 to $80,000 and $40,000 to $60,000, respectively). These are joined by an original watercolor by Salvador Dalí titled Orologi Molli, 1960, previously in the Albaretto Collection in Turin and estimated at $70,000 to $100,000. Further highlights include the color aquatint La Permissionaire, 1974, by Joan Miró ($40,000 to $60,000), and one of 30 artist’s proofs of the deluxe portfolio with text of Le Corbusier’s Unité, 1953; there has been just one other complete set of 37 lithographs at auction in the last 30 years ($35,000 to $50,000). Also available are prints by Georges Braque, Giorgio de Chirico, René Magritte and Giorgio Morandi, bronze sculptures by Jean Arp, Brassaï, Dalí and Man Ray, and a wool tapestry designed by Henri Matisse titled Mimosa, 1951 ($7,000 to $10,000).

From the Americas comes a selection of early prints and artists’ proofs by James A.M. Whistler, led by the etching and drypoint Speke Hall: The Avenue, 1870-78, estimated at $50,000 to $80,000, as well as Evening Wind, 1921, an etching by Edward Hopper ($50,000 to $80,000). Martin Lewis’s 1932 aquatint Which Way? has appeared at auction only four times in the last 30 years; here it carries an estimate of $30,000 to $50,000.

The auction will be held Thursday, March 2, beginning at 10:30 a.m. and continuing at 1:30 p.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Saturday, February 25 from noon to 5 p.m.; Monday, February 27 through Wednesday, March 1, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

An illustrated auction catalogue is available for $40 from Swann Galleries, Inc., 104 East 25th Street, New York, NY 10010, or online at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information and to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Todd Weyman at 212-254-4710, extension 32, or via e-mail at tweyman@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 551 Marc Chagall, Four Tales from the Arabian Nights, portfolio with complete text and 13 color lithographs, 1948. Estimate $250,000 to $350,000.

Kornblum1 copy.jpgMinnesota Center for Book Arts will formally rename its typesetting library in memory of Allan Kornblum, MCBA's first printer-in-residence, and a trailblazer in Minnesota's literary community and the publishing industry at large. In the early 1980s, Kornblum moved his Toothpaste Press to the Twin Cities from Iowa City, rechristening it as Coffee House Press. Kornblum continued to be a close friend and collaborator with MCBA throughout the years, donating a press and wood and metal type for use in MCBA’s studios.

A leading light in the literary community, Allan built his world, and ours, around the penned and printed word. His joy of literature, his skill at the press, and his passion for writers and readers was unmatched. -- Jeff Rathermel, MCBA Executive Director

MCBA Type Library Dedication

Saturday, February 25; 3-5pm

MCBA's Lower Print Studio

Join us as we honor Allan Kornblum’s legacy with commemorative broadsides printed on Kornblum's press, along with light refreshments. Remarks at 4pm.

About the Type Library

From Garamond to Goudy Light, the Type Library at Minnesota Center for Book Arts is filled with resources for writers, poets, artists, and printers to tell stories, one letter at a time. The tens of thousands of pounds of antique type, and over 500 unique typefaces support printers and artists of all disciplines in their creative work.

About Allan Kornblum

In 1973, Kornblum founded a small mimeograph periodical in Iowa City, Iowa that evolved into Toothpaste Press, a publishing house specializing in the production of high-quality poetry and short fiction letterpress chapbooks. Kornblum’s affiliation with the vibrant Minnesota publishing scene began in the mid-1980s, when he transferred operations from Iowa to Minneapolis. In addition to the change of venue, Kornblum renamed and reincorporated the organization as a non-profit, Coffee House Press. At a time when loose editing and production standards were the norm, Kornblum made strides toward the professionalism that typifies the industry today. That included shifting from letterpress to offset printing, using computerized typesetting, and improving the marketing and distribution of new titles. Those changes allowed Coffee House to reach a wider audience, which in turn allowed showcased authors - who may not have gained traction in the larger New York world of publishing - the opportunity to find the readers they deserved.

About Minnesota Center for Book Arts

A respected and dedicated champion of the field, Minnesota Center for Book Arts is the largest and most comprehensive center of its kind. We celebrate the book as a vibrant contemporary art form that takes many shapes. Our mission is clear: to lead the advancement of the book as an evolving art form.

MCBA is committed to book art, artists and appreciators. Our mission is achieved through quality programs that support a broad continuum of creators, learners and admirers. We lead the field by promoting innovation, sustaining traditions, educating new enthusiasts, inspiring creative expression and honoring artistic excellence. From the traditional crafts of papermaking, letterpress printing and bookbinding to new methods of art-making and communication, MCBA supports the limitless creative development of book arts.

Minnesota Center for Book Arts at Open Book, 1011 Washington Ave S, First Floor, Minneapolis MN 55415.

Phone 612.215.2520 . Fax 612.215.2545 . mcba@mnbookarts.org

Oxford, 9 February 2017—A striking new book featuring historic views of London unearthed from the Bodleian Library’s collections presents a captivating panorama of the City during the eighteenth century.

This stunning large-format book reproduces over one hundred images from the Gough collection in the Bodleian Libraries, many of which are published here for the first time. By 1800 London was the second largest city in the world, its relentless growth fuelled by Britain’s expanding empire. However, compared to today, the built-up area was still comparatively small. Depicting the present Greater London area, this title offers images of town and countryside from more than two centuries ago which contrast graphically with what we see as the metropolis today.

The Gough collection of British topography is one of the most important collections of British topography. With houses in Enfield and the City, gentleman and antiquary Richard Gough (1735-1809) commissioned works and assembled a comprehensive collection of maps, drawings and engravings that provide unrivalled insight into his era. The London illustrations capture the range of activity in the sprawling city, and are accompanied by eye- witness accounts which range from descriptions of local crime and street scenes to the results of extreme weather and significant events.

Prints made of London before and after the Great Fire show how artists and engravers responded to contemporary events such as executions, riots, fires and the effects of a tornado. They also recorded public spectacles, creating beautiful images of firework displays and frost fairs on the river Thames. Panoramas of the river Thames were popular illustrations of the day, and the extraordinarily detailed engravings made by the Buck brothers are reproduced here. The construction and destruction of landmark bridges across the river are also shown in contemporary engravings.

Before the age of photography, the most widely used means of creating a visual record of the changing capital was through engravings and drawings, and those that survive today are invaluable in showing us what the capital was like in the century leading up to the Industrial Revolution.

With accompanying text detailing its history, this title offers a unique pictorial history of Georgian London that is visually rich, historically fascinating and of interest to Londoners and visitors alike.

  • London: Prints and Drawings before 1800 by Bernard Nurse
  • Published in association with The London Topographical Society
  • Format: 232 pp, 238 x 278 mm, 123 colour illustrations.
  • ISBN: 978 1 85124 412 6
  • Hardback, £30.00
  • Publication: 17 March 2017 

Screen Shot 2017-02-09 at 9.32.56 AM.pngA first edition of Gulliver's Travels from a world-class collection of 17th, 18th and 19th century fantasy and scientific literature is one of the leading lots at Bonhams Fine Books and Manuscripts sale in London on Wednesday 1 March. It is estimated at £20,000-30,000.

Jonathan Swift's Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World ... by Lemuel Gulliver, commonly known as Gulliver's Travels, was published on 28 October 1726, selling out within two weeks. It has been popular ever since and is the most widely read work of 18th century English literature. Adapted many times for film, television and radio - and even opera - the stories of Gulliver's travels to fantastical lands, including Lilliput and Brobdingnag, are famous throughout the world.

The collection was assembled during the 20th century by a French bibliophile. It has a strong emphasis on works which would now be classified as science fiction, although important scientific and philosophical writers such as Galileo and Descartes are also represented. Other highlights include:

• A first edition of Johannes Kepler's very rare imaginary tale of a voyage to the moon - Somnium, seu opus posthumum de astronomia lunari. Divulgatum (A Dream: or, a Posthumous Work of Lunar Astronomy) - published posthumously in 1634, and estimated at £20,000-30,000. The book features an astonishingly accurate description of how the rest of the celestial system would look as seen from the moon.

La découverte australe par un homme-volant, ou le Dédale francais by Restif de la Bretonne estimated at £4,000-6,000. This proto-science fiction Utopian novel is the account of the voyages to mythical lands by the hero, Victorin, in his flying machine made of cape-like wings of silk and a head-worn umbrella-device. It is illustrated with plates depicting the flying machine and the exotic tribes encountered by Victorin on his journey, including men-asses, men-frogs, men-snakes, men-elephants and men-lions.

De la terre à la lune, trajet direct en 97 heures, by Jules Verne estimated at £800-1,000. A second edition of Verne's classic From the Earth to the Moon of 1865 which drew on the latest scientific and technological knowledge to envisage a manned flight to the moon more than 100 years before it actually happened.

The scientific works in the sale include:

• A first edition of The Discovery of a World in the Moone. Or, a Discourse Tending to Prove 'tis Probable There May Be Another Habitable World in That Planet, by John Wilkins published in 1638. It is estimated at £2,000-3,000. Wilkins' book argued that the world was not unique and defended the emerging model of the universe developed by Galileo and Copernicus. A priest at Christ Church Cathedral Oxford at the time he wrote the work, Wilkins (1614-1672) was later a founder member of the Royal Society.

• René Descartes' Principia Philosophiae, in first edition published in 1544. Estimated at £2,500-3,500, the work developed Descartes' theory of vortices, and attempted to reconcile Copernican astronomy with Biblical teachings. The final part includes the first scientific theory of magnetism.

• A first edition of Lana Terzi's Prodromo overo saggio di alcune inventioni nuove premesso all'arte maestra... per mostrare li piu reconditi pricipii della naturale filosofia estimated at £2,500-3,500. This important work in the history of aeronautics described several technological innovations including a "flying boat" which was to be made airborne by the use of four large metallic globes from which all the air had been expelled. Other inventions included an apparatus for speaking at a long distance, telescopes, microscopes and a sewing machine.

Bonhams Head of Fine Books and Manuscripts, Matthew Haley, said, "This is a first-class collection of works by European writers and thinkers using their imagination to speculate on the existence of other worlds and to cast light on their own. Sometimes satirically, as in the case of Swift, and sometimes with scientific and philosophical purpose, as with Wilkins and Descartes, the authors in this collection are united in their need to make sense of the universe and the time in which they lived."

An important collection of books and documents about the early days of hot air ballooning, put together over many years by a French bibliophile, is to be offered at Bonhams Fine Books and Manuscripts sale in London on Wednesday 1 March.

French engineers and inventors played a crucial role in the development of the hot air balloon, led by the Montgolfier brothers - Joseph-Michel and Jacques Étienne - who invented the globe aérostatique in which Etienne made the first piloted ascent in history in October 1783.

The Montgolfiers' success unleashed a torrent of activity. Other inventors were quick to build on the brothers' influential work, and the sale reflects this outpouring of ideas. The most important of these include:

A handwritten copy by Marché Fils of his letter of November 1784 to the Permanent Secretary of the Académie des Sciences, with his ideas for a dirigible and on how to keep Montgolfiers' balloons traveling in a straight line during flight. It is estimated at £1,000-2,000.

An account by one of the Montgolfiers' rivals, Jacques Charles, about the first manned ascent in a hydrogen-filled balloon in December 1783 which he undertook with his fellow inventor Nicholas-Louis Robert. Estimate £500-700.

A guide to making hot air balloons based on the work of the Montgolfiers and Jacques Charles and Nicholas-Louis Robert, which includes a dramatic account of the Montgolfier Brothers' ascent in Lyon in January 1874. Watched by a crowd of more than 100,000 people, the balloon reached a height of 3,000 ft before a tear developed in the fabric and it returned rapidly to earth. Estimate £500-700.

Despite the dizzying pace of change, writers soon began capturing the history of the development of the hot air balloon. Faujas de Saint-Fond wrote what is seen as the first serious work on hot air ballooning, including a detailed technical description of the Mongolfier brothers' achievements (£500-800). A later 19th century work, Histoire des ballons et des aéronautes célèbres, by Gaston Tissandier is estimated at £400-600.

Bonhams Head of Books and Manuscripts, Matthew Haley, said, "The first manned balloon ascent in 1783 - just six years before the outbreak of the French Revolution - was a hugely significant moment in the history of powered flight. Natural as it seems today, in the eighteenth century the idea of ascending in a balloon was as extraordinary a technological leap as a self-driving car is in the 21st century.

"As the books in this exceptional collection show, it was the catalyst for an explosion of invention. Balloon flights also became great public spectacles - hundreds of thousands of people turned out to marvel at this new phenomenon."

A very scarce, privately printed work by Mark Twain fetched over $4,000 at National Book Auctions's February 4, 2017 sale. Only four other copies of this volume have sold at auction over the last four decades.

The volume was number five of one hundred copies of Twain's "1601" published by the Derrydale Press in New York in 1926. Bearing the long-winded subtitle "Being a Fireside Conversation in ye Tyme of ye Goode Queene Bess in Which Divers Persons of Reknown Hold Converse on Concerns Personal and Intimate," this satirical squib purported to be an extract from the diary from one of Queen Elizabeth's ladies-in-waiting. Due to its scatological and sexual content, "1601" was considered unprintable by mainstream publishers prior to the 1960s and was circulated clandestinely in privately printed limited editions such as this.

The sale, held at the auction house's Freeville, New York saleroom and simulcast via Invaluable, also featured a sizeable private library of decorative antique leather bindings; sets of note included "Naturalis Historiae Libri XXXVII" by Pliny the Elder (1685), "The Posthumous Works of Frederic II King of Prussia" translated by Thomas Holcroft (1789), and "Novels of George Eliot" collected by William Blackwood (c. 1890). Other lots included antique billheads, magazine compilations, and books and correspondence from the estate of a colleague and purported muse and mistress of "Lolita" author Vladimir Nabokov.

National Book Auctions is a specialist auction house focusing almost exclusively on rare and collectible books and ephemera since the 1990s. Its sister company, Worth Auctions, handles a broad variety of personal property including fine and decorative art, furnishings, jewelry, coins, antique arms and armor, and more. For more information, contact mail@nationalbookauctions.com or mail@worthauctions.com.

099_LR copy.jpgFebruary 2017--CHICAGO--A rare poster depicting Harry Houdini performing his famous Water Torture Cell escape has sold for a world record price of $114,000.00 at Potter & Potter Auctions in Chicago. That price now stands as the most expensive magic poster ever sold at public auction.

The anonymous winning bidder participated by phone.

Printed in London in 1912, the poster depicts Houdini locked upside down and underwater in the Torture Cell, perhaps the most famous escape the magician ever invented and performed. The poster was produced one year after the trick’s invention.

“Advance buzz for the auction was high, and especially for the Houdini posters,” said Gabe Fajuri, President of Potter & Potter. “Chatter on social media included considerable speculation about just how high the price would go,” he added. “Several outlets wondered if we’d set a new world record. We’re glad they were right!”

Another Houdini poster, Houdini - King of Cards also set a record in the auction, bringing in $24,000.00. The poster was printed in 1898 in Chicago, several years before Houdini became a star. The previous record for the image was $20,400.00.

The posters were two of some 1000 vintage lithographs from the collection of professional magician Norm Nielsen. Offered for sale on February 4th, 2017 as part of an auction entitled The Golden Age of Magic Posters, Part II, the posters were collected of the course of 25 years. The first sale from Nielsen’s collection was conducted in June of 2016. In all, the two auctions from Nielsen’s collection totaled of over $1,400,000.00.

Headquartered on the North side of Chicago, Potter & Potter is a full-service auction firm specializing in the sale of collectibles, rare books, and magic memorabilia.

For additional information, images, and details, contact:

Potter & Potter Auctions, Inc.

3759 N. Ravenswood. Ave. Suite 121 Chicago, IL 60613 www.potterauctions.com
Phone: 773-472-1442, Email: info@potterauctions.com

 

AUSTIN, Texas — Stories of inspiration, adaptation, innovation, confrontation, collaboration and even frustration can be found within the Harry Ransom Center’s extensive cultural collections.

From Feb. 6 to July 16, the exhibition “Stories to Tell: Selections from the Harry Ransom Center” features more than 250 items from the collections. Exclusively drawn from the Center’s holdings, the exhibition provides insight into the creative process while also establishing meaningful, personal connections between the past and the present.

“The Ransom Center’s rich holdings highlight the struggles, the complexity and the rewards of creative work in literature, art, photography, film and the performing arts,” said Cathy Henderson, associate director for education and exhibitions at the Ransom Center. “Through telling these stories, this exhibition unlocks and illuminates the profoundly human reach of archives.”

Visitors will discover:

What ties Homer’s “The Odyssey” to James Joyce’s “Ulysses”?

What made Nigerian author Amos Tutuola finally start writing books in his native language?

What forced famed painter and sculptor Henri Matisse to turn to collage for his art book “Jazz”?

Why was a “sugar coffin” sent to one of Hollywood’s biggest stars of the early 20th century?

What can a dance costume from the Ballets Russes production of “Narcisse” reveal?

How did Robert De Niro prepare for his performance in “Taxi Driver”?

What made the 1968 Democratic and Republican national conventions such great subjects for photographer David Douglas Duncan?

How did staffers from The Washington Post humanize figures involved in the Watergate scandal?

What social issues concerned artist Elizabeth Olds, the first woman to receive a Guggenheim fellowship?

How did author David Foster Wallace approach drafting and editing his work?

What did Harry Houdini and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle think about the afterlife?

The exhibition makes clear the interconnections between seemingly unrelated collections and illuminates how the Ransom Center acquires, preserves and makes these resources available to all. It also documents the creative process across different mediums and divulges the steps and efforts of artistic works, reminding us how the humanities enrich us.

“Stories to Tell” will be on view in the University of Texas at Austin’s Ransom Center Galleries on Mondays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with extended Thursday hours until 7 p.m. On Saturdays and Sundays the galleries are open from noon to 5 p.m. The exhibition is free and open to the public. Daily docent-led tours are offered at noon, Thursdays at 6 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays at 2 p.m.

NEW YORK, Feb 3, 2017 - In its 38th year, the Greenwich Village Antiquarian Book Fair is a West Village neighborhood tradition that brings together some of the world’s best known dealers, collectors, and community members to benefit PS3 The Charrette School. This year’s event will take place on Feb. 18-19 at the historic school. 

Those with a keen eye for rare and vintage books, first editions, ephemera, posters, art books, unique children’s books, manuscripts, and hard-to-find collections are sure to uncover something coveted. Collectors will be on hand to help everyone navigate the items for sale, and no previous knowledge is necessary.

“We’re thrilled to gather some of the world’s preeminent dealers under one roof for a fair that has become a touchstone of this tightknit community,” said Marvin Getman, founder of Book and Paper Fairs, who is managing this year’s event. “While the fair has its roots in this neighborhood, it’s an opportunity for anyone with an interest in starting or growing a collection, or finding a one-of-a-kind gift.”

The Greenwich Village Antiquarian Book Fair is one of many fundraisers that help to provide exceptional academic and extracurricular activities for students in grades pre-k through 5.

“We’re thrilled to have ‘Russian Avant-Garde’ by Rare-Paper, a first time dealer at the Fair, as well as a Book Making Workshop for kids Sunday 1-2pm by Esther K. Smith, author of making books with kids” said Aari Ludvigsen, a PS3 parent who is organizing this year’s fair. 

The public is welcome to visit the fair on Saturday, Feb. 18, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and on Sunday, Feb. 19, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $10 per person on Saturday, and $5 on Sunday. Children under 16 are free. The school is located at 490 Hudson St.

ABOUT BOOK AND PAPER FAIRS

Lexington, Mass.-based Book and Paper Fairs specializes in the production  of rare book and ephemera fairs in the Northeast United States. The company organizes notable events such as the New York City Book and Ephemera Fair, the Ephemera 37 Fair in Greenwich, Conn., the Boston West Book Print and Ephemera Fair, the Granite State Book and Ephemera Fair in Concord, N.H., the Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair with the new Works on Paper Gallery, and the Boston Book Print and Ephemera Fair.

Dealers interested in participating in the 38th Annual Greenwich Village Antiquarian Book Fair may contact Marvin Getman at info@bookandpaperfairs.com

ABOUT PS3

The first public school known as PS3 was established in the 1820s, when the visiting Marquis de Lafayette toured this model of progressive American education. The current PS3, also known as the John Melser Charrette School, was founded in 1971 as a progressive and experimental school. The PS3 of today came into being through a community workshop process known as a charrette, at which parents and other community members, teachers, administrators, public officials, social planners, and educational consultants arrived at a vision of child-centered learning in open multi-age classrooms, with a nonhierarchical structure, active parent involvement, and an emphasis on the arts. 

For more information about PS3 The Charrette School, please visit http://www.ps3nyc.org/

For more information about the book fair, please visit The website is www.gvabf.com

London, 1 February 2017: Today, The Folio Society and House of Illustration are thrilled to announce the longlist for the annual Book Illustration Competition (#BIC2017).

Now in its seventh year, The Book Illustration Competition is a partnership between The Folio Society and House of Illustration. To date, the competition has distributed nearly £45,000 worth of prizes and has received thousands of entries.

From hundreds of excellent entries, 23 have been selected for the longlist for 2017. The winner will receive a prestigious £5,000 commission from The Folio Society to illustrate their new edition of Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park, and the five other entrants who complete the shortlist will each receive £500. As part of the Book Illustration Competition’s committment to nurturing new talent, the judging panel ensures that students form part of the shortlist.

The difficult task of selecting the longlist fell to Sheri Gee, Art Director at The Folio Society, and Colin McKenzie, Director of House of Illustration.

Sheri Gee noted the skill of this year’s entrants in fitting with Folio’s other Austen titles: ‘The entrants did a fantastic job of working with our existing series style, producing binding designs that would work seamlessly in our Jane Austen series. It’s no mean feat to adapt to a 2-colour, graphic style for a binding, particularly when the illustration style is more fluid or painterly. Well done, all.’

‘The process of judging the longlist was, as ever, a fascinating one,’ said Colin McKenzie. ‘We particularly enjoyed the wide range of different approaches taken and have a very strong longlist.’

Entries were received from 26 countries including the USA, Malaysia, Latvia and India, and 30% of them were from students. All 23 of the longlisted entries will be on display at House of Illustration, Kings Cross, London, alongside an exhibition of ten artists’ work already published by The Folio Society from 11 February to 12 March 2017.

This year also sees the introduction of a stand alone Visitors’ Choice award, voted for both at the exhibition and online (www.houseofillustration.org.uk/BIC-visitors-choice-award). The Visitors’ Choice can be selected from any of the longlisted entries.The winning artist and one member of the public who voted for them will select £100 worth of books from The Folio Society and a one-year membership to House of Illustration.

The winner and shortlist will be selected from the longlist by eminent historian and authority on all things Austen, Lucy Worsley; Sheri Gee, Art Director and Tom Walker, Editorial Director both from The Folio Society; Colin McKenzie, Director and Olivia Ahmad, Curator both from House of Illustration and Alan Marks, winner of the 2016 Book Illustration Competition. The awards will be announced and presented by Lucy Worsley at an exclusive ceremony at House of illustration on 23 February 2017.

1. Radegund_Life and Office_Poitiers_1496-1500_f.8_Feast copy.jpegThis year at TEFAF Maastricht, Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books will exhibit four exquisite examples of royal manuscripts made in the 15th and 16th centuries, including the entire Book of Joshua from the first edition of the Gutenberg Bible, the largest fragment of the ‘Book of Books’ still on the market.

The importance of the Gutenberg Bible lies in its revolutionary use of printing with moveable type. This technique was developed around 1455 by the goldsmith John Gensfleisch from Gutenberg, and his discovery changed the world in ways that even Gutenberg’s contemporaries (judging from their remarks and statements) hardly comprehended.

The other three notable manuscripts brought to TEFAF by Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books come from the royal collections of two bibliophile French Kings: Charles VIII (1470-98) and King Louis XII (1462-1515). These books were commissioned at a time when menacing forecasts like disturbing sky phenomena, monstrously malformed animals, and other evil omens strengthened the belief that doomsday was imminent.

The first of these three, Life of St. Redgund including her Office, Mass, and Miracles and accompanied by dedicatory poems, is a manuscript in French and Latin, illuminated by the Master of St. Radegund and made for King Charles VIII and his wife Anne de Bretagne. The manuscript was made in Poitiers, France, presumably between 1496-98.

Illuminated by the Poitevin miniaturist dubbed the Master of Radegund, the manuscript is richly illustrated with eleven large miniatures in a crisp and accurate style recalling the works of the renowned illuminator Robinet Testard. The miniature illustrated above alludes especially to Radegund’s charity and humanitarianism. During a profuse banquet the king is served at the table while Radegund stands at the castle gate, feeding the poor and the lepers. Radegund was consecrated as a saint in the 9th century. This manuscript is of prime importance to the history of France.

Heraldry and emblems suggest that this manuscript was made for Charles VIII and later adjusted for Anne of Brittany. Shortly before the creation of this book, the heir to the throne, Charles Orlando, died from measles at the age of three. It is in this context that the author expresses the particularly touching wish that the queen might give birth to a “beautiful crown prince”.

The next manuscript, from the personal library of Louis XII, is a gorgeous Book of Hours with extraordinary illustrations. Created in France, c. 1500-1505. The royal coat of arms and two monograms with a double L, and the roman numbers X and II point to the royal owner. This book boasts fifteen full-page compositions, with small scenes in the borders marking the most important texts. Fifteen smaller miniatures illustrate the Gospel lectures and the suffrages of the saints. Pictured here is a painting showing the betrayal of Judas. The main scene shows the traitor, who is garbed in bright yellow as a symbol of his evil spirit, receiving the thirty pieces of silver. The outer border depicts him embracing Christ and the bas-de-page portrays the soldiers falling down scared and paralysed when Christ answers them: “I am he”.

Finally, Dr. Günther Rare Books is delighted to present Complaintes de la Foy, a manuscript written in French, on vellum, by ‘Nachier’, an otherwise unrecorded poet and

illuminated by the Master of the Entry of François I. Like the St. Radegonde manuscript, the text of this beautiful manuscript is very rare and unusual. In the text, the personification of Faith summons all “good Christians” to take part in a crusade against the Ottomans. Created in Lyon (c. 1504-1506), the manuscript’s one large introductory miniature shows Faith dressed in a black habit like a nun, kneeling and pleading before the apparition of God. In her hands, she holds a chalice with the host. A group of sophisticated and elaborately garbed noblemen observing the scene. King Louis XII is portrayed as the group’s leader, as indicated by his banner and his caparison.

Image: Jean Bouchet (?), Life of St. Radegund, illuminated by the Master of St. Radegund. France, Poitiers, presumably made in 1496-98. 260 x 180, vellum, 66 leaves (complete), 1 full-page and 10 almost full-page miniatures.

 

LCC17_870.jpgSAN MARINO, Calif.—The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens announced today that it has acquired a unique 10-volume edition of The Life and Writings of John Muir (1916-1924) that incorporates 260 original photographs—most by Herbert W. Gleason (1855-1937), a nature photographer who inspired the work of Ansel Adams. The items were purchased at The Huntington’s 20th annual Library Collectors’ Council meeting held last month.

The Council also purchased A Monograph on the Genus Camellia (1819), an outsize volume containing sumptuous hand-colored aquatint plates after watercolors by Clara Maria Pope (d. 1838), one of a small number of women in England who pursued an artistic career in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

Additional purchases included manuscripts by a close member of Galileo’s circle and by a U.S. Revolutionary War officer, as well as a genealogical roll of arms from the Elizabethan era.

“During the past two decades, the Library Collectors’ Council has helped us acquire more than 100 significant items—including rare books, individual manuscripts, archival collections, and photographs—and spent nearly $3.9 million doing so,” said David Zeidberg, Avery Director of the Library at The Huntington. “We are enormously grateful to the Council for their generous support over the years.”

The Library Collectors’ Council is a group of 43 families who assist in the development of the collections by supporting the purchase of important works that the Library would not otherwise be able to afford.

Highlights of the newly purchased materials:

John Muir, Herbert W. Gleason, and the portrayal of American landscapes

William F. Badé (1871-1936), extra illustrated 10-volume edition of The Life and Writings of John Muir (1916-1924), incorporating 10 color frontispieces, 10 handwritten manuscripts and 260 original photographs by Herbert W. Gleason (1855-1937). New York: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1916-1924. 

The Huntington’s deluxe, one-of-a-kind edition of The Life and Writings of John Muir includes an original Muir manuscript and a color frontispiece in each of the set’s 10 volumes, as well as 260 original photographs, most of them by Gleason. It is an important addition to The Huntington’s extensive collections in early environmentalism and in early California photography, which include works by Carleton E. Watkins, Edward Weston, and Ansel Adams, and sets the stage for the role of fine art photography in service to the preservationist cause.

Throughout his life, Scottish-born naturalist and philosopher John Muir possessed an unquenchable passion for nature. By the time of his death in 1914, many Americans sympathized with his vision of the everlasting unity of all living things and endorsed the necessity of preserving wild spaces. Muir’s tireless championing of the Yosemite Valley and California’s Sierra Nevada contributed to securing them as part of the Golden State’s legacy of natural wonders.

“Muir was an assiduous student of all things living and poet laureate of California’s forests, lakes, and mountains—as well as an unswerving advocate of wilderness,” said Peter J. Blodgett, H. Russell Smith Foundation Curator of Western American History. “He exemplified a radical transformation in the perspective through which humans envisioned the natural world.”

Herbert W. Gleason (1855-1937) A Snow-Banner, ca. 1911, platinum print in William Frederic Badè’s The Writings of John Muir, The Mountains of California, pt. 1, vol. 4. New York: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1916-1924.

Following Muir’s death, his daughters asked his good friend William F. Badé, a faculty member at the University of California, to prepare an edition of their father’s principal literary works. Published by Houghton Mifflin between 1916 and 1924, the 10-volume set involved the collaboration of Gleason, another close friend of Muir’s. 

Gleason was based in Massachusetts but spent much of his adult life traveling around North America with a camera and notebook. An extended visit to California and the High Sierra in the summer of 1907 brought him into contact with Muir, and a meaningful association was born. Gleason went on to become one of the most capable and prolific nature photographers of the early 20th century.

“While this unique assemblage of The Life and Writings of John Muir was perhaps created at the behest of a subscriber, research suggests that its inspiration came from Gleason himself,” said Jennifer Watts, curator of photography and visual culture. “The photographer’s imagery influenced a range of early practitioners, including a young Ansel Adams, and its eloquence is on powerful display.”

The grandest of camellia books 

Samuel Curtis (1779-1860), A Monograph on the Genus Camellia, with illustrations by Clara Maria Pope (d. 1838). London: John and Arthur Arch, 1819. 

A Monograph on the Genus Camellia is a landmark work of horticultural literature that contains what are probably Clara Maria Pope’s best-known botanical illustrations.

Pope’s first husband, Francis Wheatley (1747-1801), was a portrait, landscape, and genre painter, and his debts prompted Pope herself to turn to art to support their family. She taught drawing and sold her own art as well, sending her first painting to the Royal Academy in 1796 and continuing to exhibit there until the year of her death. After 1812, she devoted herself almost exclusively to flower painting and botanical art, in which she excelled.

Pope’s vivid watercolors of camellias were engraved for A Monograph on the Genus Camellia, with text by Samuel Curtis (1779-1860), the son-in-law of William Curtis (1746-1799), founding editor of Botanical Magazine. The plant had been cultivated in England since before 1739, and the monograph lists the 29 camellias known there at the time of publication. Curtis discusses in full the 11 varieties of Japan Rose illustrated in Pope’s five flamboyant yet scientifically informative plates, as well as the propagation and culture of camellias. Sitwell and Blunt’s Great Flower Books, 1700-1900 calls the publication “one of the earliest and probably the best of all the great camellia books.”

“Curtis and Pope’s splendid volume exemplifies The Huntington’s trinity of books, art, and gardens,” said Claudia Funke, chief curator and associate director of library collections.

The Huntington has one of the most comprehensive collections of camellia plants in the world, including nearly 80 species and 1,200 cultivars. Extensive library holdings enhance the plant’s study, most notably more than 100 rare camellia books.

Pope’s achievements are also in context with The Huntington’s outstanding British art collection, which holds more than a dozen works by her first husband, Francis Wheatley, including a pair of group portraits on display in the dining room of the Huntington Art Gallery.

Scientific manuscript by a close member of Galileo’s circle

Philosophia Naturalis, manuscript consisting of lectures delivered by Carlo Rinaldini (1615-1698) at the University of Padua, ca. 1680. 

Philosophia Naturalis (ca. 1680) consists of the texts of lectures given by Galileo’s friend and colleague Carlo Rinaldini (1615-1698) at the University of Padua. The manuscript contains discussions of Galileo’s work as well as an account of Rinaldini’s own important discoveries, including that of the convection of heat.

“Rinaldini is an important transitional figure, presenting Aristotelian ideas alongside those of the ‘new science’ of Galileo and his supporters,” said Daniel Lewis, Dibner Senior Curator of Science, Medicine, and Technology. “He was intellectually bold—no easy task in the political climate of the era in Italy, which just a few decades earlier had seen Galileo placed under house arrest.”

The manuscript, Lewis added, provides deep and rich content for scholars studying the 17th century, astronomy, experimentation, the social and cultural ramifications of the Copernican revolution, Italian science, lecture notes, and watermarks.

The text covers scientific experiments, the nature of the heavens, and an analysis of other competing worldviews. Among the authors Rinaldini cites and discusses are Brahe, Barrow, Borelli, Boyle, Copernicus, Descartes, Gassendi, Kepler, Riccioli, and Torricelli.

16th-century Palmer family genealogical roll of arms

Palmer Family Genealogical Roll of Arms signed by Robert Cooke, Clarenceaux King of Arms, ca.1575-1584, parchment, 8.5 feet in length. 

This parchment roll—composed of four membranes pasted together to form a document 8.5 feet long—claims to display the ancestry of the Palmer family from the 11th or 12th century into the Elizabethan period.

“While English families liked to take heraldic sources as gospel, scholars are far less trusting, understanding these pedigrees were frequently inventions of the imagination,” said Vanessa Wilkie, William A. Moffett Curator of Medieval Manuscripts and British History. “Historians are taking new interest in heraldic documents, family pedigrees, and family archives to better understand the complex relationship between family honor, family image, and political authority.”

In 1555, Queen Elizabeth re-established the College of Arms by royal charter. She appointed three kings of arms and six heralds empowered to verify the ancestral claims of aristocratic families and their rights to display arms. Heraldic shields were the symbols of elite power, and in the second half of the 16th century, rising gentry families were eager to prove that they, too, had these rights.

In the 1570s, the Palmer family of Gloucestershire were the model rising gentry family. William Palmer served as the Gentleman Pensioner to King Henry VIII, and by 1575, his nephew, 25-year-old Edward Palmer, was the patriarch of the family. Edward was a wealthy landowner and is likely the person who commissioned his family’s heraldic roll in the 1570s, but it was given elevated status when the controversial Clarenceaux King of Arms Robert Cooke signed the bottom of it, thus giving Palmer the documentation he needed to solidify his family’s place in the social order.

“Perhaps not surprisingly, families were willing to forge pedigrees, and many kings of arms and heralds were all too easily bribed to lend their endorsements to fabricated rolls,” said Wilkie.

In 2005, the Library Collectors’ Council purchased another one of Robert Cooke’s heraldic manuscripts—the pedigree book of the Earls of Leicester, which celebrates an established nobleman, Robert Dudley. In contrast, the Palmer family roll demonstrates Cooke’s validation of a rising country family. When combined, these two manuscripts expand scholarly understanding of the work of one of the most notorious heralds of the 16th century.

The Huntington has one of the most important collections of English heraldic sources, both print and manuscript, outside of the United Kingdom.

18th-century American manuscript regarding the divinity of Jesus

Lewis Nicola (1717-1804), Divinity of Jesus Christ, ca. 1794-1795. 

Divinity of Jesus Christ (ca. 1794-95) is an unpublished and previously unknown manuscript by Lewis Nicola (1717-1807), the founder of the Continental Army’s Corps of Invalids. In 1781, Nicola became beset by religious doubts. At the time, he was stationed at West Point, which he described as “a small country town,” and had with him only his copy of the Bible; having read it twice, he came to doubt the divinity of Jesus Christ.

“This manuscript, an extremely rare example of a theological study penned by an American man of the Enlightenment, is a new and untapped source for the studies of the rich religious and intellectual life of the Early Republic,” said Olga Tsapina, Norris Foundation Curator of American History. “It adds a new dimension to the history of American 18th-century religiosity, which mostly relies on the writings of ministers or religious testimony generated by religious revivals. The manuscript capped an important if largely unknown debate that involved Joseph Priestly, the world-famous scientist and founder of the Unitarian Church. It is a rational examination of scripture predating another example of such an endeavor, Thomas Jefferson’s Bible.”

During the Revolutionary War, Nicola served as the commander of Philadelphia’s garrison and published military manuals “calculated for the use of Americans.” After Congress accepted his proposal to establish a corps that would employ veterans unfit for active duty, Nicola spent the next five years as the commander of the Corps of Invalids in charge of guarding hospitals and military stores and collecting intelligence.

Nicola’s claim to fame stems from his controversial letter to George Washington on May 22, 1781, suggesting that because the Continental Congress was so dysfunctional, veterans should be governed by a British-style “mixed government.” The letter, which received a sharply worded rebuke from Washington, was the first episode in the wave of discontent that culminated in the Newburgh conspiracy in March 1783. It also overshadowed the rest of Nicola’s remarkable career.

“Amazingly, there is no known body of Nicola’s papers, apart from his Revolutionary War correspondence in the George Washington papers at the Library of Congress and some military papers left with the War Department,” said Tsapina. “Divinity of Jesus Christ is the only manuscript of Nicola’s that has come to light since he died, destitute, in August 1807.”

Image: From L-R: Herbert W. Gleason (1855-1937) A Snow-Banner, ca. 1911, platinum print in William Frederic Badè’s The Writings of John Muir, The Mountains of California, pt. 1, vol. 4. New York: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1916-1924; Samuel Curtis (1779-1860), A Monograph on the Genus Camellia, with illustrations by Clara Maria Pope (d. 1838). London: John and Arthur Arch, 1819. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

A charming exhibit of animals pictured in law books opens February 1, courtesy of the Yale Law Library's Rare Book Collection. Titled "Woof, Moo & Grr: A Carnival of Animals in Law Books," the exhibit is narrated from the perspective of the animals themselves and is aimed at animal lovers of all ages.

Twenty books from around the world will be on display, more than half of them printed before the nineteenth century and the earliest published in 1529. They feature illustrations of a wide variety of animals that visitors may be surprised to find in the pages of serious legal literature.

The exhibition is curated by Mark S. Weiner, a writer, filmmaker, and professor on leave from Rutgers Law School. Weiner holds a J.D. from Yale Law School and a Ph.D. in American Studies from Yale University.

"Law is a serious business," said Weiner, "which is why it's important to find a chance to laugh. The exhibit looks at the different roles that animals play in legal literature, and it quietly explores the relation between law and the imagination."

"Woof, Moo & Grr" is on display from February 1 through May 31, 2017, in the Rare Book Exhibition Gallery, Level L2, in the Lillian Goldman Law Library, Yale Law School, at 127 Wall Street in New Haven. It is open to the general public 10am-6pm, seven days a week, and open to Yale affiliates until 10pm.

The images and text from the exhibit are also available online, in the Rare Book Collection's Flickr site, at  <https://www.flickr.com/photos/yalelawlibrary/albums/72157676683194536>.

The Rare Book Collection at Yale Law Library is one of the outstanding collections of historical law books and manuscripts in North America. The growing collection stands at more than 50,000 volumes and hosts an active exhibition program.

633c1204f0a1cd6f1e0567d439689785b9633252.pngA postcard sent by Alan Turing to a psychiatrist friend in Manchester will be auctioned by Boston-based RR Auction.

Addressed to Dr. Franz Greenbaum and his children, it was sent by Turing from his Club Mediterranee holiday on Corfu, in July 23, 1953.

Reads in full: "I hope you are all enjoying your selves as well as I am here at Corfu. It is tremendously hot and one wears bathing things all day."

The front of the rare color postcard depicts an illuminated manuscript from Flavius Josephus' Antiquities of the Jews.

The first-century Romano-Jewish scholar Flavius Josephus, who commanded the Jewish forces at the Siege of Yodfat, is the namesake of the ‘Josephus Problem’ in computer science. Josephus describes a ‘counting-out game’ by which he and his soldiers, facing inevitable defeat, agreed upon an unusual suicide pact rather than surrender.

Standing in a circle, the first soldier killed the man to his left. The next surviving soldier then killed the man to his left, and this pattern continued until Josephus was the lone survivor.

The problem is thus: faced with the same situation, how could you determine where to position yourself in order to be the last man standing?

“Turing, who was fascinated by these types of algorithmic puzzles, surely knew of the ‘Josephus Problem’ and it is likely the reason he chose this specific postcard,” said Robert Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction.

Turing became a patient of the Jungian psychologist Dr. Franz Greenbaum in 1952, and became a friend of the family; in a letter from July 10th, he had written to the doctor's daughter, Maria Greenbaum, about solving a solitaire puzzle.  

In Sara Turing's pioneering 1959 biography of her son she noted that he 'normally shirked letter-writing,' and his autograph is indeed incredibly scarce in any form.

Among other items featured in the auction:

Thomas Edison signed document selling the rights to his very first successful invention—the electro-magnetic printing telegraph.

Striking 1934 Albert Einstein etching signed by subject and artist.

Robert Fulton original diagram drawing of a cross-section of a torpedo flintlock detonator in ink and watercolor. 

Albert Einstein letter where he laments his inability to help create “a special teaching post for atomic mechanics.”

The Fine Autographs And Artifacts from RR Auction began on January 20 and will conclude on February 8. More details can be found online at www.rrauction.com

[ITHACA, NY] National Book Auctions, located in Ithaca, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog.  

This catalog features rare, antique and decorative books as well as select additions of ephemera. We will offer a rare copy of Mark Twain's "1601" along with a sizeable private library of decorative antique leather bindings. Special printings and important signed items will also be presented.          

Antique and rare books in this catalog include numerous titles. Leading the group is one of the elusive copies of the Derrydale Press publishing of Mark Twain's "1601, Being a Fireside Conversation in Ye Time of Ye Goode Queene Bess," produced in 1926 and limited to 100 copies. Among the other early offerings, examples include the 1676 printing of Cave's "Antiquitates Apostolicae," featuring engraved plates, Pliny the Elder's "Naturalis Historiae Libri XXXVII," published in five volumes in 1685, and the works of Jonathan Swift with supplement, printed in fourteen volumes over the years 1755 through 1779. Additional rare pieces include signed examples of Berkeley Breathed titles from the celebrated "Bloom County" series, and the 1878 printing of Hamerton's "Etching and Etchers," containing original drawings and a signature by Charles Jay Taylor.                       

Several pleasing collections will also be showcased. Highlighted is a substantial array of decorative antique bindings, including many signed bindings. Fancy leather sets such as works by Thackeray, Cooper and Dickens will be sold along with many privately-bound tomes containing classic literature and poetry, history, books-on-books, theology and other genres. Vintage and antique titles from estate collections also include works from subject areas such as travel & exploration, history of the American West, philosophy, music & art, history of New York City and State, medicine, the Far East, and natural history, to name a few.   

Found throughout this catalog are interesting group offerings and ephemera lots. Ephemera offered includes antique billheads and correspondence, antique magazines (individual issues and bound compilations), along with a private collection of books and items reportedly belonging to a former mistress of Vladimir Nabokov.    

National Book Auctions is a public auction service specializing in books, ephemera, and art. National Book Auctions is a targeted service offering experience and expertise unique to marketing antique and modern books and ephemera for consignors and collectors alike. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of collectible, signed, and first edition books. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-269-0101 or email mail@nationalbookauctions.com.

Lot-16 copy.jpgNew York—On Thursday, January 26, Swann Galleries opened their 2017 season with a landmark sale of Alphonse Mucha & Masters of Art Nouveau: The Harry C. Meyerhoff Collection, the largest private collection of works by the artist and his circle ever to come to auction. Of the over 200 posters, sketches and ephemera, more than half of which were by Mucha; many of the pieces were unique, previously unrecorded, or had never before appeared at auction.

Swann President and Principal Auctioneer Nicholas D. Lowry, who is also the director of the Vintage Posters department, sold works to a packed room, with all bidding phones occupied. All but one of 136 offered works by Mucha found new homes, leading to a 93% sell-through rate for the entire sale. Mr. Lowry noted, “By all metrics the auction was a huge success. It was the highest sell-through rate of any major posters sale anywhere in the world since 1999.”

The top lot of the sale was the complete set of five volumes of Les Maîtres de l’Affiche, which was published periodically in Paris from 1896 to 1900. The art critic Roger Marx compiled what he believed to be the best Art Nouveau posters of the time from Europe and the U.S., with full-color lithographs of works Jules Chéret, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Théophile Alexandre Steinlen, Mucha and others. This set, in its original binding designed by Paul Berthon, was purchased by an institution for $47,500*.

The highest-value lot by Mucha was a rare set of silk panels depicting allegories of The Seasons, 1900. The designs mark a shift in the artist’s style away from pastels and towards realism. The set garnered $35,000. Other examples of Mucha’s work printed on fabric were two red panels, one on satin and one on velveteen. The satin example more than doubled its high estimate to sell for $7,500.

Many posters made their auction debut, including the ethereal Parfumerie Gellé Frères / Sylvanis Essence, 1899, in its scarce pre-text format ($27,500), and Krinogen, an unusual circular advertisement, circa 1928, which was purchased by a collector for $2,500.

One outstanding section of the sale was a run of original sketches for Documents Décoratifs and Figures Décoratifs, two books of guides by Mucha for people to decorate their homes in an Art Nouveau style. Each of the eight sketches by Mucha sold for several times their high estimates, with the highlight being a single circa 1902 pencil sketch that sold for $15,000, above a high estimate of $2,000.

All seven of the offered posters Mucha designed for the actress Sarah Bernhardt performed well, led by the dramatic life-size depiction of Medee / Sarah Bernhardt, 1898, which sold to a collector for $23,750. Bernhardt helped to launch the artist’s career when she commissioned him to create a poster for her 1894 production of Gismonda, which was so successful she reused the design in her 1896 Sarah Bernhardt / American Tour ($6,000). Another Bernhardt highlight was the 1908 Leslie Carter, which fetched $18,750, a record for the work, above a high estimate of $7,500.

Several works in the sale broke previous auction records, including a La Vague, 1897, by Privat-Livemont. The previous record for the well-known work, which was heavily inspired by Japanese Ukiyo-e prints, was $5,760, set in 2012; the new record is $9,375.

“With 93% of lots sold, this proved to be our most successful poster sale by lot and our third best by value,” said Mr. Lowry later that day. “We had the highest attendance we’ve ever had at a preview, a standing-room only special event, a full auction room and active bidding on almost all of the lots. As an auctioneer I can only say that every aspect of the auction was a pleasure, and that our diligent work was validated by such strong numbers is an extra pleasure.” He added, “It was a real event, in the old-fashioned sense of an auction being an event.”

Harry C. Meyerhoff was the owner of champion racehorse “Spectacular Bid” and a vintage poster collector based in Easton, Maryland. He began collecting fin de siècle posters in the 1970s with his wife and soon turned his focus to Alphonse Mucha. His main advisor for the collection was William J. Tomlinson, the highly regarded Baltimore art dealer and appraiser. Harry C. Meyerhoff died on February 11, 2016 at the age of 86.

The next auction of Vintage Posters at Swann Galleries will be held on March 16, 2017. For more information, or to consign materials to future sales, contact Nicholas D. Lowry at posters@swanngalleries.com or via phone (212) 254-4710, ext. 57.

Image: Lot 16 Les Maîtres de l'Affiche, complete set of five volumes, in Paul Berthon binding, Paris, 1896-1900. Sold January 26, 2017 for $47,500. (Pre-sale estimate: $35,000 to $50,000)

55a Foringer Abundan#8724A3 copy.jpgThe paper money we handle every day depicts familiar portraits of presidents and statesmen, but how many people know that a woman's portrait was once a standard likeness on federal currency?  Or that a notorious showgirl's portrait was engraved for bond coupons?  Or that a portrait of one of Queen Victoria's daughters was turned into "Young America" for use on stock certificates?  The exhibition Images of Value: The Artwork Behind U.S. Security Engraving 1830s-1980s, on public view at the Grolier Club from February 22 to April 29, 2017, presents a rare look behind the images that appeared on bank notes and securities produced in the United States for over 150 years. 

For the first time visitors can see a remarkable range of original wash drawings and paintings, period photographs and prints used to engrave the images on documents of value for the United States and countries ranging from Argentina to China to Spain, along with the documents on which the resulting engravings appeared.  The exhibition is primarily from the holdings of Mark D. Tomasko, a private collector, scholar, and researcher who documents the engravers, artists, designers, and bank note firms.  

Much news has been made in recent months about portraits of women coming to U.S. federal paper money, but in reality it’s a case of women coming back to federal paper money. Martha Washington’s portrait was a constant presence on US Silver Certificates from 1886 to the turn-of-the-century, and possible sources for the image used are on display along with the Silver Certificates on which she appeared.

Before the Civil War banks were chartered by the states, and most local banks issued their own bank notes. This created a large demand for quality paper money and gave rise to a thriving group of bank note engraving firms, effectively making the U.S. the world leader in security engraving by the late 1850s.  

Exquisite miniature drawings by Asher B. Durand, George W. Hatch, Henry Inman, and Thomas Birch illustrate the era when artwork needed to be drawn in a very small size to be engraved.  Photography later liberated the artwork from the miniature size (the art could be photo-reduced to the size to be engraved).  The result was the golden age of wash drawings, 1850s-1870s, with marvelous allegorical and genre drawings by American artists including the outstanding F. O. C. Darley, whose drawings of the American scene set a high standard.  Featured in the exhibition are Darley's drawings of Union Civil War soldiers, and some of his genre subjects.  Other noted artists shown for this era include James D. Smillie and Walter Shirlaw. 

American and European prints of the mid- and late-nineteenth century include several remarkable mid-century French chromolithographs of female heads, an art engraving of one of Queen Victoria’s daughters (turned into a security engraving entitled “Young America”!), a large theater poster, and a large print of Rosa Bonheur’s Horse Fair (one of the largest paintings in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, at 8’ x 16’).  Horse Fair became an engraving 1 ½” x 3 ½” and was used on documents as diverse as an 1870s Bolivian bank note and an 1880s New York City street railway bond.

By the twentieth century photographs became more commonly used as the artwork source for bank note picture engravings.  On view are photographs of Chinese subjects turned into engravings on bank notes for China but produced by American bank note firms.  Other period photos used for engravings include a large panorama of Lower Manhattan in 1904 and a portrait of Evelyn Nesbit, the “girl in the red velvet swing” who became a decorative engraving for coupon bonds.

Alonzo E. Foringer, a muralist who had worked for Edwin Blashfield, is a star of the show, with his large oil paintings of allegorical females produced from the 1910s to the 1940s.  The finest picture engravers created the best allegorical engravings of the twentieth century from Foringer’s work, a marriage of engraving and art that has never been equaled.  Known today primarily for a World War I Red Cross poster, Foringer’s real achievement is his bank note art, which graced the stocks and bonds of hundreds of U.S. companies and at least 50 bank notes of foreign banks and governments. 

Robert Lavin followed Foringer and became the second greatest security engraving artist of the twentieth century, working in the 1960s-1980s.  His allegorical paintings, and paintings of working people (perhaps best described as “Capitalist Realism”), became the leading picture engravings for stocks and bonds in the later twentieth century.  Some examples of other artists’ work of the 1950s and 1960s are also shown in the exhibition.

CATALOGUE:

The exhibition Images of Value: the Artwork Behind U.S. Security Engraving 1830s-1980s, sponsored by the Grolier Club’s Committee on Prints, Drawings, and Photographs, is accompanied by a full-color catalogue with a preface by William H. Gerdts. 

PUBLIC EVENTS:

Free Lunchtime Exhibition Tours led by curator Mark Tomasko: February 22, March 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29, 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm. 

Illustrated Talk by the curator followed by a Panel Discussion on the Artwork Behind U.S. Security Engraving: Tuesday, March 7, 2017, 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm. 

ABOUT THE GROLIER CLUB: 

Founded in 1884, the Grolier Club of New York is America’s oldest and largest society for bibliophiles and enthusiasts in the graphic arts.  Named for Jean Grolier, the Renaissance collector renowned for sharing his library with friends, the Grolier Club’s objective is to foster the study, collecting, and appreciation of books and works on paper.

VISITING THE GROLIER CLUB: 

47 E. 60th Street, New York, NY  10022

212-838-6690

Hours: Monday-Saturday, 10 AM to 5 PM

Admission: Open to the public free of charge

www.grolierclub.org 

Image: Alonzo E. Foringer. [Standing female with wheat and scythe]. Oil on canvas, 30 x 30.” For American Bank Note Company, 1927. Collection of Mark D. Tomasko.

f98fcc62-8473-4ad2-9939-84c2007dfd15.jpgTaking as its focus one of The Met's most captivating masterpieces, this thematic exhibition affords a unique context for appreciating the heritage and allure of Circus Sideshow (Parade de cirque), painted in 1887-88, by Georges Seurat (1859-91). Anchored by a remarkable group of related works by Seurat that fully illuminates the lineage of the motif in his inimitable conté crayon drawings, the presentation explores the fascination the sideshow subject held for other artists in the 19th century, ranging from the great caricaturist Honoré Daumier at mid-century to the young Pablo Picasso at the fin de siècle. This rich visual narrative unfolds in a provocative display of more than 100 paintings, drawings, prints, period posters, and illustrated journals, supplemented by musical instruments and an array of documentary material intended to give a vivid sense of the seasonal fairs and traveling circuses of the day. Among the highlights is Fernand Pelez's epic Grimaces and Misery—The Saltimbanques (Petit Palais, Paris), of exactly the same date as Seurat's magisterial work and, with its life-size performers aligned in friezelike formation across a 20-foot stage, a match for his ambition. Seurat's Circus Sideshow will be on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, from February 17 to May 29, 2017.

The exhibition is made possible by the Janice H. Levin Fund, the Gail and Parker Gilbert Fund, and an Anonymous Foundation.

Circus Sideshow is one of only a half-dozen major figure compositions that date to Seurat's short career. More compact in scale and more evocative in expression than his other scenes of modern life—which he regarded as "toiles de lutte" (canvases of combat)—the painting effectively announced the Neo-Impressionist's next line of attack on old guard turf, signaling a shift in focus away from the sunlit banks of the Seine to the heart of urban Paris. Circus Sideshow initiated a final trio of works devoted to popular entertainment and led the fray as the first to tackle a nighttime setting with the benefit of his innovative technique, alternatively called pointillism or divisionism (the former term emphasizing the dotted brushwork, the latter, the theory behind separating, or dividing, color into discrete touches that would retain their integrity and brilliance). It was his singular experiment in painting outdoor, artificial illumination. The result is disarming. In relying on his finely tuned approach to evoke the effects of ethereal, penumbral light in this evening fairground scene of the Corvi Circus troupe and their public at the Gingerbread Fair in Paris, Seurat produced his most mysterious painting. From the time it debuted at the Salon des Indépendants in Paris in 1888, it has unfailingly intrigued, perplexed, and mesmerized its viewers. Seurat's closest associates, seemingly dumbstruck, largely confined their spare remarks to its novelty as a "nocturnal effect." The laconic artist never mentioned the picture.

Circus Sideshow depicts the free, teaser entertainment set up outside the circus tent to entice passersby to purchase tickets—known in French as a parade and loosely translated as the "come-on" or sideshow. At far right, customers queue up on the stairs to the box office. On the makeshift stage, under the misty glow of nine twinkling gaslights, five musicians, a ringmaster, and clown play to the assembled crowd of onlookers whose assorted hats add a wry and rhythmic note to the foreground of this austere and rigorously geometric composition. As viewers, we observe the show—as if from the rear of the audience, a part of the crowd. 

Seurat took a raucous spectacle that depended on direct appeal, the banter of barkers and rousing music, jostling crowds, and makeshift structures, and he silenced the noise, rendered the staging taut and ordered, hieratic and symmetrical, exquisitely measured and classically calm. Enveloped by the hazy gloom of night, the players and public are presented with the solemnity of an ancient ritual.

For all its uncommon beauty and striking invention, Circus Sideshow courts conventions and associations that were commonplace in representations of the parade. Throughout the 19th century it had been a stock motif in popular print culture, notably for social and political caricature, where it became an acute device for parodying politicians, who like saltimbanques, are trying to sell something. During the 1880s, the parade subject gained ground: it was given a contemporary edge by popular illustrators; it was painted with riveting descriptive detail by artists who sought success at the annual Paris Salon with works that had broad appeal; and it was mined, with spirited stylistic rivalry, by artists who jockeyed for position in the avant-garde. In the 1890s, the great era of the poster, the subject attracted a new wave of creative talents eager to establish their reputations through success in the commercial world. The poster was modern printing technology's extension of the time-honored parade; both functioned to pull the public into the show. The presentation brings this rich illustrated history to bear on Seurat's Circus Sideshow in a context designed to elucidate the genesis of his composition and to puzzle out the sources and parallels for his haunting and enigmatic work.

The exhibition is organized chronologically, with Circus Sideshow at center stage. It will be displayed in tandem with 17 works by Seurat that exceptionally reunite the painting with the conté crayon drawings most closely related to his conception, including preparatory studies, independent sheets that trace his exploration of the motif, and the glorious café-concert drawings that were shown alongside the picture at the Salon des Indépendants in 1888. The same venue featured Seurat's Models (Poseuses), now in The Barnes Foundation (and precluded from travel), which will be represented in the exhibition by the gemlike small version (private collection). This core group of works is seen with relation to contemporaneous images of the Corvi Circus and the Gingerbread Fair, offering a keen sense of time and place.

As the exhibition will highlight, through loans from nearly 50 public and private collections, Seurat's choice of subject attracted a steady stream of artists in the 19th century—from caricaturists, popular illustrators, and poster designers to painters of like ambition—determined to make their mark on the Paris art scene. Daumier, who set a powerful precedent at mid-century, is handsomely represented by satirical lithographs, as well as pithy paintings and watercolors that chart the saga of itinerant circus performers dependent on the fickle whims of the public. His pace-setting imagery and initiatives find a recurrent echo throughout the exhibition, which is punctuated by a veritable encore performance in the cast of players showcased in graphic works by Henri-Gabriel Ibels dating to the early 1890s. 

The appeal the parade motif held for Seurat's Parisian contemporaries will be seen to great effect.In addition to works by other vanguard artists, such as Louis Anquetin, Emile Bernard, Pierre Bonnard, Jules Chéret, Louis Hayet, Lucien Pissarro, and Paul Signac, or those on the cusp, such as Jean-Louis Forain and Jean-François Raffaëlli, the presentation features recently rediscovered pictures shown in the Paris Salons of 1884 and 1885, long lost from sight by artists little-known today, as well as the unprecedented showing in the United States of Fernand Pelez's monumental Grimaces and Misery—The Saltimbanques (Petit Palais, Paris), which was on view at the Salon of 1888, the same spring as Seurat's brooding masterpiece debuted at the Salon des Indépendants.

As a reminder that the "show goes on," the exhibition ends with early works by two artists who continued to explore the parade and its timeless portrayal of the pathos of comic spectacle well into the 20th century: Picasso's moody nighttime scene, Fairground Stall (Museu Picasso, Barcelona), painted on his first visit to Paris in 1900, and Georges Rouault's bravura Sideshow (Parade) of ca. 1907-10 (Centre Pompidou, Musée National d'Art Moderne, Paris).

Seurat's Circus Sideshow may be seen as the natural successor to exhibitions that have had as their focus other great paintings by the Neo-Impressionist artist: Seurat and The Bathers in 1997 at the National Gallery, London, and Seurat and the Making of La Grande Jatte at The Art Institute of Chicago in 2004. The scale and scope of The Met's presentation have been tailored to vivify a painting that is smaller in size and highly evocative in subject. The current one-venue show may also be appreciated with relation to other recent projects, such as Cézanne's Card Players (2011), Madame Cézanne (2014-15), and Van Gogh: Irises and Roses (2015) that have likewise furnished a fresh context for appreciating the heritage of best-known and loved 19th-century paintings in The Met's collection. 

Image: Georges Seurat (French, 1859-1891). Circus Sideshow (Parade de cirque), 1887-88. Oil on canvas. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Bequest of Stephen C. Clark, 1960.

1 ambrotype copy.jpgCONCORD, MA--(January 2017) -The Concord Museum today announced a year-long celebration of the Bicentennial of Henry David Thoreau’s birth. One of the world’s most original writers and thinkers (1817-1862), Thoreau is best remembered for living in a 10 x 15 foot house near Walden Pond, where he wrote Walden. In addition to being a great American author, Thoreau is renowned as a Transcendentalist, an abolitionist, a naturalist, a pioneer of ecological awareness and climate change, and an innovator of civil disobedience.

While the Bicentennial of Thoreau’s birth will be recognized world-wide and in his hometown of Concord, it is of special significance to the Concord Museum, which holds the world’s largest and most comprehensive collection of artifacts related to Henry Thoreau, including the simple green desk on which he wrote Walden.

David F. Wood, Concord Museum’s Curator and author of An Observant Eye: The Thoreau Collection at the Concord Museum, stated, “Thoreau’s Bicentennial is something of a family affair for the Concord Museum. Henry David Thoreau knew the Museum’s founder, and called the collection he had formed ‘our museum’. Thoreau should perhaps be considered the most sophisticated material cultural historian at work in the mid-nineteenth century.”

Margaret Burke, Executive Director of the Concord Museum, explained, “Two centuries after his birth, we believe that much can be learned from Thoreau and his perception of the world. Thoreau’s insistence on thinking, observing, and living deliberately continues to suggest frameworks for both understanding the past and navigating the present.”

To celebrate the Thoreau Bicentennial year, the Concord Museum has created a year-long initiative titled “BE THOREAU”, which includes a series of special exhibitions and public programming such as workshops, gallery talks, and children’s activities. Margaret Burke explained, “The series encourages us to explore Thoreau’s writings from historical and contemporary perspectives and we sincerely hope will inspire new generations.”

Beginning on February 10, 2017, the Concord Museum will launch the Thoreau Bicentennial celebration with a deeply personal exhibition by photographer Abelardo Morell. Walden: Four Views | Abelardo Morell will be on exhibit in the Concord Museum’s Wallace Kane Gallery through August 20, 2017. The exhibition will also be accompanied by a broad range of special programs. 

In collaboration with The Morgan Library & Museum, New York, and the Concord Museum, on September 29, 2017, This Ever New Self: Thoreau and His Journal, the most comprehensive exhibition ever devoted to the life of one of America’s most influential writers and thinkers, will open at the Concord Museum.

The newly-created exhibition, This Ever New Self: Thoreau and His Journal brings the remarkable holdings from the world’s two most significant Thoreau collections: journals, manuscripts, letters, and books, and field notes from The Morgan Library & Museum; and from the Concord Museum, unique personal items that have never before left Thoreau’s hometown, including the very desk on which he wrote his journal.

Every private journal tells the story of self. For his entire adult life, Thoreau filled notebook after notebook with his observations and reflections, strong in the belief that a closely examined life would yield infinite riches. His journal was his everyday companion, an essential tool for a mindful existence, and grist for Walden, one of the world’s most influential books. The exhibition takes Thoreau’s manuscript journal as a point of departure to introduce the many facets of this extraordinary man - the student, reader, writer, worker, thinker, Concord neighbor, and, above all, keen observer of the inner and outer world. It reveals how Thoreau used his journal as a place to cultivate - and constantly renew - his very own self. 

The Morgan Library & Museum, June 2- September 10, 2017

Concord Museum, September 29, 2017 - January 21, 2018           

About the Concord Museum: The Concord Museum is where all of Concord’s remarkable past is brought to life through an inspiring collection of historical, literary, and decorative arts treasures. Renowned for the 1775 Revere lantern and Henry Thoreau’s Walden desk, the Concord Museum is home to a nationally significant collection of American decorative arts, including clocks, furniture, and silver. Founded in 1886, the Museum is a gateway to historic Concord for visitors from around the world and a vital cultural resource for the town and region. www.concordmuseum.org

Image: 

Henry D. Thoreau, 1862

Edward Sidney (E.S.) Dunshee (1823-1907), New Bedford, Massachusetts

Ambrotype, leather, glass, velvet

3¾ x 3¼ x ¾, closed case; 2¾ x 2¼, oval image

Gift of Mr. Walton Ricketson and Miss Anna Ricketson (1929) Th33b

Objects from the Concord Museum Thoreau Collection

Photographs by David Bohl, courtesy Concord Museum

Kansas City, MO. Jan 26, 2017-Contemporary English photographer Richard Learoyd, using a large camera obscura in his East London studio, creates figure studies, portraits and still lifes that are neither glamorous nor retouched, yet they exude serene power along with mesmerizing detail. Richard Learoyd: In the Studio, an exhibition organized by the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles and curated by Arpad Kovacs, Assistant Curator in the Department of Photographs at the Getty, opens at The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City Feb. 10. Learoyd will be in Kansas City and in conversation with Photography Curator April M. Watson in Atkins Auditorium on Friday, Feb. 17 at 6 p.m., sponsored by The Photography Society. Tickets are free and can be reserved at www.nelson-atkins.org.

The exhibition includes 18 large-scale color photographs and two artist’s books.

“Richard Learoyd is internationally recognized as one of the most compelling contemporary photographers of our time,” said Julián Zugazagoitia, Menefee D. and Mary Louise Blackwell CEO & Director of the Nelson-Atkins. “His images convey both a psychological depth and a physical weight. We find in them the timeless qualities that make us human: strength, vulnerability, boredom, determination, confidence and shame.”

Learoyd’s process is as singular as the artist himself. Using a room-sized camera obscura, which is a dark chamber fitted with a lens, he creates an upside-down image and exposes it on a large sheet of light-sensitive paper. He then feeds the paper into a color-processing machine attached to the camera. Since the resulting print is not enlarged from a negative, each photograph is unique and exceptionally sharp. He admits his process is restrictive and labor-intensive.

“Learoyd creates visually seductive images that invite viewers to slow down and engage with the art,” said Watson. “His works inspire thoughtful consideration of the many beautiful complexities that make us human.”

Richards’s still lifes are unconventional. In one piece, two cuttlefish have been trussed in thread as ink dribbles down the silvery flesh, hanging in midair. Recalling the still life paintings of Francis Bacon, the photograph becomes an abstract study in the tension between organic and geometric forms. Another photograph, both beautiful and disturbing, features the lifeless, contorted body of a flamingo perched on a piece of glass against a plain studio backdrop.

Richard Learoyd: In the Studio runs through June 11.

This exhibition has been organized by the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles and curated by Arpad Kovacs, Assistant Curator in the Department of Photographs at the Getty. In Kansas City, the show is supported by the Hall Family Foundation.

The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art

The Nelson-Atkins in Kansas City is recognized nationally and internationally as one of America’s finest art museums. The Nelson-Atkins serves the community by providing access and insight into its renowned collection of nearly 40,000 art objects and is best known for its Asian art, European and American paintings, photography, modern sculpture, and new American Indian and Egyptian galleries. Housing a major art research library and the Ford Learning Center, the Museum is a key educational resource for the region. The institution-wide transformation of the Nelson-Atkins has included the 165,000-square-foot Bloch Building expansion and renovation of the original 1933 Nelson-Atkins Building.

The Nelson-Atkins is located at 45th and Oak Streets, Kansas City, MO. Hours are Wednesday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thursday/Friday, 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Admission to the museum is free to everyone. For museum information, phone 816.751.1ART (1278) or visit nelson-atkins.org.

Appointment in Smara.jpgNEW YORK, NY - MARCH 11, 2017: Who Knows The Best Book Fairs In New York City? The Shadow Show Knows! Flamingo Eventz and Lamont Cranston step out of the shadows to celebrate Rare Book Week in New York City by announcing the return of The Manhattan Vintage Book & Ephemera Fair and The Fine Press Book Fair! Known as The Shadow Show because it is held in conjunction with the well-known New York Antiquarian Book Fair at the Park Avenue Armory, this year it will be held on Saturday March 11, 2017.

A couple years ago we moved the show uptown, directly across the street from the Park Avenue Armory to The Church of St. Vincent Ferrer, 869 Lexington Avenue at 66th Street, and everyone agreed; this was the smart move! We are pleased to be returning to St. Vincent’s again this year with another exciting field of exceptional Exhibitors.

This show has grown steadily since its inception in 2009 to present some of the finest Vintage & Antiquarian Book and Ephemera Dealers in America, Canada and Europe - many of whom are members of ABAA, ILAB, ESA, PADA, MARIAB, MABA, LIABDA and other professional groups - all gathered together for one fabulous weekend to offer an incredible Vintage Book & Ephemera adventure! The inclusion of The Fine Press Book Fair in 2014 added an exciting new dimension to the show and brought it to a new level of prominence. Now, with this move to the doorstep of the Armory and the New York Antiquarian Book Fair, we bring an unprecedented opportunity and ease of enjoyment to the Vintage Book World.

As always, the fair will present an outstanding array of fine, rare & unusual old books, as well as poetry, prose, political, social, historical, children's series, maps, postcards, autographs, prints, posters, World’s Fair, and much, much more. A special feature found only at Flamingo Shows will be Antiques Appraisals by John Bruno and guest Appraisers 1-3pm at $5/item!

Exhibitor Specialties include: African American, Americana, Architecture, Art, Art Deco, Auctions, Autographs, Aviation, Baseball, Books, Bibles, Black History, Black Power, Calendars, Calling Cards, Christmas, Circus, Civil War, Cook Books, Charts, Children’s Books, Cocktails, Design, Dogs, Die Cuts, Documents, Engineering, Engraving, Ephemera, Erotica, Esoterica, Fantasy, Fashion, Fishing, Floridiana, Folklore, Folk Music, Foreign Language, Furniture, Games, Gardens & Horticulture, Graphics, Historic Documents, Horses, Hunting, Illustrated Books, Interior Design, Japan, Judaica, Letters, Logbooks, Manuscripts, Maps, Maritime, Medicine, Middle East, Military, Modernism, Music, Native American, Natural History, Nautical, Naval, New York City, New York State, New Jersey, Novelties, Olympic Games, Pacifica, Photographs, Photography, Pochoir, Polar, Pop-Ups & Moveable Books, Poetry, Postcards, Posters, Presentation Copies, Presidential Archives, Press Books, Prints, Pulitzer Prize Winners, Psychedelica, Puppetry, Puzzles, Railroad, Reference, Revolutionary War, Russia, Scholarly, Science, Science Fiction, Sports, Sporting, Technical, Theatre, Theology, Trade Cards, Trade Catalogues, Travel & Exploration, Travel Brochures, Typography, U.S. Coastal History, Vanity Fair Prints, Valentines, Voyages, Watercolors, Whaling, Wine, Yachting. These, and many other specialties, will be found at this event. Be sure to check our website, FlamingoEventz.com, for complete details and easily downloaded Discount Coupons.

Date/Hours: Saturday March 11, 10am-5pm.

Location: The Church of St. Vincent Ferrer, 869 Lexington Avenue at 66th Street, New York, NY 10065

Admission: Adults: $15, Youths 12-21: $7, under 12: free w/Paid Adult.

Appraisals: 2-4pm, $5/item by John Bruno and Guest Appraisers.

Directions: Check our website: FlamingoEventz.com for easily downloaded point-to-point maps.

Miscellaneous: There are parking garages throughout the neighborhood & subway stops nearby.

Screen Shot 2017-01-25 at 10.43.22 AM.pngParis, January 2017—The sale of books and manuscripts on 8 February will open with an extremely fine selection of antique books on Medicine (including the last books from Jean Blondelet's library), Natural Science and Literature. The sale of three remarkable manuscripts in Rimbaud's hand will be a major event.

REMARKABLE COLLECTION OF ARTHUR RIMBAUD WORKS

Plaisirs du jeune âge. Seven autograph manuscript drawings, 1865 (lot 86, estimate: €100,000-150,000).

These are the first known drawings by Arthur Rimbaud, dated from 1865 when he was 10. The notebook containing these drawings belonged to the bibliophile Jacques Guérin; the rest of the book is now one of the treasures in the Rimbaud Museum in Charleville-Mézières, but these exceptional drawings were still in private hands. They are some of the only ones that can be attributed to the poet with certainty. They reflect the world of a young poet already critical of the world around him: for example, we see the enactment of a mass, prefiguring the anticlericalism of the poet's Premières Communions, the literary parody of a Scandinavian legend and the first known self-portrait by Rimbaud.

Les caractères de Théophraste, 1866. Prize book received by Rimbaud in 1870 (lot 87, estimate: €8,000-12,000) 

A brilliant student in his final year, Arthur Rimbaud received this book as a prize at the age of 15 from the principal of his school. "A testimony to the highly satisfactory work of the pupil Rimbaud (Rhetoric class)," wrote the headmaster. Later, as indicated by an ex-libris, this book belonged to Paul Eluard: never mentioned as regards this copy, this provenance is important knowing Rimbaud's considerable influence on the Surrealists. 

La rivière de Cassis, June or July 1872 (lot 88, estimate: €200,000-300,000)

This poem’s manuscript, one of considerable modernity and freedom, is the one Rimbaud copied for Paul Verlaine. We know another version, now in the Bibliothèque Nnationale de France, but Verlaine's version is the most accomplished and stands out for three reasons: it has no date, no title and no punctuation. The extremely modern poems of this period are among Rimbaud's last verses.

Receipt from Harar made out to Armand Savouré, on behalf of Menelik II, in June 1889 (lot 89, estimate: €30,000-40,000) 

While Rimbaud's years in Harar largely contributed to his legend, we know little about them. This receipt sums up two months of the poet's activity in Harar while he was an arms dealer, as it recapitulates the last arms transactions he organised for Menelik II, between 23 May and 22 June 1889. This receipt is one of the longest listed (112 words), one of the few to be signed twice by Rimbaud and one of the only ones to mention Emperor Menelik, although he ordered the weapons. It is all the more exceptional as it is still only partially unpublished.

ANTIQUE BOOKS

From the library of Jean Blondelet While the selection of books from this exceptional library, successfully sold on 31 May last year, focused on the great discoveries of medicine, the books coming up for auction on 8 February contain treatises on the consequences of these discoveries and the progress they enabled. This final selection will be a new opportunity for book collectors to admire copies of rare editions in original bindings from prestigious provenances, illustrating the high standards the great collector Jean Blondelet always applied when choosing his books.

Two copies of Jérôme Cardan's Subtilités will appeal to collectors. One of them is in a remarkable ornate original binding in gilt vellum: a luxury rarely allowed to books on medicine (lot 10, estimate: €3,000-5,000). The Tabulae anatomicae by Casserio are appropriately bound with the treatises of his pupil Spigelius, in first editions (lot 11, estimate: €5,000-7,000). A pioneer in research on brain pathologies who coined the term "neurologia" or neurology, Thomas Willis is represented by two copies with outstanding provenances, including the first edition of 1664 of Cerebri anatome (lot 60, estimate: €4,000-5,000).

The sale also includes an exceptional compendium of the four greatest treatises by the celebrated anatomist Fabricius ab Acquapendente, in folio editions, bound with a coat of arms by one of his students (lot 18, estimate: €20,000-30,000). These four treatises, magnificently illustrated with fine copper engravings, deal with the valves of the veins, the nutrition of the foetus and the vocal organs of human animals.

Among the books with extraordinary provenances, a precious example by the naturalist Aldrovandi in a morocco binding with the arms of Jacques Auguste de Thou (lot 1, estimate: €6,000 - 9,000), will be opening the sale. There is also a Geometry by Dürer that once belonged to Nostradamus (lot 39, estimate: €12,000-18,000), a copy of the memoirs of Larrey, first surgeon to the Emperor, which he gave to Napoleon's adopted son, Eugène de Beauharnais (lot 28, estimate: €6,000-9,000), and the first collective publication of Paracelsus from the library of the greates of alchemists' patrons, Moritz of Hesse “the Learned” (lot 43, estimate: €20,000-30,000).

Natural science and medicine

A masterpiece of natural science, a very fine coloured copy of Nederlansische Vogelen by Cornelius Nozeman (lot 41, estimate: €10,000-15,000) presented the first overview of Holland's birds and was the most expensive publication ever undertaken in the Netherlands. In this category, it is accompanied by Seligmann's Vogelen with 473 hand-coloured figures (lot 51, estimate: €12,000-18,000), and a beautiful morocco-bound book on hummingbirds by Lesson (lot 30, estimate: €2,000-3,000). Worth noting: a very rare and fine copy of Deux livres de chirurgie (1573) by Ambroise Paré in period vellum (lot 44, estimate: €8,000 -12,000).

Literature and history

A superb copy of Barthélémy's Voyage du jeune Anacharsis en Grèce is one of 18 magnificent published on very large paper (lot 4, estimate: €12,000-18,000). Collectors will undoubtedly be fired up by the very early and unpublished manuscript of Boulainvilliers' Jugements astronomiques sur les nativités (lot 7, estimate: €8,000-12,000). Also noteworthy is the fabulous Coutumier de Normandie, an editio princeps (1483) in period binding (lot 15, estimate: €15,000-20,000), and lastly a splendid copy of the Cours d'hippiatrique by Lafosse (lot 27, estimate: €13,000-18,000), magnificently coloured, also in a period binding.

19TH AND 20TH CENTURY BOOKS

19th century artists' letters

This sale features letters from great artists of the 19th century, including Degas, Ingres, Lucien Pissarro, Odilon Redon (lot 85, estimate: €1,800-2,200), and Paul Signac (lot 92, estimate: €3,000-5,000). We can also mention letters from the inventor of photography, Nicéphore Niépce, on his financial situation with his creditors (lot 82, estimate: €25,000-30,000) and several letters from Hector Berlioz writing about the French revolution of 1830 (lot 66, estimate: €4,000-5,000) or standing up for his new wife (lot 67, estimate: €5,000-7,000).

20th Century books and manuscripts

The section devoted to the 20th century features books by contemporary artists published by the Editions du Solstice, including the rare La Nouvelle chute de l'Amérique (The New Fall of America) by Roy Lichtenstein (lot 119, estimate: €35,000-50,000) and Ode à ma mère by Louise Bourgeois (lot 100, estimate: €15,000-20,000). The illustrated books also include Pomme endormie, one of the few deluxe copies on Japan paper with 16 signed lithographs by Giacometti (lot 114, estimate: €20,000-25,000), together with a rare copy on green paper of 1929, a famous erotic work by Man Ray, here bound by Jean de Gonet (lot 121, estimate: €10,000-15,000), and rare editions of Joan Miro, Gustav Klimt, Nicolas de Staël, also with original contributions by Hans Bellmer, Pablo Picasso, Jacques Prévert and Salvador Dalí.

The catalogue features some major literary manuscripts as well - for example, an autograph letter from Guillaume Apollinaire to Lou containing two long poems (lot 95, estimate: €30,000-50,000). Jean Genet shines with one of his finest texts, Pour un funambule (lot 112, estimate: €9,000-12,000), a tribute to his acrobat lover, and a large collection of letters to his translator and American literary agent, mostly unpublished (lot 113, estimate: €35,000-45,000). Finally, the manuscript of Jean-Paul Sartre's last novel is a genuine literary rediscovery (lot 140, estimate: €14,000-18,000).

Auction: Wednesday 8 February

Exhibition: 3, 4, 6 and 7 February

New Photographic Survey of Walden Pond

What has become of the fabled Walden Pond? In his debut monograph Walden (Kehrer Verlag, May 2017S.B. Walker -- an artist from New England who grew up a few miles from Walden Pond -- surveys the symbolically charged landscape of literary giant Henry David Thoreau in an attempt to find out the answer. The publication of Walker's book marks the bicentennial of Thoreau's birth. Walking tours, lectures and exhibitions are planned throughout the year and around the world. 

Deeply rooted in the American collective conscious, Walden Pond is a mythical place perceived as wild and often considered to be the birthplace of the modern environmental movement. The contemporary Walden depicted in Walker's photographs is perhaps best characterized as a glorified suburban park, nestled amongst the sprawl of metropolitan Boston. As our awareness of the place is largely derived from Thoreau's rhapsodic description some 150 years ago -- writings in which he often drew connections between New England and the pastoral Arcadian landscape portrayed by the Roman poet Virgil -- the state of affairs as shown in Walker's Walden reveals a thought provoking and troubling paradox.

In his essay, Alan Trachtenberg writes: "... [Thoreau's] Walden Pond is a place of still, pristine waters and natural processes of seasonal change, of blossoming and dying, of regeneration into new life ... Walker's pictures, on the other hand, show something gone seriously wrong at this cherished site, a monument to American idealism itself ..."

In Walker's Walden we see a place populated by locals and tourists flocking to the hallowed spot to bird-watch, swim, nap, read, fish, and take a stroll in the woods. Signs of the encroachment of modern life are seen in the presence of wire fences, eroded pathways, chain saw markings, parking lots, a landfill just 1,200 feet from the edge of the pond, and a bulldozer poised to clear the way for a highway expansion project. The last image in Walden captures the liberated waters of the pond following an ice melt -- a scene that would be sublime if it were not for the presence of a Target shopping bag floating on the pond's surface in the foreground. 

An aura of melancholy sweeps through Walker's photographs suggesting the absence of a sense of well-being. Trachtenberg writes: "This seems like a frozen Walden, a freeze too deep to be redeemed by first aid alone ... by claiming 'Walden' for his title, [Walker] offers Thoreau -- and through him the entire tradition of American romanticism -- a formative role in his own extraordinary book. Walker's pictures are layered against each other to reveal an unrelenting vision of disenchantment with what Walden Pond once represented to enthralled Americans."

Walker and Thoreau were both in their late twenties when they began creating their works about Walden Pond. In 1845, Thoreau moved into a cabin in the woods beside Walden where he lived for two years recording his thoughts and feelings that would lay the groundwork for his seminal book. Nearly 170 years later, every day after work for four years (2010-2014), Walker headed down to the pond to walk the 1.7-mile loop with his camera and Thoreau's book to engage with Walden Pond and its cast of denizens. 

Recent articles in the press have addressed how Walden Pond is becoming increasingly polluted at the hands of man and that the ice on the pond is melting earlier due to global warming. It is Walker's hope his book will not only revive interest in the transcendental writings of Thoreau, but also contribute to the dialogue about the need to mitigate climate change and protect our planet's delicate ecological balance.

S.B. Walker is an artist living and working in New England. His works have been exhibited internationally and can be found in public and private collections including the Museum of Fine Arts (Boston), the Smith Museum of Art, the David Winton Bell Gallery at Brown University, and the Prentice and Paul Sack Photographic Trust, among others. He is represented by Janet Borden Inc., New York, NY. For more information, go to: http://www.sbwalker.net

Alan Trachtenberg is the Neil Gray Jr. Professor Emeritus of English and American studies at Yale University, where he taught for thirty-five years. His books include Shades of Hiawatha (H&W, 2004) and The Incorporation of America: Culture and Society in the Gilded Age (Hill & Wang, 2007).

Book Details:                                                                   

ISBN: 978-3-86828-765-3                                     

Hardcover, 8 x 10 inches                                                

124 pages; 58 b&w illustrations                                       

USD $40.00; Euro (D) 35,00

An early 19th century whaling log fetched $3,600 at National Book Auctions' January 21, 2017 sale.

The bound manuscript, featuring 48 leaves and 16 ink drawings, related to the whaling ship "Victory" of New Bedford, Connecticut. Captained by Henry Adams, the ship left New Bedford in July 1823 for the whaling grounds off the coast of the southern tip of South America. The log begins in August at sea; the ship reached the whaling grounds in October. The unnamed officer who kept the log evidently put back to sea as the log recommences in July 1824 on board the ship "New Galen" from Boston, heading toward Mexico.

The sale, held at the auction house's Freeville, New York saleroom and simulcast via Invaluable, also featured rare, antique, and decorative volumes dating back to 1549, as well as a second session from a private collection of collectible modern horror, mystery, and science fiction books. Titles of note included "Astro-Theology" by William Derham; "A Voyage Round The World" by George Anson; "The Box from Japan" by Harry Stephen Keeler; and "Vampire" by Hanns Heinz Ewers.

National Book Auctions is a specialist auction house focusing almost exclusively on rare and collectible books and ephemera since the 1990s. Its sister company, Worth Auctions, handles a broad variety of personal property including fine art, furnishings, jewelry, coins, and more. For more information, contact mail@nationalbookauctions.com or mail@worthauctions.com.

Interior 02.jpegDaniel Crouch Rare Books will mark the opening of their New York Gallery at 24 East 64th Street with a launch party on Burns Night (25 January 2017). A small selection of Celtic cartography will be on display, in keeping with the traditional Scottish celebration, as well as the gallery’s reputation as specialist dealers in fine and rare antique maps, plans, sea charts and voyages.

Daniel Crouch and Nick Trimming, partners in Daniel Crouch Rare Books, have appointed Noah Goldrach and Kate Hunter to manage the New York gallery. Noah studied Medieval History at the Wesleyan University, CT, and has worked both at Sotheby’s, and as a bookseller specializing in Continental, English and American early printed books. Kate graduated from Cambridge Univeristy, and joins Daniel Crouch Rare Books having worked previously for Christies, Maggs Bros, and Graham Arader. The launch is timed to coincide with the Winter Antiques Show (20 - 29 January) and Bibliography Week (23 - 28 January). The gallery is open Monday to Friday, 10am to 6pm.

In keeping with the Burns Night theme, James Dorret's 1750 map of Scotland and Macdonald Gill’s 1928 Agricultural Map of Scotland will be on display during the launch. Dorret’s map has been described as "a landmark map which was used directly or indirectly for nearly all Scottish maps for the next 40 years", (National Library of Scotland). Although little is known about Dorret, he served as the valet to the Duke of Argyll, and was tasked with mapping first Argyll, and then the whole of Scotland.

Macdonald Gill’s agricultural map of Scotland, dated 1928, provides a fascinating and detailed representation of the country’s natural produce. The map is illustrated with livestock such as pigs, sheep and cows which adorn the counties of Roxburgh, Lanark and Dumfries. Drawings of deer are shown in the highlands, with raspberries and strawberries marked in the regions of Ayr and Peebles, fishing fleets off the east coast labelled haddock, cod and lobsters as their bounty, with hake and herrings off the west coast. In the border, a table shows statistics for the local agriculture and fisheries including figures for the annual catch or crop and the value of the produce.

Image: The New York Gallery at 24 East 64th Street. 

 

45638g_lg copy.jpgLOS ANGELES, January 19, 2017 - A rare 1494 Basel edition of Christopher Columbus’ letter to King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella entitled, “Christophorus Columbus, De insulis nuper in mari Indico inventis” will be auctioned by Nate D. Sanders Auctions on January 30, 2017. 

The 56-page book features Columbus’ letter to King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella regarding his discovery of the new world. The March 1493 letter was penned by Columbus on the Nina while sailing back from the “Indian” isles and was addressed to Spain’s king and queen, his patron Luis de Santangel and the Royal Treasurer Raphael Sanxis. Columbus confirmed the new lands he discovered justified the expensive and risky expedition. Leander de Cosco translated the letter into Latin for this 1494 Basel edition.

Six woodcuts designed by famed German artist Albrecht Durer are included in the hardbound book. The woodcuts represent the first depictions of the New World. They show the arrival of the Spanish at the insula hyspana, a quasi-map of the Antilles, the construction of the fort La Navidad on the island of Hispaniola and Columbus' caravel under full sail. The title woodcut of the edition depicts a portrait of Ferdinand of Aragon holding the shields of Castile and Leon and is accompanied by a coat of arms.

The book being auctioned is from Robert Menzies’ collection and contains private library labels from turn-of-the-century philanthropist Elizabeth Wharton Drexel and Pennsylvania Senator Boies Penrose.

Bidding for the book begins at $750,000.

Additional information on the document can be found at 
http://natedsanders.com/The_First_Account_of_the_Discovery_of_the_New_Worl-LOT45638.aspx

About Nate D. Sanders Auctions

An industry leader in documents and autographs, Nate D. Sanders Auctions has conducted auctions in Los Angeles since 1990 and now holds major auctions on a monthly basis. Owner Nate Sanders is recognized for his knowledge of sports, historical and Hollywood memorabilia. To learn more visit natedsanders.com

6-Poe copy.jpgNew York— On Thursday, February 14, Swann Galleries will offer Icons & Images: Photographs & Photobooks, with spectacular examples of the medium representing a range of styles and technological advances, from mid-nineteenth century portraiture to contemporary photocollages.

The sale is led by a selection of 50 plates from Eadweard Muybridge’s groundbreaking series, Animal Locomotion, 1887. This collection of motion studies largely features the human form, as well as a menagerie of exotic animals. This precursor to film is estimated to sell between $30,000 and $45,000.

Among early photographs is a sixth-plate tintype of Edgar Allan Poe, after the “Traylor” daguerreotype, taken in 1849 just three weeks before the author’s death. The original daguerreotype was damaged and then lost; this rare tintype is expected to fetch between $10,000 and $15,000. Further highlights include an albumen print of General George A. Custer, taken in 1872 by J.A. Scholten ($4,000 to $6,000); a portrait of Walt Whitman in Brooklyn, attributed to painter Thomas Eakins in 1887, valued at $4,000 to $6,000; and a selection of stunning landscapes by Carleton E. Watkins and silver print microphotographs of snowflakes by Wilson A. Bentley.

Also featured is a run of rare orotones by Edward S. Curtis, many in their original frames, including The Rush Gatherer, 1910, and Chief of the Desert, Navajo, 1904 ($15,000 to $25,000 and $12,000 to $18,000, respectively). Further selections include portfolio 20 of The North American Indian, 1928, with 35 large-format photogravures of indigenous Alaskans, estimated at $8,000 to $12,000, and the rare portrait of Geronimo, Apache, valued at $5,000 to $7,500.

The sale features a run of lots relating to the space program, the highlight of which is a remarkable gathering of 22 large prints selected from NASA's Archives for a 1985 exhibition at the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum titled Sightseeing: A Space Panorama. Astronauts approved the images, which had never before been published by NASA ($15,000 to $25,000). Also available is an archive of approximately 280 photographs depicting Apollo missions, estimated at $7,000 to $10,000. Further lots in this section include a series of ten photocollages of the moon, and a collection of 67 photographs documenting the moon landing as seen on national television ($5,000 to $7,500 and $4,000 to $6,000, respectively).

There is a rich selection of works by twentieth-century American photographers, including Alfred Stieglitz’s intimate portrait of his lover and protégée Dorothy Norman, which was previously in Norman’s personal collection. This image, which was not reproduced in Sarah Greenough’s Alfred Stieglitz, The Key Set, may be unique; it is estimated at $20,000 to $30,000. Ansel Adams is well represented in the sale with more than a dozen works, including the breathtaking Clearing Winter Storm, taken in 1944 and printed in the 1970s, expected to sell between $25,000 and $35,000. His 1979 photobook Yosemite and the Range of Light, one of 250 signed copies of the deluxe edition, is estimated at $10,000 to $15,000. Important works by Robert Frank include Hearse, London, 1951 silver print, printed 1973, and Trolley - New Orleans, silver print ($20,000 to $25,000 and $10,000 to $15,000, respectively). Further highlights include images by Berenice Abbott, Margaret Bourke-White, Roy DeCarava, Lewis W. Hine and Dorothea Lange.

A set of 32 silver prints by Leni Riefenstahl relating to the 1936 Berlin Olympics, with action shots and posed portraits of athletes including Jesse Owens, carries an estimate of $25,000 to $35,000.

Contemporary works include a run of images by Nan Goldin from the 1990s, led by Cody in the Dressing Room at the Boy Bar, NYC, 1991, estimated at $7,000 to $10,000, as well as Larry Fink’s complete April, 1999 Portfolio with 20 photographs selected from Fink’s humanist photo essays ($5,000 to $7,500). Works by Steve McCurry and Patrick Demarchelier will also be available.

The section of photobooks includes a unique maquette for Lucien Clergue’s unpublished book, Picasso en Provence, with 150 candid silver prints of Pablo Picasso taken by Clergue in the late 1950s and early ‘60s, estimated at $8,000 to $12,000. Also available is Larry Clark’s complete Tulsa Portfolio, with ten silver prints (each estimated at $15,000 to $25,000). Scottish photographer John Thomson’s magnum opus, Illustrations of China and its People, Volumes I and II, London, 1873, is estimated at $15,000 to $20,000. Also available are works by and about Richard Avedon from a private collection, including the 1969 silver print Willem de Kooning, Painter, Springs, Long Island, printed circa 1975, estimated at $7,000 to $10,000, and a selection of rare photobooks, many of which are signed.

The auction will be held Thursday, February 14, beginning at 1:30 p.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Thursday, February 9 through Saturday, February 11 from noon to 5 p.m.; Monday, February 13 from noon to 5 p.m.; and Thursday, February 14 from 10 a.m. to noon. Also available by appointment.

An illustrated auction catalogue will be available for $35 from Swann Galleries, Inc., 104 East 25th Street, New York, NY 10010, or online at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information and to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Daile Kaplan at 212-254-4710, extension 21, or via e-mail at dkaplan@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 6 Sixth-plate tintype of Edgar Allan Poe, after daguerreotype by William A. Pratt, 1849-late '50s. Estimate $10,000 to $15,000.

READING, Pa. - Berks Community Television (BCTV) is bringing live auctions to television with the debut airing of a new show called Auction Action On BCTV on Monday evening, January 30th, at 6 pm, with the first item up for bid at 7 pm. The program will be hosted by Bill Howze, the owner of The Renaissance Auction Group in Reading, Pa., and host of the popular BCTV show All That Stuff.

In the first hour of the show, Mr. Howze will explain how the auction works and preview featured lots. All bidding is online. Individuals can bid from anywhere in the world on their desktop or mobile devices beginning Monday, January 16th. 

Auction previews will be held at 1251 Chestnut Street on two Saturdays and Sundays - January 21st, 22nd, 28th and 29th, from 9 am to 1 pm each day. Berks County residents who have BCTV as part of their cable package will be able to view the show live. Bidding will be driven through The Renaissance Auction Group website at www.auctionhowze.com. The show will be fast-paced - averaging one item closing per minute.

Starting at 7 pm, the auction will officially kick off. The debut program will feature many items in a broad range of categories, many of them specific to Berks County. These will include a circa 1775 Berks County tall case clocks, a Reading Trolley fare counter, a Philadelphia & Reading Railroad platform sign and original works by artists with ties to the Berks County area.

“The merchandise mix will include multiple categories of antiques collectibles and fine art,” Mr. Howze said. “We expect a strong and enthusiastic viewership in our first show, especially with the many interesting items relating to Berks County. I’m pleased that my auction firm will be conducting this event  in conjunction with BCTV. Part of the proceeds will benefit our public access channel.”

Heather Adams, executive director of BCTV, echoed those words. “Bill Howze’s All That Stuff show consistently ranks in the top ten programs viewed online at bctv.org, so we’re excited to have him host a second show with such a unique auction concept,” she said. “As for the partnership, it’s a win-win. Plus it widens our audience by attracting antiques and collectibles enthusiasts.”

Ms. Adams said BCTV has benefited from fundraiser auctions for 25 years, but not in this way. She added that Auction Action On BCTV is scheduled from 6 pm to 10 pm, but because of the nature of an auction, it may run shorter or longer. The show will be telecast live from the BCTV studio. BCTV is seen in 100,000 homes in Berks County, through Comcast and Service Electric cable.

The regional artists represented in the auction will include Christopher Shearer (1846-1926), Victor Shearer (1872-1951), W. Eugene Burkhardt, Jr., M.B. (Mary) Leisz and Hazel Feltman (1947-2012) among others. All had direct ties to Reading and Berks County. The Christopher Shearer is a 1925 oil on canvas, three Victor Shearer works date from 1935-1941. Two W. Eugene Burkhardt, Jr., works are beautiful cut flower collages.

Christopher Shearer was born in Reading and was best known for his landscape, coastal and wildlife paintings. His father encouraged his artistic side by building him a studio in the back yard of his Shearertown farm. At age 21, he opened a studio in Reading and was quite successful in selling his paintings. Shearer exhibited his works at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts.

Victor Shearer made a name for himself by becoming a landscape and seascape painter in the traditional style. He often sold his artworks for a few dollars apiece on the streets of Reading. He lived in Reading nearly his entire life and before pursuing art he had a basket making business.

W. Eugene Burkhardt, Jr. was an internationally known dried flower artist and the author of Pressed Flower Art: Tips, Tools and Techniques for Learning the Craft. In September 2015, at Renninger’s Market in Kutztown, an auction of Burkhardt’s work. framed and unframed prints, awards and Philadelphia Flower Show entries - was held. Mr. Howze officiated the sale, in fact. 

Additional items in the auction specific to Pennsylvania will include a Chippendale tall case clock, a period Chippendale side chair, a 1909 photo lithograph showing the Mayor of Reading and members of the Reading Police Department, photos of Civil War soldiers from Fleetwood, Pa. and Reading and a watercolor painting by Jack Coggins (1911-2006), who was born in Great Britain but emigrated to the US and lived in New York and Pennsylvania.

Items in the auction not connected to Reading will include an original work by pop art icon Peter Max (N.Y., b. 1937), a Tiffany sterling silver cake stand weighing 38 troy silver ounces, portrait miniatures of the Emperor Napoleon and his Empress Josephine, and a pair of original oil on canvas studies by Lord Frederick Leighton (Great Britain, 1830-1896).

Leighton received his training in Brussels, Paris and Frankfurt, unlike most major artists of the 19th century, who studied at the Royal Academy of Schools. He was blessed with golden good looks and led a charmed life. He was also the only painter ever to be raised to the English peerage, but it was short-lived; one day after being designated a Lord, Leighton died at age 66.

Berks Community Television can be seen on Comcast Reading channel 15; Comcast-Southern Berks channel 965; and Service Electric channel 19. The Municipal Access Channel (MAC) is Comcast Reading channel 99. BCTV.org is a 501c3 nonprofit corporation committed to providing live programming produced and hosted by members of the community on cable TV and its website.

The Renaissance Auction Group is located at 1404 Friedensburg Road in Reading. The firm assists clients in the liquidation of tangible property, including antiques, collectibles, business inventories and commercial equipment, as well as residential, historic, commercial and agricultural real estate. Benefit auction consultation and production services are also provided.

To learn more about The Renaissance Auction Group, visit www.auctionhowze.com. To learn more about Berks County Television, visit www.BCTV.org.

__Shiftlab_CatalogCover.jpgSeager Gray Gallery, in Mill Valley, California, presents Trace, an exhibition of works by Shift-Lab, a collaborative group of artists working in the print and artist book media.  The artists include Katie Baldwin, Denise Bookwalter, Sarah Bryant, Macy Chadwisk and Tricia Treacy. Trace is a set of maps: a large collaborative map and five smaller maps by each individual artist, that fold into single sheet books. A series of framed prints, printed ephemera, a digitally printed newspaper, and sound file accompany the work. Trace utilizes a range of media including embroidery, letterpress, risograph, processing software, screenprint, and video/audio capture. The exhibition will run from February 1 to February 28 with a reception for the artists on Saturday, February 4 from 5:30 to 7:30. 

The exhibition comes as a celebration of Codex, the Biennial fair beginning the following day at the Craneway Pavilion celebrating the book as a medium for art with exhibitors from around the globe.

A full color catalog of the exhibition is available through the gallery and at Codex: http://bit.ly/Shift_Lab_TraceCatalog.

NEW YORK, 18 January 2017-Today in New York, Sotheby’s auction of Alexander Hamilton: An Important Family Archive of Letters and Manuscripts achieved an outstanding total of $2,645,750, surpassing its pre-sale high estimate of $2.1 million. All 77 lots on offer - representing hundreds of individual documents- found buyers, marking a rare ‘White Glove’ auction. Eleven lots broke the previous auction record for any document handwritten by Hamilton - a record that had held since 2001*.

Viewed by thousands of visitors over the past week at Sotheby’s New York, the collection of letters and manuscripts by and relating to Alexander Hamilton drew a diverse audience: from political-science enthusiasts to theater lovers, newly-impassioned historians, and institutional collections-even the company of Hamilton: An American Musical. This remarkable archive of highly-personal documents had descended through Hamilton’s family for the last two centuries, with many of the manuscripts previously unknown to historians.

Selby Kiffer, Senior International Specialist for Sotheby's Books & Manuscripts, noted: “We have been thrilled to be part of the cultural movement that has re-established this Founding Father's rightful place in history. The results of today’s sale are an indicator not only of the tremendous public interest in Alexander Hamilton, but also of the appetite among both new and established collectors to own historical documents.”

A highlight of today’s auction was the document responsible for Alexander Hamilton’s foray into the public sphere: Alexander Hamilton’s Appointment as Aide-de-Camp to General George Washington from 1777, which sold for $212,500. This appointment jumpstarted Hamilton’s political career, leading to subsequent positions as congressman, founder of the Bank of New York, member of the Constitutional convention and more.

The auction was led by A Previously Unrecorded Autograph Draft of Pacificus Essay No. VI, which achieved $262,500. One of the most important essays written by Alexander Hamilton, under the pen name Pacificus, Pacificus VI is particularly vital to the storyline of Hamilton as no manuscript copies of The Federalist Papers - considered by many to be his most famous work - survive.

FURTHER SALE HIGHLIGHTS

**All Achieving Multiples of Their Estimates**

Lot 1036

Philip Schuyler

A Group of 34 Autograph Letters Signed ("PH. Schuyler"), 1790-1804, to His Daughter Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton

Estimate $35/50,000

Sold for $125,000

Lot 1007

Alexander Hamilton 

Autograph Letter Signed (“AH”) to Elizabeth Schuyler (“My Dearest Girl”); The Earliest Surviving Love Letter from Alexander Hamilton to His Future Wife

Estimate $40/60,000

Sold for $118,750

Lot 1040

Philip Schuyler

A Group of 17 Letters, 1793-1803, Addressed to His Son-in-Law, Alexander Hamilton

Estimate $30/50,000

Sold for $118,750

Lot 1016

Alexander Hamilton

Autograph Letter Signed (“A Hamilton”) to Elizabeth Hamilton, Announcing that the Army Is Preparing to Engage Cornwallis in Virginia

Estimate $30/50,000

Sold for $106,250

Lot 1043

Alexander Hamilton

Autograph Letter Signed (“AH”) To Angelica Schuyler Church, Sending And Requesting Family News

Estimate $6/8,000

Sold of $62,500

*The previous auction record for an Alexander Hamilton manuscript was $44,650, established at Christie’s New York in May 2001.

 

The National Library of Israel announced today that it has acquired the finest private collection of Hebrew books and manuscripts in the world, the renowned Valmadonna Trust Library, through a private sale arranged by Sotheby’s. The acquisition, made jointly with Archaeology, Books and Judaica collectors Dr. David and Jemima Jeselsohn, will be housed and highlights will go on show in the National Library of Israel’s landmark new building in Jerusalem, designed by award-winning architects Herzog & de Meuron, due to open to the public in 2020.  

Founded in 1892, The National Library of Israel (NLI) is unique among the great libraries of the world. It is the primary institution of national memory of the State of Israel and of Jewish people throughout the world and it is the home of the largest collection of works concerned with Jewish life and Israel, as well as a leading collection for Islamic and Middle Eastern studies.

Tasked with collecting, preserving and providing access to the cultural treasures of both the State of Israel and the international Jewish community, the NLI has recently embarked upon an ambitious initiative to transform itself into a cutting-edge global centre at the forefront of knowledge dissemination and cultural creativity.  This process is being driven by the principle of creating unprecedented public access to its priceless collections. The transition is taking place in the realm of content, with a wide range of cultural, educational, and technological initiatives already underway, as well as in the physical realm, with the construction of its new library building in the heart of Jerusalem adjacent to the Knesset.

The Valmadonna Trust Library was assembled over a period of more than six decades by visionary collector Jack Lunzer. It comprises a wide-ranging group of more than 10,000 works that chart the spread of Hebrew printing and the global dissemination of Jewish culture. Among the highlights of the collection are an incunabula of the Pentateuch, printed in Lisbon in 1491; one of only two surviving copies of a Passover Haggadah printed in Prague in 1556; The Plantin Polyglot or “King’s Bible,” printed in Antwerp between 1568 and 1573; and more than 550 broadsheets dating from the 16th to the 20th centuries. The acquisition is an important and exciting addition to the NLI’s collection. The printed works in the collection are in superb condition and the acquisition has enabled NLI to gain in one acquisition what would have taken decades to collect. The acquisition is made possible by a generous gift from the Haim and Hana Solomon Fund.

Throughout its renewal process, NLI has expanded its collections, while investing significant resources to make them available online. As part of its collection development, NLI has partnered with hundreds of institutions in Israel and across the world to provide access to cultural treasures, including many that are not among the National Library's physical holdings. The new NLI building will address the needs of leading scholars, while also opening access to intellectual and cultural treasures for the general public.

Says David Blumberg, Chairman, National Library of Israel: "The National Library of Israel is currently in the midst of a comprehensive renewal process by which it is fast becoming the most significant cultural institution in Israel and the Jewish world. Its new home, designed by Herzog and de Meuron, is currently being constructed adjacent to the Knesset and will be completed in less than four years' time. In this context, the Library continues to expand its collections tremendously, acquiring cultural and intellectual treasures ranging from ancient Jewish and Islamic manuscripts to contemporary music. The Valmadonna Trust Library represents an historic addition to our leading collection of Jewish manuscripts, prints and books, which reflect and embody the cultures of the Jewish people around the world and across the ages." 

Says Oren Weinberg, Director, National Library of Israel: "The acquisition of the Valmadonna and its arrival in Jerusalem present a tremendous opportunity for the National Library of Israel to further realize the vision of its renewal, as we will open access to these exquisite cultural treasures for researchers and the general public in Israel and across the globe."

Philadelphia, PA - January 17, 2017 - Today, Howell Rosenberg, Esq., Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Library Company of Philadelphia announced the election of Dr. Michael J. Barsanti as the Edwin Wolf 2nd Director effective February 20, 2017.  Dr. Barsanti succeeds Dr. Richard Newman as the company's Chief Executive Officer. This appointment was made following a national search conducted by a leading executive search firm who worked in conjunction with trustees and staff of the Library Company, who have enthusiastically and unanimously endorsed this appointment.

Mr. Rosenberg stated that, "We are thrilled to have Mike join the Library Company's highly acclaimed staff of scholars, curators, and professional administrators. Mike's business and academic work will be among the keys to success that he will bring to us and we are thankful that we were able to attract such a high level professional. "

Dr. Barsanti holds a bachelor's degree from Williams College, a Master's degree from University of Miami, and a PhD in English Literature from the University of Pennsylvania.  He has led a distinguished career in the Philadelphia cultural community that includes positions at the Rosenbach Museum and Library, the Pew Center for Arts and Heritage, and the Free Library of Philadelphia Foundation. He is also an Adjunct Professor at Drexel University and serves on the Board of Trustees of the Independence Charter School.  His experience has been broad:  in fundraising, program development, membership, marketing, and operations. Additionally, he founded Throwaway Horse, a company devoted to fostering a deeper understanding of literary masterworks by joining the visual aid of graphic novels with the aid of the internet and social media. He has worked closely on its flagship project ULYSSES "SEEN,"  a graphic novel adaptation of James Joyce's ULYSSES that brings the novel's deeper mysteries to a new set of readers.  Dr. Barsanti lives in the Mount Airy section of Philadelphia with his wife, Erin Mooney, and their three children. 

According to Dr. Barsanti, "I am deeply honored to be chosen to be the next Edwin Wolf 2nd Director of the Library Company of Philadelphia.  On Ben Franklin's 311th birthday, we can take pride in how his library has endured, and the idea it is based upon --improving a community through the sharing of knowledge -- has never been more relevant.  I am eager to carry forward Dr. Franklin's great experiment and bring it to new learners from all walks of life, ensuring its continued relevance and its adaptation to a changing world."

About the Library Company of Philadelphia

Founded in 1731 by Benjamin Franklin, the Library Company is America's oldest cultural institution and served as the Library of Congress from the Revolutionary War to 1800. It was the largest public library in America until the Civil War and remains one of North America's most important research repositories. Today, the Library Company of Philadelphia is an independent research library and educational institution specializing in American and global history from the 17th through the early 20th centuries. Open to the public free of charge, the Library Company houses the world's largest holdings of early American collections with approximately one million rare books, manuscripts, broadsides, ephemera, prints, photographs, and works of art. The collections reflect the country's many faces and varied interests including African American history, economic history, women's history, the history of medicine, and visual culture. The Library Company promotes access to these collections through fellowships, exhibitions, programs, and online resources.

The mission of the Library Company is to foster scholarship in and increase public understanding of American history before 1900 by preserving, interpreting, making available, and augmenting the valuable materials in our care, thus providing meaningful stewardship of the legacy of founder Benjamin Franklin. To find out more, please visit www.librarycompany.org

BOSTON, MA, January 17, 2017--ANTIQUES ROADSHOW, PBS's most-watched ongoing series, has released its summer 2017 production tour, including first-time visits to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania and Green Bay, Wisconsin, along with return visits to St. Louis, Missouri; New Orleans, Louisiana and Portland, Oregon. 

Episodes recorded in those cities will be included in the 14-time Emmy® Award nominated production's 22nd broadcast season, to air in 2018.

"ANTIQUES ROADSHOW is so excited to hit the road again in our enduring search for the country's hidden treasures," said ROADSHOW executive producer Marsha Bemko. "This year we travel to two never-before-visited cities: Harrisburg and Green Bay. I can't wait to explore these new areas, and see what local items we uncover in all the cities!"

Admission to ANTIQUES ROADSHOW is free, but tickets are required and must be obtained in advance. Fans can apply for a chance to receive one pair of free tickets per household. The 2017 Tour ticket application process opens Tuesday, January 17 at 3pm ET. To enter the drawing for free tickets to a summer ROADSHOW event and to see complete application rules, go to pbs.org/antiques/tickets For more information you may also call toll-free 888-762-3749.

Deadline for applications is Monday, April 10, 2017 at 11:59 PM PT.

At each appraisal event, approximately 5,000 ticketed guests will receive free valuations of their antiques and collectibles from specialists from the country's leading auction houses and independent dealers. Each guest is invited to bring two items for appraisal. To see FAQs about ANTIQUES ROADSHOW events, go to: pbs.org/wgbh/roadshow/tickets/faq.

From each of the events, three episodes of television per city will be created for inclusion in ANTIQUES ROADSHOW's 22nd season, airing in 2018. 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW 2017 Summer Tour Dates:

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania                                       June 3

Green Bay, Wisconsin                                            June 17

St. Louis, Missouri                                                 July 8

New Orleans, Louisiana                                         July 22

Portland, Oregon                                                  August 12

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW, produced by WGBH Boston, is seen by an average of 8 million viewers each week. ANTIQUES ROADSHOW's 21st  broadcast season is currently airing Mondays at 8/7c PM on PBS.

Hitler and Mussolini Patching Together Nazi Soldier.jpgBoston, MA — January 17, 2017 — Elizabeth E. Barker, Ph.D., Stanford Calderwood Director of the Boston Athenæum, announced today the donation to the Athenæum of the collection of WWII visual materials of architectural photographer, author, and Athenæum Proprietor Richard W. Cheek. The Richard W. Cheek World War II Graphic Arts Collection contains over 2,000 posters and war maps, 189 linear feet of books, 4,000 magazines, and approximately 6,500 pieces of WWII ephemera, including patriotic envelopes, board games, playing cards, and pin-ups.

“We couldn’t feel more grateful—or more honored—to become the repository of such a discerning collector’s lifelong passion,” stated Barker. “Richard Cheek’s gift provides fresh insight into a critical moment in world history. The value of this archive for scholars—and, indeed, for any curious person—is incalculable. The collection elevates the Athenaeum’s ability to serve as an essential research center for three of our nation’s greatest conflicts. ”

The Cheek collection complements the Athenæum’s existing Civil War and WWI-related holdings: together, these visual records provide a valuable resource for the study of 19th- and 20th-century American society and culture. The acquisition reflects the institution’s mission to serve its members, the broader community, and scholars throughout the world by preserving and augmenting its collections, providing library services and cultural programming, and preserving and enhancing the unique atmosphere of its landmark building.

Of the collection’s remarkable breadth, Catharina Slautterback, the Athenæum’s Curator of Prints and Photographs, explains that “part of its value lies in its sheer numbers,” adding that the collection “conveys, in a way that a smaller collection could not, the pervasiveness of propaganda in American society during the war.” Both Slautterback and collector Richard Cheek emphasize the role of the collection’s graphic and visual elements in communicating persuasive wartime narratives. “To understand why Americans were willing to engage in another global conflict while still suffering from the consequences of the Great War,” Cheek says, “we need to know the pictures and symbols that motivated them.” He adds, “In a society that was becoming increasingly visual in its orientation, images were more important than words in persuading people to fight again.”

The son of a WWII veteran and the grandson of a renowned Civil War historian, Richard Cheek began collecting WWII ephemera as a young boy. Fascinated by the “panoply of war,” he received an early gift of several signal flags, rescued from a U.S. destroyer that sunk off the coast of Okinawa. “Torn, dirty, and redolent of desperate action,” as he describes them, these symbolic objects were the first of what was to become a vast collection.

Cheek, a longtime member and Proprietor of the Boston Athenæum, was inspired to donate his graphic arts collection to the Athenæum after viewing its 2014-2015 exhibition, Over Here: World War I Posters from Around the World and attending a gallery talk led by Slautterback, the exhibition’s curator. An exhibition featuring selections from the Cheek collection is planned for 2020, the 75th anniversary of the war’s conclusion, to be curated jointly by Cheek and Slautterback. A fully illustrated catalog will accompany the exhibition.

About the Boston Athenæum:

The Boston Athenæum, a membership library and fine art museum, first opened its doors in 1807 as a sanctuary of arts and letters for Boston intellectuals. Today, it continues to serve its members and the community with a vast circulating collection, rich and varied special collections, extensive archives, comprehensive electronic resources, handsome reading spaces, and a dynamic programming schedule. The exhibition gallery and many events are open to the public. Membership is open to all. For more information, visit bostonathenaeum.org.

Image: Artist Unknown, [Hitler and Mussolini Patching Together Nazi Soldier], ca. 1943. Silkscreen poster. Richard W. Cheek WWII Graphic Arts Collection. Gift, December 2016.

National Book Auctions has been engaged to sell a trove of important theological and historical texts dating back to the sixteenth century that were rescued from a flooding church in Akron, Ohio in 1969. The volumes were saved from the deluge by the church's minister and have gone unseen by the public for the past past five decades.

Dan Cole, Operations Director for National Book Auctions, arrived in Akron in the company van not knowing what to expect. "All we knew beforehand was that the minister had carried off as much as he could as the church was filling up with water. When I got inside the house, there were close to a hundred boxes along rows and rows of shelves, all basically untouched since the day of the flood. It still wasn't clear what condition the contents were in-whether the water had already gotten to them."

Explains Founder and CEO David Hall, "It wasn't until we got the books back to the auction gallery that the real archaeological work began. We were pleased to discover that the collection was on the whole very well-preserved and contained some very scarce and early titles. It is a real honor to bring this kind of material out of the dark and into the light again after so long. Discoveries like this are what make our jobs so rewarding."

The first session of the consignment, offered at the auction house's Freeville, New York saleroom and simulcast via Invaluable on January 7, 2017 realized over $27,000. The top lot was George Leo Haydock's "The Holy Bible Translated From the Latin Vulgate", published in two illustrated volumes in 1812 and 1815, which fetched $2,250. 

Other titles of note included William Cave's "Antiquitates Apostolicae", published as a full-leather folio in 1676; the complete 24-volume "Encyclopedia Londonensis" dating from the early 19th century and lavishly illustrated with over 1,000 engraved plates; and a scarce first edition of "Le Vite Degli Imperatori Romani"-Antonio Ciccarelli's 1590 biographical history of the Roman Emperors. 

Further religious and secular material from this fascinating collection will be offered on January 22, 2017. They include Hachette's "La Devotion a la Divine Providence"; James Fennimore Cooper's "The Two Admirals"; and Digby's "The Broad Stone of Honour".

National Book Auctions is a specialist auction house focusing almost exclusively on rare and collectible books and ephemera since the 1990s. Its sister company, Worth Auctions, handles a broad variety of personal property including fine art, furnishings, jewelry, coins, and more. For more information, contact mail@nationalbookauctions.com or mail@worthauctions.com.

AntiquarianAuctions.com is an online auction site dedicated to the sale of rare and out-of print books, maps & prints, documents, letters, ephemera and vintage photography.

All pricing is done in US$. No buyer’s premium is charged.

Lot 2

Clouet (Jean Baptiste) Carte d'Afrique divisée en ses principaux Etats...
Published: Mondhare & Jean, Paris & Cadiz, 1785

Estimate: $12,000/13,500

Stunningly beautiful wall map, with historiated border, which also shows Cook's voyages. One of the few of these all maps to survive in good condition. A work of art.

L'abbé Jean Baptiste Louis Clouet (1729 - 1790) was a French cartographer and geographer born 1729 in Rennes. He was a member of the Academy of Science in Rouen. His main work was the Géographie Moderne, which first was issued in 1767. This carte de cabinet (a wall map) is one of a set of four continents and the world (five maps in all), all with historiated borders, published in 1785 by Mondhare & Jean in Paris and Cadiz.

This map of Africa is printed on four sheets which are joined and laid on reinforcing linen. This is a beautiful wall map of Africa, with two title cartouches; the principal one in French and another in Spanish. The main cartouche is elaborate and richly embellished with iconography representing various features of Africa, e.g. Africa is personified by a Ceres like female figure wearing an elephant scalp headdress from Roman iconography - and she is holding a cornucopia; pyramids; and a crocodile representing the Nile River.

Lot 3

2 Photograph Albums with 95 original photos from Gambia

Published: London, 1840 - 1843

Estimate: $1,500/2,000

With stunning pictures of Gambia during the colonisation, among the market in Basse, building of police station at Basse, police forces, Fulas, Fatoto, musicians, building of shops in Kudang, Soudan traders, Governors of Gambia (Sir Edward John Cameron and later Sir Cecil Hamilton Armitage, formerly Chief Commissioner of the Northern Territories of the Gold Coast), Cape St. Mary, views of streets and markets, villages, ports, landscapes, etc. Extremely rare photos of steamers Artimon, Tendaba, Sandu, Duncannon, Swan, Waterwitch, Combo, Mungo Park, Mansa Kila Ba, Vampire, official governor's and ships Kade, Fuladu, Rip, Maypole, Fuladu, Scout, etc.

The earliest photographs show construction and other scenes in the port of Banjul, now the capital, then still called Bathurst, including a flood in 1918. Several show the building of stores in Kudang in 1917. The latest show visits of Governors to Basse, the major city on the Eastern side of the country, in 1922. Especially interesting are the images of the native inhabitants, including Sudan traders, market scenes, washerwomen, musicians, street life, a "wizard" with worshipers, Fulas. Many travel albums have a few interesting subjects among a lot of fillers, but here almost every image is rich in content. All photographs titled in English.

Lot 7

Tyler (Richard Oviet) The Planets (limited to 25 copies)

Published: Uranian Press, New York, 1958 Estimate: $5,000/7,500

Although this spectacular work should be viewed as a cohesive work of art, with Tyler responsible for the design and execution of every part, it is nonetheless also true that each of the beautiful prints are stand-alone pieces which repay close examination, and re-examination. The subjects clearly presage Tyler's subsequent life as the Rev. Relytor of the Uranian Phalanstery.

Richard Oviet Tyler's work is "included in the permanent collections of the Library of Congress, Museum of Modern Art, U.S. Embassies Overseas, New York Public Library, David Rockefeller, and many private collections" (quote from resume published in 1962)

Large 4to. 20 leaves of sekishu paper, printed one side only in colours from woodblocks, by Tyler, each leaf signed, numbered, and titled in pencil by the artist. Unbound as issued within an original cloth portfolio, the cloth hand-printed with images by Tyler, decorative paper endpapers, cloth ties.

Lot 8

Cobb (Irvin S.) Film Script: a 152pp. original holograph manuscript “ ... The Dark Horse or So This is America ..." Published: [Los Angeles?], 1934

Estimate: $5,000/7,500

A 152pp. holograph manuscript , “ ... The Dark Horse or So This is America or Homespun”, being a 1934 early draft of a film script which eventually became a movie titled “Our Leading Citizen” starred Bob Burns, Susan Hayward and Joseph Allen, and was released in August 1939.

The substantial differences between this work and the final movie mean that, in effect, this constitutes an original unpublished work by one of America’s great 20th-century humorists.

“Irvin Shrewsbury Cobb (June 23, 1876 - March 11, 1944) was an American author, humorist, and columnist who lived in New York and authored more than 60 books and 300 short stories. Cobb was the second of four children born to Kentucky natives in Paducah, Kentucky. ... Cobb was raised in Paducah, where the events and people of his childhood became the basis for much of his later works. Later in life, he would acquire the nickname of "Duke of Paducah."

Lot 12

[Ramsey (William)] The Gentlemans Companion: or, a character of true nobility, and gentility: in the way of essay. By a Person of Quality. The health benefits of golf, and a warning about marriage: "'tis a Disease not to be Cured, but by Death".

Published: Thomas Sawbridge, London, 1676

Estimate: $2,000/3,000

A fine copy of the rare second edition of a fascinating and entertaining work, here in a high status binding: includes what is probably the first time in print that a Doctor recommends the health benefits of golf, or 'gauff' as it is spelt here. Slightly earlier, the general idea of golf as healthful recreation appears in the Marquis of Argyle's Instructions to a Son (1661, quoted in The Chronicles of Golf, p. 108 ff.).

This second and final edition of Ramesay's work appears to be scarcer than the first and is properly rare. In a section on outdoor exercise, the author writes that "Exercises and Recreations which are used.. [in the outdoors], that may benefit a Gentleman, and most healthy, are Pilmall, [and] Gauff, these by striking the Ball exercise the whole Man, together with the walk, and may be used moderately without any excess or violence" (p.136). On the other hand, Ramesay did not approve of soccer ('foot-ball'), lumping it with 'hurling' and 'wrastling': all of which he describes as 'rude pastimes better becoming the Vulgar, and Labouring Man'. He relents slightly and allows that watching rather than taking part is acceptable.

The work, first published in 1672, is remarkably wide-ranging and includes an apparently heart-felt section on the importance of thinking long and hard before marrying (" 'tis a Disease not to be Cured, but by Death"): Ramesay, who was married to a 'termagent' according to the Rev. James Grainger, apparently expanded on this theme in his Conjugam Conjurgium or, some serious considerations on marriage (published in 1673, Macclesfield copy sold for 2400 GBP).

Lot 231

Morris (William) Kelmscott Press, A Note By William Morris on His Aims in Founding the Kelmscott Press, Together With A Short Description Of The Press By S.C. Cockerell, & An Annotated List Of The Books Printed Thereat

Published: The Kelmscott Press, London, 1898

Estimate: $1,200/1,300

This is the last book printed at the Kelmscott Press. One of 525 copies. 8vo. Original linen-backed boards, lettered in black on the upper cover. pp. [iv] + 70 + [1] Frontispiece designed by Sir Edward Burne-Jones and engraved on wood by William Morris, woodcut borders to frontispiece and first page of text, 4 large woodcut initials (designed for the Froissart, but never used), text printed in black and red in the Golden type, with 5 pages in the Troy and Chaucer Type.

A very good copy. The linen spine has a couple of small
areas of early mild fraying. There is slight bumping of
two corners with minimal wear at the corners. There is a small leather ex-libris (of a prominent South African) at the top inner side of the front pastedown with some offsetting from this to a few adjacent blank pages. Otherwise the book is internally clean and unmarked and without foxing.

Lot 311

Beckett (Samuel) Waiting for Godot

Published: Faber & Faber, London, 1956

Estimate: $650/850

The first UK Edition of the Nobel prize winner's highspot and arguably the definitive play of the Twentieth Century. In the original yellow cloth with red lettering on the spine. The boards are fine and unmarked. There is a neat ownership name at the top of the front free endpaper and very light offsetting to both free endpapers, otherwise this is a fine crisp unmarked and unfoxed copy in a very good plus price-clipped dustwrapper which has some light rubbing and edge wear with a 1-2mm. sliver of loss at the top of the spine. Publisher's note tipped in as required.

AntiquarianAuctions.com is an online auction site dedicated to the sale of rare and out-of print books, maps & prints, documents, letters, ephemera and vintage photography.

Dealers and collectors worldwide have been selling and bidding on the site since 2010. Only established booksellers who are members of major national trade associations such as ABA, ABAA, PBFA or SABDA or are of good standing in the trade are permitted to sell on the site.

Auctions are held every five weeks and run on the model of a timed auction for one week.

All pricing is done in US$. No buyer’s premium is charged.

Next auction: Auction #57: 2 - 9 March 2017

Contact: Antiquarian Auctions: Paul Mills P.O. Box 186 7848 Constantia, Cape Town South Africa E-mail: support@antiquarianauctions.com Tel: +27 21 794 0600

detail.jpgBOSTON, MA - January 16, 2016 - Skinner, Inc. presents an outstanding two-session auction on Friday, January 27 in its Boston gallery. Fine Prints & Photographs starts at 12PM, followed by  Fine Paintings & Sculpture at 4PM. Previews will be on Wednesday, January 25, 12 to 5PM; Thursday, January 26, 12 to 8PM; and Friday, January 27, 9 to 10AM.

Robin S. R. Starr, Vice President and Director of American & European Works of Art, notes that in addition to a broad selection of pre-20th-century material, the auction offers an especially robust quantity of modern and contemporary work in all categories. A considerable number of items are from private collections and fresh to market, including notable examples that have descended in the families of the artists or original owners. 

Fine Prints & Photographs

The selection of prints is both broad and deep. There are works by traditional masters Rembrandt, Dürer, and Piranesi as well as strong offerings by more modern artists such as Josef Albers, Philip Guston and Alex Katz.

Among the highlights:

  •  David Hockney, Lightning (Lot 78, $7,000-9,000) One of several Hockney prints referencing the phenomenon of lightning, it is strikingly different from the colorful images more commonly associated with this multi-faceted artist.
  • Roy Lichtenstein, The Art Critic (Lot 88, $25,000-35,000) is a late work, at a point when the artist was playing off his own previous works and also looking back at the art of the earlier 20th century. This intentionally Picasso-esque version of an iconic Lichtenstein girl is retrospective in more than one sense.
  • Pablo Picasso himself is richly represented. Lot 100, Femme au char triumphal ($40,000-60,000) and Lot 101, Le joueur de diole ( $35,000-55,000) are unique hand-painted terra cotta tiles. The sale boasts a strong group of his turned ceramics as well.

Additionally there are works by Paul Klee, Helen Frankenthaler, Frank Stella, Robert Rauschenberg and—literally—too many other important artists to list.

In the photographs portion, Skinner is pleased to present work by sought-after masters such as Manuel Álvarez Bravo, Ernst Haas, Edward Weston, Ray K. Metzker, Ilse Bing, and Nan Goldin, and also fine examples by less widely-known but very accomplished photographers. 

73 diverse lots are being offered. Michelle Lamunière, Fine Photographs Specialist, points out that besides 20th-century work, there is a broad selection of 19th-century material, including images of the Middle East by Francis Frith and Auguste Salzmann. 

A major grouping of photographs are from the collection of Harvey Shipley Miller, a leading collector in the 1970s and 80s, at a time when there were few serious collectors of photographs as fine art. Proceeds from the sale of these items will benefit the Philadelphia Museum of Art. 

Of special note are:

  • Alfred Stieglitz, The Two Poplars, Lake George (with The Dying Chestnut Tree) (Lot 162, $8,000-12,000) reflects the photographer’s shift from a Pictorialist to a modernist "straight" aesthetic, while also revealing the subject of trees and nature as sources of personal meditation.
  • Andre Kertesz, Distortion 166 (Lot 161, $5,00-7,000) is one of a series of nudes photographed with mirrors and special lenses to create surreal distorted images.
  • Irving Penn, Marcel Duchamp, New York (Lot 181, $15,000-25,000) This platinum print (made in 1979 from a 1948 negative) is one of Penn’s famous studio wall “corner” series of portraits, important for its size and subject as well as its intrinsic artistic appeal and innovative use of a starkly simplified background.
  • Sally Mann, Untitled (Lot 196, $8,000-12,000) Mann is best known for her photographs of her young children and husband on their family farm in Virginia. This work represents another of Mann’s abiding interests: the Southern landscape haunted by the presence of history.

Fine Paintings & Sculpture

With over 275 lots, the second session of the auction promises a great start to the New Year. Robin Starr notes that Russians and other artists from the former Soviet Republic make an especially strong showing.

  • Ivan Aivazovsky, Along the Coast, Capri (Lot 265, $130,000-190,000). This leading Russian romanticist, influenced by Turner, was especially well known for seascapes and was hugely successful in his own lifetime.
  • Philippe Maliavine, Russian Peasants Singing (Lot 404, $150,000-250,000). Born into a poor peasant family, Maliavine (Malyavin) became a noted portraitist and international success. He combined Russian Impressionism and traditional folk themes in his paintings of colorful large-scale peasant figures.
  • François Angiboult, Cubist Still Life (Lot 442, $10,000-15,000) Behind the French masculine name was Hélène, La Baronne d’Œttingen, a Polish aristocrat married to a Russian officer. Hélène was an important member of Parisian avant-garde culture in the early 20th century.

The offerings are so rich that there will be a special lecture in conjunction with the auction, Across the Chasm of Foreignness: Art from the Russian and Soviet Empires in the West, by Anna Winestein, Executive Director of the Ballets Russes Arts Initiative, on Wednesday, January 25 at 6PM 

Artists from Cuba, Hungary, Belgium and Scotland, as well as many other countries, are represented among the more familiar American and European painters. Diversity of period, style, medium, and subject matter continue as a hallmark of this multi-part auction.

Robin Starr points to a group of French Post-Impressionist works of particular interest. These include Lot 363, Les fumées ($60,000-80,000) and Lot 364, La tour de Collioure ($250,000-350,000) both by Henri Martin. The artist experimented with the pointillist technique most associated with Georges Seurat, used to great effect in the misty atmosphere of Les fumées (meaning “the smoke”) and on a sunlit beach scene in the south of France.

Another significant Post-Impressionist work is by Louis Valtat, Boules de neige et pavot (Lot  396, $15,000-25,000). Valtat was associated with the Fauves and was an important figure in the stylistic transition from Monet to Matisse.

Alexander Calder is exceptionally well represented in this auction by five works in different media.  Three unique pieces are offered in the second session of the auction:

  • Aula Magna (Lot 438, $25,000-30,000), a gouache, pencil, and ink drawing for an installation in the auditorium of the Universidad Central de Venezuela. Working with the architects and sound engineers, Calder designed a system of suspended and fixed large panels that were successful both acoustically and aesthetically.
  • Profils (Lot 439, $70,000-90,000), gouache and ink, is a lively portrayal of a circus act. It re-caps the themes of balance and movement central to all Calder’s work, especially his sculptures and mobiles.
  • Untitled, Standing Mobile (Lot 440, $150,00-250,000) is a moving sculpture that, while less than six inches high, displays the engineering skill, artistic genius and wit for which Calder is renowned.

Image: Ray K. Metzker (American, 1931-2014). Berghoff Annex, Chicago, c. 1958

Old Master Drawings & Prints at Christie's

NEW YORK—Christie’s is pleased to announce the sale of Old Master & British Drawings on January 24 followed by the return of a various owner sale of Old Master Prints on January 25, to take place in New York for the first time in over 15 years. Old Master Paintings will be offered in April 2017, during Classic Week at Christie’s New York.

Christie’s Old Master & British Drawings sale on January 24 is comprised of 131 lots including works from distinguished private collections and institutions. Important works leading the sale are Francisco de Goya’s  Hunter with his dog in a landscape and a lavish design by Peter Paul Rubens inspired by a composition by Renaissance artist Giulio Romano.

The sale features a strong selection of Italian drawings including studies by Giacomo Cavedone, Parmigianino  and Taddeo Zuccaro, together with several works inspired by Michelangelo by Battista Franco, Giulio Clovio and Cesare da Sesto’s early study after the Sistine ceiling. Works by Piazzetta, Giovanni Battista and Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo, Piranesi and Francesco Guardi constitute the highlights of an outstanding selection of Venetian drawings.

Highlights from the British section include A male nude by Henry Fuseli, and works by Gainsborough and Burne-Jones. Charles de la Fosse’s preparatory study for the painting The Virgin’s Coronation with a selection of nineteenth-century works round out the sale.

The sale of Old Master Prints encompasses 220 prints from five centuries, offering an in-depth survey of the printed image in Europe, from Martin Schongauer’s (1450-1491) engravings created in the 1470s to a View of San Francisco by the French Charles Meryon (1821-1868), printed around 1855.

Classic prints by the most celebrated and widely collected artist-printmakers, including Albrecht Dürer (1471-1528), Rembrandt (1606-1669), and Francisco de Goya (1746-1828), stand side by side with extreme rarities, such as an anonymous, hand-coloured woodcut of the Virgin nursing the Child, printed in Northern Italy around 1530; one of a few surviving devotional prints of the period.

The estimates vary as much as the dimensions of the works: the exquisite little engravings by Hans Sebald Beham (1500-1550) are the size of a postage stamp, while the monumental woodcut The Submersion of Pharaoh’s Army (estimate: $200,000-300,000) after a design by Titian leads the sale and fills an entire wall in its scale.

DALLAS — Heritage Auctions announced sales of more than $850 million for 2016, the firm’s third-best year ever, and nearly equal to its 2015 sales of $860 million. The results are a signal of the company’s continuing dominance in the collectibles realm while other major auction houses recorded significantly lower sales volume for the same period. 

Heritage’s fine art category recorded a 28 percent leap in 2016 — in stark contrast to sales at its two largest competitors, both of which saw sales decline by approximately 30 percent.

“Through diversity, transparency and ardent attention to our clients, Heritage solidified and increased its commanding lead as the largest auction house founded in America,” said Heritage Co-Chairman James Halperin. “And we’re anticipating an even better 2017.”

U.S. Coins remains Heritage's largest category, with 2016 auction totals exceeding $192 million, outselling all other numismatic auction houses combined by a wide margin according to the Professional Numismatists Guild annual survey, which shows Heritage maintaining its 56 percent market share.

World & Ancient Coins at Heritage realized about $47 million, while Currency posted over $29 million auction sales. Both categories also showed early signs of increased market strength at major Heritage auctions in Florida and New York which realized almost $70 million during the first 10 days of January 2017.

“Based on late 2016 and early 2017 auction results, the U.S. Coin Market remains upbeat, with prices now already 10 to 12 percent above the previous years’ prices, on average,” Halperin said. “We are already seeing extremely positive results from the first coin auctions of the year. Meanwhile, our plans to expand into other markets and geographic regions are on track.”

Several of Heritage’s other categories set records: 

·         Heritage’s Sports auctions grew from $42 million in 2015 - already more than double any other auction firm’s Sports Collectibles sales - to an incredible $57.4 million in 2016. 

·         Heritage’s already-dominant Comics and Comic & Animation Art Auction category was another juggernaut, with total realized auction prices realized jumping from $34 million to a record $43 million, again outselling all other auction competitors combined. 

·         Fine Jewelry, Timepieces and Luxury Accessories at Heritage combined for a solid year as well, with more than $41.7 million in auction totals (more than $30 million in Jewelry and Watches and more than $10.7 million in Luxury Accessories), versus more than $26 million ($15 million in Jewelry and Watches & $11 million in Luxury Accessories) in 2015.

·         Movie Posters posted sales of $7.95+ million vs. $7.4+ million in 2015.

·         Luxury Real Estate saw sales increase to $19 million vs. $11.2 million for 2014 and 2015 combined. 

·         Wine recorded auction totals of $10.8 million in 2016 vs. $7.55 million in 2015.

Strategic growth continued as:

·         The company expanded its national footprint, opening an office in Palm Beach, Florida, and a full-service showroom in Chicago, Illinois. 

·         For the first time, Heritage's clientele now includes more than 1 million online registered bidder-members, with nearly 90,000 new members added in 2016. 

·         The firm also maintained its online lead, with the total number of unique visitors to HA.com holding steady at nearly twice the combined total number of unique visits the websites of Heritage Auctions’ five closest competing web sites.

·         Online sales (reported in early 2016 for 2015) were $344 million - surpassing all other auction houses; 2016 online sales figures are now being compiled and will be released soon.

Heritage Auctions is the largest auction house founded in the United States and the world’s third largest, with annual sales of more than $850 million, and over one million online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and receive access to a complete record of prices realized, with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com.

Want to get the up-to-the-minute updates and breaking news stories about Heritage Auctions? Follow us on HA.com/Facebook and HA.com/Twitter. To view an archive of Heritage press releases go to: HA.com/PR. To link to this release on your blog or Website: HA.com/PR-3096.

PJS6647_large.jpgAUSTIN, Texas—The archive for the acclaimed drama "Mad Men," one of television's most honored series in history, has been donated to the Harry Ransom Center, a humanities research library and museum at The University of Texas at Austin.

The donation was made by Matthew Weiner, the series creator, executive producer, writer and director; and Lionsgate, which produced the critically acclaimed series. The donated materials include script drafts and notes, props, costumes, digital records and video relating to the creation, production and marketing of the series.

"Mad Men," which followed the professional and personal lives of Madison Avenue advertising men and women during the 1960s, has been praised worldwide as much for its brilliantly drawn characters and artistic originality as for its historical authenticity. "Mad Men" premiered in 2007, going on to join an elite group in 2011 when it became only the fourth drama to be awarded four consecutive Emmy® Awards for Outstanding Drama Series. Additional honors for the series include: three Golden Globe® Awards for Best Television Drama Series; a Peabody Award; three Producers Guild Awards; six Writers Guild Awards; two BAFTA Awards; five Television Critics Association Awards, including Program of the Year; and being named on AFI's Top 10 Outstanding Television Programs for seven consecutive years in addition to receiving a special award at last year's luncheon for the show's final season.

"'Mad Men' is a groundbreaking program, noteworthy for the high quality of its writing, acting and design, as well as for the insightful depiction of American culture through the lens of the past," says Steve Wilson, the Ransom Center's curator of film. "Through the 'Mad Men' holdings, students and scholars will gain new insights into the creative decisions that shaped the series and a greater understanding of the evolution of motion pictures."

The series archive is rich in information about the work of actors, designers, writers, producers and creative direction, which aligns with the strengths of the Ransom Center's film holdings. The archive complements the film collection at the Ransom Center, including its collections of David O. Selznick, Gloria Swanson and Robert De Niro.

"It's our hope that the 'Mad Men' archive can satisfy academic curiosity and also provide creative inspiration," says Weiner. "Both artists and scholars can retrace our steps and see how we became interested in the parts of the story we were interested in, and how the creation of the physical world as well as the characters and storylines in the show were the work of many talented people." Read more from Weiner about the donation (PDF).

Materials from the series' 92 hour-long episodes include inspiration boards and lookbooks of period fashion and home and office design, set and costume drawings, scripts, shooting schedules and call sheets. Production footage includes dailies, screen tests, gag and demo reels, trailers and publicity material.

The donation includes a selection of costumes and small props, including materials for several of the show's fictional ad campaigns and characters' personal effects such as Joan's pen necklace, Betty's medical file and Don's terms of re-employment letter.

"'Mad Men' is more than a great show—it is part of American and television history, a ground-breaking classic worthy of the scholarly research the Ransom Center supports," says Lionsgate Television Group Chairman Kevin Beggs. "From its dramatization of gender roles in the workplace to its attention to historical detail in costume, set design and music, 'Mad Men' set standards that will be emulated for decades to come. We're proud to join with the show's brilliant creator, Matthew Weiner, in making this archive available to students who want to explore a cultural touchstone."

Scholarly and popular interest in "Mad Men" is already strong, and the Ransom Center is confident that there will be enduring research interest in this landmark series. The depth and breadth of the archive allows researchers to see the full scope of the "Mad Men" team's work.

"With this acquisition, the Ransom Center becomes a must for researching television," says Alisa Perren, associate chair and associate professor in UT Austin's Department of Radio-Television-Film. "The Center's acquisition of the 'Mad Men' materials represents an exciting moment for television and media industry scholars. This collection will be vital for those wishing to learn about modern television development, research, writing and production processes, 1960s-era advertising practices and shifting gender roles in American society."

The Ransom Center will conserve and catalog the materials, which will then be made available for exhibition, teaching and research. The Ransom Center also awards fellowships to scholars to conduct on-site research in its collections.

A selection of materials from the archive will be on view in the Ransom Center's lobby through Feb. 1.

Script from "Mad Men." Photo by Pete Smith.

GERMAN SCHOOL_Adoration of the Magi_Germany, Swabia or Franconia, c. 1465-70.jpgSince 1991 Les Enluminures has sold important examples of early drawings both to major public institutions and to private collectors. Today, opportunities to purchase drawings before 1500 are extremely limited, and even drawings before 1600 have become scarce on the art market. Les Enluminures is pleased to present a selling exhibition of 13 exceptional drawings. The drawings presented here include a wide variety of media, and they show notable shifts in technique over two centuries. They fit into three basic categories: copy drawings, sketches for eventual compositions, and fully worked out compositions.

January 20th to 28th, 2017 at Les Enluminures

23 East 73rd Street • 7th Floor

Penthouse • New York, NY 10021

Tel +1 212 717 7273

newyork@lesenluminures.com

www.lesenluminures.com

Click here for PDF version of the catalogue

“There remains much to be learned from early drawings, and because of their increasing rarity, as well as intrinsic artistic interest, every example merits close attention and further study. Here is an uncommon opportunity for private collectors and institutions alike to acquire an Old Master drawing that documents an early moment in the history of drawing.” -----Dr. Sandra Hindman

“My fascination with the history of collecting illuminated manuscript leaves and cuttings in part fueled my interest in early drawings. I noted that many collectors of Old Master drawings often included fragments of illuminated manuscripts - both leaves and cuttings - in their collections. It is worth noting that many museums worldwide house miniatures with drawings in their departments of prints and drawings (this is the practice at the Art Institute of the Chicago and the Musée du Louvre, among many others).” -----Dr. Sandra Hindman

Image: GERMAN SCHOOL. Adoration of the Magi, Germany, Swabia or Franconia, c. 1465-70. 

CA Book Fair_credit JosephDriste copy.jpgOAKLAND, CA - The 50th California International Antiquarian Book Fair recognized as one of the world's largest and most prestigious exhibitions of antiquarian books, returns to Northern California to celebrate its 50th Anniversary, Friday, February 10 through Sunday, February 12, 2017 at the Oakland Marriott City Center. 

Sponsored by the Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association of America (ABAA) and the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers (ILAB) and featuring the collections and rare treasures of nearly 200 booksellers from over 20 countries around the world, the three-day Fair gives visitors the opportunity to see, learn about and purchase the finest in rare and valuable books, manuscripts, maps, autographs, graphics, photographs, fine bindings; children's and illustrated books, and ephemera from many centuries and countries.

This year’s Book Fair will include a special exhibit from The Bancroft Library at the University of California, Berkeley, which has a long history of collecting the literary fiction of California. In more recent years, that scope has expanded to include mystery and detective fiction, fantasy and science fiction, and western fiction. This special exhibit will highlight California authors’ notable contributions in genre fiction and will emphasize recent donations to the library by featuring materials from the extensive collection of influential author, critic, and literary mentor Anthony Boucher, first editions by early members of the Northern California Chapter of Mystery Writers of America, selections by popular western and adventure writer Kenneth Perkins and MWA Grand Master Ross Macdonald, and more. 

The Book Fair will work with local “book art” artists and organizations to create an interactive, informative, and entertaining area at the Fair. Local libraries and universities will be exhibiting one-of-a-kind works from their collections. Calligraphers, bookbinders and a small press operator will once again be creating unique souvenirs for attendees to take home. Fun for all ages!

The Book Fair’s schedule will also include the following events and special exhibits, free with Fair admission:

Saturday, February 11

9:00 am - 10:30 am: California Rare Book School presents: “The Other Book: The Ames Almanack Opens a Window on Colonial America.” Two books were commonly found in eighteenth century households in North America: the Bible and the Other Book, or the Almanach.  Susan M. Allen, who teaches "History of the Book, 200-1820,” at California Rare Book School, will share an illustrated lecture from her course demonstrating how to “read” almanachs, both bibliographically and culturally, and how to decipher their puzzling tables.

11:00 am - 12:30 pm: California Rare Book School presents: Bound for El Dorado: Collecting California and the Far West. Presented by Gary F. Kurutz, Director of the Special Collections Branch, California State Library.

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm: Meet Mr. Blake, An illustrated lecture on the life, work, and influence of William Blake, given by John Windle, ABAA specialist in the literary and artistic output of this English genius. Jointly presented by the ABAA and the Bibliographical Society of America.

3:00 pm - 4:30 pm: California Rare Book School presents: Printers, Collectors, Bibliographers, and the Inquisition: A Brief Introduction to the History of the Book in Hispanic America. Presented by Daniel J. Slive, Head of Special Collections at the Bridwell Library, Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University and David Szewczyk, proprietor, Philadelphia Rare Books & Manuscripts Co. 

Sunday, February 12

12:30 - 1:15 pm: Book Collecting 101, Learn from ABAA member Vic Zoschak, Jr., Tavistock Bookshop to create a strategy for collecting books, as well as how to spot a “first edition,” judge a book’s condition, and learn bookish terms and jargon.  

1:15 - 2:00 pm: What’s This Book Worth? - Vic Zoschak, Jr., Tavistock Books will discuss the primary factors that give books commercial and monetary value, as well as strategies for appraising and selling books.

2:00 - 3:30 pm: Discovery Day is the public’s chance to discover if those old books gathering dust are worth something.  The public will receive free, expert oral appraisals on up to three books. Appraisals are limited to a first come, first served basis - within the scheduled times. 

The Book Fair’s venue in downtown Oakland is an added convenience for bibliophiles. The Oakland Marriott City Center is just steps away from the 12th Street BART Station, making it easily accessible to attendees from San Francisco and all over the East Bay.  Out-of-town visitors will appreciate staying onsite at the Marriott, plus fair visitors arriving at both Oakland and San Francisco airports can take BART directly to the new venue. 

Moreover, downtown Oakland is within easy walking distance to diverse and eclectic cuisine, hip nightspots, historic Old Oakland, museums, Lake Merritt and the waterfront at Jack London Square.  

Sponsors for the Book Fair include: Michals Insurance Agency, Inc. Media sponsors for the book fair include: ABC7, BART, Interiors California, SF Gate and The San Francisco Chronicle. 

Tickets and Information

The 50th California International Antiquarian Book Fair will be held at the Oakland Marriott City Center at 1001 Broadway in downtown Oakland from 3 p.m. - 8 p.m. on Friday, February 10; 11 a.m. - 7 p.m. on Saturday, February 11; and 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. on Sunday, February 12.

Tickets are available online or at the door. Friday admission tickets are $25; Saturday and Sunday tickets are $15 and all tickets allow return admission for the remainder of the fair. For more information about tickets or exhibiting, visit www.cabookfair.com. Pre-sale ($13-$23) and student passes ($10-$20) are available online now.

For more information about the 50th California International Antiquarian Book Fair, please visit the website at www.cabookfair.com or the ABAA website at www.abaa.org; or contact Fair Managers, White Rain Productions at, cafair@whiterainproductions.com, (800) 454-6401. 

Image: Credit Joseph Driste. 

micro.jpegDALLAS - The unprecedented sale of 32 antique microscopes is set to star in Heritage Auctions’ Jan. 19 Gentleman Collector Auction. The instruments come from a prominent West Coast collection and are offered at no reserve. The consignor has assembled a collection over the years that rivals those in many museums. All are offered with period cases and have been meticulously maintained.  

A rare cased 1858 Smith and Beck Binocular Microscope is one of the collection’s finest pieces. Over three dozen pristine accessories accompany the instrument. The microscope was the personal instrument of Thomas Glazebrook Rylands, widely regarded as one of 19th-century Britain’s brightest minds. A collection of his hand-drawn charts, calibrations and botanical specimens are included in the lot.

Microscopes have long been a fascination with gentleman collectors. Microsopists generally attribute the modern microscope to the invention of the compound microscope in the Low Countries in the early 17th century. Since then, the instrument has been a staple of scientists’ desks and laboratories across the globe. The most notable collector was King George III, whose collection filled the halls of Kew Palace.

Of the 32 instruments on offer, five date before the 20th century, including a cased J. Swift & Son Folding Traveling Monocular Microscope. The microscopes display no more than light wear from use. Some maintain full optics - a testament to the collection’s quality.

Additional auction items relating to early microscopy and 20th century science include several rare slides, such as a microscopic picture slide of a basket of flowers, and autographs of Jonas Salk, Linus Pauling, and Albert Sabin.

Heritage Auctions is the largest auction house founded in the United States and the world’s third largest, with annual sales of more than $800 million, and over one million online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and receive access to a complete record of prices realized, with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com.

Want to get the up-to-the-minute updates and breaking news stories about Heritage Auctions? Follow us on HA.com/Facebook and HA.com/Twitter. To view an archive of Heritage press releases go to: HA.com/PR. To link to this release on your blog or Website: HA.com/PR-3092.

Lot-211 copy 2.jpgNew York— On Thursday, January 26, Swann Galleries will open their 2017 auction season with Alphonse Mucha & Masters of Art Nouveau: The Harry C. Meyerhoff Collection, the largest such collection of works by the master and his circle ever to come to auction.

More than half of the over 200 lots in the sale are works by Mucha, tracing the artist’s career from his time in Prague, to Paris and New York. The selection offers rare views into Mucha’s process and personal life with previously unrecorded preparatory sketches for the famous Documents Décoratifs and Figures Décoratifs, as well as an etching of his young son.

One highlight of the sale is the complete set of Les Maîtres de l’Affiche, 1896-1900, a selection of the era’s posters from Europe and the U.S., compiled by Roger Marx. Each of the five volumes features posters by leading artists, including Mucha and others in the sale, in a special green and gold binding designed by Paul Berthon. In all, the set features 240 superlative posters reproduced as full color lithographs, and is expected to sell between $35,000 and $50,000.

Several works by Mucha make their auction debut, including a rare circular advertisement for the hair gel Krinogen, 1928, and a counter-top display screen for Savon Mucha, 1907 ($2,000 to $3,000 and $3,000 to $4,000, respectively). The scarce, smaller format of Nestlé’s Food for Infants, 1898, makes a rare auction appearance with an estimate of $4,000 to $6,000, while Bleuze - Hadancourt Parfumeur, circa 1899, which has been seen at auction only a handful of times in the last 25 years ($15,000 to $20,000).

In addition to posters, promotional ephemera designed by and after Mucha will also be in the sale, including chocolate tins, menus, programs and magazine covers, all of which speak to the artist’s popularity and ubiquity. Also present are several sets of decorative panels, for use as wall coverings in a fashionable fin de siècle home, including Têtes Byzantines (Byzantine Heads), circa 1897 ($15,000 to $20,000); Aurore et Crépuscule (Dawn and Dusk), 1899 ($10,000 to $15,000); and several versions of Les Fleurs (The Flowers), circa 1900.

Classical favorites for which Alphonse Mucha is known include the iconic Zodiac / La Plume, 1896, and Job, 1896 (each $15,000 to $20,000); La Trappistine, 1897, valued at $7,000 to $10,000; and Bières de la Meuse, in the exceedingly rare smaller format, 1897, expected to sell between $6,000 and $9,000. Further seminal works, such as the foreboding Medee / Sarah Bernhardt, 1898 ($12,000 to $18,000), and Monaco - Monte Carlo, 1897 ($12,000 to $18,000), will also be crossing the block.

The sale is filled out with works by artists in Mucha’s circle, most notably Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec’s Confetti, 1894, and Babylone d’Allemange, 1894 ($40,000 to $60,000 and $30,000 to $40,000, respectively). Also available is the iconic Ambassadeurs / Yvette Guilbert, 1894, by Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen ($4,000 to $6,000) and several other works by the artist. Travel posters by Adolfo Hohenstein, including Monaco / Exposition et Councours de Canots Automobiles, 1900, estimated at $10,000 to $15,000, and works by Pierre Bonnard, Eugène Grasset and Privat-Livemont, among others, will also be in the sale.

Harry C. Meyerhoff was a Baltimore entrepreneur in construction with a passion for horse racing, evidenced by a run of equestrian posters that start the sale, topped by Ludwig Hohwein’s Das Goldene Buch / Des Sports, 1910, estimated at $2,000 to $3,000. Meyerhoff assembled the Art Nouveau collection with his wife in the 1970s and ‘80s.

The auction will be held Thursday, January 26, beginning at 1:30 p.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Saturday, January 21 from noon to 5 p.m.; Monday, January 23 through Wednesday, January 25 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Thursday, January 26 from 10 a.m. to noon.

An illustrated auction catalogue is available for $35 from Swann Galleries, Inc., 104 East 25th Street, New York, NY 10010, or online at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information or to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Swann President and Director of Vintage Posters, Nicholas D. Lowry at 212-254-4710, extension 57 or posters@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 211 Mucha, Princezna Hyacinta, 1911. Estimate $15,000 to $20,000.

1483544578873.jpgWashington, DC—Before venturing west to capture America's frontier in paintings and photographs, 19th-century artists explored the eastern landscape, which served as a powerful source of mythmaking for a nation finding its identity in the nineteenth century. However, with the exception of images from the Civil War, photography of the East during the period has never before been the exclusive focus of an exhibition or catalog. As the first of its kind, East of the Mississippi: Nineteenth-Century American Landscape Photography will explore this fundamental chapter in America's photographic history through 175 photographs, including daguerreotypes, salted paper prints, albumen prints, stereo cards, and albums. On view at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, West Building from March 12 through July 16, 2017, the exhibition showcases photographers who documented the nation's transition over the course of the century, exploring the untouched wilderness, the devastation of the Civil War, and the dramatic transformations of industrialization.

"We are delighted to present the first exhibition devoted to this foundational period in both the history of photography and of our nation," said Earl A. Powell III, director, National Gallery of Art, Washington. "The assembling of such an extraordinary selection of photographs, many of which are rarely displayed, could not have been undertaken without the generous support of the Trellis Fund and Kate and Wes Mitchell."

Exhibition Organization and Support

The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art in association with the New Orleans Museum of Art, where it will be on view from October 5, 2017 through January 7, 2018.

The exhibition is made possible through the generous support of the Trellis Fund. Additional funding is kindly provided by Kate and Wes Mitchell.

Exhibition Highlights

Organized chronologically and thematically, East of the Mississippi begins with some of the earliest American photographs, created shortly after news of the Frenchman Jacques-Louis-Mandé Daguerre's invention reached eastern cities in late 1839. While Niagara Falls was already a favorite subject for paintings and prints, the first extant daguerreotypes of the natural wonder were made by British scientist Hugh Lee Pattinson in April of 1840. Soon after, dentist Samuel Bemis captured New England's White Mountains in an extraordinary series of daguerreotypes.

As areas of the East Coast's picturesque terrain became a popular destination for urban dwellers of Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, photography became a means of marketing sites to tourists. In July of 1845 the Langenheim Brothers adopted the panorama format popular in the nineteenth century by making five daguerreotypes of Niagara Falls and mounting them side-by-side in a single frame. Photographers James Wallace Black and Franklin White journeyed to the White Mountains, making some of the earliest series of salted paper prints of the area, while others such as James McClees, Frederick DeBourg Richards, and Jay Dearborn Edwards trained their cameras on the built environment as urban centers experienced growth and transformation. George Kendall Warren, a pioneer of the college yearbook, photographed landscapes around college campuses including West Point.

The exhibition continues with photographs and paintings from the late 1850s and early 1860s, demonstrating the close ties between the two media as photographers sought to make landscapes more deeply attuned to contemporary aesthetic concern. Influenced by the ideas of painter Thomas Cole, art critic John Ruskin, and transcendentalist philosophers such as Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau, these photographers worked in close collaboration with painters or were even painters themselves. Photographer John Moran and his brother, the painter Thomas Moran, worked side by side in the environs of Philadelphia and the mountains of Pennsylvania. Samuel Masury photographed the Loring Estate on the coast of Beverly, Massachusetts as John Frederick Kensett painted the same landscape for Coastal Scene (c. 1860-1870). Further north, Charles and Edward Bierstadt collaborated with their brother Albert on a series of albumen prints of the White Mountains before Albert painted a similar scene in 1863, Mountain Brook.

The following section presents a range of photographs that document the impact of the Civil War on the eastern American landscape, showing selections from two of the most significant photographic publications of the 19th century—Alexander Gardner's Gardner's Photographic Sketch Book of the War (1866) and George Barnard's Photographic Views of Sherman's Campaign (1866), both of which revealed the modification and devastation of the land from the war. Also featured are Andrew J. Russell's photographs of the building of military infrastructure in northern Virginia.

Two sections focus on the many ways in which photographers approached landscapes altered by industrialization. Thomas H. Johnson captured the coal mines expanding across northeastern Pennsylvania, while James F. Ryder and William H. Rau were hired by railroad companies, in 1862 and the 1890s respectively, to record newly laid train routes and showcase the scenic views made possible by the new infrastructure. Included are seven of Henry Peter Bosse's cyanotypes created while on a mapmaking survey of the upper Mississippi River. Undertaken to plan improvements to the river aimed at facilitating commerce and industry, the series illustrate photography's role in shaping development.

Finally, the exhibition presents photographers in the last decades of the century who made a living marketing the East's natural beauty while also advocating for its preservation. George Barker produced striking mammoth-plate albumen prints of Niagara Falls and Florida resorts. After finding success selling scenes of the Adirondacks to tourists and industrialists, Seneca Ray Stoddard made photographs such as Drowned Lands (c. 1888) which captured the forest ravaged by the timber industry. Stoddard used his photographs to advocate for the passing of a law to create Adirondack Park. In Wisconsin, Henry Hamilton Bennett began by selling stereographic prints of the Dells to the growing number of the river's steamboat tourists. He later protested plans for a dam that would submerge the sandstone formations he had so beautifully photographed. Finally, works by Alfred Stieglitz and Edward Steichen conclude the exhibition, hinting at the future of American landscape photography in the 20th century.

Curator, Catalog, and Related Activities

The exhibition is organized by Diane Waggoner, curator of nineteenth-century photographs, National Gallery of Art.

The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog copublished by Yale University Press and written by Diane Waggoner; with additional essays by Russell Lord, Freeman Family Curator of Photographs, New Orleans Museum of Art and Jennifer Raab, assistant professor in the history of art, Yale University. Featuring 220 color illustrations, the 288-page hardcover catalog will be available at shop.nga.gov/, or by calling (800) 697-9350 or (202) 842-6002; faxing (202) 789-3047; or e-mailing mailorder@nga.gov.

Image: Henry Peter Bosse, Construction of Rock and Brush Dam, L.W., 1891, cyanotype, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mary and Dan Solomon

X_LePaonPainting copy.jpgIn conjunction with the exhibition, “A True Friend of the Cause”: Lafayette and the Antislavery Movement, the Grolier Club and Lafayette College are pleased to offer a roundtable discussion on the role of the Marquis de Lafayette as an international antislavery advocate and his contributions to the abolitionist movement on three continents. A number of the exhibition’s themes will be explored, including the personal and intellectual origins of Lafayette’s interest in the welfare of the enslaved during and immediately following the American Revolution; his involvement in transatlantic antislavery organizations; his experiment in gradual emancipation in French Guiana; and his enduring influence on American abolitionists, both black and white.

The discussion will be moderated by the exhibition’s curators:

Olga Anna Duhl, Oliver Edwin Williams Professor of Languages, Lafayette College and Grolier Club member

Diane Windham Shaw, Director of Special Collections and College Archivist, Lafayette College

Speakers will include:

Laura Auricchio, professor of Art History at Parsons School of Design, a college within The New School. Her writings on Lafayette include The Marquis: Lafayette Reconsidered (2014), winner of the 2015 American Library in Paris Book Award, and “Transplanting Liberty: Lafayette’s American Garden,” in Dan O’Brien, ed., Gardening—Philosophy for Everyone: Cultivating Wisdom (2010). She has also written extensively on French women artists of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries with publications including Adélaïde Labille-Guiard: Artist in the Age of Revolution for the J. Paul Getty Museum (2009).

François Furstenberg, professor of History at Johns Hopkins University. He is the author of In the Name of the Father: Washington’s Legacy, Slavery, and the Making of a Nation (2006) and When the United States Spoke French: Five Refugees who Shaped a Nation (2014). His scholarship on the connections between the U.S. and the French Atlantic world in the 18th-century also includes his prize-winning 2011 article in the William and Mary Quarterly, “Atlantic Slavery, Atlantic Freedom: George Washington’s Library, Slavery, and Trans-Atlantic Abolitionist Networks,” in which Lafayette figures prominently.

John Stauffer, professor of English, American Studies, and African American Studies at Harvard University. He is the author and editor of numerous books on slavery and abolition, including Picturing Frederick Douglass: An Illustrated History of the Nineteenth Century’s Most Photographed American (2015) and Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln (2008). He has appeared in and served as an advisor to the PBS documentaries, The Abolitionists and The African American Experience: Many Rivers to Cross. In addition to antislavery, his scholarly interests include the Civil War era, social protest movements, and photography.  

January 24, 2017, 2:00-3:30 p.m. with a reception to follow

The Grolier Club, 47 E. 60th Street, New York City

To Register, please email Maev Brennan at mbrennan@grolierclub.org

Image: Jean-Baptiste Le Paon, Lafayette at Yorktown, oil on canvas, 1782. Lafayette College Art Collection

 

662a7558-6d5e-4e61-9530-1dad8b5e35d5.jpg[ITHACA, NY] National Book Auctions, located in Ithaca, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog.  

This catalog features rare, antique and decorative books as well as select additions of ephemera. We will offer an array of early titles dating back to 1539, along with a private modern collection of collectible horror and science fiction titles. Special printings and decorative antique fancy leather bindings will also be offered.          

Antique and rare books in this catalog include numerous titles. Among the earliest examples are works chronicling the use of symbols and emblems, such as the 1629 printing of Hoyer's "Flammulae Amoris - S P Augustini Versibus et Iconibus Exornatae."  Additional early titles include Sebastian Franck's "Teutscher Nation Chronic Alt und New Vorbilde," produced in 1539 and housed in a hand-tooled vellum binding with the original hand-forged brass clasps, the 1590 first edition of Ciccarelli's "Le Vite Degli Imperatori Romani," and Ruscelli's "Le Imprese Illustri con Espositioni," printed in 1572.  Among the other scarce volumes are early vellum bindings, rare engraved plates, decorative antique sets, limited editions, author-signed copies, and much more.                   

Several pleasing collections will also be showcased. Highlighted are additional early theological, historical and literary works from the 16th through 18th centuries, including Venegas' "Natural and Civil History of California," produced in two volumes in 1759. Two important early encyclopedias will also be sold including an American printing, Dobson's "Encyclopaedia or a Dictionary of Arts Sciences and Miscellaneous Literature," produced in 21 volumes over the years 1798 to 1803, and an English example, Wilkes' "Encyclopaedia Londinensis," including the full complement of 24 volumes printed between 1810 and 1829, and profusely illustrated with copperplate engravings. The modern estate collection includes thousands of titles from the horror, occult, supernatural, science fiction and fantasy genres. Highlights include works by H. P. Lovecraft and others, and desirable printings from publishers such as Arkham House.  

Found throughout this catalog are interesting group offerings. Important Celtic and Gaelic topics covering the history of Scotland and Ireland are presented alongside many bound magazine compilations dating back to the early 1800's. Early engravings and other plates have been gathered into attractive groups.   

National Book Auctions is a public auction service specializing in books, ephemera, and art. National Book Auctions is a targeted service offering experience and expertise unique to marketing antique and modern books and ephemera for consignors and collectors alike. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of collectible, signed, and first edition books. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-269-0101 or email mail@nationalbookauctions.com.

 

DALLAS — A remarkable variety of private collections, all carefully curated over decades, comes together in the fifth annual Heritage Auctions’ Gentleman Collector Auction Jan. 19 in Dallas, Texas.

“This sale covers a wide spectrum,” Heritage Vice President of Special Collections Nick Dawes said. “We started the Gentleman Collector Estates Auction five years ago with the collection of Malcolm Forbes, and I think this is the best auction we have had so far.” 

Highlights include a circa 1919 Rare and Important Mitchell 35mm Standard A Motion Picture Film Camera (est. $70,000-100,000) operates as either a hand crank or electric drive. It originally was owned by RKO Radio Pictures, before ultimately being owned and used by a Walt Disney cinematographer. One of the early Mitchell Standard motion picture cameras that shot nearly all of the early movies in Hollywood and around the world, this one retains the original design and is in excellent condition.

A Bach-Auricon 16-mm Motion Picture Newsreel Camera Package (est. $25,000-35,000), circa 1953, retains all of its original components and sits on a factory-correct original wood tripod, the height of which can be adjusted to anywhere from 67-92 inches. The camera, considered a rare find from the golden era of movie newsreel cinematography, has all of its original paint and finishes, and the large, original factory 1,200-foot film magazine. The camera’s movement and sync motor work, and the package includes the lens and sound amplifier.

A Rare American Gilman Joslin Terrestrial Library Globe on a stand (est. $15,000-20,000), circa 1869, (nicknamed the ‘Boston Globe’) highlights a rare cartographic group including maps, some dating to the 16th century.  The globe, in original condition was consigned by an East Coast family and is one of two iterations of this floor model terrestrial globe by Joslin, who was awarded a gold medal for his terrestrial and celestial globes by the American Institute in 1852.

Another lot expected to be among the most coveted in the auction is a Pair of Cantonese Export Silver Gilt Filigree Rosewater Sprinklers and Underplates (est. $12,000-18,000), circa late 18th century, made for the Indian or Middle Eastern market and recently discovered by a Heritage expert in Holland.   

Collectors will have a chance to acquire a Mole Richardson Model 410 2000 Watt Fresnel Studio Light (est. $12,000-18,000), circa 1939. This light, which stands 65-1/2 inches high, has been refreshed with factory-correct instrument pain finish and bead-blasted to expose the original Shelby Steel Tube yoke and the original bronze fittings. It includes the original on/off switch and the original factory cable, but also includes a new wireless remote control on/off switch. The light was owned and used by Paramount Film Studios until it was sold in 1988, has electrical internals that have been cleaned, de-wired and fitted with a socketed 2,700-degree LED lamp, and includes a refinished mid-century factory stand. 

Among the private collections is a group of 31 rare microscopes from a private West Coast collector. A spectacular cased Smith and Beck Binocular Microscope (est. $7,000-10,000), circa 1858, includes two full boxes of rarely seen accessories and bull’s-eye condenser, all in the original cabinetry. The instrument was the personal property of gentleman scientist extraordinaire Thomas Glaebrook Rylands, a descendant of whom sold it to the current seller. The auction also includes a 1959 Cased Ernst Leitz Dialux with an inclined binocular head with calibrated inter-pupillary adjustment and adjustable left eyepiece.

Perhaps the finest collection of vintage British biscuit tins to come to auction includes over 300 tins and most of the rarities, in very fine condition. Collectors are sure to fight over the rare William Crawford & Sons Rolls-Royce Limousine Biscuit Tin (est. $1,200-1,600), circa 1929.

Other lots that are expected to attract intense bidder interest include, but are not limited to: 

·         A rare Spanish Mechanical Rowboat Toy in its Original Box (est. $7,000-9,000), circa 1930 - one of the highest quality toys we have seen at Heritage.

·         An Alligator Leather and Silver-Mounted Violin Case (est. $3,500-5,000) from sometime in the first half of the 20th century.

·         A Mikhail Ovchinnikov Russian Silver Tankard with Wood Grain Motif (est. $3,000-5,000), circa 1908-17, with chased faux bois decoration to body simulating woodgrain, saw tooth texture on the edge of the lid and a geometric handle and heart-shaped thumbrest.

·         A collection of nautical antiques relating to Admiral Horatio Nelson, over 50 antique meerschaum pipes, an exquisite collection of Georgian and Victorian paint boxes collected by a prominent artist, over 50 remarkable alligator leather accessories, mostly of the Edwardian period, a collection of drinking tankards of the highest quality and a fascinating collection of 19th century German nutcrackers round out this delightful sale.

·         Two nine-inch Continental Carved Oak Comical Dwarf-Form Nutcrackers (est. $1,200-1,600), circa late 19th-early 20th century.

·         A 19th-century Fine Meerschaum Pipe of a Tattooed Female Moore in its original case (est. $800-1,200); woman portrayed is semi-topless.

·         Three J. Holland, W.J. Reeves & Son, and J. Newman’s English Regency Watercolor Paint Kits (est. $400-600) from the first half of the 19th century.

Heritage Auctions is the largest auction house founded in the United States and the world’s third largest, with annual sales of more than $800 million, and over one million online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and receive access to a complete record of prices realized, with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com.

Want to get the up-to-the-minute updates and breaking news stories about Heritage Auctions? Follow us on HA.com/Facebook and HA.com/Twitter. To view an archive of Heritage press releases go to: HA.com/PR. To link to this release on your blog or Website: HA.com/PR-3089.

delitium.jpgNew York, NY, December 22, 2016 — Delirium: The Art of the Symbolist Book, opening January 20 at the Morgan Library & Museum, explores creative encounters between Symbolist authors and the artists in their circles.  The movement coalesced during the second half of the nineteenth century as writers in France and Belgium sought a new form of art—one that referenced the visible world as symbols that correlate to ideas and states of mind. The Symbolists celebrated subjectivity, expressed through a nuanced language of reverie, delirium, mysticism, and ecstasy. For these writers, literature suggests meaning rather than defines it.

The Symbolist movement was a revolt against naturalism, with an emphasis on allusion and self-expression that resonated with contemporary painters, who were in turn inspired to translate these ideas to visual art. Collaborations in print with Symbolist writers presented artists with a paradox: to create illustrations for words deliberately detached from explicit meaning or concrete reality. Divergent attempts to meet this challenge helped to liberate illustration from its purely representational role, introducing an unchartered dialogue between text and image. These developments informed the emergence of the concept of the book-as-art, a tradition that continues today. 

“With its renowned collections of printed books, manuscripts, and drawings, the Morgan Library & Museum is an ideal venue for this exhibition,” said Colin B. Bailey, director of the museum. “The works in Delirium, which are drawn primarily from our own holdings, reveal the innovations and all-encompassing aspirations of the Symbolist aesthetic. The movement would have a profound effect on avant-garde literature, artists’ books, and modern theories of art.” 

The exhibition, on through May 14, features works by more than thirty leading figures, including Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), Stephane Mallarmé (1842-1898), Paul Verlaine (1844-1896), Alfred Jarry (1873-1907), Maurice Maeterlinck (1862-1949), Odilon Redon (1840-1916), Maurice Denis (1870-1943), Pierre Bonnard (1867-1947), Henri Fantin-Latour (1836-1904), Henry van de Velde (1863-1957), and Fernand Khnopff (1858-1921). 

THE EXHIBITION

Delirium opens with an introduction to some of the movement’s literary and artistic precursors: works by Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867) and the painters Eugène Delacroix (1798-1863) and Puvis de Chavannes (1824-1898). Baudelaire’s writings on Delacroix helped shape the foundation of Symbolist poetics. A manuscript of an early poem about Delacroix’s Tasso in the Madhouse (1839) is juxtaposed with a study for one of the many works championed by the poet: The Struggle of Jacob with the Angel (1850). What moved Baudelaire was the painter’s ability to convey his interior life through the suggestive use of color, contour, and movement. These effects provoked memories, involuntary associations, and reverie in each viewer. Baudelaire adapted these ideas to poetry in his ground-breaking works: Fleurs du mal (1857) and Les épaves (1866), illustrated by the Belgian artist Félicien Rops (1833-1898).

There is not a uniform or guiding artistic style connected with the Symbolist movement, which is immediately apparent among the illustrations in the books on view. The writers counted among their friends visual artists associated with many avant-garde groups: Impressionists (Manet), the Decadents (Rops), the Nabis (Vallotton, Rippl-Ronai), post-Impressionists (Denis, Bonnard), Les XX (Khnopff, Minne), and Art nouveau (van de Velde, Rysselberghe). Each artist brought their individual aesthetic styles to the challenge of illustrating Symbolism— a literary movement, which itself lacked coherence.

At the center of the gallery, the first and last artist’s book associated with the movement are presented: Stéphane Mallarmé’s L’après-midi d’un faune (1876), illustrated by Édouard Manet; and Paul Verlaine’s Parallèlement (1900), illustrated by Pierre Bonnard. With its delicate imagery, oscillating typography, and Japanese-inspired book design, L’après-midi d’un faune beautifully conveys Mallarmé’s alternating states of reality, dream, and memory. Like several poets and novelists in the exhibition, Mallarmé expressed ambivalence toward illustration, believing that poetry needed no elaboration. Nevertheless, Mallarmé solicited illustrations from his friends throughout his career.

The variations in Bonnard’s intimate designs for the deluxe edition of Verlaine’s Parallèlement present an entirely different aesthetic. This is the result of the artist’s personal responses to each poem. His visual plays of association are depictions not necessarily of the subject matter but of whatever thoughts and visions emerged as he was reading. Bonnard’s asymmetric and erotic imagery skirts the margins or transgresses the linear order of the book’s classic typography. The artist kept pace with his spontaneous impressions of Verlaine’s text by sketching some designs directly onto typeset pages.

The artwork within the Symbolist books may be understood as a single artist’s interpretation of and reaction to the words on the page. Other artist collaborations on view that exemplify such individual responses to literature include George Minne’s melancholy imagery for Maurice Maeterlinck’s Serres chaudes, Redon’s haunting frontispieces for the poet Iwan Gilkin, and Maurice Denis’s evocative designs for André Gide’s Le voyage d’Urien.

While much of the artwork that corresponds with the Symbolist movement is anti-naturalistic, the legacies of some writers associated with the movement are tied to their public image and well-known portraits that were disseminated in print. Félix Vallotton (1865-1925), ubiquitous in periodicals of the 1890s, is known for his many thumbnail portraits of Symbolist writers. One of his first artistic woodcuts, a portrait of Paul Verlaine, is on view, along with images of Arthur Rimbaud by Fantin-Latour and Carjat, Manet’s engraved portrait of Baudelaire, and Nadar’s photograph of Mallarmé.

Delirium culminates with an examination of cover and title designs. Symbolist publishers, particularly in Belgium, were at the forefront of using cover designs as visual preludes to the literature within. The Pre-Raphaelite influence on Symbolist imagery is apparent in Carlos Schwabe’s (1866-1926) aspirant figure on the cover of Dreams by Olive Schreiner—a rare example of a Symbolist artist illustrating work by a female author. Also represented are the Belgian artists Théo van Rysselberghe and Henry van de Velde, whose book decorations heralded a new form of non-representational ornament. Their works encompass the influence of the Arts and Crafts movement, Seurat’s ideas about the affective qualities of line, and the emergent Art Nouveau. The experimental typography of author and artist Alfred Jarry, whose illegible title design is itself a Symbolist work of art, is also on view.

Translation Feature

Selected translations of poetry associated with objects on view will be made available on a hand-held card in the gallery. For this special feature, the Morgan collaborated with the contemporary poets Ariana Reines, Mark Polizzotti, Barry Schwabsky, Luc Sante, Marcella Durand, and John Godfrey to enrich the public’s experience by providing works by Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Rimbaud, and others in English.

Image: Odilon Redon (1840-1916), Centaure lisant, 19th century, Charcoal on light brown paper. The Morgan Library & Museum, Thaw Collection.

Jean Baptiste Balthazar Sauvan.jpegThe first Interiors auction of 2017 kicks off with an important collection of London Underground posters designed by Clifford (1907-1985) and Rosemary (1910-1998) Ellis. Alongside a selection of the Ellises’ own drawings, prints and paintings will be works by Walter Sickert, Howard Hodgkin, Adrian Heath and Wojciech Fangor. Interiors takes place on 10th and 11th January at Donnington Priory and will also feature Furniture, Carpets, Clocks and Works of Art. 

A fabulous range of Jewellery, Silver, Watches and Pens will be offered on 18th January, with the special online Australia Day Wine auction on 26th January. 

Books and Works on Paper will take place on 23rd February, and features a superb selection of landscape aquatints. Fine Wine, Port and Champagne follows on 24th February and both auctions will be held at Bloomsbury House, London. 

March will see both the sale of Works from the Collection of Jan Krugier, the highly renowned art dealer (8th March) and Autographs & Memorabilia at Bloomsbury House, London on 23rd March. Concluding the March auctions will be Fine Clocks, Barometers and Scientific Instruments (28th March) and Fine Furniture and Works of Art (29th March) with many more to come as the year continues. 

Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions’ Interiors sale at Donnington Priory, Newbury, on 10th & 11th January 2017 will include property from the collection of the late Clifford and Rosemary Ellis. Part of the legacy left by the Ellises includes paintings, drawings and posters by both Clifford and Rosemary either separately or working together. Lots range in estimate from £100 - £2,000.

In 1933, they were commissioned to design a series of posters for the London Underground. They also designed posters together for the Empire Marketing Board, a government Department established in 1926 with the aim of encouraging people to buy Empire products. The poster campaigns were an integral part of the advertising program and Clifford and Rosemary produced a number of designs during the 1930s. They also designed posters for Shell and the General Post Office.

Save the date…in 2017

Jewellery, Silver, Watches & Pens (Donnington Priory, Newbury) |18th January

Books and Works on Paper (Bloomsbury House, London) | 23rd February 

Australia Day Wine (online auction) | 26th January 

Jewellery, Silver & Watches (Donnington Priory, Newbury) | 15th February 

Wine: Timed Online auction | 20th February & 23rd March 

Interiors (Donnington Priory, Newbury) | 21st & 22nd February 

Books and Works on Paper (Bloomsbury House, London) | 23rd February 

Fine Wine, Port, Champagne (Bloomsbury House, London) | 24th February 

Works from the Collection of Jan Krugier (Donnington Priory, Newbury) | 8th March 

Fine Jewellery, Watches & Silver (Donnington Priory, Newbury) | 15th March 

20thc. Books and Works on Paper & Early Prints (Bloomsbury House, London) | 16th March 

Autographs & Memorabilia (Bloomsbury House, London) | 23rd March 

Fine Clocks, Barometers & Scientific Insts (Donnington Priory, Newbury) | 28th March 

Fine Furniture & Works of Art (Donnington Priory, Newbury) | 29th March

Image: Jean Baptiste Balthazar Sauvan, Picturesque Tour of the Seine, from Paris to the Sea, 25 hand- coloured aquatint plates with hand-coloured vignette at the end, 1821. Est. £1,800 - £2,200.

 

A new selection of 28 posters, prints, drawings and photographs is now on display in the ongoing Library of Congress exhibition “World War I: American Artists View the Great War.” 

The exhibition opened in May 2016 and is on view through Saturday, Aug. 19, 2017 in the Graphic Arts Galleries on the ground floor of the Library’s Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C.  It is free and open to the public Monday through Saturday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.  Tickets are not needed.

In the new rotation of art, notable themes include the vilification of the German enemy; trench warfare and the use of poison gas; the service of Red Cross nurses and volunteers; and the aftermath of the war and recovery.  Artists represented include George Bellows, Kerr Eby, Charles Dana Gibson, Gordon Grant, Edwin Howland Blashfield and Samuel J. Woolf; poster artists Frances Adams Halsted, James Montgomery Flagg and John Norton; cartoonists McKee Barclay and Otakar Valasek; and photographer Lewis Hine. 

The works of art are drawn from the Library’s Prints and Photographs Division collections.  In addition to the 28 new items on display, a monitor slideshow highlights another 60 items.

The exhibition examines the use of wartime art for patriotic and propaganda messages—by government-supported as well as independent and commercial artists.  Many of the artists worked for the federal government’s Division of Pictorial Publicity, a unit of the Committee on Public Information.  Led by Charles Dana Gibson, a pre-eminent illustrator, the division focused on promoting recruitment, bond drives, home-front service, troop support and camp libraries.  In less than two years, the division’s 300 artists produced more than 1,400 designs, including some 700 posters.

Heeding the call from Gibson to “Draw ‘til it hurts,” hundreds of leading American artists created works about the Great War (1914-1918).  Although the United States participated as a direct combatant in World War I from 1917 to 1918, the riveting posters, cartoons, fine art prints and drawings on display chronicle this massive international conflict from its onset through its aftermath.

“World War I: American Artists View the Great War” is made possible by the Swann Foundation for Caricature and Cartoon, and is one in a series of events the Library is planning in connection with the centennial of the United States’ entry into World War I.  An online version of the exhibition is available at loc.gov/exhibits/american-artists-view-the-great-war/.  Katherine Blood and Sara Duke from the Prints and Photographs Division at the Library of Congress led the division’s curatorial team.  Betsy Nahum-Miller from the Library’s Interpretive Programs Office is the exhibition director. 

The art exhibition complements the upcoming major exhibition “Echoes of the Great War: American Experiences of World War I,” which will open Tuesday, April 4, 2017.  “Echoes” will feature more than 200 items and will draw from a wide array of original materials from the Library of Congress, which has the most comprehensive collection of multi-format World War I holdings in the nation.  In combination, these exhibitions reveal the extraordinary stories of this turbulent time in our nation’s history and the powerful global forces that war unleashed.

Now through April 2017, the Library of Congress is featuring twice-monthly blogs about World War I, written by Library curators who highlight stories and collection materials they think are most revealing about the war.  The blogs can be viewed at loc.gov/blogs/.  In 2017 and 2018, the Library will offer lectures, symposia and other programming on World War I, produce educational materials, publish a book about the war, and plant Victory Gardens in the front beds at its Jefferson and Adams buildings. 

The Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division holds nearly 16 million photographs, drawings and prints from the 15th century to the present day.  International in scope, these visual collections represent a uniquely rich array of human experience, knowledge, creativity and achievement, touching on almost every realm of endeavor: science, art, invention, government and political struggle, and the recording of history.  For more information, visit loc.gov/rr/print/.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov, and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

313.jpgLas Vegas, NV, December 19, 2016 - Morphy Auctions, the finest auction destination for fresh to the market collections, is pleased to announce this can’t miss sale to be held on Thursday, January 19th at the company’s Las Vegas, Nevada gallery starting at noon EST.  This event will feature “the best of the west” across numerous collecting categories and price points.   All items in this sale are available for preview now.

This sale’s selection of over 50 American and English Bowie knives is truly on the cutting edge.  Bowie knives are fixed blade fighting knives with a cross-guard and a clip point; they are named after James Bowie who was known for his knife fighting skills. Bowie died at the Alamo.  Getting right to the point, lot #226, a Rezin Bowie Presentation Knife, is the big prize in this key category.  This example was one of four knives given by Rezin Bowie, brother of James Bowie, to four important friends in honor of James’ accomplishments.  This knife was gifted to Edwin Forrest, a popular American actor who was friend to both Bowie brothers.  This well documented rarity with provenance is estimated at $100,000-200,000 and should be of great interest to historians, museums, and miliatria enthusiasts worldwide.  

Other rock-star caliber Bowie knives include lot #55, a c. 1835 knife stamped Schively 75 Chestnut Street Philad., estimated at $75,000-125,000.  This breathtaking example, complete with its beautiful, classic skeletal style Schively scabbard with German silver mounts, is one of less than two dozen known in existence.  And lot #56, a massive c. 1835 knife stamped Broomhead & Thomas Celebrated American Hunting Knife, is estimated at $45,000-60,000. This rarity, in wonderful condition, is detailed with German silver mounts, Mother of Pearl scales, four decorative rivets, and a nameplate on both sides.  It also comes with its original brown leather scabbard.  

This event offers a 24 carat opportunity to purchase some of the finest antique gold bars, nuggets, gold quartz jewelry, watches, and accessories in memory.  Collectors will undoubtedly take a shine to the more than 60 precious metal selections on offer.   Bar none, lot #106, a Harris Marchand & Co. gold bar with serial number 6476, is the prime investment in this auction with its $250,000-350,000 estimate.  This large, all original and documented rectangular ingot weighs 56.65 ounces and has an 1857 value of $1002.42.  Lot #104, a spectacular and highly ornate pocket watch, is another timely auction highlight.  This solid gold timepiece, estimated at $50,000-80,000, is made and signed by the Illinois Watch Company and features elaborate gold in quartz and moss agate decorations, elegant engraving, and a highly desirable watch chain.  And lot #114, a rare gold match safe inlaid with gold quartz on both sides as well as its top, should spark lots of interest with its $15,000-25,000 estimate.  

Native American cultural materials and weapons are two key categories in this exciting, upcoming sale.  Many of these one of a kind treasures and artifacts exhibit extraordinary craftsmanship.  Lot #169, a c. 1870 Cheyenne beaded war shirt is made from buffalo hide and features hair drops.  It is estimated at $30,000-60,000.  Lot #4, a beautiful c. 1860 Northern Plains contour pipe bag detailed with an unusual pony beaded panel with a stylized butterfly, copper cones, and brass beads, is estimated at $15,000-25,000.  And lot #10, a c. 1860’s early Sioux beaded buffalo hide cradle decorated with horse tracks is estimated at $20,000-40,000.

It’s time to get a handle on this event’s selection of interesting and antique tomahawks.  Lot #179, a c. 1760 Eastern pipe tomahawk, features an iron head with a scalloped edge and brass inlay, a blade engraved with a cannon on one side and the sun on the reverse, and a brass inlaid pipe bowl.  It retains its original gasket and haft and is estimated at $50,000-100,000.  Lot #346, a c. 1870 Cheyenne Plains tomahawk with an extremely wide pictorial blade depicting two Indians in battle is estimated at $30,000-40,000.  And lot #13, a c. 1870 Plains pipe tomahawk is unusually decorated with two bat wing cut-outs, seven inlaid brass circles, and design elements punched around the blade.  This stunning, rare example is estimated at $30,000-40,000.

Antique materials relating to America’s expansion in the 1800’s is well represented in this sale.  Many “Go West” themed items are on offer, including signs, posters, calendars, displays, and other ephemeral categories.  lot #316, a Rock Island railroad reverse glass advertising sign has Mother of Pearl inlays along the entire locomotive and shows incredible detail. This sign would have hung in an executive’s office and was made by the Western Sandblasting Co. in Chicago.  It is estimated at $40,000-80,000.  Could there be a bidding war over lot #146, a Battle Axe cigar reverse glass advertising sign?  This remarkable example shows an image of a smiling Native American and an older well-dressed gentleman enjoying some Battle Axe tobacco; the colors are magnificent and this piece has a great presence.  It is estimated at $80,000-150,000.  And it’s “California, here I come!” with lot #313, an advertisement from 1898 for “California's Golden Jubilee and Mining Fair.” This jewel of a piece pictures a miner with axe slung over his shoulder and raising a large gold nugget above his head.  It has an auction estimate of $40,000-80,000.

This sale rounds out with an intoxicating blend of outstanding vintage and antique back bar bottles, with over 50 examples on offer.  Lot #258, a c. 1890 fine old gin label under glass bottle featuring an attractive young woman wearing a large hat, flirts with a $15,000-25,000 estimate.  Lot #87, a c. 1895 Custer's Reserve whiskey back bar bottle decorated with enameled lettering and a fantastic image of Custer riding a horse, takes a stand at $10,000-15,000.  And lot #415, a c. 1895 a Black Cat Whiskey enameled bar bottle in excellent plus condition will have collectors “feline groovy” with its $4,000-6,000 estimate. 

According to Dan Morphy, Morphy Auctions’ President, "We are so looking forward to kicking off our 2017 auction year in Las Vegas with this truly outstanding sale.  The “western themed” merchandise on offer is among the highest quality and diverse in nature to come to auction in memory.  Clearly, Las Vegas is the ideal location for an auction event featuring these “geospecific” categories!  The antique bottles and advertising selections in this sale are also truly remarkable.  Just being around them is like taking a trip backward in time.  We welcome you to visit our gallery in Las Vegas to view these rarities in person, or of course check them out online anytime at www.morphyauctions.com.”

About Morphy Auctions:
Morphy Auctions, the finest auction destination for fresh to the market collectibles, is located in Denver, Pennsylvania. The company also has an office in Las Vegas, Nevada.  A full service auction house, the company presents over 30 premier auctions annually, as well as monthly discovery sales. Morphy's team of specialists includes the nation's finest and most recognized experts in popular collecting categories including advertising; firearms; fine automobiles, automobilia and petroliana; coin-operated machines; antiques, fine, and decorative art; dolls, bears, toys, and trains; cast iron; coins; marbles; and jewelry.  Morphy Auctions is owned by President and Founder Dan Morphy, himself a lifelong and passionate collector of antiques, banks, and numerous other categories.  Morphy's has been in business since 2004 and has grown from two to over 65 employees in over a decade.   

Morphy Auctions, Las Vegas is located at 4520 Arville Street, Las Vegas, NV 89103.   We can be reached by phone at 702-382-2466, by fax at 702-382-6513, and by email at info@morphyauctions.com.  Our Las Vegas gallery is open Monday through Friday from 9:00am-4:00pm. For more information on Morphy's, please visit www.MorphyAuctions.com.

Image: Lot 313 California's Golden Jubilee Advertisement, est. $40,000-80,000. Courtesy of Morphy Auctions.

091cf2fae7a905a46cae9b1a5fdfdf92da40cf3b.pngBOSTON, MA - (December 16, 16) A Marilyn Monroe signed photograph sold to $24,959 according to Massachusetts-based RR Auction.

The sultry vintage matte-finish portrait of Monroe taken during a Frank Powolny glamour shoot in 1953, signed and inscribed in white ink, “To Jimmie, Best regards, Marilyn Monroe.”

Monroe and Powolny most famously teamed up in 1953 for a series of stunning, artfully framed publicity stills for the 1953 film Gentlemen Prefer Blondes.

“Powolny captured countless stars in photos that ended up in newspapers, magazines and theater lobbies around the world,” said Robert Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction.

Immortalized for his classic World War II pinup of Betty Grable, Powolny remained a trusted photographer for Monroe throughout her career, and is noted as taking the last known still photographs of the starlet during production of Something's Got to Give, one week before her death in 1962.

 “A gorgeous image elevated by the contrast of Monroe’s white signature and the deepness of the unlit ‘film noir’ background,” said Livingston. 

Highlights from the sale include, but are not limited by:

Greta Garbo signed and inscribed photograph to Eva von Berne, sold for $17,908.

James Dean 'East of Eden’ oversized signed photograph, sold for $12,383.

Three Stooges signed photograph of the ‘Dizzy Doctors’, sold for $8,467.

Peg Entwistle oversized signed photograph, sold for $6,072.

Wizard of Oz: Billie Burke Signed photograph,sold for $5,598.

Superman: George Reeves signed photograph, sold for $5017.

The Tom Gregory Hollywood Auction from RR Auction began on Thursday, December 8th and concluded on Thursday, December 15, 2016. For information, visit the RR Auction web site at www.rrauction.com.  

Image: Glamorous, boldly signed 1953 Frank Powolny portrait of Marilyn.

Dallas - Following the death of former astronaut and Senator John Glenn, experts at Heritage Auctions - the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer - caution collectors about fake and forged autographs entering the marketplace. 

“Whenever a celebrity or historical figure passes, we quickly see spurious signatures and counterfeit memorabilia being offered online and at flea markets,” said Michael Riley, director of Space Collectibles at Heritage Auctions. “Legendary astronaut John Glenn’s passing is an opportunity for fraudsters to trick the public with forged autographs and other fake items purportedly from him.”

Glenn, the man author Tom Wolfe called “the last true national hero America has ever made” died Dec. 8. The former war hero, astronaut and United States Senator was revered across the country, and his death elicited an outpouring of sentiment to his family from around the globe he once circumnavigated.

Following his history-making achievement as the first American to orbit the Earth to his career in the U.S. Senate and even a bid for the U.S. Presidency, Glenn lent his autograph often on objects as diverse as baseballs, book signings of his memoir, publicity photographs and many other keepsakes. 

If the price is too low to be believed, there is a chance the item is fake, forged or stolen. Consider that in October 2009, a photo with a mat signed by 28 astronauts - including Glenn - sold for $15,535. In October 2008, a pair of Mercury 7 Type M Test Gloves Glenn wore sold for $7,170. In May 2016, a Glenn-autographed photo of himself in an orange spacesuit that was taken for his STS-95 mission in 1998, when at 77 he became the oldest person to fly in space, sold for $750. 

Genuine Glenn autographs usually sell for $50-$100, and higher for special items, such as an authentic signature on a genuine item related to his career as an astronaut, like a Mercury-Atlas 6 (Friendship 7) Space Flown One Dollar Bill, which sold for more than $20,000 at auction, according to Riley.

Hopefully, the market will not be flooded with Glenn-signed memorabilia. He has been in the public eye since 1959 as an astronaut and U.S. Senator and has willingly signed items, so there is no shortage of his mementos on the market.

“The ideal method of authenticating an autograph is to get it in the hands of a knowledgeable expert,” Riley said. “Those extremely familiar with his signature can determine if it is real or a fake. 

Nonetheless, there are steps people can take to reduce the risk of getting lured into a transaction that is done dishonestly, priced unfairly, or even both:

·         Always make sure to buy and sell through a reputable dealer.

·         Beware of Autopen Signatures. The Autopen (a machine that produces mechanized replicas of autographs) can appear authentic, but there is a website that allows collectors to check signatures against known machine patterns.

Heritage Auctions is the largest auction house founded in the United States and the world’s third largest, with annual sales of more than $800 million, and over one million online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and receive access to a complete record of prices realized, with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com.

Want to get the up-to-the-minute updates and breaking news stories about Heritage Auctions? Follow us on HA.com/Facebook and HA.com/Twitter. To view an archive of Heritage press releases go to: HA.com/PR. To link to this release on your blog or Website: HA.com/PR-3086.

12_Newton.JPGThe Fine Books & Manuscripts sale totaled $9,433,063, with 82% sold by lot and 91% sold by value, making this the highest total for a various owner sale of Books & Manuscripts at Christie’s. There was active in-room, phone, and online participation from institutions, established collectors, and new buyers with registered bidders from over 25 countries.

The top lot was Sir Isaac Newton’s (1642-1727) Philosophiae naturalis principia mathematica (estimate: $1,000,000-1,500,000), which realized $3,719,500, nearly four times its low estimate and setting a new world auction record for a printed scientific book. 

Other sale highlights included nine lots of correspondence to the Marquis de Chastellux (1734-1788), featuring six letters by George Washington (1731-1799) and three by Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), which collectively realized $1,138,750, with single lots more than doubling initial estimates.

The top lot of the selection was George Washington's (1732-1799) Autograph letter signed (“Go: Washington”), Mount Vernon, 25 April, 1 May 1788, to François Jean de Beauvoir, Marquis de Chastellux (estimate: $80,000-120,000), which realized $307,500.

Strong results were achieved for private collections including early botanical books belonging to Cornelius J. Hauck (1893-1967), which sold 90% by lot, and an important collection of major 19th century American authors, formed by Mrs. J. Insley Blair of Far Hills, New Jersey, which sold 92% by lot, with many titles more than doubling initial estimates.

BEVERLY HILLS, California - A Production Cel and Key Master Background of the Evil Queen and her Magic Mirror from Walt Disney’s Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs conjured $59,750 to lead Heritage Auctions’ $1,385,924 Animation Art Auction in Beverly Hills. The Dec. 10 auction is the fifth straight animation auction to surpass $1 million during the last two years, realizing a grand total of $7.4 million.

“This only proves the animation market is increasingly being considered as fine art,” said Jim Lentz, Director of Animation at Heritage Auctions. “No other auction house has been able to deliver consignors anywhere near our $7 million in successful bids over the last two years.”

A rare, Production Cel Sequence and Pan Key Master Background Setup from the 1965 holiday classic, A Charlie Brown Christmas, sold for $59,750, but it was art from Walt Disney Studios that claimed the lion’s share of bids.

Concept art from artist Mary Blair proved popular, as her imagining of Disneyland’s It’s a Small World attraction sold for $31,070; her concept painting for the mermaid sequence in 1953’s Peter Pan ended at $26,290 and concept art of Pan and Wendy, Michael, John and Tinker Bell flying off to Neverland sold for $14,340.

A hand-painted Cel Setup of the Blue Fairy chatting with Jiminy Cricket from Pinocchio sold for $21,510, and Production Cels and Master Pan Production Background Setup of the main characters from 1955’s Lady and the Tramp ended at $13,145.

Warner Brothers cels by Chuck Jones saw intense bidder interest as 15 bidders competed to own a single Production Cel of Elmer Fudd and Bugs Bunny from the animated short What’s Opera, Doc?, which sold for $13,145. A Color Painting of Bugs Bunny and Friends hand-drawn by Jones himself sold for $12,547.

Additional highlights include, but are not limited to:

A group of Four Original Drawings of various Disney characters published by Good Housekeeping in the 1930s and 1940s sold for a combined $21,569.

An Original Painting featuring “Snow White” by Peter Max sold for $11,950.

A drawing of the “Horned King” by Tim Burton for the 1985 film The Black Cauldron brought $11,950.

A circa 1935-39 Production Cel and Background Setup featuring both Mickey and Minnie Mouse from the short the Brave Little Tailor/Music Land realized $10,755.

A rare, detailed Model Sheet from 1940, showing early renditions of title character Pinocchio, sold for $9,560, nearly double its $5,000 pre-auction estimate.

Gulliver's Travels Production Cel Setup and Key Master Background Setup (Max Fleischer, 1939) sold for $7,170

A rare Title Cel and Master Background Set up for Super Friends animated television program sold for $1,673.

Heritage Auctions is the largest auction house founded in the United States and the world’s third largest, with annual sales of more than $800 million, and over one million online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and receive access to a complete record of prices realized, with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com.

Want to get the up-to-the-minute updates and breaking news stories about Heritage Auctions? Follow us on HA.com/Facebook and HA.com/Twitter. To view an archive of Heritage press releases go to: HA.com/PR. To link to this release on your blog or Website: HA.com/PR-3082.

Signature Image.jpgNew York, NY, December 2016 — One of the most popular and enigmatic American writers of the nineteenth century, Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) wrote almost 1,800 poems. Nevertheless, her work was essentially unknown to contemporary readers since only a handful of poems were published during her lifetime and a vast trove of her manuscripts was not discovered until after her death in 1886.  

Often typecast as a recluse who rarely left her Amherst home, Dickinson was, in fact, socially active as a young woman and maintained a broad network of friends and correspondents even as she grew older and retreated into seclusion. Bringing together nearly one hundred rarely seen items, including manuscripts and letters, I’m Nobody: Who are you?—a title taken from her popular poem—is the most ambitious exhibition on Dickinson to date. It explores a side of her life that is seldom acknowledged: one filled with rich friendships and long-lasting relationships with mentors and editors.  

The exhibition closely examines twenty-four poems in various draft states, with corresponding audio stops.  In addition to her writings, the show also features an array of visual material, including hand-cut silhouettes, photographs and daguerreotypes, contemporary illustrations, and other items that speak to the rich intellectual and cultural environment in which Dickinson lived and worked. The exhibition is organized in conjunction with Amherst College. 

“Emily Dickinson’s work—and life—remain endlessly compelling to literary scholars and to the larger artistic community,” said Colin B. Bailey, director of the Morgan Library & Museum. “With its experimental poetics and vivid language, her verse continues to be a source of critical inquiry, while her quiet, unassuming years in Amherst are celebrated in music, theatre, and the cinema. The Morgan’s exhibition explores a less well-known aspect of her life—her personal and professional friendships—that will surely delight and surprise exhibition-goers.”

THE EXHIBITION

I. Childhood Years

“I attend singing school.”

Born in 1830, Emily Dickinson was part of a tight-knit family at the social center of Amherst, a small college town in western Massachusetts. She lived almost her entire life in the shadow of Amherst College, which was cofounded by her grandfather and where her father served as treasurer between 1835 and 1873. Life in such an environment brought a steady stream of visitors from far and wide, and Dickinson lived within an intellectually stimulating community that would later be reflected in her letters and poetry. Her father was protective, yet encouraged his children to pursue educational opportunities. Primary schooling for young women was not uncommon in Dickinson’s time, and she formed many strong attachments to her schoolmates and instructors at Amherst Academy, where she was part of a close group of friends known as the circle of five. Her exposure to poetry and keen use of language dates to her youth, as does her interest in the natural world and aesthetic presentation, evident in the books from her library, early letters, and her herbarium, an album of carefully pressed botanical specimens.

II. A Year at Mount Holyoke

"Everything is pleasant & happy here.”

At the age of sixteen, Dickinson left home to study at Mount Holyoke Female Seminary, a women’s college, in nearby South Hadley, Massachusetts. She tested into the first of three academic levels but was promoted to the second by midyear and took courses in chemistry, botany, history, and languages. She was roommates with her cousin Emily Norcross and her time there is well documented in the surviving letters she sent to her brother, Austin, and friend Abiah Root, one of the circle of five friends from Amherst Academy. It was not unusual for women to attend only a single year of higher education, and Dickinson returned to Amherst at the end of the academic year.

III. Companions and Correspondents

“Stay! My heart votes for you.”

Dickinson was not a student at Amherst College—which was established in 1821 with the explicit goal of educating, in Noah Webster’s phrase, “indigent young men of promising talents and hopeful piety” for the Christian ministry—but, as the daughter of the college treasurer, she was expected to attend public events such as commencement and to assist with the annual trustee’s reception hosted at her father’s house. After the Civil War, the college drifted away from its focus on missionary training, but during Dickinson’s lifetime it was a hotbed for religious revivals. She led a socially active life when she was young, attending performances, concerts, and lectures and remaining close to friends she had made as a child at Amherst Academy. She also formed new relationships, often through her brother, Austin. He introduced her to his social circle and Dickinson would have a brief flirtation with one member. Later, Austin’s wife, Susan, would become one of the poet’s dearest friends. Even as she became more reclusive, and increasingly withdrew from society in the 1860s, Dickinson maintained an active correspondence, composing more than one thousand letters in her lifetime.

IV. Literary Influences and Connections

“After long disuse of her eyes she read Shakespeare & thought why is any other book needed?”

One benefit of life in a college town was access to books, newspapers, and magazines that might not otherwise be readily available. The Dickinson family kept a respectable library in their home, and Dickinson also borrowed books from friends. In addition to her wide-ranging reading habits, she was acquainted with some major figures in the worlds of publishing and literature, chief among them the editors Samuel Bowles, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, and Thomas Niles, as well as the writer and activist Helen Hunt Jackson. Although Bowles and Higginson both championed women writers, their views were far from universal. Helen Hunt Jackson forged her own career as an author and urged Dickinson to publish her poetry, with one small success.

V. Civil War Years

“I heard a Fly buzz-when I died-” 

Massachusetts played an important role in the Civil War, politically and militarily. For a brief time, the state’s Springfield Armory, not far from Amherst, was the sole government manufacturer of muskets and other arms. Hundreds of local residents, both white and African American, joined the Union army, although Dickinson’s brother Austin avoided service. Students and faculty from the college also joined the conflict. Charity events related to the war became a regular feature of daily life. Dickinson began collecting her rapidly increasing output of poems into hand-sewn manuscript booklets, known as fascicles, as early as 1858, but the war years saw a sharp increase in her productivity. Thirty out of forty fascicles and at least five unsewn sets of poems—each of which could include more than twenty drafts—date from the years 1861-65. Most of Dickinson’s poems that were published during her lifetime also appeared during this period.

VI. Lifetime Publications

“I had told you I did not print.”

Closely examining Dickinson’s unique manuscript practices provides a partial answer to the question of why she did not pursue publication. While Dickinson’s social network included supporters of her writing and the work of women writers in general, there were equally strong voices arguing the opposite position. She regularly exchanged letters with influential editors,including Bowles, Niles, and Higginson. But, for all of their progressive views—Bowles, for instance, hired Fidelia Hayward Cooke as literary editor at The Springfield Republican in 1860—Dickinson was constrained by the disapproval of her father and of other figures she admired. Only ten of Dickinson’s 1,789 poems were published during her lifetime but always with added titles and altered punctuation. With one exception, the poems appeared in newspapers and periodicals on densely printed pages and surrounded by articles and advertisements, as was typical for the period. Dickinson is never credited—her poems all were published anonymously—and it is probable they were printed without her consent. At the same time, she did not shun publication altogether. She submitted several poems to Niles who never printed them while Dickinson was alive, but would later publish the first three posthumous editions of her work to great success.

VII. Posthumous Publications and Legacy

“It was not death for I stood up.”

Emily Dickinson died at her home on May 15, 1886, possibly of kidney disease. Of her trove of poems, hundreds had been shared with her network of friends and correspondents, but Dickinsonhad kept sets and fascicles entirely private. These poems were only discovered by her sister, Lavinia, after her death.

Lavinia looked to Susan Dickinson, her sister-in-law and one of the poet’s closest friends, to publish them. But work proceeded slowly, and Lavinia eventually turned the manuscripts over to Mabel Loomis Todd, Austin’s mistress. Todd dedicated much of the rest of her life to editing and publishing Dickinson’s poetry. The first two books—in 1890 and 1891—were coedited by Higginson, the poet’s old literary mentor. Todd and Higginson faced many difficulties when interpreting Dickinson’s challenging manuscripts and were further hindered by technology (Todd’s typewriter did not have lowercase letterforms). They worked to regularize Dickinson’s lines and alter her punctuation in order to make the verse “look” more like conventional poetry. Nevertheless, more than four hundred poems were brought out within ten years of Dickinson’s death, and her indisputably strong literary reputation was quickly established.

Today, Dickinson is widely recognized as one of the most important poets of the nineteenth century and her work is acknowledged as a precursor to modernism. She profoundly influenced later generations of poets, writers, musicians, and visual artists, including Hart Crane, Robert Frost, Elizabeth Bishop, Adrienne Rich, Charles Wright, and Susan Howe; Aaron Copland and Dawn Upshaw; Joseph Cornell and Jen Bervin.

Image: The only authenticated image of Emily Dickinson, Daguerreotype, ca. 1847. The Emily Dickinson Collection, Amherst College Archives & Special Collections. Gift of Millicent Todd Bingham, 1956, 1956.002.

 

Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions’ two-day Interiors sale at Donnington Priory, Newbury, on 10th & 11th January 2017 will include property from the collection of the late Clifford and Rosemary Ellis. Part of the legacy left by the Ellises includes paintings, drawings and posters by both Clifford and Rosemary either separately or working together. Lots range from £100 - £2,000.

There will also be a number of works on offer by other artists such as Walter Sickert, William Scott, Adrian Heath and Howard Hodgkin which the Ellises acquired throughout their long careers. The majority have a direct personal connection to the artist and gives a glimpse of the rich cultural life that the Ellises created during their lifetimes, such as a drawing by Walter Richard Sickert, Grand Hotel Restaurant (Lot 106, est. £1,000-£1,500) which was a gift from Thérèse Sickert to Clifford Ellis in 1942 and thence by descent to the present owners. 

As well as leading the way in the teaching of fine art, husband and wife, Clifford and Rosemary, were both prolific in their own artistic output. The selection reveals the breadth of subject matter and interests of each and also charts the progression of their work over a number of years. The mid 1940s paintings by Clifford are of interest not only in terms of their artistic merit but also in reflecting the art of the period. In his position as head of the Bath Academy, Clifford was undoubtedly exposed to the work of what were to become some of the leading artists of their day and their influence is clearly visible in some of his work. Works by Rosemary Ellis are indicative of a more illustrative style and are closer to the work that the couple created for the ‘The New Naturalist’.

In 1933, the Ellises were commissioned to design a series of posters for the London Underground. They also designed posters together for the Empire Marketing Board which was a government Department established in 1926 with the purpose of encouraging people to buy Empire products. The poster campaigns were an integral part of their advertising program and Clifford and Rosemary produced a number of designs during the 1930s. They also designed posters for Shell and the General Post Office.

In addition to this sale, prints by Clifford and Rosemary Ellis will be on offer in a timed online only auction, which starts at 10am (GMT) on Tuesday 3rd January and closes on Monday 16th January 2017. Both artists were keenly interested in the printmaking process and, as with many of their generation, it formed an integral part of their artistic output. The group ranges from examples of animals and birds by Clifford Ellis comparable to the works produced for ‘The New Naturalist’ series of books to a number of series of linear prints characteristic of 1950s abstraction. All works offered come directly from the estate of the artists and the sale offers a rare opportunity to acquire one of their prints. Many are working proofs with hand-written annotations adding a personal dimension to the work. 

70-Plancius-Spice-Map copy.jpgNew York— “Prices are stronger than they have been in years,” said Caleb Kiffer, Specialist of Maps & Atlases at Swann Auction Galleries. The December 8 sale of Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books wrapped up the 2016 auction season at Swann with strong numbers, selling 88% of the lots offered.

Early maps of the East Indies headlined this sale from its inception, and they did not disappoint. One quarter of the top 20 lots pertained to early European exploration of the region, including “The Spice Map,” a colloquial term for Petrus Placius’s Insulae Moluccae Celeberrimae, 1598, which helped to open the area to Dutch traders. It sold for $31,200*. The highlight of the sale was The Complete East-India Pilot, or Oriental Navigator, 1797, Robert Laurie and James Whittle’s monumental atlas with 113 engraved charts, called the pinnacle of eighteenth-century mapmaking: it sold for $81,250, above a $60,000 high estimate. Also in the sale was one of the first maps ever published of the area, Claudius Ptolemaus’s Undecima Asiae Tabula, circa 1480s, a double-paged engraved map that set the standard for geographical printing ($6,000). “The East Indies section came primarily from a single collection,” Mr. Kiffer said. “It was fun to see them all together, telling the narrative of the spice trade from the perspective of different countries over the span of several hundred years. They were a hot spot in the sale, as were the New York views.”

All but one of the 22 offered lots related to early maps and scenes of New York City sold. Two panoramic views of the city each went for well above their estimates: one was a first state engraving by Robert Havell Jr., which sold for $10,000, while the second was an 1856 graphite drawing by Frederick William Billing showing recognizable landmarks ($8,750). “The Water Map,” as Egbert Viele’s Sanitary and Topographical Map of the City and Island of New York is known, is an 1865 survey of Manhattan still in use today to determine building sites; it was purchased by a collector for $7,250, a record for the work. Ephemera included the 1908-1909 wine list from the Hotel Astor, which offered a magnum bottle of 1877 Château Lafite Rothschild for $15; in 2016, the menu fetched $594.

There was a successful run of maps and charts of New England by Joseph Frederick Wallet Des Barres, including The Coast of New England ($25,000); Buzzards Bay & Vineyard Sound ($12,500); and A Plan of the Town of Newport ($11,250). Each is from the first state of Des Barre’s monumental mariner’s atlas The Atlantic Neptune, printed in London in 1776.

Rare elephant folio prints from John James Audubon’s Birds of America, published in London between 1827 and 1838, saw high prices after competitive attention. The dramatic Mocking Bird, Plate 21, one of Audubon’s most famous images, nearly doubled its estimate to sell for $18,750. Two rare plates, uncut and uncolored, made an appearance in the sale: Passenger Pigeon, Plate LXII, and Three-Toed Woodpecker both illuminate the binding process behind the beloved botanical tome, and were purchased by the Saint Louis Mercantile Library. Fourteen of the 16 Audubon prints offered were sold.

Botanical prints also held strong interest, including plates from Robert John Thornton’s Temple of Flora, 1800-04, all of which sold above their estimates. These were led by The Blue Egyptian Water-Lily, 1804, and The Quadrilateral Passion-Flower, 1802, each of which sold for $2,860. One show-stopper was an engraved plate from the first edition of Mark Catesby and Georg Ehret’s Natural History of Carolina, 1731-43, titled Magnolia Grandiflora, depicting the white flower in dramatic contrast against a black background; it sold for $10,625. In all, 50 of the 58 offered natural and botanical plates and books found buyers.

         A rare deluxe edition of Thomas Shotter Boys’s Original Views of London As It Is, 1842, was also in the sale. Considered the finest lithographed plate book on nineteenth-century London, the 26 hand-colored vistas helped to change the prevailing opinion that only natural views could be beautiful. This extremely rare edition, in its original state, garnered $21,250.

          Mr. Kiffer commented, “the sale indicated a confidence in the market for this material, with very solid prices being achieved for lots sold in the middle of the market as well as the high end. Several items sailed past the high estimates, with overall interest from private collectors and the trade alike.”

Image: Lot 70 Petrus Plancius, "The Spice Map," double-page map of Southeast Asia, London, 1598. Sold December 8, 2016 for $31,200.

December 2016, Boston, MA - Everyone loves ANTIQUES ROADSHOW, the iconic reality series entering its 21st season! The enduring appeal of PBS's most-watched ongoing series is the collection of moments that make up each season - the footnotes to history, the family stories, the astounded reactions. Beginning Monday, January 2 at 8pm an all-new season premieres including this season's top find when an Auguste Rodin bronze is discovered in Fort Worth, Texas.
 
Along with that masterpiece, more amazing items are revealed in the 14-time Emmy® Award nominated series' new season, including three one-hour episodes produced from each of six cities: Fort Worth, Texas; Indianapolis, Indiana; Palm Springs, California; Salt Lake City, Utah; Virginia Beach, Virginia and Orlando, Florida.
 
"As Executive Producer, my best moment each year is the start of a new ANTIQUES ROADSHOW season where we unveil a diverse collection of America's hidden treasures," says Marsha Bemko. "As a fan, my most memorable moment from the 2016 summer tour was the chance to try on Archie Bunker's jacket, which was brought to ROADSHOW by a guest in Palm Springs, CA."
 
Across the 29-episode new season, fans will see memorable appraisals and stories including:
  • An unforgettable reaction in Palm Springs when a guest brings in his late husband's 1966 Roy Lichtenstein screenprint and learns he was always right about owning a treasure. 
  • An incredible family story in Salt Lake City around 1970 Robert Smithson "Spiral Jetty" plans acquired from the owner's father, a contractor who worked with the artist on the project.
  • A heartrending history lesson in Orlando from a 1918 peach can label with a letter from a World War I soldier penned on the back.
  • A favorite unique item in Indianapolis comprised of autographs from President Nixon's 1972 trip to China brought to ROADSHOW by the AP photographer during Nixon's time in office.
  • A new-generation definition of antique in Fort Worth with a rock and roll poster collection, ca. 1968, featuring images promoting Jimi Hendrix, the Grateful Dead and more!
  • A hidden treasure that was revealed in Virginia Beach after being found in the crawl space of the guest's uncle's home, which turned out to be a rare John Needles games table. 
As ANTIQUES ROADSHOW appeals to viewers across generations, interactive ways to experience the 21st season include live tweeting with producers and appraisers Mondays at 8pm ET during new episodes, after-the-show AR Extras Live short-form social broadcasts, bonus footage and more through the weekly AR Extras newsletter and our second-screen Appraise it Yourself play-along game.
 
ANTIQUES ROADSHOW, a production of WGBH Boston, puts the reality in reality television! Part adventure, part history lesson and part treasure hunt, the series is seen by an average of 8 million viewers each week in 2016.

BOSTON, MA - (December 8, 16) A drill chuck used by Commander Dave Scott on the lunar surface during his three historic moonwalks of the Apollo 15 mission sold for $49,000 according to Boston-based RR Auction.

The Apollo Lunar Surface Drill was a necessary piece of equipment for two of the mission’s experiments: the Heat Flow Experiment, and the deep drill core; both of which required the successful operation of the drill chuck.

“The scientific objective of the deep core drill was to obtain a 10-foot core of lunar materials for analysis of thermal properties and stratigraphic composition of the upper surface of the Moon,” said Scott in a letter included in the sale.

“The drill was used to insert a deep core tube into the surface near the probes of the Heat Flow Experiment, to collect lunar material from the surface down to a depth of ten feet.”

Results from the experiments concluded that the Moon, was far more radioactive than previously thought, bore a significant stratigraphic history, revealing a total of 58 individual layers in the deep core sample.

“It was an essential artifact related to some of the most substantial and important lunar surface findings of the Apollo program,” said Robert Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction.

Highlights from the sale include, but are not limited by:

Mickey Mouse production cel and production background from Fantasia, sold for $54,878.

Dave Scott’s Lunar Surface-used Rover ‘Bearing Map,’ sold for $49,000.

James Madison signed book from his personal collection, sold for $26,043.

Albert Einstein signed and inscribed vintage portrait, sold for $20,212.

CIAM/NASA complete aerodynamic wind tunnel test model, sold for $10,760.

The Autographs, Artifacts & Animation from RR Auction began on November 17 and concluded on December 7. For information, visit the RR Auction web site at www.rrauction.com

 

DALLAS — Frenzied bidding drove the return on a Hand-Carved American Tobacconist Cigar Store Indian to $150,000 to claim top-lot honors in Heritage Auctions’ Americana & Political Auction Dec. 3 in Dallas, Texas that realized a combined $1,783,252.

Created in the manner of cigar store Indians carved by Julius Melchers, and perhaps by Melchers himself, this 67-1/5-inch statue was in such high demand that the ultimate return was more than seven times the pre-auction estimate of $20,000. The figure is depicted wearing a bear claw necklace and medallion with a pelt over his right shoulder.

“A selling price in the mid-five figures range was expected,” Heritage Americana Auctions Director Tom Slater said, but furious bidding drove the price to $150,000. 

“This was a very strong auction,” Slater observes. “We have found that auction items of the best quality - regardless of category -  have tended to exceed expectations, and this auction certainly continues that trend.” 

A red, white and blue Horace Greeley 1872 Presidential Campaign Banner with albumen photo and gold-leaf trim brought in $40,000. The founder and editor of the New York Tribune, among the great newspapers of that era, Greeley served as a senator from New York before running in a race for the presidency that ultimately was won by Ulysses S. Grant. The banner hangs from a wood dowel at the top and is displayed in a shadow box frame.

“This is one of the very best 19th-century political banners,” Slater said. “It has appeared three times in auctions over the last 15 years, selling for an average of a little over $20,000 each time, and never breaking the $25,000 barrier. In Saturday’s auction, it sold for $40,000.”

Among the most popular items were from a collection of coveted presidential memorabilia. Leading the way was a Silver Cigarette Box by Tiffany from the Oval Office during the John F. Kennedy presidency. The box, which has two cedar-lined interior compartments, came with a notarized statement on White House stationery from the previous owner and was removed with other personal belongings after Kennedy’s assassination in order to facilitate the transition to President Lyndon B. Johnson, beat its pre-auction estimate when it went for $45,000. 

Another wildly popular item from the presidential memorabilia group was a pen used by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt to sign a 1940 Naval Buildup Bill that realized $37,500. The pen was enclosed in a framed shadow box along with a letter on White House Stationery that was sent to Captain Joseph M. Patterson in New York after FDR signed the bill, which was an effort to bolster the United States’ defense despite a promise not to send American troops into the European war.

A massive 1840 William Henry Harrison Campaign Pitcher also drew $37,500. Considered by many to be the premier ceramic political display item of the 19th century, it features four panels with portraits of the ninth American president, each of which sits below a log cabin and the words “The Ohio Farmer” and above a patriotic eagle. This lot drew dual interest, from collectors of political artifacts and enthusiasts of American-made pottery. The selling price is believed to be a record for this sought-after item.

One of the more curious lots in the entire auction was a lock of George Washington’s hair, which sold for $32,500, nearly twice as much as its pre-auction estimate. Held together with a blue thread, the lot comes with a detailed chain of provenance, showing that the hair has been in the possession of the families of Lewis Morris (1726-98) and Robert Hunter Morris (1700-64).

Among the top remaining non-political items was a Mormonism: Highly Important Circa 1863-64 Photo Album, which realized $35,000 - nearly doubling its pre-auction estimate. More than 60 of the images deal with Mormon leaders and Salt Lake City; the remaining 30 images are European in origin.

Four bulbs and a socket used in a Thomas Edison patent infringement case brought in $30,000. The provenance of the lot traces back to the consignor’s great aunt, Anna Knudsen, who was married to John C. Rowe, a patent attorney in the firm of Eaton, Lewis and Rowe, which represented Edison in various patent infringement cases.

A lever-action Henry Rifle drew $24,375. Once belonging to Lieutenant Ezra Rideout, the rifle was passed on to his brother, Jacob, likely when Jacob - a member of the clergy - decided in the 1870s to travel west and preach on the frontier, a trek that ultimately landed Rideout in Arizona Territory, where he apparently spent some time in the mining boomtown of Contention, near Tombstone. 

A significant collection of Presidential memorabilia from the estate of  Malcolm S. Forbes offered a fine Cox & Roosevelt Jugate from the St. Louis Button Co., which sold for $17,500, as well as a Bronze Bust of Woodrow Wilson, which ended at $10,000.

 

On 13th December, Sotheby’s London will offer for sale over 40 original illustrations by leading artists, designers, and musicians to benefit House of Illustration.

The pieces offered for sale fall into a number of different sections including “What Are You Like?” (autobiographical drawings by leading cultural figures), Quentin Blake’s illustrations of Sophie and the BFG at St Pancras International station, and original drawings of the Famous Five commissioned to celebrate the series’ 70th anniversary.

Artists include Quentin Blake, Brian Eno, Eric Clapton, Oliver Jeffers, Emma Chichester Clark, Peter Capaldi, David Shrigley, Peter Brooks, Peter Blake, Paul Smith, and Margaret Howell.

A registered charity, House of Illustration is the UK's only public gallery dedicated solely to illustration, with a creative programme of exhibitions, talks and events. Founded by Sir Quentin Blake and opened in July 2014 at the heart of the King's Cross regeneration area, it is the place to see, learn about and enjoy illustration in all its forms. For more information, click here. Ahead of the sale, all the works will be on display at Sotheby’s 34-35 New Bond Street from 9-12 December 2016.

Original drawings by Quentin Blake showing the BFG in London at St Pancras Station Quentin Blake, “The BFG and Sophie in London I, II and III”, each est. £1,500-2,000.

“What are you Like?” Autobiographical Drawings by Leading Artists, Designers, and Musicians

In 2008 The House of Illustration invited people from many disciplines to express themselves visually by playing "What Are You Like?". This was a Victorian parlour game in which players were asked to describe themselves by doing a series of drawings of their favourite things.

Contributors were asked to illustrate eight favourite things from a list of twelve-their favourite animal, book, clothes, comfort, food, pastime, place, possession, music, shoes, weather and their pet aversion. They were encouraged to use whatever medium they most enjoy.

Browse all 31 works here (lots 233-263).

Brian Eno,'WHAT ARE YOU LIKE?' Est. £1,000-1,500

Brian Eno is a British musician, composer, record producer, singer, writer, and visual artist. Described as one of popular music’s most influential and innovative figures, he was a member of Roxy Music in the 1970s and has collaborated with numerous artists including David Byrne, David Bowie, Coldplay, and James Blake.

Peter Brookes, 'WHAT ARE YOU LIKE?' Est £1,500-2,000

Peter Brookes is the multi-award-winning political cartoonist for The Times, a post he has held since 1992. He has contributed to many other magazines, including The Spectator, Radio Times, The Times Literary Supplement and the New Statesman.

Quentin Blake, 'WHAT ARE YOU LIKE?' Est. £3,000-5,000

Quentin Blake is a world-renowned, multi-award-winning British illustrator who has written and illustrated over 300 books, including some of the greatest children’s books of the last fifty years. He was the UK’s first Children’s Laureate and is the founding trustee of House of Illustration.

Peter Capaldi,'WHAT ARE YOU LIKE?', Est. £1,500-2,000

Peter Capaldi is a BAFTA-award-winning British actor, writer and director. He is best known for being the twelfth and current actor to play the Doctor in the BBC TV series Doctor Who, and for the role of Malcolm Tucker in the BBC comedy series The Thick of It.

Paul Smith, WHAT ARE YOU LIKE?' Est. £1,000-1,500

Paul Smith is a renowned British designer with a global design brand. In 2011, he was awarded the Outstanding Achievement in Fashion Design award at the British Fashion Awards for his exceptional contribution to the British fashion industry.

David Shrigley, 'WHAT ARE YOU LIKE?' Est. 2,000-3,000

David Shrigley is an award-winning British artist whose sculpture ‘Really Good’ was unveiled as the Fourth Plinth Commission in London’s Trafalgar Square in 2016. He was shortlisted for the Turner Prize in 2013 and his work is included in prominent international collections, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, Art Institute of Chicago and Tate London.

Eric Clapton, 'WHAT ARE YOU LIKE?', Est. £2,000-3,000

Eric Clapton is a world-renowned guitarist, singer and songwriter, widely considered one of the most important and influential guitarists of all time. Eric Clapton has won 18 Grammy awards and the Brit Award for Outstanding Contribution to Music.

Peter Blake, 'WHAT ARE YOU LIKE?', Est. £2,500-3,500

Peter Blake is a world-renowned British artist and pioneer of 'Pop Art'. One of his best-known works is the 1967 album cover for The Beetles’ Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. In 1981 he was elected a member of the Royal Academy and in 1994 he was made the Third Associate Artist of the National Gallery.

Margaret Howell, 'WHAT ARE YOU LIKE?', Est. £800-1,200

Margaret Howell is a world-renowned British clothing designer. She was elected a Royal Designer for Industry in 2007.

The Typescript for “Doctor Who: Into the Dalek”, Est. £2,000-3,000

Illustrated with a Drawing by Peter Capaldi, Dr Who Himself The actor Peter Capaldi (b. 1958) was revealed as the twelfth incarnation of Doctor Who during August 2013 and his performances have been enthusiastically received (‘all the hallmarks of a great Doctor’, ‘the air of the classic Doctor’ and ‘wise and thoughtful’). “Into the Dalek” is the second episode of Capaldi’s first series, and his first story involving Daleks. First broadcast on 30 August 2014, it was given positive reviews. The Independent called the episode ‘a classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster’.

Original Illustrations for the covers of Enid Blyton’s Famous Five

In 2012, to celebrate the 70th anniversary of Enid Blyton's much-loved Famous Five series, five of the most illustrious children's illustrators of today were asked to provide new special anniversary covers for the first five adventures in the series. These original artworks were published by Hodder Children's Books for the 70th anniversary edition. Please click here to see all five illustrations (lots 294-298).

House of Illustration is a registered charity which receives no public funding and depends on its admission price and the generosity of its supporters to put on exhibitions, to commission new illustration work, promote new illustration talent and to run its illustrator-led learning programme for schools, families, students and enthusiasts of all ages. 

houseofillustration.org.uk. @illustrationHQ

NEW YORK - One of the rarest of all Enigma Machines, the M4, designed for use by the German Navy during World War II, was sold today (7 December) for $463,500 at Bonhams History of Science and Technology Sale in New York. This is a world record price at auction for an M4 Enigma surpassing the previous highest price of $350,000 also set by Bonhams in 2015. The fully operational machine dating from 1943 had been estimated at US$280,000-350,000.

The M4 Naval Enigma was ordered in 1941 when the head of the German Navy Admiral Karl Doenitz believed, correctly, that the security of the Naval M3 Engima had been compromised. The M4 was reserved for deployment by U-boat forces on land and at sea to enable the Naval High Command to communicate securely with the U-Boat fleet. The machine in the sale is in fine condition and is, therefore, believed to have been used from a base on shore rather than from a U-Boat.

Bonhams Science and Technology specialist Tom Lamb said, "This M4 Enigma was in perfect condition and very desirable. Most of the 120 or so M4 Enigma machines known to have survived are in museums or in government hands so this was a rare chance to acquire one of the very few still available. I am, of course, delighted to have broken our own world record."

In total the sale made $1,109,000 with 73% of the lots sold. Other highlights included:

A first edition of the General Theory of Relativity signed and inscribed by Albert Einstein. Estimated at $80,000-100,000 it sold for $125,000.

A handwritten letter from Charles Darwin to the Secretary of the Royal Society on the merits of candidates being considered for the award of the Royal Medal and the Copley Medal for 1857. The letter sold for $93,750 having been estimated at $20,000-30,000.

A handwritten manuscript by Isaac Newton about his family's pedigree written in preparation for his knighthood in 1795. It was sold for $60,000 against an estimate of $50,000-70,000.

A piece of the original mold which led Alexander Fleming to the discovery of penicillin. Estimated at $10,000-15,000 it sold for $46,500.

Walt Disney signed Last Will and Testament      1.jpegCALABASAS, Calif.— Walt Disney’s Last Will and Testament, plus his signed document marking the genesis of the Disney Empire/brand; How the Grinch Stole Christmas production artwork (perfectly timed to the 50th anniversary of the animated TV special!) and Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas original artwork and set pieces; Disneyana, featuring rare animation art and Disney park props, including an “Atom-mobile” miniature prop from the retired Journey Through Inner Space attraction, an assortment of props from The Pirates of the Caribbean attraction, a miniature Jungle Cruise boat, cast member attraction costumes and rare hand-silkscreened ride posters highlight Profiles in History highly anticipated Animation and Disneyana auction, Friday, December 9, 2016.

Other featured items include the instantly recognizable I Dream of Jeannie and Bewitched opening titles cels and the most comprehensive collection of artist Robert “Bob” William John Olszewski works ever assembled—from his earliest days, prior to working with Goebel/ Hummel, to his most spectacular and desirable Disney-related pieces. Every work of art exhibits the world-renown, legendary attention to detail, design, depth and quality that has inspired Bob’s celebrated reputation and legacy.  Every piece in this collection is extremely rare, sold out, and no longer available. While many items are signed, upon request, Bob has graciously agreed to personally sign any of the lots that are not.

This sale represents a rare opportunity for collectors on so many fronts. In addition to Walt Disney’s last will and testament and signed document trademarking his legendary name, we have an extensive selection of illustration art, including Charles Schulz, Dr. Seuss, Chuck Jones, Gary Larson, E.H. Shepard and Robert Crumb. I am especially excited to have a wide array of Bob Olszewski’s extraordinary sculptures in this sale, highlighted by the Disneyland Main Street diorama. There’s literally something here for everyone!, said Joe Maddalena, owner of Profiles in History. 

Additional auction highlights include: 

  • The Transformers original animated series never-before-seen production art, scripts, and cels
  • An incredible selection of Christmas illustration art and original paintings
  • “Cinderella” ball gown production cel on a master production background from Cinderella
  • Original Disney concept art by Eyvind Earle and Mary Blair.
  • Charles Schulz “Peanuts” art including an It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown storyboard
  • Comic strip art by Charles Schulz, Gary Larson and Patrick McDonnell

Qualified bidders can participate in person, by telephone, fax, submit absentee bids or participate online in real time from anywhere with Internet access across the globe. For more information, including a PDF and flip book of the entire auction catalog with full item descriptions, please visit www.profilesinhistory.com.

Image credit: Profiles in History. 

vcsPRAsset_534765_124134_a7012519-49fb-4ec9-a272-3ea5ef31c725_0.jpgPreview days for Kaminski Auctions Thanksgiving sale were very well attended which was an indication of good things to come for the annual auction.  Old faces and friends visiting the preview, plus 1700 visiting online and over 30% of them new users to the site brought a worldwide audience to add to the excitement of the sale.  A collection of Richard F. Outcault (American, 1863-1928) "Buster Brown" Sunday comic strip original art works that had descended through the family of the artist brought the most excitement to the day. Buster Brown was a comic strip character created in 1902 by Richard F. Outcault and was adopted as the symbol of a children’s shoe company called the Brown Shoe Company in 1904.  In the early 20th century Buster Brown and his pit bull terrier "Tige” were well known to the American public.   

The six Buster Brown lots were hotly contested over the phones and through multiple Internet bidding platforms.  They were finally hammered down at $47,700 with buyer’s premium and all sold to the same European bidder.  The top lot of the collection was titled "The Worm Turns Twice," dated March 19th, 1916.  It had been published in the Philadelphia Record. All of the Outcault artwork included the original newspaper sheet.

Other artwork and decorative arts on offer were from the Belvedere Guest House on Fire Island, New York.  Three Robert Bliss (American, 1925-1981), paintings sold as separate lots with the highest titled "Boy at the Beach," oil on masonite, signed and dated bringing $7,800. A 19th century classical marble bust of Robert Burns brought $5,700 and another of Sir Walter Scott brought a similar price.  Top lot from the Belvedere was an outstanding 18th century French Louis XV basin decorated with carved putti and figureheads. The basin had a particularly beautiful copper liner with a crest on the embossed center. Originally purchased at Park Bennett, New York in the 1940s to 1950s, it sold for $14,000.

A signed Tiffany Studios Turtleback table lamp from a private collector with an exquisite leaded stained glass shade was the top lot of the two- day sale with an $18,000 hammer price.  A surprise lot was a set of twelve Baccarat crystal "Czar" pattern stemware comprised of three different forms including four each of wine, champagne and water goblets, each with four colors of blue, rose, green and chartreuse that brought $10,800.

Top name estate jewelry brought good prices with a signed Van Cleef ladies’ eighteen carat gold and diamond bracelet from a New York collection bringing $14,400, a circa 1920 Cartier diamond, platinum and sapphire fur clip sold for $8,400 and a ladies' diamond and platinum engagement ring with a 3.53carat center stone sold for $18,000.

Day one of the sale which featured the majority of Asian items in the auction saw a huge painting by Brian Coole (British, born 1939) titled  “The Hongs of Canton from the Mainland”, oil on board from a New Hampshire estate sell for $11,400, while a circa 1950’s modern Chinese painting of a boat by the coast, signed lower right and inscribed verso "Given to George and Rosalie Humphrey, Sept. 1953, by Sergei Eliseev Professor at Harvard-Yenching Institute, Originally in Shanghai Museum then in Fogg Art Museum in Cambridge Massachusetts " brought $15,600.

All prices quoted include 20% buyer’s premium for all prices realized go to www.kaminskiauctions.com.

Image: Richard F. Outcault (American, 1863-1928), "Buster Brown" Sunday comic strip original art, titled "The Worm Turns Twice.”

Screen Shot 2016-12-07 at 9.39.37 AM.pngBernard Quaritch Limited has just published a new catalogue of books from the library of the conductor and musician Christopher Hogwood (1941-2014). This second catalogue of works from Hogwood’s library is titled ABCD, and comprises alphabet books, fine printing and artists’ books, books on Cambridge and the University Printer’s ‘Christmas Books’, and works by Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (aka ‘Lewis Carroll’).

The finely-produced and beautiful books in this catalogue include works by Richard Avedon, Peter Blake, Eric Gill, Florence Keynes, David Kindersley, Gwen Raverat, Virginia Woolf, etc., and reflect Hogwood’s eclectic bibliophile interests and his love of Cambridge.

For further information, please contact Mark James (m.james@quaritch.com / 020 7297 4873) or Anke Timmermann PhD (a.timmermann@quaritch.com / 020 7297 4855).

9. Hunt IX, 2016 © Hugo Wilson, Courtesy Shapero Modern    small.jpgShapero Modern is delighted to present Chroma hunt, an exhibition of hand-coloured etchings by the celebrated British artist, Hugo Wilson.

The images in this portfolio of nine etchings are closely related to Wilson’s recent series of paintings which portray the most primal of all rituals, the hunt. Hunting scenes were popular with wealthy collectors in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. They represented a kind of ‘trophyism’ and a way of displaying mastery over nature. Wilson’s etchings are based on, or inspired by, famous paintings by old masters such as Rubens and Stubbs and show bizarre events where great beasts such as lions and crocodiles have been trained to hunt other animals. These images of writhing, snarling forms, some recognisable, others indistinct, portray immense animal strength - but the hunter remains unseen. Suggestive of mythic battle scenes, Wilson’s paintings shake the foundation of the context that they appear to mimic.

Wilson’s classical training is evident in his extraordinary technical facility - he studied at the renowned Charles H. Cecil Studio in Florence, Italy - as well as in his reverence for the masters of the Western artistic canon. His work suggests both a devotion to and subversion of this tradition. Wilson’s interest in mutability and instability is manifested in these works that take elements from European old master paintings and classical sculpture, and subjects them to a process of transformation. In the finished works reconfigured elements from the originals hover at the edge of legibility whilst new possibilities for meaning emerge.

The art historian Alison Bracker has written: ‘As his stunning new work confirms, Wilson translates the aesthetics of past centuries and cultures into an oeuvre that continually wrestles with one question in particular: why has man persisted in creating and sustaining ideological structures throughout time? The question invigorates the artist’s ‘Hunt’ paintings, which re- imagine the hunting rituals and mythologies enacted within works by Rubens, Stubbs and Venetian painter Jacopo de’ Barbari.’ †

Wilson works across a range of media including painting, drawing, sculpture and printmaking. His use of etching in these works also recalls eighteenth and nineteenth century natural history illustrations, particularly John James Audubon’s ornithological masterpiece, The Birds of America, 1827. Wilson’s interests are wide-ranging and encompass science, religion and culture, systems of classification, history and memory. Addressing such diverse subjects, his work enacts an investigative process in which the outcome is by no means certain. The work forms a series of open-ended questions and correspondingly provisional answers.

† Alison Bracker, from ‘Never a Single Approach,’ in Hugo Wilson, Parafin, London, 2015

Shapero Modern
14th December 2016 - 10th January 2017
Private View: Tuesday 13th December, 6—8.30 pm

Image: Hunt IX, 2016 © Hugo Wilson, Courtesy Shapero Modern.

Lot 1 - GAUR ITS RUINS AND INSCRIPTIONS - Estimate Rs 7,00,000-Rs 8,00,000 ($10,295-$11,765) - Image 1.jpgMumbai, December 6 2016: StoryLTD’s upcoming online auction, Old Maps, Books and Photographs, features 82 rare and carefully selected old maps, vintage photographs, and gilt-bound books. The lots offer a glimpse into over 200 years of colonial India, presenting an extraordinary opportunity for collectors of historical memorabilia.

StoryLTD’s previous auctions of rare books have been well-received, highlighting a growing interest in the category among serious collectors. The upcoming sale extends the category to include maps, and photographs of picturesque landscapes, monuments, and portraits of maharajas. The categories also present some of the earliest recordings of official events such as coronations, battle scenes, and ethnographic studies of Indian life.

The books on auction date from the mid-1700s to the early 20th century. Featuring exquisite gilded covers, lavish illustrations and vivid descriptions of accounts as they unfolded at the time, these books range from INR 14,000 - 8 lakhs. The maps range from engraved, hand-coloured, topographical renderings, to records of early settlements in India and around the world. They are estimated between INR 20,000 - 3 lakhs. Photographs include rare, hand-coloured portraits of royal families, and albumen photographs of Indian monuments. They are estimated between INR 25,000 - 6 lakhs.

The auction will take place on storyltd.com on 13 - 14 December 2016.

About StoryLTD:

Launched in 2013 by Saffronart, India’s leading online auction house, StoryLTD (pronounced ‘Story Limited’), is an online art purchasing platform intended to give both first-time bidders and serious collectors an opportunity to acquire unique Indian fine and decorative art pieces. Featuring a carefully curated, exclusive selection that includes fine art, photographs, limited edition prints, textiles and jewellery, to home accessories, vintage and designer furniture.

StoryLTD partners with some of the leading designers, independent retailers, manufacturers, artists, collectors and dealers from India and around the globe, and offers its clients an unparalleled collection that encompasses a variety of styles, designs and historical periods— hidden behind every object and art work they present is a unique historical, aesthetic and cultural narrative — its ‘Story’. Everything at StoryLTD is ‘limited’ in its individuality, availability and value; nothing is commonplace.

Image: Gaur: Its Ruins and Inscriptions. London, 1878. Estimate: Rs 7,00,000-Rs 8,00,000 ( $10,295-$11,765).  

101-Nietzsche copy.jpgNew York—Works by and about twentieth century artists dominated the scene at Swann Galleries’ biannual sale of Art, Press & Illustrated Books on Thursday, December 1. Of the top 20 lots in the sale, only two were published before 1900. The sale also broke several auction records.

The highlight of the sale was a rare limited edition of Das Werk von Gustav Klimt, 1918, the only monograph published in the artist’s lifetime. The retrospective work, with richly printed collotype plates, ten in color with gold and silver highlights, sold to a collector for $60,000*. Another outstanding lot was a preparatory proof of László Moholy-Nagy’s Composition which was published in the Belgian avant-garde magazine Het Overzicht, circa 1924. The print sold after competitive bidding for $17,500, a record for the work.

The most complete set ever to come to auction of the Mexican Stridentist journal Horizonte, 1926-27, made its debut. The periodical was edited by Leopoldo Méndez and Ramón Alva de la Canal, and contributors included Diego Rivera and Rufino Tamayo. Stridentism was a radical avant-garde art movement founded in Mexico City in 1921, formed out of the momentum of the Mexican Revolution; Horizonte was their outlet. The set sold for $22,500.

Auction records were set for a scarce first edition of Die Farbenklaviaturen von Le Corbusier, 1931, a wallpaper sample book designed by the artist to allow people to create harmonious color combinations in their homes ($6,000), as well as Kurt Schwitters’s Die Silbergäule, Merz 8. Die Kathedrale, 1920, with seven lithographs, which sold to a collector for $4,420. The first limited edition of Five Poems, 2002, by Kara Walker and Toni Morrison broke its previous auction record to sell for $1,000.

Several works made their auction debuts, including Percy Bysshe Shelley’s The Sensitive Plant, 1898, one of ten copies printed on vellum for the Guild of Women Binders, which sold to a collector for $5,250. The ornate Insel-Verlag edition of Friedrich Nietzsche’s Also Sprach Zarathustra, 1908, designed and bound by Eleanore Ramsey, also went to a collector for $15,000.

Further highlights included a first edition of the satirical alphabet book skewering the 1913 Armory show, titled The Cubies’ ABC, by Mary M. and Earl H. Lyall, which sold for $4,750. Douze Quatrains, 1930, by Pierre Bragenell, with 12 erotic pochoirs attributed to Gerda Wegener, was purchased by a collector for a record $5,500. Another record was set for a scholarly compilation by Hsiang Yüan-Pien titled Noted Porcelains of Successive Dynasties, 1931, which garnered $5,250.

Modern fairy mythology performed well in the sale, including Fairyland, 1926, an Australian picture book by Ida Rentoul Outhwaite, which sold for a record-breaking $4,250. Similarly, the first English trade edition of The Book of Fairy Poetry, 1920, sold for nearly four times the high estimate at $1,750. The book contains the first illustrated version of J.R.R. Tolkien’s poem Goblin Feet. While not strictly fairy-related, Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, illustrated and signed by Salvador Dalí, brought $5,750.

Christine von der Linn, Swann Galleries’ Art, Press & Illustrated Book specialist said, “I was overjoyed at the amount of excitement and active participation from bidders around the world for the lots on offer in this small but powerpacked sale. This auction was curated very specifically, with small, strong selections of European Avant-Garde books and prints, fine illustrated books, and works by artists featured in major museum exhibitions this year. In particular, the enthusiasm surrounding the Moholy-Nagy shows at the Guggenheim and The Art Institute of Chicago, and the Mexican Modernism show at the Philadelphia Museum of Art has actively sparked rediscovery of important artists. That was definitely reflected in the interest in those lots this week. ” She added, “I haven’t had so much fun in a sale in a long time.”

Image: Lot 101 Friedrich Nietzsche, Also Sprach Zarathustra, Insel-Verlag edition, bound by Eleanore Ramsey, 1908. Sold December 1, 2016 for $15,000, the book's first appearance at auction. (Pre-sale estimate: $8,000 to $10,000)

Screen Shot 2016-12-06 at 8.18.03 AM.pngNEW YORK, 5 December 2016—The Bible collection of renowned theologian and author, Dr. Charles Caldwell Ryrie, soared over pre-sale expectations today at Sotheby’s New York, realizing $7,341,818 (estimate $3.5/5.4 million). Over the course of four hours, 195 printed and manuscript Bibles in Hebrew, Greek, Latin, English and numerous other languages, as well as other theological works, were offered, led by the Wycliffite New Testament in the later version, in Middle English, which tripled its estimate and achieved $1.7 million (estimate $500/800,000). With many lots coming to the marketplace for the first time in decades, this impressive collection garnered interest from both public institutions and private collectors from around the world.

Selby Kiffer, International Senior Specialist, Books & Manuscripts, stated: “The outstanding result of today’s sale of The Bible Collection of Dr. Charles Caldwell Ryrie is a testament to the dedication with which this towering figure assembled his extraordinary group of Bibles and letters signed by theological figures. The sale followed a well-received exhibition that, despite the acclaimed Formatting the Word of God exhibition in 1998-99, marked the first time the full extent of the collection was revealed.”

The heart of The Bible Collection of Dr. Charles Caldwell Ryrie lies in early English translations of the Bible, including the top lot of today’s auction, John Wycliffe’s Wycliffite New Testament in the later version, in Middle English. Produced in England around 1430, numerous telephone bidders competed for this rare manuscript, finally selling for $1,692,500 against a pre-sale estimate of $500/800,000. Bible in English, Coverdale’s Version is another such example: faithfully and truly translated from Dutch and Latin into English, this first edition is one of the most complete copies to appear at auction in over twenty years, and sold for $348,500 (estimate $150/250,000).

Non-English Bibles, particularly manuscripts, also achieved significant prices. “The Benton Gospels” in Greek, written in Constantinople from the early to mid-10th century, realized $250,000 (estimate $50/80,000) while The Four Gospels, in Greek sold for $275,000 (estimate $50/80,000). Bible with Prologues and Interpretations of Hebrew Names, in Latin, hailing from Italy, hence the nickname [Italian Bible], obtained $200,000 in the New York salesroom this afternoon.

Screen Shot 2016-12-05 at 9.13.47 AM.pngLos Angeles, CA — Depart Foundation announced that it will present a comprehensive exhibition of rare and important historical works by one of the most influential photographers of the American West, Edward S. Curtis (1868-1952). Curated by Bruce Kapson, Rediscovering Genius: The Works Of Edward S. Curtis will mark the premier institutional showing of Curtis’s masterwork body of Copper Photogravure Printing Plates used in the production of his epic publishing venture The North American Indian, and will include examples from every photographic medium in which the artist worked.

The Copper Photogravure Printing Plates are the source of origin for every vintage photogravure print extant and produced in The North American Indian. The exhibition's compilation of 30 individual Plates, presented in their original copper and inked state, is being shown for the first time in the 110-year history of this rediscovered body of the artist’s work. Each Plate is a unique work and a primary document of one of the most significant publishing ventures of the 20th century. Curtis spent more time refining and perfecting the imagery in these Plates than in any other medium. “Their three-dimensionality offers a wholly new material and aesthetic experience that is distinct from Curtis’s more widely exhibited gravures, photographic prints, and orotones. The immediacy of the copper Plates is unlike any other vehicle for these iconic images; it is as though they allow the viewer to be transmitted through the frame to the very moment the image was captured,” said Kapson.

In addition to these unique Copper Photogravure Printing Plates, Rediscovering Genius will showcase rare and notable examples drawn from every other photographic medium with which Curtis worked to help contextualize their significance. Among them, a very rare Hand-Colored Glass Lantern Slide from Curtis's "Musicale" lecture series, in which he displayed photographic images alongside his early recordings of Native American music and languages to illustrate their rituals and traditions.

A pioneer in many respects, Curtis in 1904, only a few years after field motion picture cameras were available, was using them to document Navajo, Hopi and Cheyenne rituals. As part of the exhibition, Curtis’s pioneering 1914 feature film, In the Land of the Head-Hunters (War Canoes) will run continuously and Anne Makepeace's biographical documentary on Curtis, Coming to Light, Edward S. Curtis and the North American Indians, will be screened as a separate event at Depart Foundation in Los Angeles on Friday, December 9, 2016. Kapson says, "Believing that motion pictures were increasingly the medium to reach the masses - and that this first film might lead to other motion pictures based on Indian subjects - Curtis founded his own film company in Seattle and created a full-length film on Kwakiutl Indian life in 1914. Curtis lived and worked with the Kwakiutl for three years, and as Makepeace's documentary Coming to Light reveals, Curtis and his work are still cherished and honored by the descendants of those who participated."

Edward S. Curtis's work had the duality of being an incredible artistic creation and a document of a people. He was the first photographer to portray American Indians as anything other than objects of curiosity, and the first photographer to involve them as both active participants and contributing collaborators in the making of their own image.

Curtis created a vision of the American Indian that had never existed and never been surpassed. He produced images that not only record real daily activity, but also convey a dignity, universal humanity and majesty.

Bruce Kapson

Bruce Kapson is a respected expert on Edward S. Curtis and is widely regarded as the leading research authority on the Master Exhibition Prints of Curtis. As a Curtis curator and independent research scholar, he is responsible for several groundbreaking discoveries in the field and he has appraised major institutional and private collections. The consulting expert and a partner in the world’s largest archive of Original Copper Photogravure Plates from Curtis’s The North American Indian, Kapson’s gallery is considered the expert source for original works.

DEPART Foundation
DEPART Foundation provides an alternative platform for creative experimentation and exploration, set within a global context, that thrives outside of conventional, cultural structures. The impact of its work can best be understood as the charting of new artistic destinations with every project and program it undertakes.

Since its founding in 2008, DEPART Foundation has served as a catalyst for the Italian art and cultural community, strengthening the dialogue between Italy and the international art world. Like multiple outposts in Europe and U.S., DEPART Foundation has actively encouraged artistic production through sponsorship of young and established artists and the provision of spaces and resources conducive to the research, production and exhibition of new work, and to the presentation of educational and public programs.

Some of the most interesting and dynamic artists of our time, from around the world, have been presented for the first time in Rome by DEPART Foundation. They include Cory Arcangel, Joe Bradley, Nate Lowman, Ryan McGinley, Tauba Auerbach, Darren Bader, Louis Eisner, Roe Ethridge, Sam Falls, Mark Flood, Elias Hansen, Brendan Lynch, Oscar Murillo, Sarah Braman, Seth Price, Jon Rafman, Stephen G. Rhodes, Amanda Ross-Ho, Sterling Ruby, Lucien Smith, Valerie Snobeck and Frances Stark.

NOVEMBER 18, 2016-JANUARY 7, 2017

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION

Lyn Winter, +1 213 446 0788, lyn@lynwinter.com Livia Mandoul, +1 407 919 93924, livia@lynwinter.com

DEPART FOUNDATION

Damiana Leoni and Lorena Stamo, roma@departfoundation.org

Image: Edward S. Curtis, Pulini and Koyame - Walpi, Volume 12, 1921, Copper Photogravure Printing Plate, 9 x 6 inches.

vcsPRAsset_531423_103864_e89bfb76-c449-4a7a-a938-3db90fe30582_0.jpgLos Angeles, California - Julien’s Auctions, the world-record breaking auction house to the stars is now in the Guinness Book of World Records for the second time,  having sold the most expensive dress ever to be auctioned. The Marilyn Monroe “Happy Birthday Mr. President” dress worn by Monroe on Saturday, May 19, 1962, at a Democratic fundraiser and early 45th birthday celebration for President John F. Kennedy at Madison Square Garden, was sold by Julien’s Auctions on November 17th, 2016 in Los Angeles for $4.8 million. The dress was sold to Ripley’s Believe it or Not and surpassed all other records for a dress sold at auction. Julien’s Auctions is also in the Guinness Book of World Records for selling Michael Jackson’s white glove for $420,000 in 2009 making it the most expensive glove ever sold at auction.

Under a bright spotlight, the legendary Marilyn Monroe walked on stage and peeled away her white ermine fur coat, revealing a skintight, sheer, flesh-colored dress that sparkled with over 2,500 handstitched crystals.  The custom Jean Louis creation was so tight fitting that Marilyn wore nothing underneath and had to be sewn into it at the last minute. When Marilyn appeared and the dress was finally revealed the entire audience gasped.

“Wow, what an honor and such exciting news,” said Darren Julien, President & CEO of Julien’s Auctions. “We never imagined we would be in the Guinness Book of World Records again and I must say it is pretty amazing. We owe a great deal of gratitude to the many people who have trusted us throughout the years with their personal and career items. Can’t wait to do it all over again in 2017.”

The Guinness Book of World Records announcement is one of many accolades Julien’s Auctions has received recently as the auction house continues to break world records. World records were set when Julien’s Auctions sold John Lennon’s original 1962 J-160E Gibson guitar for $2.41 million; The Beatles drum skin from their famous appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 which sold for $2.12 million; Ringo Starr’s 1963 Ludwig Oyster Black Pearl three piece drum kit which sold for $2.2 million; Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” jacket which sold for $1.8 million; Ringo Starr’s personal copy of The White Album pressed with #000001 which sold for $790,000; Michael Jackson’s white glove which sold for $420,000 (and also in the Guinness Book of World Records) and Marilyn Monroe’s grave marker which sold for $212,400.

“Marilyn Monroe’s dress was one of the most exciting moments in our auction house’s history. I am thrilled that this was the dress that broke all records and now has a place in the Guinness Book of World Records,” said Martin Nolan, Executive Director of Julien’s Auctions. “I am so very proud to be able to have our name in the record books alongside such an enduring and timeless beauty as Marilyn.”

bulbs.jpegDALLAS - An archive of Thomas Edison’s lightbulbs, court evidence and the keys to his famed Menlo Park, New Jersey, laboratory where he invented the phonograph, sold for a combined $64,375 at a Dec. 3 public auction of Historical Americana held by Heritage Auctions in Dallas. The archive included six, 19th century lightbulbs tied to a famous court case, which had descended in the family of Edison’s own attorney for more than 100 years. 

“These bulbs were entered as evidence when Edison sued three different companies for allegedly infringing on his patent for the incandescent bulb,” said Don Ackerman, a consignment director for Historical Americana for Heritage Auctions. “Edison’s own keys were used to open the doors of his laboratory was where the genius earned his nickname as “The Wizard of Menlo Park.”

One bulb in the archive was created by Heinrich Göbel, a German inventor who claimed to have invented the incandescent lightbulb in 1868, years before Edison did in 1879. The bulb and related documentation sold for $23,750. Göbel did not apply for a patent, but served as a star witness against Edison when Edison sued three manufacturers of incandescent lamps who he claimed infringed against his bulb patents. The set of five bulbs used in the court case sold for $30,000.

“Both ‘original’ Goebel lamps and reproductions were offered as exhibits, but there was no proof that any of them were made prior to 1880,” Ackerman said. “This tactic by defense attorneys became known as the "Goebel Defense" and it has since been used in other similar cases."

Multiple bidders pushed the auction price of the keys to $10,625. Consigner Charlie Knudsen, who acquired the items from his great aunt, who was married to one of the attorneys whose law firm represented Edison in patent lawsuits, was excited during the auction.

“This is such an important archive - I’m glad it will go to a good home, to someone who also appreciates Edison’s contribution to science and history,” he said.

Heritage Auctions is the largest auction house founded in the United States and the world’s third largest, with annual sales of more than $800 million, and over one million online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and receive access to a complete record of prices realized, with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com.

Want to get the up-to-the-minute updates and breaking news stories about Heritage Auctions? Follow us on HA.com/Facebook and HA.com/Twitter. To view an archive of Heritage press releases go to: HA.com/PR. To link to this release on your blog or Website: HA.com/PR-.

 

pnin_pjs2410_300dpi.jpgAUSTIN, Texas — The Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin has acquired books from Gabriel García Márquez’s library. The collection will reside alongside the author’s literary archive, which the Ransom Center acquired in 2014. The selection of more than 180 books includes those that are inscribed, signed and sometimes annotated. 

This selection from the Gabriel García Márquez library reveals expected and unexpected friendships and varied connections between the Nobel laureate and others. The collection includes books inscribed to García Márquez and to his wife, Mercedes, by friends and prominent political and cultural figures such as Isabel Allende, Richard Avedon, Fidel Castro, Bill Clinton, J. M. Coetzee, Carlos Fuentes, Pablo Neruda, Toni Morrison and Mario Vargas Llosa, among others. Also within the library are a number of García Márquez’s own works with annotations by the author.

“I was García Márquez’s official biographer and knew him for 20 years, until his death,” said Gerald Martin, the Andrew Mellon Professor Emeritus of Modern Languages at the University of Pittsburgh. “Few have had access to his library. I am thrilled by this extraordinary acquisition. … I would like nothing better than to take a flight from London tomorrow and spend a year (or more) among the riches of the Harry Ransom Center — my current American dream!”

One of the oldest presentation books is an inscribed first edition of Augusto Monterroso’s “Obras Completas (y otros cuentos)” (“Complete works (and other stories)”). García Márquez once said of one of Monterroso’s works, “This book should be read with your hands in the air: Its danger is based on its sly wisdom and the deadly beauty of its lack of seriousness.” The most recent books are Fidel Castro’s “La contraofensiva estratégica” and “La Victoria estratégica,” published in 2010. In a 1983 interview in Playboy, García Márquez said of Castro, “Ours is an intellectual friendship.”

With 15 books, Colombian poet and author Álvaro Mutis has the largest representation in the library. Authors in the collection come from more than 15 countries including Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Guatemala, Mexico, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela.

Many authors associated with the Latin American Boom are represented in the collection with inscribed editions including Julio Cortázar’s “Rayuela” (“Hopscotch”), José Donoso’s “El obsceno pájaro de la noche” (“The Obscene Night Bird”), and works by Carlos Fuentes, Mario Vargas Llosa and Juan Rulfo.

While processing and cataloging the collection, Amy F. Brown, the Ransom Center’s cataloging librarian, noted that “The García Márquez library is unique in its depth and variety. These books took me through a veritable Latin American ‘republic of letters.’”

Some of the books from the García Márquez library and their inscriptions can be seen online. The collection is open and accessible for research at the Ransom Center.

Image: Pablo Neruda's "Nueva odas elementales" (1963). Photo by Pete Smith.

BEVERLY HILLS — Items from the estate of creative comedy and advertising genius Stan Freberg (1926 - 2015) will be available to his fans in a public auction of animation cels and related memorabilia conducted by Heritage Auctions in Beverly Hills, California, and online Dec. 10 and 11, 2016.

Personally selected by his widow, Hunter Freberg, the items include the first draft script for his acclaimed 1961 comedy album, “Stan Freberg Presents The United States of America Volume One: The Early Years;” the 1953 Gold Record award for the satirical “St. George and the Dragonet:” the script for his award-winning 1958 recording “Green Chri$tma$;” animation cels from his prodigious voice-over work and important items from his memorable TV commercials. Other highlights offered in “The Treasures of Stan Freberg Collection” are his 1960 Hollywood Walk of Fame plaque and the Inkpot Award he received at the 2009 San Diego Comic-Con. 

“Stan Freberg was a genius who rose to the height of achievement and stardom in so many different fields. Advertising Age called him the father of the funny commercial,” said Jim Lentz, Director of Animation Art at Heritage Auctions. 

“He was an animation voice-over actor for over 70 years, from age 18 to 88. He achieved fame as a puppeteer with the television program, “Time for Beany,” and with his space alien puppet, Orville. He was the leading comedy album recording artist for Capitol Records, a prominent television personality and a Radio Hall of Fame star,” explained Lentz.

Many of the awards and animation cels were kept at home “so we could see them all the time,” said Hunter Freberg. “He was the son of a Baptist minister and always said God had given him the blessings for all the creativity he had. No words can describe living with THE Stan Freberg. We laughed so hard, and never had a boring moment together!,” she recalled.

Highlights from the Stan Freberg Collection include:

·         Freberg’s personal, typed with handwritten notations first draft script for his acclaimed 1961 comedy record album, “Stan Freberg Presents The United States of America Volume One: The Early Years.” The manuscript is accompanied by a second version of the script for nine sections of the album and a copy of the actual vinyl record that sold more than one million copies (est. $5,000).

·         A typed manuscript for the 1953 recording of “St. George and the Dragonet” that starred Freberg, June Foray, Daws Butler and Hy Averback as a parody of the popular radio and television crime series, “Dragnet.” The record quickly rose to number one on both the Billboard and Cash Box record charts. The script is accompanied by a vinyl record, “The Best of Stan Freberg,” that includes “St. George and the Dragonet.” (est. $1,000).

·         The Capitol Records gold record award Freberg received for “St. George and the Dragonet.” (est. $1,000).

·         An original script and sheet music for Freberg’s acclaimed holiday season satire record, “Green Chri$tma$” (est. $5,000), and the 1958 Best Comedy Performance nomination certificate he received for that record from the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences.

·         The Hollywood Walk of Fame award presented to Freberg on February 9, 1960 when his star was formally unveiled at 6145 Hollywood Blvd. in Los Angeles, and a second award presented to him on November 3, 2010 to mark the 50th anniversary of the famous Hollywood Walk of Fame (est. $2,000).

·         Animation cells including an artist’s proof (#19 of 50) of Bugs Bunny and Pete Puma (voiced by Freberg) from the 1997 Warner Brothers cartoon, “Rabbits Kin,” signed by Freberg (est. $750); a hand-painted production cel of Pete Puma from the 1990 season of “Tiny Toons” (est. $1,000); Freberg’s personal favorite cel depicting The Three Bears (est. $750) (Freberg voiced “Junyer Bear”) hand-signed by legendary cartoon artist and director Chuck Jones; and a one-of-a-kind cel created and inscribed by “The Simpsons” animator Phil Ortiz that depicts Homer Simpson and Freberg and voice-over actress June Foray as Simpson characters (est. $750).

·         The Inkpot Award he received at the 2009 San Diego Comic-Con convention for Achievement in Animation (est. $1,000); the 1992 “Annie’s” Winsor McCay Award (est. $1,000) from the International Animated Film Society for Freberg’s “distinguished lifetime contribution to the art of animation;” and his 1995 Radio Hall of Fame Award (est. $1,000).

·         Examples of materials created by Freberg to produce award-winning comedic advertising and marketing campaigns for Chung King Chow Mein (est. $1,000) and Kaiser brand aluminum foil (est. $1,000).

Heritage Auctions is the largest auction house founded in the United States and the world’s third largest, with annual sales of more than $800 million, and over one million online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and receive access to a complete record of prices realized, with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com. 

Want to get the up-to-the-minute updates and breaking news stories about Heritage Auctions? Follow us on HA.com/Facebook and HA.com/Twitter. To view an archive of Heritage press releases go to: HA.com/PR. To link to this release on your blog or Website: HA.com/PR-.

Screen Shot 2016-12-01 at 9.37.45 AM.pngDreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions is delighted to be offering the books and photogravure prints from Edward Sheriff Curtis' anthropological masterpiece, The North American Indian as part of their Books, Photographs and Other Works on Paper sale on 15th of December 2016 (1:30pm).

This ethnographical survey by photographer and chronicler, Edward Sheriff Curtis (1868-1952) remains one of the most significant and powerful insights into the world of the indigenous peoples of North America. The sale this December, which will take place at Bloomsbury House, 24 Maddox Street, London, will include volumes one to thirteen of the twenty volume series alongside a large number of the original accompanying portfolio plates. Many of the portfolio plates, which carry attractive estimates ranging from £300 to £1,800, will be offered as separate lots, appealing to a broad selection of budgets and collectors.

The North American Indian documents over eighty distinct native peoples from the culture areas of the trans-Mississippi west. The volumes contain a huge repository of ethnographic information including the outlines of social organisation, biographies of key leaders, myths and more. The sale catalogue features an introduction by Mick Gidley, Emeritus Professor of American Literature & Culture at the University of Leeds and author of several works on Curtis, including Edward S. Curtis and the North American Indian, Incorporated (Cambridge University Press, 1998; paperback, 2000).

The books and portfolios were originally issued to subscribers between 1907 and 1930, each volume and set of plates supposedly one of 500 copies (most likely a smaller run). These volumes therefore only entered the major libraries and homes of the super-rich. The set featuring in the auction was subscribed to by Sir William Northrup McMillan (1872-1925), an American industrialist and friend of Theodore Roosevelt, the latter who also provided the foreword to The North American Indian. Russell Mount, cataloguer of the Curtis lots at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions notes, ‘a set with an intriguing connection to Roosevelt, the President being first a portrait subject of Curtis, then soon his friend, supporter, and confidant. Roosevelt's encouragement to persevere with the project of The North American Indian was of inestimable importance to Curtis’.

The volumes (Lot 200, Est: £60,000-80,000, pictured) incorporate 983 plates with photogravures taken by Curtis himself. Curtis’ ‘documentary pictures’ cover portraiture, tribal arts & crafts, shamanisitic rituals, maps and plans. Lots 201-518 are comprised of the larger-format photogravure plates issued in the portfolios and include many of the more famous photographic images such as Mósa - Mohave (pictured below) which sees the subject powerfully returning the viewer’s gaze (Lot 251, Est £1,500 - £2,000).

Appealing to collectors of both photography and Americana alike, the striking photographic portraits of tribal Chiefs, men, women and children are documented alongside landscapes images. Lot 288, On The Little Bighorn - Apsaroke, 1908 (Est £1,000 - £1,500) and Lot 354 Sun Dance Encampment - Piegan (Est £1,000-£1,500) show the people’s ease with the natural world. Elsewhere, scenes of village life are depicted in Story Telling- Apache, (Lot 210 Est: £1,200 - £1,800) and The Blanket Weaver - Navaho (Lot 232, Est £1,000 - £1,500). Although these scenes may have been reconstructed for the camera, they not only capture the dignity and pride of the native peoples, but also document the craftsmanship inherent within the native cultures.

NEW YORK——The Estate of Maureen O'Hara sale at Bonhams New York today (29 November) sold over 95% of her private documents, clothing, and memorabilia, reaching a total over $445,000. "The Irish style icon's personal effects were volleyed between phone, internet and a healthy crowd of in-room bidders from Ireland, Europe, South America, and Asia," explains Catherine Williamson, Director of the Fine Books and Manuscripts and Entertainment Memorabilia at Bonhams Los Angeles.

The infamous cache of love letters from Quiet Man Director John Ford sold for $75,000. Written during the run-up to filming Ford's 1952 film The Quiet Man, almost all of them are in their original envelopes. After meeting on the set of How Green Was My Valley (1941) O'Hara and Ford began a long and often turbulent friendship colored by Ford's obsessive – and sometimes violent – fascination with the red-haired siren, who he called his 'Rosebud'. O'Hara later said of the director," for years I wondered why John Ford grew to hate me so much. I realize now that he didn't hate me at all. He loved me very much and even thought that he was in love with me." Read more about the two's famous relationship in Neil Lyndon's Bonhams Magazine essay.

O'Hara is perhaps best known for her iconic portrayal of Mary Kate Danaher in The Quiet Man, opposite John Wayne. There was competitive bidding on items associated with the classic film, including O'Hara's personal, heavily annotated The Quiet Man script (originally given to John Ford, with his name on the cover), which sold for $50,000. O'Hara's clothes and jewelry also proved exceedingly popular. A tweed jacket she wore in The Quiet Man (estimated $5,000-7,000), sold for $16,250. Another highlight was O'Hara's pair of Meissen porcelain floral encrusted covered vases, which sold for $31,250 against an estimate of $3,000-5,000.

Bonhams Director of Entertainment Memorabilia, Catherine Williamson, said, "It's clear that O'Hara's appeal is evergreen—she speaks just as much to young movie goers to those who saw her when her films first premiered. She had a fantastic sense of style and her clothing and accessories proved particularly popular, often selling for as many as 10 times their low estimates."

Maureen O'Hara (1920-2015) grew up on the outskirts of Dublin. She joined Dublin's Abbey Theatre in 1934 and spent three years training with the company. At 17, O'Hara was discovered by British actor Charles Laughton, who signed her to a contract with his Mayflower Pictures. Her first major film was the Alfred Hitchcock-directed Jamaica Inn (1939), co-starring Laughton. This was swiftly followed by her first Hollywood movie, The Hunchback of Notre (1939), which cemented her movie star status. Known as "The Queen of Technicolor" for her fiery red hair and emerald green eyes, O'Hara appeared in more than 60 movies and was awarded an honorary Oscar in 2014 for her contributions to the film industry.

Sotheby's London to Offer The Bute Hours

Screen Shot 2016-11-30 at 4.31.28 PM.pngLondon, 30 November 2016--The Bute Hours, one of the most extraordinary Medieval English Book of Hours in existence, is to be auctioned at Sotheby’s London on 6 December 2016, with an estimate of £1.5 to 2.5 million, making it one of the most valuable English books to appear at auction. This lavish work includes more than 50 large miniatures and was probably made for a nobleman of the royal household who is depicted with his wife and children throughout the book.

English Books of Hours are extremely rare on the market, and this particular manuscript remains mostly unstudied. Lavishly adorned with elaborate miniatures, historiated borders and initials, this unique manuscript was produced by several different artists working in a homogeneous style, with an evident fondness for contemporary Netherlandish manuscript illumination, while also borrowing from German engravings. The richness of illustration in this Book of Hours is unparalleled in English illuminated manuscripts of the time, and is thus a reflection of the significant social status of its patron, who is depicted throughout the book.

The manuscript takes its modern name from the Marquesses of Bute, whose ancestral home is on the Isle of Bute, off the west coast of Scotland. The family traces its ancestry back to the 12th century, and is descended from kings of both Scotland and the United Kingdom. The manuscript was acquired for the Bute library by John Crichton-Stuart, 5th Marquess of Bute, who died in 1956; it passed with the title and properties (including six castles and an important art collection) to his eldest son John Crichton-Stuart (1933-93), who was born just 15 minutes before his twin brother, and thus became the 6th Marquess of Bute. In 1983, he sold a number of illuminated manuscripts at Sotheby's, including the Bute Hours.

The Berger Collection Educational Trust, Sold to Benefit Future Philanthropy

The Bute Hours comes to sale from the Berger Collection Educational Trust, sold to benefit future philanthropy. Both natives of Denver, William M. B. Berger and Bernadette Berger began their collecting activities in the 1990s with a passion that has rarely been matched. Over the course of just a few years, they amassed one of the most important collections of British Art in America, spanning over 600 years, as well as excellent examples of French, Italian and American paintings and drawings. The Bergers were dedicated to using art as a vehicle for education: “We have always believed that art, as well as music, poetry, and literature, refreshes and enriches our lives”, they said. In order to further their mission, they founded the Berger Collection Educational Trust.

The Trust’s mission focuses on British Art, culture and history, and uses the collection that the Bergers created to further its goals. It has sponsored numerous exhibitions throughout the United States devoted to British painting, as well as being a major supporter of the British Art Journal. The Trust administers, together with the Journal, the highly prestigious William M. B. Berger Prize for British Art History, awarded for excellence in the field.

In addition to the Bute Hours, a number of properties from The Berger Collection Educational Trust, will be sold at Sotheby’s New York & London in 2016 and 2017 to benefit future philanthropy.

Dr. John Wilson, Trustee, The Berger Collection Educational Trust, commented: “Bill and Bernadette Berger established the Berger Collection Educational Trust to demonstrate the role of British culture in influencing the Western Cultural Tradition in general, and American culture in particular. Their wide-ranging tastes and interests created a collection that allowed visitors to come face-to-face not only with significant paintings and works on paper, but also manuscripts, royal seals and important early books. Since its inception, the Trust has driven and supported educational activities promoting the history of British art, including programs at the Denver Art Museum and the Portland Museum of Art, and raised funds to further the mission of the Collection. The works on offer at Sotheby’s, many of which fall outside the British sphere, will be sold to further this mission.”

1eec3654ab321bf30e35f38be4969c9a374a06fa.jpegBOSTON, MA -  RR Auction is proud to present The Stanley Wiater archive of Modern Horror literature that comprehensively documents the history of the world’s most terrifying genre in its December monthly offering.

A three-time winner of the illustrious Bram Stoker Award, Wiater has earned distinction as a writer, editor, anthologist, journalist, and collector over the course of four decades, with his contributions adding significantly to the growth and visibility of the genre.

The enormous archive consists of over one hundred boxes of material from throughout Wiater’s remarkable career, broken down as follows: 79 banker’s boxes; 14 smaller boxes; four typewriter paper boxes; two bins of assorted posters and artwork; three 100-slot trays of audio tapes; and 27 books contributed to or edited by Wiater.

After several years of collecting pulp, horror, and adventure novels, Wiater found himself well positioned when modern horror emerged in the late 1960s and early 1970s with the release of classic films like Rosemary’s Baby and The Exorcist, and then with the unprecedented rise of Stephen King as a mainstream horror scribe. A 1974 interview with Ray Bradbury, Wiater’s first as a budding journalist, paved the way for his career as a writer of oral history, in addition to his initial Bram Stoker Award for Dark Dreamers: Conversations with the Masters of Horror, a series of insightful interviews with twenty-six of the genre’s most influential writers.

Wiater’s massive collection of audio and videotape, offering over 200 hours of unedited recordings and transcripts, the vast bulk of which have never been published, serve the archive as a uniquely educational keystone and resource. A portion of the interview content includes talks with writers like Stephen King, Ray Bradbury, Clive Barker, Richard Matheson, Robert Bloch, Harlan Ellison, Ira Levin, and David Morrell; and with filmmakers such as Martin Scorsese, George Romero, Roger Corman, David Cronenberg, and Sidney Pollack.  Ten of the audio tapes are available for listening online. 

In 2000, Wiater developed a television series fittingly called Dark Dreamers, which, inspired by his book of the same name, featured one-on-one interviews with writers Barker and Matheson, directors John Landis and Wes Craven, special effects wizard Stan Winston, and many more. The result is a collection of over 150 raw, unedited videotapes of never-before-seen footage. In addition to Dark Dreamers, Wiater has edited two anthologies of original fiction by nearly two dozen writers, as well as books on Stephen King, Brian Lumley, and Richard Matheson’s classic Twilight Zone television scripts. He edited Comic Book Rebels, a definitive treatment on the growth of the underground comix movement of the 1960s, and has penned numerous other manuscripts, both published and unpublished, including his first story, which won a contest judged by Stephen King.

The archive also features a large number of manuscripts—Wiater’s own and those of writers he anthologized or edited; a substantial amount of business and literary correspondence from a wide array of mainstream and underground writers; the paper archives of the Horror Writers Association; original unreleased material by fantasy surrealist photographer J. K. Potter; and a section of material related to Wiater’s employment with Mirage Studios.

“The Stanley Wiater archive documents the lore and history of literature’s most terrifying genre with amazing depth and unmatched appreciation,” said Robert Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction.

The Autographs, Artifacts & Animation auction from RR Auction began on November 17 and will conclude on December 7. For information, visit the RR Auction web site at www.rrauction.com

DALLAS — A pair of posters from the iconic 1942 film Casablanca headlined Heritage Auctions’ Vintage Movie Posters Auction Nov. 19-20 in Dallas, which realized a total of $1,918,571. Both posters more than quadrupled their pre-auction estimates: A Casablanca (Warner Brothers, R-1953) Italian 2-Fogli poster went on the block with an estimated price of $50,000, to sell for $203,150, while a Casablanca (Warner Brothers, 1942) Half Sheet Style B, which went into the auction with an estimated return of $40,000, sold for $167,300.

“This was an exceptional auction that brought together some of the most coveted movie images from Hollywood,” Heritage director of vintage posters Grey Smith said. “The collection included some lots that had been in high demand for some time to our most avid collectors.”

A poster from The Good, the Bad and the Ugly (PEA, 1966), an Italian premier 24 Sheet, with artwork by Franco Fiorenzi and Michelangelo Pappuza, (similar to the two and four fogli with its reflective silver background) sold for $77,675. 

Collectors seeking a poster from the 1932 box office bomb and exploitation film Freaks (MGM, 1932) got their wish in the auction, when a rare Pre-War Belgian Poster for the film sold for $28,680.

Considered one of the defining classics in film noir, a poster from Jacques Tourneur’s Out of the Past (RKO, 1947) sold for $22,705.

A poster of The Maltese Falcon (Warner Brothers, 1941) One Sheet realized more than twice its pre-auction estimate of $8,000 when it brought in $21,510, and a depiction of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s most famous novel, a poster of The Hound of the Baskervilles (20th Century Fox, 1939) One Sheet realized a sale price of $19,120.

A lobby card measuring 11 inches by 14 inches from Dracula (Universal, 1931), one of the most famous horror films of all time, nearly quadrupled its pre-auction estimate of $4,000 when it sold for $15,535.

Collectors searching for an exceedingly rare poster from Captain Blood (Warner Brothers, 1935) One Sheet got their chance in this auction; the lot was another that exceeded its pre-auction estimate when it sold for $14,340.

A surprise lot that crashed the sale’s top 10 lots was a ceramic Dracula/Lugosi Statuette (circa Late 1940s, which also drew $14,340. It is believed that the figure, which stands eight inches tall, actually may have been sculpted by actor Bela Lugosi and given as a gift to friends. Rumors suggest that only about 25 were made, and only a fraction of those remain in existence.

WB16 image1.jpgMinnesota Center for Book Art’s twenty-sixth Winter Book features poetry and prose by Heid E. Erdrich exploring the complex conversations between artists and viewers. every-blest-thing-seeing-eye imagines the varied experiences of viewing art in a gallery. Curation is meant to direct viewers, but every viewer comes to each artwork in a distinct manner—from myriad intellectual, emotional, and spiritual starting points. When an Ojibwe poet acts as curator, her statements on the work of indigenous artists become part of a larger, non-linear narrative in which characters and emblems, just like the artists who create them, cannot be fully fathomed. And yet, we must look. We must see every blest thing. 

every-blest-thing-seeing-eye was designed by Jeff Rathermel and Todd Thyberg, with Thyberg serving as Master Printer. Printing of the deluxe edition portfolio of prints was directed by Tom Spence. every-blest-thing-seeing-eye features poetry and prose by Heid E. Erdrich, a poet, writer, and faculty mentor at Augsburg College. The twenty-sixth Winter Book was produced in two editions, with illustrations by Jim Denomie, Aza Erdrich, Eric Gansworth, Dyani Whitehawk, Louise Erdrich, Adrea Carlson, and Jonathan Thunder.

The Standard Edition (100 numbered copies; $40) contains letterpress printed text and images on Arches Platine papers. The accordion structure features die cuts, a Cave Paper banded closure, and ochre accents throughout. 

The Deluxe Edition (26 lettered copies; $295 / $235 before December 31) is also letterpress printed on Arches Plantine paper, is accompanied by a portfolio of seven prints and various physical artifacts referenced in the text, all housed in a custom glass top case.

Minnesota Center for Book Arts wishes to thank Wet Paint Inc., Smart Set, and Angel Bomb Design + Letterpress for their generous support. Special thanks to the many Winter Book volunteers for their gifts of time and talent. 

Join MCBA in celebrating the handmade book at our annual Winter Book publication celebration! 

Saturday, December 10, 2016

7pm: Reading by Heid E. Erdrich

Followed by a book signing and public reception with light refreshments in MCBA’s Studios and Gallery.

Free and open to the public.

For more information, visit mnbookarts.org/winterbook



super copy.jpgDALLAS — Original Underground Comix Art and key books from the Golden Age and Silver Age helped push the total value of Heritage Auctions’ Comics & Comic Art Auction Nov. 17-19 in Dallas to nearly $10 million, the second-highest total ever for a comic auction. The #1 Comics auction record ($10,389,821) was set by Heritage in July 2012.

“This auction was very gratifying to us at Heritage Auctions, because so many of the lots surpassed our pre-auction estimates,” Heritage Director of Operations for Comics and Comic Art Barry Sandoval said. “For example, we certainly thought the Pep Comics run would sell for multiples of the Price Guide value, but we weren’t expecting some to sell for as much as 12 times the Guide value!”

The top lot was a rare unrestored copy of Superman #1 (DC, 1939) CGC VG+ 4.5 CGC which sold for $358,500. Although an estimated 1,000,000 copies were printed in 1939, very few are known to have survived in this grade or better; this issue is ranked third on Overstreet’s Top 100 Golden Age Comics list.

One of the auction’s highlights was a 9.6 CGC NM+ issue of The Amazing Spider-Man #1 Curator Pedigree (Marvel, 1963), which is one of the top Silver Age comics Heritage has sold in 15 years of auctions. The book sold for $262,900. 

An FN- 5.5 CGC copy of Batman #1 (DC, 1940) was another exceptionally popular Golden Age lot that sold for $239,000. The issue, which features the debut appearances of two characters who would end up being long-time Batman nemeses: Catwoman and the Joker, who are two of the reasons for the issue’s appearance on Overstreet’s list of Top 100 Golden Age Comics. This issue features a retelling of Batman’s origin and a classic cover by Bob Kane and Jerry Robinson, and is one of the top 20 CGC-graded copies.

Steve Ditko’s Amazing Spider-Man #27 Splash Page 1 Original Art (Marvel, 1965) hauled in $239,000. The page features Spider-Man and his greatest villain: The Green Goblin.

Headlining the Underground Comix lots was Robert Crumb’s Thrilling Murder Comics #1 “Jumpin’ Jack Flash” Complete Four-Page Story Original Art (San Francisco Comic Book Co., 1971), which sold for $143,400, setting a new world record for the artist. Considered one of Crumb’s most violent and taboo-breaking stories, this art combines the title of the 1969 Rolling Stones song with the events that led to the notorious Tate-LaBianca murders by Charles Manson’s “family” members.

Another top Underground lot was the Robert Crumb Mondo Snarfo “Grim Grids” Complete Three-Page Story Original Art (Kitchen Sink, 1978). The book sold for $131,450!

A Flash Comics #1 (DC, 1940) FN+ 6.5 CGC pulled in $107,550. Considered one of the nicest copies of this Golden Age collection, fewer than a dozen copies nicer than FN/VF 5.0 or better are known to exist.

More Fun Comics #73 (DC, 1941) VF 8.0 CGC, another coveted issue, went for $104,562.50. In particularly high demand because it includes the origin and first appearance of Aquaman and Green Arrow, its NM- value jumped 43 percent from 2015 to 2016 - the largest jump of any book on Overstreet’s Top 100 Golden Age Comics list. 

Other top results include, but are not limited to:

·         An Alex Raymond Flash Gordon Sunday Comic Strip Original Art dated 8-14-38 (King Features Syndicate): $95,600

·         A Robert Crumb Le Monde Selon Crumb [The World According To Crumb] Promotion Poster Original Art (C.N.B.D.I., 1991): $77,675

·         A Bill Watterson Calvin and Hobbes Daily Comic Strip Original Art dated 4-21-86 (Universal Press Syndicate, 1986): $77,675

·         A Marvel Comics #1 (Timely, 1939) GD/VG 3.0 CGC: $77,675

·         A Jack Davis MAD #6 Complete Six-Page Story “Casey at the Bat!” Original Art (EC, 1953): $77,675

Heritage Auctions is the largest auction house founded in the United States and the world’s third largest, with annual sales of more than $800 million, and over one million online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and receive access to a complete record of prices realized, with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com.

Want to get the up-to-the-minute updates and breaking news stories about Heritage Auctions? Follow us on HA.com/Facebook and HA.com/Twitter. To view an archive of Heritage press releases go to: HA.com/PR. To link to this release on your blog or Website: HA.com/PR-3065.

Screen Shot 2016-11-29 at 9.39.11 AM.pngDreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions is delighted to announce the return of Islamic and Near Eastern manuscripts and miniatures to its regular Western manuscripts sales this December, reuniting these two categories in the auction world after a gap of fifty years. The dedicated section will be offered alongside Western Manuscripts and is curated by Roxana Kashani, Bloomsbury Auctions’ Head of Islamic Manuscripts and Miniatures. The whole sale comprises 123 lots spanning nearly a millennia of human history.

Western and Oriental Manuscripts and Miniatures will be auctioned on Wednesday 7th December 2016 (10:30am) at Bloomsbury House, 24 Maddox Street.

A highlight from the western manuscripts on offer is Bede’s Homilies on the Gospels in Latin (Lot 2, Est: £5,000 - 7,000). This remarkable fragment dates back to the second or third quarter of the ninth century. No copies of the text survive from England before the twelfth century, with this fragment having origins from Germany, most likely Fulda. In a letter written in 747-751, St. Boniface requested from one of Bede’s students and followers, Archbishop Egbert of York, “some of the works which Bede has composed” including “his book of homilies for the year, because it would be a very handy and useful manual for us in our preaching”. This may be a cutting from an immediate descendent of the manuscript sent. Another leaf sold at auction in 2010, and is now in Durham University Library.

Another star lot is a finely illuminated humanist manuscript of Trionfi (Lot 73, Est £10,000-15,000) by the Italian poet and scholar, Francesco Petrarch (1304-1374). Petrarch, credited as being the father of the Renaissance, was the first poet laureate of Italy since the Roman Empire. His verse would inspire hundreds of writers throughout Europe to compose in the same style and little more than a century after his death, Pietro Bembo would use Petrarch’s vernacular works (including those here) to create the standard of modern Italian. The manuscript, likely from Florence and dated circa 1480-90, is written in a strikingly elegant hand by a known scribe who worked for a number of the greatest ducal and royal courts during the Renaissance. It is likely that the manuscript was originally commissioned as a luxury, pocket-copy of the Trionfi for a wealthy client with an interest in Italian literature.

A manuscript document in Latin circa 1280 recording a grant of land in Derbyshire includes a rare clause excluding the future sale of the land to “the religious or the Jews” (Lot 64, Est: £600 - 800). The specification that the lands here could not be sold to religious communities was most probably to avoid their being alienated into Church ownership permanently. However, the extension of this clause to the Jews can be seen as an early record of anti-Semitism in the terrible climate of growing fear and uncertainty which lead up to Edward I’s edict of expulsion in 1290.

A beautiful Book of Hours in its original binding dated circa 1500 from the Netherlands, also features in the sale (pictured, Lot 91: Est: £18,000-25,000). The three large and nine small portrait miniature paintings in the manuscripts have been firmly attributed to the important artist, the Master of James IV, now known as Gerard de Horenbout (circa 1465 - circa 1540). Quirky additions to the border decorations include a series of apes, ‘aping’ human activities. Examples include an ape in an apron nursing a baby, another playing a harp and one with a missing limb on crutches receiving alms from a wealthy ape. Gerard de Horenbout worked for a wealthy, international clientele and contributed to some of the most celebrated illuminated manuscripts produced in his lifetime, including the fabulously opulent Rothschild Prayerbook (last sold in 2014 for £13,605,000).

Oriental Manuscripts

From the Oriental section of the sale, a miniature leaf-shaped Qur'an, copied by Mohammad Saleh Taom Zadeh, in Arabic is another key highlight (Lot 112, Est: £4,000-6,000). Striking for its remarkable design and measuring just 72mm x 40mm, this copy of the Qur’an is dated 1284 AH (1867/68 AD) and unusually illuminated in silver, rather than gold. The text is elegantly laid out mimicking the veins of a real leaf, and the miniature is stored in a bespoke box. The breath- taking design details point to the quality of this manuscript and the wealth of the patron who commissioned it. Only two comparable Qur’ans have appeared on the open market in recent decades.

From Persia, Kolliyat by Muhsin al-Din Sa'adi Shirazi, "Sa'di" (Lot 121, Est: £10,000-15,000, dated 1243 AH [1827-28 AD]) serves as another standout illuminated manuscript from the Oriental section. Sa’di is one of the most revered poetic and prose writers in Persian history, and here the text is surrounded with gold detailing creating a cloud-like effect on the page. Most interestingly, this has provenance from the library of Shahzadeh Khanlar Mirza, the 17th son of Crown Prince Abbas Mirza of the Qajar dynasty. Shahzadeh Khanlar became one of the most prominent princes of his generation. Notably, he became Nasser al-Din Shah’s chief commander in the Anglo- Persian war of 1856. Inside the lacquered outer boards are two fascinating and detailed depictions of an old and young man set against idyllic pastoral backgrounds.

Another captivating lot is a miniature Qajar Qur'an from Persia in the mid-nineteenth century (Lot 110, Est £4,000- 6,000). This intricately decorated, pocket-sized prayer book was probably commissioned by an aristocrat for the purposes of Hajj. It is stored in an accompanying leather carrying pouch of contemporary design with silk-lining and leather strap (detached on one side) which would have made it easily transportable during pilgrimage.

Hemingway copy.jpgNEW YORK - On December 3, Jasper52 will auction a remarkable single-owner collection of Ernest Hemingway books - some of them first editions - together with rare Hemingway family-autographed ephemera. Absentee and Internet live bidding on all items in the 113-lot online-only sale is being facilitated exclusively through LiveAuctioneers.com. All lots will open for bidding at $1. Some have a reserve price.

Like Hemingway, the owner of the collection is an award-winning writer and world traveler. Enamored with Hemingway’s writing style from a young age, he set about collecting the author’s “really important books” around 40 years ago. 

Whether on assignment in Europe, taking a leisurely drive up the California coast, or combing through bookstores near Hemingway’s last home in Idaho, the collector says he always watched out for rare editions and signed material. 

“I keep my eyes open every minute, because you never know where you’ll find a gem,” the collector said. “I’ve found books in Germany, Norway, all sorts of places.”

He also became acquainted with members of the Hemingway family, noting, “I’ve met two of Hemingway’s daughters and interviewed his youngest son, Jack, in Sun Valley (Idaho).”

The collector’s thorough knowledge of Hemingway’s career helped him to identify what was genuinely rare. “Some of the early books aren’t flashy, but they’re so hard to come by,” he said.

Of the first editions in the auction, the top-estimated lot is A Farewell to Arms. Published in 1929 by Grosset & Dunlap, this classic has a pre-sale estimate of $800-$1,000.

Another prized first edition is Lot 104, a 1926 first edition of The Sun Also Rises published by Scribners. It is expected to make $800-$1,000.

Bidders will have an unusual opportunity to acquire an instant Hemingway library in Lot 111, a complete collection of 20 handsome leatherbound volumes accented with 22K gold. Published in the 1990s by Easton Press, this collection is top quality throughout and is still sealed in its original packaging. The set is estimated at $1,000-$1,500

The top-estimated item in the sale is Lot 113, a 1943 War Department publication titled Basic Field Manual - First Aid For Soldiers, issued to and signed by Hemingway in black ink. This one-of-a-kind article has been exhaustively researched and will convey to the winning bidder with supportive background information. It is estimated at $8,000-$12,000.

All Hemingway family signatures are desirable to collectors, but the most elusive of all is the signature of Ernest Hemingway’s mother, Grace Hall Hemingway. The auction contains a first-edition copy of a 1940 book titled Sunnyside Children, by Helen Clark Wentworth, which has been inscribed and signed by Grace Hemingway. Entered as Lot 112, the book could reach $1,500-$2,500.

Bidding has opened on all lots in Jasper52’s Dec. 3 Ernest Hemingway Book Auction.

Image: 1943 War Department publication titled ‘Basic Field Manual - First Aid For Soldiers,’ issued to and signed by Hemingway in black ink. One-of-a-kind item. Est. $8,000-$12,000

Screen Shot 2016-11-28 at 9.37.51 PM.pngNew York, NY — In 1972, Robert Owen Lehman placed his renowned music manuscript collection on deposit at the Morgan Library & Museum. To celebrate his eightieth birthday, the Morgan will host a dazzling concert of piano works from his collection this Friday, December 2. Beginning at 6 PM, a selection of music manuscripts from the Lehman Collection will be on view in Pierpont Morgan’s Library. At 7:30 PM, pianist Jenny Chen will perform in Gilder Lehrman Hall compositions by Beethoven, Mendelssohn, Chopin, Ravel, Debussy, and Stravinsky. The concert launches a year-long display of manuscripts from Mr. Lehman’s archive of more than two hundred music autographs by composers from the eighteenth through the twentieth centuries. The installation—part of an ongoing rotation of works drawn from the Morgan’s collections called Treasures from the Vault—will change continuously throughout the 2016-17 season.

The first rotation of Lehman Collection manuscripts in Treasures from the Vault showcases J. S. Bach’s Prelude and Fugue for organ in B Minor, BWV 544; Beethoven’s Rage Over the Lost Penny, Brahms’s First Piano Concerto (score for piano solo); Haydn’s last string quartet; Liszt’s B Minor Sonata; and Stravinsky’s Petrushka  (1911). Two further installations will highlight works by Mozart, Mendelssohn, Chopin, Debussy, Ravel, and Rachmaninoff and Schumann, Puccini, Richard Strauss, Schoenberg, Prokofiev, and Mahler. The breadth and quality of the collection is astounding, and without a doubt, it is the greatest collection of music autographs in private hands today. Each item on display will be accompanied by an audio excerpt, available on the Morgan’s Audio Guide which is free with museum admission, so that viewers can hear the compositions they are seeing.

The December 2nd concert features Beethoven’s Rage; Mendelssohn’s Rondo capriccioso; Chopin’s Etudes, op. 10, nos. 3 and 9, and Nocturne, op. 48, no.1; Ravel’s Jeux d’eau; selections from Debussy’s first book of Preludes; and ends with Stravinsky’s formidable Three Movements from “Petroushka.” Pianist Jenny Chen meets the myriad challenges of these works with confidence, artistry, and passion. Born in Taipei, she began her musical training at age six. She has since worked with Eleanor Sokoloff at the Curtis Institute and recently completed a music master’s degree at the Yale School of Music. Currently, she is a Doctor of Musical Arts candidate at the Eastman School of Music where she studies with Douglas Humpherys. Winner of numerous competitions and appearing in major venues in the United States and abroad, she recently performed in the Brahms Piano Quintet in F Minor, op. 34 at the inaugural Chamber Music Encounters program sponsored by the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center.

215-B.jpgFALLS CHURCH, Va. - More than 400 lots of fine and rare books, antique maps, autographs and historical Americana will be auctioned on Thursday, December 1 at Waverly Rare Books in Falls Church, Virginia. The sale will start at 6 p.m. Eastern Time, and Internet live bidding will be facilitated by LiveAuctioneers.com.

“This is a wildly diverse auction with a timeline that starts with a three-book volume of 18th-century Piranesi prints and travels through the centuries to contemporary times, with Flash Gordon artwork and presidential autographs,” said Monika Schiavo, director of Waverly Rare Books. “We also have an archive of material pertaining to the legendary Tuskegee Airmen.”

A strong candidate for top lot of the auction is an exceedingly rare volume by Giovanni Battista Piranesi (1720-1778), the Italian artist famous for his etchings of Rome and his imaginary “prisons.” Published in Rome in 1762 by Gernosi Salomoni, the volume weighs a hefty 16 pounds. Printed on wove paper, with mostly near-fine plates, it is expected to sell for $6,000-$9,000.

Rex Wayne Scouten (1924-2013) served ten US presidents in his positions as White House Chief Usher from 1969-1986 and White House Curator from 1986-1997. His collection includes autographs by such notables as John F. Kennedy (as a Congressman), First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy, and all US presidents from Truman through Clinton. “This collection comes with impeccable provenance. It couldn’t be better,” Schiavo said. The political section also features cards signed by Cabinet members from the Theodore Roosevelt through Jimmy Carter administrations and Supreme Court Justices from multiple administrations. 

Original Flash Gordon artwork from a 1970s Union Carbide-sponsored series, drawn, colored and signed by the comic illustrator Alphonso “Al” Williamson (1931-2010), has an estimate of $500-$700. The artwork is titled The Hairy Giants of Mongo’s Northland. In this nail-biting adventure, Gordon is “taken slave by the Hairy Giants who inhabit an icy cave city.”  

A three-volume set of books containing ink and watercolor drawings on paper by the renowned mycologist (fungus expert) M. F. Lewis is expected to garner $3,000-$6,000. Hundreds of species of fungi are shown in more than 100 sheets. Most of the species are from Shropshire, Englan, and neighboring counties in Wales. Nearly all species are identified, and many are dated (1860-1902).

The Tuskegee Airmen were African-American fighter and bomber pilots who flew missions in World War II. The auction features a fascinating archive of documents and historic photographs from Charles F. Francis, author of The Tuskegee Airmen, an important chronicle of the groundbreaking aviators and their navigators, mechanics, instructors and other support staff.  

The rare and antique map section features a three-volume atlas that accompanied the official records of the Union and Confederate armies during the Civil War. Compiled by Capt. Calvin D. Cowles of the 23rd U.S. Infantry, the set was published in the 1890s and is lavishly illustrated with maps on plates. The large folio is bound in leather and cloth. The set is expected to reach $4,000-$6,000.

Top lots in the cartography section include Herman Moll’s Carolina Map of the Southeastern U.S. and a 1628 map of Honduras - Atlas Sive Cosmographicae - an early depiction of the area from Virginia to Florida.

First-edition fans will be treated to a copy of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s very first novel, This Side of Paradise (Charles Scribner & Sons, 1920), signed by the author himself. The first edition, ninth-printing copy is in fine condition with its original green cloth cover and bright gilt spine. It is signed on the endpaper, “Most sincerely, F. Scott Fitzgerald.” Estimate: $4,000-$6,000

The auction also boasts signed material from former NASA astronauts, signed baseball and hockey memorabilia, two guestbooks from the landmark Washington, D.C. restaurant Paul Young’s, original Tarzan illustrations by Dale Hoover and Neil Adams, science fiction books and memorabilia from the Phil Petras collection, scrapbooks, diaries, account books and more.

Previews will be held at Waverly Rare Books’ gallery in northern Virginia on Saturday, Nov. 26 from 10-2; Monday, Nov. 28 from 10-6; Tuesday, Nov. 29 from 10-7; Wednesday, Nov. 30 from 10-7; and on auction day, Thursday, Dec. 1 from 10-6.

Waverly Rare Books is a division of Quinn’s Auction Galleries. The firm is always accepting quality consignments for future auctions. To consign a single item, an estate or a collection, please call 703-532-5632, or send an email inquiry to info@quinnsauction.com. View the fully illustrated auction catalog and register to bid absentee or live online at www.LiveAuctioneers.com

Image: Lot 215 Archive of letters, documents, photographs and ephemera pertaining to the Tuskeegee Airmen, from Maryland native Charles E. Francis (1916-1993), who authored the first history of the military aviators in 1955, ‘The Tuskegee Airmen: The Men Who Changed a Nation.’ Est. $600-$900 

Auction Guide