"Law's Picture Books" Published

Yale.JPGTalbot Publishing is pleased to announce the publication of an important new title: “Illustrated law books” may seem like an oxymoron. After all, law is conceptual, analytic, and so very wordy! Yet for the past decade, over a thousand illustrated law books have been assembled in the Yale Law Library - spanning eight centuries and four continents. Law’s Picture Books began as a major exhibition of that collection at the Grolier Club (9/13 to 11/18/17) in New York City, curated by Rare Book Librarian Michael Widener and legal historian Mark S. Weiner. In challenging the stereotype of legal literature as a dreary expanse of dry text, this book will surprise and delight both bibliophiles and members of the legal community.

This handsome full-color book is enhanced by Michael Widener’s essay “Collecting Yale Law Library’s Picture Books,” Mark S. Weiner’s “Reflections on an Exhibition,” Jolande E. Goldberg’s “Ars Memoria in Early Law: Looking Beneath the Picture” and Erin C. Blake’s “Law’s Picture Books and the History of Book Illustration.”

Law’s Picture Books

The Yale Law Library Collection

Michael Widener Mark S. Weiner

Paperback, full color, vii, 211 pp., 9”x 9” ISBN 978-1-61619-160-3 $39.95

 

Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, one of the nation's leading auction houses, will expand its regional reach to Atlanta, Georgia. With headquarters in Chicago, this will be the firm's eighth location in addition to Denver, Milwaukee, Naples, Palm Beach, Scottsdale and St. Louis. 

Mary Calhoun has been hired as director of business development for the location. Calhoun is a civic leader who sits on the board of numerous local organizations and helps to coordinate some of their largest annual events. These organizations include the Atlanta Opera, the Trust for Public Land, Atlanta History Center, Cherokee Garden Library and Cherokee Garden Club.

Calhoun spent seven years at Sotheby's New York in a number of business development and marketing roles. Notably, she oversaw marketing initiatives for the Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis and Duke and Duchess of Windsor collections.

"I'm thrilled to bring my years of experience to Leslie Hindman Auctioneers as the firm grows in Atlanta," said Mary Calhoun. "With the recent hiring of Michael Shapiro, former Director at the High Museum of Art, I'm excited to help bring the exceptional service and reach of an international auction firm to Atlanta." 

Regarding Leslie Hindman Auctioneers' expansion into Atlanta, Michael Shapiro, who joined the firm as a Senior Advisor, said, "Leslie has created one of America's leading auction houses, and I look forward to helping Leslie Hindman Auctioneers continue to flourish."

At Sotheby's Calhoun worked closely with management teams, specialists in numerous categories and all areas of client service. She received her Bachelor of Arts in Classical Languages from Kenyon College in Gambier, Ohio. 

"We plan on making Atlanta a major auction center," said Leslie Hindman, founder and CEO of Leslie Hindman Auctioneers. "We are delighted that Michael Shapiro and Mary Calhoun will lead our efforts in building a hub for the entire Southeast."

Leslie Hindman Auctioneers is a globally recognized brand with eight national offices and over 60 auctions conducted annually in collecting categories such as fine jewelry and timepieces, contemporary art, 20th century design, rare books, furniture, decorative arts and more. They work with buyers and sellers across the globe, connecting with millions of collectors through each auction conducted. For more information, please contact Jim Sharp at (312) 280-1212.

About Leslie Hindman Auctioneers

Leslie Hindman Auctioneers is among the leading fine art auction houses of the world and one of the largest in the country. As a globally recognized brand, Leslie Hindman Auctioneers conducts over 60 auctions annually in categories such as fine jewelry and timepieces, contemporary art, modern design, rare books, furniture, decorative arts and more. The firm has salerooms and business offices in Atlanta, Chicago, Denver, Milwaukee, Naples, Palm Beach, Scottsdale and St. Louis but connects with millions of collectors worldwide through online resources and global listings. The firm is also a founding partner of Bidsquare, a live auction platform formed by six leading auction houses, and owns a proprietary online bidding platform, LHLive, as well as LHExchange, an e-commerce site specializing in high-end designer furniture and decorative arts. Visit www.lesliehindman.com for more information.

Screen Shot 2017-09-19 at 8.24.11 AM.pngLOS ANGELES - The Getty Museum will exhibit a rare drawing by one of history’s most admired artists, Michelangelo, for a limited time from September 20 through October 29, 2017. The drawing was part of a landmark group of 16 drawings and one painting acquired by the Getty Museum in July of this year.

Study of a Mourning Woman, ca. 1500-05, by Michelangelo Buonarroti (1475-1564) made headlines after it was rediscovered in the collection at Castle Howard in 1995. Before then, it had been hidden among other treasures in the family collection, unknown to scholars for hundreds of years. This is the first time the drawing has been exhibited in a museum since its rediscovery. 

“Michelangelo’s drawing is the supernova among a collection of some 16 extraordinarily rare and important drawings recently acquired by the Getty,” says Timothy Potts, director of the J. Paul Getty Museum. “Michelangelo is rightly regarded as one of the very greatest painters, sculptors, architects, and draftsmen in history, and it was important to me that the people of Los Angeles and other visitors to the Getty have the opportunity to view this exquisite addition to our collection before it is shown elsewhere.”

Following its presentation at the Getty, the drawing will be loaned to the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York for the exhibition Michelangelo: Divine Draftsmen and Designer opening November 13.

Michelangelo’s powerful pen and ink study of a mourning woman exemplifies his extraordinary talent for monumental figural conceptions. It is characterized by dense hatching and crosshatching in brown ink, with highlights of white lead. The figure is seen in profile and dressed in a full-length robe worn by women of antiquity as depicted in Renaissance painting. Her pose and attitude reflect the mourning figures often found in paintings of Christ’s deposition from the cross or a lamentation. 

“With a sculptor’s three-dimensional conception of space, Michelangelo here depicts a solidly monumental single figure of a type for which he became famous,” said Julian Brooks, senior curator of drawings at the Getty Museum. “This immensely powerful work is a new linchpin in our Italian Renaissance collections and a superb example of the artist’s talent and creativity.”

The drawing represents the pinnacle of a group of pen and ink drawings made early in Michelangelo’s career, at a pivotal moment when his fame as a sculptor was also spreading to dramatic painted compositions. While there is no known Michelangelo project that includes this figure, the design was nevertheless known to a number of the artist’s contemporaries. Examples of figures directly inspired by Study of a Mourning Woman can be found in a manuscript page in the Farnese Hours by Giulio Clovio (1498-1578), and drawings by Lorenzo Sabatini (c. 1530-1576) and Francesco Salviati (1510-1563).

For this special presentation, the drawing will be displayed in the Getty Museum’s North Pavilion, on the second floor gallery devoted to Italian Renaissance paintings. It will go on view again at the Getty in January 2018, when it returns from the Michelangelo exhibition at the Met, alongside the other recently acquired drawings and Jean Antoine Watteau’s painting La Surprise, 1721.

LH Map.jpgJ.T. Palmatary's rare birds-eye view of pre-fire Chicago sold just shy of $200,000 in Leslie Hindman Auctioneers' September 13 Fine Books and Manuscripts auction conducted in Chicago. It was printed in 1857 by Braunhold & Sonne and is one of four known copies. The three other copies are held by the Library of Congress, the Newberry Library and the Chicago History Museum. 

The example offered by Leslie Hindman Auctioneers was the only known obtainable copy of the map in private hands. Having sold to a collector in Chicago, it remains in private hands. 

"As the map is one of only four known copies, we're thrilled that it sold to a Chicago area collector," said Gretchen Hause, Director of Fine Books and Manuscripts at Leslie Hindman Auctioneers.

Palmatary is known for his aerial views of cities. The birds-eye view of Chicago was completed just one year after the Illinois Central Railroad was built, which appears in the foreground of the map. Another notable feature is an area called "The Sands," visible in the lower right-hand corner. Notorious in its time, the area was known for having a high concentration of brothels, gambling dens, saloons and inexpensive motels. In 1871, during the Great Chicago Fire, the Sands became a point of refuge for displaced Chicagoans. Palmatary detailed notable places in the city, as depicted on the map via a lower margin legend. The view includes street names, homes, churches and points of industrial interest. 

"The market remains strong for rare material in excellent condition. Both of these things contributed to the high price realized for Palmatary's Chicago map," said Hause.

The Fine Books and Manuscripts department is now accepting consignments for its December auction. Visit lesliehindman.com for additional information.

About Leslie Hindman Auctioneers

Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, one of the world¹s foremost fine art auction houses, has been providing exceptional service and achieving record prices since 1982. With more salerooms in the United States than any other auction house, Leslie Hindman Auctioneers conducts over 60 auctions annually in categories such as fine jewelry and timepieces, contemporary art, modern design, rare books, furniture, decorative arts and more. The firm has salerooms and business offices in Chicago, Atlanta, Denver, Milwaukee, Naples, Palm Beach, Scottsdale and Saint Louis but connects with millions of collectors worldwide through online resources and global listings. The firm is also a founding partner of Bidsquare, a live auction platform formed by six leading auction houses, and owns a proprietary online bidding platform, LHLive, as well as LHExchange, an e-commerce site specializing in high-end designer furniture and decorative arts. Visit www.lesliehindman.com for more information.

BOSTON, MA - Princess Diana's sterling silver card case sold for $20,974 according to Boston-MA based RR Auction

The case was among belongings Diana had personally donated to charity months before her death on Aug. 31, 1997.

Engraved on the front, "Diana," and was given to her as a gift by her 'Granny.' The handsome case has a lovely, ornate design on the exterior with leather card pockets inside. 

"What makes these items incredibly special is the strong sentimental value they offer, many coming directly from Princess Diana," said Bobby Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction.

03f56192e1c88311047152bd37d9e2d3a35b23d5.jpegHighlights from the sale include, but are not limited by:

Diana’s hand-written French vocabulary book from her time at a Swiss finishing school sold for $15,204. 

A 17-inch (43-centimeter) silver necklace with a capital "D'' charm that Diana is thought to have worn as a teen sold for $8,893. 

Princess Diana and Mother Teresa photo and signature display sold for $8,636. 

A casual white sweater likely worn in Diana’s teenage years sold for $8,572. 

Princess Diana's elegant black metal mesh handbag sold for $7,411. 

Princess Diana signed Red Cross photograph sold for $7,136. 

Princess Diana sterling silver perfume bottle sold for $6,270. 

A silver locket containing a photograph of Princess Diana and her sons Prince Harry, and Prince William sold for $6,209.

The Princess Diana Tribute auction from RR Auction concluded on September 13.  More details including results can be found online at www.rrauction.com.

Princess Diana's French Lesson Book With Extensive Handwriting

Remarkable circa 1978 handwritten French vocabulary notebook from her time at Swiss finishing school, marked on the front cover in her own hand, "Diana Spencer, Madame Fowls Vocabulaire, Articles de Fowlor." 

Inside are a total of 19 pages full of handwritten notes (most double-sided), plus a couple of additional lines, consisting of translations of vocab words from French to English. 

Affixed throughout are small photocopies of short French articles, apparently used in her class. 

Accompanied by a letter of provenance from Sally Fell, the head chef at Althorp, in part: "I was employed as head chef at Althorp House during the 1980s when Diana, Princess of Wales, was a regular visitor. 

During this period Raine Spencer was in the process of totally redecorating Althorp in her own style. As Diana now permanently resided in London, one of the rooms listed for redecoration was her old bedroom and the butler at the time, Carl Ackerman, was instructed to remove all of Diana's belongings and offer them to the staff, or dispose of them if no interest was shown. All the items were placed on a long table in the courtyard, and we the staff were invited to take what we wished, which is how I came to possess Diana's French vocabulary school book." 

“We know of only one other example of Diana's schoolbooks to be held in private hands,” said Bobby Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction.

Diana attended Institut Alpin Videmanette, a finishing school in Rougemont, Switzerland, for one term in 1977-1978. It was during this period that she was first introduced to Prince Charles, who was dating her older sister Sarah. Their relationship lasted only briefly before dissolving over some of Sarah's comments reported in the gossip columns. 

Diana and Charles's relationship blossomed in 1980, and they got married in 1981. 

“It’s a truly remarkable Diana piece, filled with her teenage handwriting,” said Livingston. Executive VP at RR Auction. 

 

LONG ISLAND CITY, NY - On September 21, Artbook @ MoMA PS1 opens the doors to a larger, newly designed location on the first floor of the museum, featuring dedicated space for programming organized in collaboration with MoMA PS1.

Coinciding with the New York Art Book Fair, September 21-24, 2017, the space's opening events include signings with Christian Wassmann, Debi Cornwall, Katherine Bernhardt and Sascha Braunig, and magazine issue launches with BOMB and OSMOS. Artbook @ MoMA PS1 is also proud to host a celebration for the new facsimile of Depero’s Bolted Book published by Designers and Books. For a complete, up-to-date event schedule, please visit us online at www.artbook.com/momaps1.

Also during the fair, internationally recognized artist’s book maker Jan Voss will be the featured artist hosted by the new Artbook Atelier within the space. A unique print shop, the Artbook Atelier will commission artists to design “unlimited” limited editions that will be produced "on-site and on-demand" for finite periods of time. Customers will be able to request commissioned prints by the yard on a variety of papers. Each edition will be printed on demand for one year, after which Artbook Atelier will declare and cap the edition size.

As part of MoMA PS1 and the community, Artbook has a special bond with Greater New York and Long Island City in particular, and continues to welcome neighborhood residents and families. Ongoing programs developed with the museum's curatorial team will make Artbook @ MoMA PS1 a hub for the community.

In the fall, Artbook @ MoMA PS1 opens its new children's book area, where kids will have a space of their own to play and discover new and classic children's titles. A cozy maze of low shelves housing a world of books recognizable to children as their own, this space will become an ongoing focal point of the new store. An adjacent area with comfortable seating will be filled with lush greenery provided by The Sill, a plant shop on the Lower East Side of Manhattan.

In the winter, Artbook @ MoMA PS1 will unveil another new section: a world-class selection of rare art and photography books that will complement its acclaimed offering of titles on contemporary art, theory, and visual culture. Continuing our decade-long partnership with the museum, we will continue to stock titles from publishers large and small, and from imprints based locally as well as internationally.

As visitors return to Artbook over the months and years to come, they will discover that the space looks a little bit different each time. In fact, Artbook @ MoMA PS1 has been specially designed to encourage fluidity in its layout, enabling this dynamic environment to accommodate different kinds of events, panel discussions, workshops, and experimental programming. With its carefully-conceived, flexible configuration, the new space embraces and supports MoMA PS1’s mission to serve as a catalyst and an advocate for new ideas, discourses, and trends in contemporary art.

Both a world-class art bookstore and an inviting public space for museum programs, Artbook @ MoMA PS1 welcomes international, American, and local visitors; artists as well as students; and readers steeped in art theory alongside people coming to contemporary art for the first time.

"We are thrilled to be partnering not only with the curatorial team at MoMA PS1 but also with the Long Island City community, Greater New York City, and local artists," says founder Skuta Helgason. "We look forward to becoming a hub for book-focused events, artist-centered programs, and community partnerships. It makes our day when we see someone browsing the shelves and discovering an artist for the first time."

“It is so important to give books, their covers, and their content a physical and visual presence in a space beyond the internet. Once a year, MoMA PS1 is completely filled with books for the New York Art Book Fair, but with the newly expanded book space, Artbook @ MoMA PS1, we can offer a dedicated home for books and related programs throughout the year,” added Klaus Biesenbach, Director of MoMA PS1 and Chief Curator at Large at the Museum of Modern Art. “Visitors can browse and experience this environment of inspiration, discovery, surprise, and discussion, looking over the surfaces of books displayed generously like a landscape, open them and go deeper into their content, and even participate in programs—which is more than what is possible at any other space in New York City. We are filling an urgent need in the creative community.”

ABOUT ARTBOOK

Artbook LLC is a wholly-owned subsidiary of D.A.P. / Distributed Art Publishers, Inc., the world's largest distributor of books and museum catalogs on art, photography, architecture, and design. In addition to the bookstore at MoMA PS1, Artbook also runs the acclaimed magazine store in the entry Kiosk to the museum on Jackson Avenue.

Other Artbook store locations include:

  • Artbook @ Hauser Wirth, Los Angeles, CA
  • Artbook @ Walker, Minneapolis, MN

And art fairs:

  • Artbook @ Art Basel Miami Beach, Miami, FL
  • Artbook @ Design Miami, Miami, FL
  • Artbook @ Frieze NY, New York, NY
  • Artbook @ New York Art Book Fair, New York, NY
  • Artbook @ The LA Art Book Fair, Los Angeles, CA

Online, artbook.com offers an ever-expanding selection of art, photography, architecture, and design titles from world-class museums and galleries, international imprints, and small presses.

MS. Sansk_d.14_16v copy.jpgOXFORD, 14 September 2017 - The origin of the symbol zero has long been one of the world’s greatest mathematical mysteries. Today, new carbon dating research commissioned by the University of Oxford’s Bodleian Libraries into the ancient Indian Bakhshali manuscript, held at the Bodleian, has revealed it to be hundreds of years older than initially thought, making it the world’s oldest recorded origin of the zero symbol that we use today.

The surprising results of the first ever radiocarbon dating conducted on the Bakhshali manuscript, a seminal mathematical text which contains hundreds of zeroes, reveal that it dates from as early as the 3rd or 4th century - approximately five centuries older than scholars previously believed. This means that the manuscript in fact predates a 9th century inscription of zero on the wall of a temple in Gwalior, Madhya Pradesh, which was previously considered to be the oldest recorded example of a zero used as a placeholder in India. The findings are highly significant for the study of the early history of mathematics.

The zero symbol that we use today evolved from a dot that was used in ancient India and can be seen throughout the Bakhshali manuscript. The dot was originally used as a ‘placeholder’, meaning it was used to indicate orders of magnitude in a number system - for example, denoting 10s, 100s and 1000s.

While the use of zero as a placeholder was seen in several different ancient cultures, such as among the ancient Mayans and Babylonians, the symbol in the Bakhshali manuscript is particularly significant for two reasons. Firstly, it is this dot that evolved to have a hollow centre and became the symbol that we use as zero today. Secondly, it was only in India that this zero developed into a number in its own right, hence creating the concept and the number zero that we understand today - this happened in 628 AD, just a few centuries after the Bakhshali manuscript was produced, when the Indian astronomer and mathematician Brahmagupta wrote a text called Brahmasphutasiddhanta, which is the first document to discuss zero as a number.

Although the Bakhshali manuscript is widely acknowledged as the oldest Indian mathematical text, the exact age of the manuscript has long been the subject of academic debate. The most authoritative academic study on the manuscript, conducted by Japanese scholar Dr Hayashi Takao, asserted that it probably dated from between the 8th and the 12th century, based on factors such as the style of writing and the literary and mathematical content. The new carbon dating reveals that the reason why it was previously so difficult for scholars to pinpoint the Bakhshali manuscript’s date is because the manuscript, which consists of 70 fragile leaves of birch bark, is in fact composed of material from at least three different periods.

Marcus du Sautoy, Professor of Mathematics at the University of Oxford, said:

‘Today we take it for granted that the concept of zero is used across the globe and is a key building block of the digital world. But the creation of zero as a number in its own right, which evolved from the placeholder dot symbol found in the Bakhshali manuscript, was one of the greatest breakthroughs in the history of mathematics.

‘We now know that it was as early as the 3rd century that mathematicians in India planted the seed of the idea that would later become so fundamental to the modern world. The findings show how vibrant mathematics have been in the Indian sub-continent for centuries.’

 Richard Ovenden, Bodley’s Librarian, said:

‘Determining the date of the Bakhshali manuscript is of vital importance to the history of mathematics and the study of early South Asian culture and these surprising research results testify to the subcontinent’s rich and longstanding scientific tradition. The project is an excellent example of the cutting-edge research conducted by the Bodleian’s Heritage Science team, together with colleagues across Oxford University, which uncovers new information about the treasures in our collections to help inform scholarship across disciplines.’ 

The Bakhshali manuscript was found in 1881, buried in a field in a village called Bakhshali, near Peshawar, in what is now a region of Pakistan. It was found by a local farmer and was acquired by the Indologist AFR Hoernle, who presented it to the Bodleian Library in 1902, where it has been kept since.

An academic paper about the results, conducted at the Oxford Radiocarbon Accelerator Unit, is currently being prepared for publication. A short video about the research results can be found at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pV_gXGTuWxY&feature=youtu.be 

A folio from the Bakhshali manuscript will go on public display at the Science Museum in London as a centrepiece of the major exhibition Illuminating India: 5000 Years of Science and Innovation, opening 4 October 2017. The exhibition will celebrate India’s central role in the history of science and technology by exploring its influential contributions to subjects as diverse as space exploration, mathematics, communication and engineering.

Image: Carbon dating has revealed that folio 16 from the 70-page Bakhshali manuscript dates from 224-383 AD. This is therefore one of the earliest known examples of the use of zero (written as a dot) used as a placeholder, i.e. the use of zero to indicate orders of magnitude in a number system.

Lincoln Ferro.jpgDALLAS, Texas (Sept. 12, 2017) - A rare and exceptional Abraham Lincoln: Life-size Portrait by Penrhyn Stanlaws (est. $1,500+) is just one of the many standout lots featured in Heritage Auctions’ Dec. 2 Americana & Political auction. Consignments of quality material relating to the life and times of Abraham Lincoln are being accepted until Oct. 11, 2017. The auction comes a year after Heritage’s $2.4 million special auction dedicated to the life and times of Abraham Lincoln.

The 25-by-30-inch oil-on-canvas is a half-length portrait of Lincoln, seemingly modeled on the Feb. 9, 1864 photograph by Mathew Brady, clutching a green cloak. The portrait is considered one of the most accurate images of Lincoln ever created.

Stanlaws used several references to complete the artwork: Volk's Lincoln life mask of 1860, physical descriptions (including that given by Lincoln himself), 120 photographs of Lincoln and one description "given me personally by an usher in Ford's Theatre on that fateful night."

Two more bronze likenesses of Lincoln on offer in the auction include an 11-inch bust of our 16th president (est. $2,500+), signed "Jo Davidson 1943" on back of Lincoln's collar. One of the preeminent sculptors of his time, Davidson’s unique piece in that he traditionally only worked from live subjects. “To complete this bust in a way that would have been satisfactory to him must have been a great struggle - he strived to capture not only a subject’s likeness but character as well. It is a really unique piece that is not a typical example of Davidson’s method,” said Don Ackerman, Consignment Director for Heritage Auctions.

The second bronze is an approximately 24-inch tall life-sized bust of Abraham Lincoln by Louis Mayer (est. $10,000+). The piece is signed on the side by the artist: "Louis Mayer © 1916", and has a lovely, greenish-brown patina with excellent detail. This marks the first time Heritage ever has sold a full-body Mayer statue of Lincoln.

Not to be outdone, the auction also holds a Lincoln & Hamlin: Ferrotype Jugate (est. $3,000+), inscribed in small letters below the busts "Lincoln and Hamlin" in near-mint condition.

To consign your material to be auctioned alongside these items Dec. 2, visit Heritage Auctions’ Historical Americana portal to meet the Oct. 11, 2017 consignment deadline.

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, London, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

mostyn-add-ms-89250-f052r copy.jpgA rare and beautiful Psalter - a volume of psalms - produced in thirteenth-century London has been acquired by the British Library. The Mostyn Psalter-Hours was acquired for the nation with a grant of £390,000 from the National Heritage Memorial Fund (NHMF) and funding from other generous supporters.

The book includes a calendar, decorated with twenty miniatures of the labours of the months and the signs of the Zodiac, and a Psalter with eight of the original ten large historiated initials, the Hours of the Virgin, and the Office of the Dead.

The manuscript can be identified securely as having been produced in London, and is one of relatively few surviving examples of luxury books known to have been made in the capital during the medieval period. Its calendar features a sequence of London saints - including the seventh-century bishops of London, Melitus and Erkenwald - and the feast of the translation of Edward the Confessor in Westminster in 1269. 

The manuscript’s original patron is unknown, but its high quality illumination - where text sits alongside highly decorative letters and illustrations - indicates that it was made for an important individual - possibly a bishop, as an image of a bishop appears in the illustration for Psalm 101, which is where a donor portrait might be expected.     

“The Mostyn Psalter-Hours is an outstanding example of English illumination of the highest quality and represents a crucial piece of evidence for the history of English painting,” said Kathleen Doyle, Lead Curator, Illuminated Manuscripts at the British Library. “Because the manuscript is localised to London, it is a critical focus around which to group other manuscripts - of Psalter texts and others - in a Westminster/London context, and to compare with books made in other centres. The addition of the Mostyn Psalter to the British Library’s collections will facilitate identification of London-based scribes and artists in other manuscripts. Similarly, the representation of the possible patron within the book will also help shed light on the process of creating such luxury books.”

The purchase price of the manuscript was £775,000 and was supported by a contribution of £390,000 from the National Heritage Memorial Fund, along with support from the Art Fund, Sir Siegmund Warburg’s Voluntary Settlement, the late Bernard Breslauer, the Friends of the British Library, and the Friends of the National Libraries.

John Glen, Minister for Arts, Heritage and Tourism said: “This important thirteenth-century manuscript was produced in London so it is fitting that it will now go on display at the British Library. I am pleased that this rare work has been saved for the nation through a generous donation from the National Heritage Memorial Fund and that the manuscript will be digitised and available for all to enjoy.”

Sir Peter Luff, Chair of NHMF, said: “The Mostyn Psalter-Hours is quite simply exquisite. What makes it particularly special is that we are able to trace its production back to thirteenth-century London and with just a few luxury books produced in the capital during this period still remaining, it’s a rare survival. The National Heritage Memorial Fund was set-up to save the UK’s most precious heritage at risk and so we felt it imperative this treasure should be safeguarded for future generations to study and enjoy.”

“We are hugely grateful to the NHMF and for the generous support of all the other funders, for making this important acquisition possible,” said Scot McKendrick, Head of Western Heritage Collections. “The British Library holds the world’s largest collection of medieval English Psalters and current and future generations of scholars will be able to study the Mostyn Psalter-Hours alongside other notable examples from the period.”

The manuscript has been digitised and is available to view on the Library’s Digitised Manuscripts website. It will also be placed on display in the Library’s Sir John Ritblat Treasures gallery (which is open seven days a week), after which it will be available to scholars in the Library’s Manuscripts Reading Room.

Image: lluminated page from the Mostyn Psalter-Hours (Add MS 89250 folio 52r).

The September 9, 2017 sale at National Book Auctions featured a wide array of books and ephemera, with particular focus on children's literature and modern firsts.

A signed first edition of Roald Dahl's "Boy" brought $1,187 against a high estimate of $500 and a signed first edition of Stephen King's "IT" brought $1,000 against a high estimate of $400, likely due to renewed curiosity surrounding the release of the major motion picture adaptation.

The sale also featured colonial American pamphlets, vintage science fiction pulp magazines, cased ambrotype portraits, illustration art, and vellum volumes dating back to the early 17th century.

Further complementary material will be offered in future sessions throughout the fall and winter of 2017. For more information on bidding or consigning, email evan@worthauctions.com or call 607-279-0607.

LONDON, England (September 11, 2017) - One of the world's largest auction companies, Heritage Auctions (www.HA.com), has now opened an office in London, England at 6 Shepherd Street, London, Mayfair W1J 7JE. The London office joins Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong in the international footprint for Heritage Auctions.

“London is the next logical step in the international expansion of Heritage,” said Cristiano Bierrenbach, Executive Vice President of Heritage Auctions. “It is one of the financial centers of the world, as well as a major hub of the art and collectibles market. We are very excited to take this step, and expect that the transparency, efficiency, and global presence of Heritage will be quickly recognized and embraced by the British market.”

The office will be staffed by veteran coin collectors and experts Max Tursi and Nicholas Mathioudakis. Tursi received an MA in Classics from Universitá degli Studi of Pavia, Italy.  A life-long coin collector, he has worked for a number of prestigious firms including Christie’s Rome, Astarte S.A. in Lugano, Spink and Son and Classical Numismatic Group in London. Most recently he has been partnered with Mathioudakis at London Coin Galleries Ltd. since 2014. In the last 18 years Tursi has acquired extensive experience in both the retail and the auction world. Focusing mainly on ancient coins, his area of expertise extends to European medieval and modern coins.

Nicholas Mathioudakis has been collecting coins since the age of thirteen. Having lived in Saudi Arabia, he would spend a lot of time roaming the souks in search of hidden treasures where he also bought his first ancient Greek coin. His drive and passion for numismatics led him to take up a full time position at Morton and Eden (formerly associated with Sotheby’s) where he catalogued ancient coins and paper money. Mathioudakis’ areas of expertise include ancient coins, paper money, particularly of the Middle East, European medieval, Islamic and modern coins. 

Dallas, Texas-based Heritage Auctions is the world's largest auctioneer of fine art and collectibles and the largest auction company founded in the United States. In addition to its headquarters in Dallas, Heritage has offices in New York City, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago and Palm Beach as well as in Asia and Europe.

The Heritage Auctions' London saleroom and offices are regularly open to the public from 11 a.m. to 6:30 p.m., Monday through Friday. The phone number is +44 (0)207 493 0498 and the email address is UK@HA.com. For additional information, visit HA.com.

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos

Speke title MR copy.jpgThe National Library of Scotland and Bernard Quaritch Limited today announced the Library’s acquisition of one of only twelve family copies of John Hanning Speke’s What Led to the Discovery of the Source of the Nile, which includes an additional eight-page supplement, describing Speke’s announcement of his discovery of the source of the Nile to the Royal Geographical Society, as well as details of his feud with Sir Richard Burton - pages which were suppressed from the trade edition at the behest of Speke’s family and his publisher, Blackwood’s. 

Speke and Burton’s dispute stemmed from their first joint expedition to Africa in 1854-1855, and continued to blight their second expedition in 1856-1859. During their second expedition they located Lake Tanganika, and Speke, leading a subsidiary party, discovered Ukerewe Lake on 3 August 1858, which he named the Victoria Nyanza. As Speke’s biographer Alexander Maitland wrote, it was ‘in this moment [...] that the inspiration struck him, so clearly henceforward he could never be in any doubt, that here, stretching out before him, was the lake which formed the great reservoir of the White Nile’. 

Burton disagreed with Speke’s hypothesis, but Speke travelled back to England before him and lectured to the Royal Geographical Society on the expedition’s discoveries and his (correct) conviction that he had identified the source of the Nile, before publishing an account of the expedition in Blackwood’s Magazine. In his final expedition (1860-1863), Speke was able to confirm that the Victoria Nyanza was the source of the Nile, and he returned to England in 1863 to a rapturous reception. Later in the year he published his Journal of the Discovery of the Source of the Nile and then in 1864 What Led to the Discovery of the Source of the Nile, his final work, which was based on his notes from the two earlier expeditions, and was intended to provide a context to his discovery while also presenting his arguments against Burton. 

For nearly 150 years after its publication Speke’s final work, published just weeks before his death, held a secret known to very few and unremarked in print: an eight-page supplement, which he called the ‘Tail’, with a description of his first public announcement to the RGS on the source of the Nile and further details on his feud with Burton. Speke had originally wanted to include the ‘Tail’ in his book, but pressure from his family and his friend and publisher John Blackwood led Speke to agree to suppress it. By way of a compromise, Blackwood’s printed twelve extra copies for the author to distribute to his family, which included the additional material; of these twelve, only five are known to survive. 

The archive of William Blackwood & Sons is held by the National Library of Scotland, and Blackwood’s ledgers for the publication of the book document these twelve ‘Tail’ copies, which are also recorded in a letter from William Blackwood to Speke of 16 July 1864: Blackwood wrote to Speke that he would receive his copies of the book shortly, adding, ‘[i]n a short note I have to day from my Uncle John, he beg[s] of me, to drop you a line to be very cautious, & not let any of these copies be sent about beyond your family circle’. Until very recently the Library has only held a copy of the standard edition of What Led ..., but it has now acquired a ‘Tail’ copy from the antiquarian booksellers Bernard Quaritch Ltd, who were offering it on behalf of a private collector. 

This copy was inscribed by the author’s brother Benjamin Speke, presumably after John Hanning Speke’s death on 15 September 1864. Dr Graham Hogg, a rare books curator in the National Library of Scotland, said: ‘We are delighted to acquire this copy for our collections in view of the fact that the Blackwood’s archive provides the key to the history of this long-forgotten suppressed text, and we also hold correspondence between the Blackwoods and John and Benjamin Speke. Moreover, this example is, as far as we know, the only one of the five recorded copies to be held in any institution internationally and thus freely available to scholars’. Maitland, who drew heavily on the Blackwood’s archive when writing Speke, commented, ‘I can’t think of a better place than the National Library of Scotland for this book now’. 

Mark James of Bernard Quaritch Ltd added, ‘Quaritch is delighted to have facilitated the acquisition of this rare and remarkable volume by the Library, and its previous owner is very pleased that we have found a permanent home for it in such a suitable collection’. 

 

Amherst, MA--Eric Carle is famous for his representations of cheerful suns and soulful moons. While he traditionally leaves his daytime skies the white of the paper, he evocatively paints his nighttime scenes in deep blues and indigos. The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art is pleased to present "The Art of Eric Carle: Night," on view from September 12, 2017 through March 18, 2018. The exhibition features original artwork from more than 20 Carle books, including Papa, Please Get the Moon for Me, Dream Snow, and The Very Quiet Cricket. Several pieces from Draw Me a Star are also included to mark the 25th anniversary of the book's publication.

Carle often sprinkles his nighttime images with twinkling stars, fireflies, and other creatures of the night. The moon--in all its phases--always displays a gentle face. "The calm moon is a source of comfort in the night," says Carle. 

Visitors to "The Art of Eric Carle: Night" will recognize familiar nocturnal images from some of the artist's classic picture books. Ellen Keiter, the Museum's chief curator, says the idea for the exhibition occurred to her while she was looking through Carle's art; she found herself repeatedly lingering over his arresting nighttime scenes. "I was very taken with them. The blues really appealed to me. I wondered if there was enough nighttime imagery to assemble a show. I thought it could be a beautiful installation," said Keiter.  

What she found will delight visitors--33 original collages. The selection on display--ranging in date from 1972 to 2015--provides a broad representation of Eric Carle's distinguished picture-book career. The exhibition includes collages from some of his most popular books like The Very Lonely Firefly and The Artist Who Painted a Blue Horse to lesser known titles such as The Honey Bee and the Robber and The Secret Birthday Message.

"It was rewarding to do this research," said Keiter. "I found stunning sunsets and vast night skies. I hope visitors enjoy seeing Eric's work from this unique perspective."

Keiter encourages people to visit the Museum to see Carle's art firsthand: "The original collages are incredibly vibrant; their colors and textures really sing. Art always appears 'flatter' on the printed page," she said.  

In addition to the art, guests to "The Art of Eric Carle: Night" are invited to make fun "moon shadows" on a heat-sensitive painted wall and to explore colors and patterns at two Starry Night light tables. A specially-constructed Night Walk creates a magical experience for visitors of all ages.  

This exhibition is made possible through the generous support of the Hsin-Yi Foundation.  

About The Carle

The mission of The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, a non-profit organization in Amherst, MA, is to inspire a love of art and reading through picture books. The only full-scale museum of its kind in the United States, The Carle collects, preserves, presents, and celebrates picture books and picture book illustrations from around the world. In addition to underscoring the cultural, historical, and artistic significance of picture books and their art form, The Carle offers educational programs that provide a foundation for arts integration and literacy. Eric Carle and his wife, the late Barbara Carle, founded the Museum in November 2002. Eric Carle is the renowned author and illustrator of more than 70 books, including the 1969 classic The Very Hungry Caterpillar.

Since opening, the 40,000-square foot facility has served more than half a million visitors, including 30,000 schoolchildren. The Carle houses more than 13,000 objects, including 6,600 permanent collection illustrations. The Carle has three art galleries, an art studio, a theater, picture book and scholarly libraries, and educational programs for families, scholars, educators, and schoolchildren. Educational offerings include professional training for educators around the country and Master's degree programs in children's literature with Simmons College. Museum hours are Tuesday through Friday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday 12 noon to 5 p.m. Open Mondays in July and August and during MA school vacation weeks. Admission is $9 for adults, $6 for children under 18, and $22.50 for a family of four. For further information and directions, call 413-559-6300 or visit the Museum's website at

www.carlemuseum.org

Screen Shot 2017-09-06 at 9.32.00 AM.pngFirst published in 1943, and since translated into 270 languages and 26 different alphabets, few books have touched the world like Antoine de Saint-Exupéry’s modern fable The Little Prince. In its first Folio edition, this definitive two-volume set includes a new introduction by his biographer and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Stacy Schiff, as well as restored versions of Saint-Exupéry’s unforgettable illustrations, as inseparable from the story as the words themselves. 

Already a best-selling French author and pioneering pilot, Saint-Exupéry wrote his most cherished work while in secluded, self-imposed exile in America after escaping the fall of France to the Germans in 1940. Armed with a set of children’s watercolours and a typewriter, he created a story that was both a wide-eyed celebration of childhood adventure and a sombre, existential work of startling depth. A year after its publication, Saint-Exupéry took off on a mission over the Mediterranean and disappeared, his body never to be found. In Schiff’s poetic words, the author and his prince would forever ‘remain tangled together, twin innocents who fell from the sky’. 

Before his doomed return to Europe, Saint-Exupéry left a working copy of the manuscript, including numerous illustrations not included in the first edition, with his friend Silvia Hamilton, in ‘a rumpled paper bag’. The commentary volume to the Folio edition includes these preliminary sketches and drawings, accompanied by a page-by-page description by Christine Nelson, curator of the recent celebrated exhibition of the collection at New York’s Morgan Library and Museum. 

Using a painstaking production process, Folio have used a 1943 edition to restore each image to its vibrant, original colouring. As a nod to the book’s origins, the illustrations retain their original French captions. The binding on the main volume is a striking yellow with the unmistakable image of the prince staring out at the stars, while the commentary volume is bound in blue in a rippling design by celebrated designer Paul Bonet used on an early French edition of the work. 

Product information 

Bound in blocked cloth. Set in Bembo Infant. 112 pages. 40 integrated colour illustrations. Printed endpapers. 83⁄4 ̋x 61⁄4 ̋. Blocked slipcase.
Commentary Volume: Bound in blocked paper. 80 pages.
36 integrated colour illustrations. 83⁄4 ̋x 61⁄4 ̋. 

UK £49.95 US $73.95 Can $99.95 Aus $99.95  

The British Library is delighted to announce that Harry Potter: A History of Magic will open at the New-York Historical Society in October 2018, following its run at the British Library in London from 20 October 2017 -- 28 February 2018.

The exhibition’s New York opening marks the 20th anniversary of the publication of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone in the US by Scholastic, following the 20th anniversary celebrations of the publication of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone in the UK in 2017.

Ahead of the UK opening in London, Harry Potter: A History of Magic has already sold over 25,000 tickets - the highest amount of advance tickets ever sold for a British Library exhibition. Tickets are available to buy from the British Library website.

The exhibition unveils rare books, manuscripts, and magical objects from the British Library’s collection, capturing the traditions of folklore and magic at the heart of the Harry Potter stories. Exploring the subjects studied at Hogwarts, the exhibition includes original drafts and drawings by J.K. Rowling and Harry Potter illustrator Jim Kay, going on display for the first time. 

As it travels from London to New York, the exhibition will evolve to include US-specific artefacts from New-York Historical’s collection and items from US Harry Potter publisher Scholastic’s collection.

Jamie Andrews, Head of Culture and Learning at the British Library, said:

“We are so excited to be taking a major exhibition to New York for the very first time. Harry Potter: A History of Magic promises to be a stunning exhibition, capturing the traditions of folklore and magic across the world, which are at the heart of the Harry Potter stories. We’re delighted to be able to share this exhibition with fans across the pond following its run here in London, especially as we have the opportunity to develop the exhibition for a US audience in collaboration with the New-York Historical Society and US publisher Scholastic.”

Louise Mirrer, President and CEO of the New-York Historical Society, said: 

“As the oldest museum in New York, the New-York Historical Society is honoured to present Harry Potter: A History of Magic in 2018 and bring these incredible treasures from the British Library to a whole new audience. The Harry Potter series has turned a generation into avid readers, and they’re sure to be enchanted by this fascinating exploration of magical traditions and myths from across the world, which make the Harry Potter series so rich and exciting.”

US fans will also get a sneak peek of what to expect in the exhibition. On 20 October 2017, marking the day the exhibition opens in London, Scholastic will publish one of the two accompanying titles, Harry Potter: A Journey Through a History of Magic. Aimed at a family audience, this book showcases a selection of the amazing artefacts, manuscripts, original artwork, and magical objects included in the exhibition. Harry Potter: A Journey Through a History of Magic will be published by Scholastic simultaneously with UK print publishers Bloomsbury on 20 October alongside the eBook edition, which will be published in both markets by Pottermore.

In autumn 2018, to accompany the exhibition in New York, Scholastic will also publish an official comprehensive companion book, Harry Potter: A History of Magic. A collaboration between the publishers and British Library curators, this lavishly produced, full-colour coffee-table book will make the exhibition experience available to everyone. Again, a digital edition will be published by Pottermore - this edition will have enhancements allowing the content to be navigated in multiple, digital-first ways and will feature additional visuals of exhibition artefacts.

BL-Lamb.jpgIn Mu Xin’s Words: Treasures of the British Library will take place at the Mu Xin Art Museum in Wuzhen, from 15 October 2017 to 14 January 2018. Mu Xin (1927-2011) was an ardent admirer of English poetry, drama and fiction and the exhibition features original manuscripts - loaned by the British Library - of four of his favourite writers: Lord Byron, Charles Lamb, Oscar Wilde and Virginia Woolf.

These rare and valuable manuscripts are visiting China for the first time, as part of a wider three-year programme of cultural exchange, The British Library in China: connecting through culture and learning. This has already seen a hugely successful exhibition of literary treasures at the National Library of China in Beijing, and the launch of a Chinese language website - www.britishlibrary.cn - that features over 200 digitised items and more than 70 interpretive essays, including the items and authors featured at the Wuzhen exhibition and themed articles on Mu Xin and English literature.

The exhibition at Mu Xin Art Museum will coincide with the 2017 Wuzhen Theatre Festival and includes:

  • The original 1923-24 manuscript of The Hours by Virginia Woolf (published subsequently in 1925 as Mrs Dalloway
  • Handwritten manuscript of Lord Byron’s poem Love and Gold
  • Typewritten and extensively corrected manuscript for act one of Oscar Wilde’s play Lady Windermere’s Fan
  • Original letters from Charles Lamb, co-author of Tales From Shakespeare, a book which was instrumental in popularising Shakespeare’s works in China

Mu Xin was a passionate reader of all these authors and wrote at length on them and their works. He described Byron as “the strongest voice in human civilisation […] against authority and for freedom, absolute freedom of the individual.” 

Of Charles Lamb’s impact on him as an adolescent he wrote: “it was love at first sight.” Writing about Irish author Oscar Wilde he could be more ambivalent: “Wilde was indeed a wit, sharp and eloquent. At times, however, I want to say to him: ‘Do not say too much. The more you say, the more mistakes you make.’” 

Recalling a lifetime’s reading of Virginia Woolf, Mu Xin commented: “Age really matters. I read her when I was in my thirties, forties, even fifties. In my sixties I understood. I understood where she had been right, and where she had been wrong.”

The Director of Mu Xin Art Museum Chen Danqing said: “It is a pleasure and an honour for the Mu Xin Art Museum to host a display from the British Library, featuring a selection of manuscripts by iconic writers including Lord Byron, Charles Lamb, Oscar Wilde and Virginia Woolf. When Mr Mu Xin was referencing these great authors in his lectures, the idea that their manuscripts would one day find their way to Wuzhen would have been unimaginable. Generations of Chinese readers have admired English literature in its translated form. Now, seeing these original manuscripts in person makes that reading experience much more real and rich. I’m sure these great writers would have loved to meet their Chinese readers.”

Roly Keating, Chief Executive of the British Library, said: “We are delighted to bring these treasures of English and Irish literature to Wuzhen, so that people in China can see for themselves original drafts bearing the very marks of their creation. Through his long career, Mu Xin himself exemplified the breadth and depth of cultural exchange between Britain and China, so it’s doubly appropriate that we are displaying works by four of his favourite authors in the spectacular Mu Xin Art Museum dedicated to his life and art.”

The curator of In Mu Xin’s Words: Treasures of the British Library, Alexandra Ault said: “The manuscripts selected highlight the act of writing and the creative processes of each author. Byron’s Love and Gold shows the poet working intensively on a single sheet of paper, continually turning it to make use of all the available space while crossing out sections before rewriting. The second draft for Lady Windermere's Fan is typewritten and both stage directions and actor’s lines are extensively corrected by Wilde in pencil. It bears the stamp of Mrs Marshall's typewriting office on the Strand, London, showing how often a number of people could be involved in the production of a manuscript. These four exciting items bring to life the production of literature and place famous plays, stories and poems into three-dimensional creative spaces.”

Image: Letters from Charles Lamb to the poet Bernard Barton, 1822-1831. © British Library Board.

 

2075.jpgFairfield, ME—James D. Julia’s late summer sale truly hit it out of the ballpark, captivating bidders from all over the world with extraordinary selections of fine temptations from the most desirable and prestigious collecting categories. After the hammer fell for the last time, 60 lots made $10K or above. In addition, 16 lots realized $25K or more, and 3 lots broke the $50K mark!

This sale featured breathtaking treasures that caught everyone’s attention for their rarity and irresistible appeal from start to finish. Several exceptional sales results spotlight the quality and range of James D. Julia’s Fine Art, Asian & Antiques division.

The first day of this sale offered a full range of carefully curated paintings and fine art.

Lot 1159A, Jiro Takamatsu’s Shadow of Two Keys (Skeleton & Church Key) “NO. 211,” was estimated at $30,000-50,000 but locked up $69,575. This work is signed and dated by the artist and retains its label from the Tokyo Gallery. It descended through the family of Robert H. Chase of Greenwich Village, NY, and was discovered hanging in the kitchen of a Maine home. Lot 1392, a thoughtful painting attributed to Narcisse-Virgil Diaz de la Peña called “Figure Beside Woodland Pool Looking Across to Pasture” soared to over ten times its low estimate to realize $60,500. This piece was from the Webster Family Trust and descended from the Rockefeller/Dodge Family. And lot 1340, Heywood Hardy’s “The First of November” featuring sportsmen on their horses and dozens of eager hounds and came from a Woodstock, VT collection with fabulous provenance was another best in show, making $48,000. This sale also featured two other Hardy works, “Preparing for The Hunt” and “The Meet with Riders & Hounds,” which also sold above their low estimates. 

The second day of this sale presented finely curated collections of European decorative arts and American historical rarities.

Lot 2075, The Book Les Roses, authored by Redouté and Thory and published in Paris by Firmin Didot (1817-1824), was the day’s best seller, realizing $65,340 on a $10,000-20,000 estimate. This attic find is from the estate of Louise A. Livingston of Oyster Bay, Long Island. Bidders battled over two important militaria highlights on day two of this sale. They included lot 2011, a Nantucket Presentation Sword given to Mexican War Hero Major Moses Barnard for “Planting the 1st American Flag on Parapet at Storming of Chapultepec, September 13, 1847” and lot 2004, a 1st Battalion marked Revolutionary War Charleville musket. When the smoke finally cleared, these items realized $41,140 and $36,300 respectively. And lot 2133, a Queen Anne Transitional Walnut Ball and Claw foot corner chair more than doubled its low estimate to realize $30,250.

The final day of the sale featured a stunning array of outstanding Asian arts and American decorative arts. 

Two tables with great provenance served up outstanding results. The first, lot 3569, was a Qing Dynasty Huanghuali and hardwood side table which made $33,880. This table was purchased in 1923 in Peking and has remained with the original owners, the Hobart family, ever since. Items from the Hobart collection established the benchmark for the Chinese antiquities market in the United States at two famous sales conducted at Sotheby’s in New York. And the second, lot 3597, a 19th century Anglo-Indian marble topped carved rosewood side table realized $27,225 on its $4,000-6,000 estimate. This table descended from the family of William G. Pierce who sailed from New York to Hong Kong, arriving June 15th, 1849. And lot 3523, Tsuguharu Foujita’s charmingly illustrated A Book of Cats: Being 20 Drawings, more than doubled its low estimate to make $21,175. 

Those are just a few of the leading highlights from this comprehensive sale, but they certainly don’t tell the entire story of this incredibly successful auction. 

James D. Julia is internationally recognized as the leader in works featuring Maine artists and themes and Rockport School paintings, and the sales results from those categories only serve to solidify that well-deserved reputation. Lot 1045, Gertrude Fiske’s “The Old Cove, Ogunquit” more than doubled its low estimate to make $24,200. Lot 1210, Leon Dabo’s “The Hudson, Autumn Morning” realized $24,200. This work was featured in the 15th Annual Exhibition at the Poland Springs Gallery and formerly shown in the Maine State Building, Poland Springs, Maine. This auction featured three works by Maine’s own Marsden Hartley - the most important being lot 1018, his “Summer Haze” which made $42,350. Lot 1168, Aldro Thompson Hibbard’s “West River, Vermont” realized $18,150; this handsome example was one of two Hibbards sold through this auction. Lot 1081, Emile Albert Gruppe’s “Motif 1,” one of 23 Gruppes sold through this auction, made $19,360. 

Eight works by Hayley Lever were also extremely popular among bidders. Highlights among those include lot  1133, his “Eastern Yacht Club Regatta, Marblehead, MA” which sailed to $36,300; lot 1267, his “Calm Day, St. Ives, Cornwall, 1905” which tripled its low estimate to make $32,670; lot 1101, his “East Gloucester, MA, 1913” which realized $20,570; and lot 1134, his “Sunday Afternoon Stroll, Marblehead, MA 1924” which found its way at $18,150. 

Other paintings featuring nautical themes also ruled the sea at this sale. Lot 1220, Thomas Chambers’ “View from West Point” featuring an impressive view of the Hudson River made $15,730. Lot 1075, Jack Lorimer Gray’s “Snowfall, Waterfront” realized $31,460; this was one of two Grays sold through this auction. And lot 2249, James Edward Buttersworth’s “Shipping in a Busy Channel” changed hands at $23,595; three other Buttersworth examples were also featured in this sale. 

Two unusual painting highlights deserve special note. The first is lot 1442, Barend Koekkoek’s “Traveler in A Forest Landscape.” This under-the-radar example was estimated at $2,000-3,000 but realized $19,360 - over six times its high estimate! And lot 2290, Sir Henry Raeburn’s “Portrait of John Balfour, M.P” made $18,150. This handsome half portrait of a young man with curly brown hair wearing a brown coat, yellow vest, and white stock descended in the family of Albert L. Ellsworth, founder of the British American Oil Company. 

This sale featured a number of exceptional American-made antique highlights. Lot 2214, a circa 1912-1915 Old Town Canoe Company display sample, paddled its way to $25,410. This is the company’s earliest salesman’s model sample; these absolute rarities can be identified by the wording: “Genuine Old Town Canoe Co. Canoes” painted on their sides. Lot 2111, a leaping stag full body copper weathervane, probably by Cushing & White, made $18,150. This fine example is from a home in Biddeford, ME. And lot 2206, a late 19th/early 20th century carved carousel dog in the manner of the Herschell-Spillman company realized $9,075. 

Finally, lovely and important antique items designed for the home caught the eyes of enthusiastic bidders. Lot 3037, a fine carved oak tall case clock with a marked Tiffany & Co. dial ticked its way to $12,100, more than doubling its low estimate. Lot 3115, an elaborately detailed Rococo Revival Boulle marquetry shelf clock featuring a cast bronze figure of a younger partially robed Father Time holding a sickle in his right hand and a sundial in his left hand made $6,655. Another sterling highlight is lot 3096, a set of twelve silver service plates from Redlich & Co., NY. These are detailed with pierced rims, floral medallions, and scroll work and realized $8,470. Lot 3584, a large Qing Dynasty celadon glazed bottle vase whose provenance includes the Webster Family Trust and the Rockefeller/ Dodge Family, made $19,360 - nearly ten times its low estimate. And things were twice as nice with lot 3049, a pair of fine vintage Hermes black leather “Constance” handbags. Estimated at $2,500-3,500, they carried the day at $4,840.

According to Department Head Bill Gage, “This auction represents one of the finest for collectors in memory, with a great number of individuals bidding in person, over the phone, and online. We moved this sale a week earlier than usual to coincide with several other important antique shows and events in the New England area. Clearly that was a great decision based on the number of new faces noted in our standing room only gallery during the sale. Our next Fine Art, Asian & Antiques Auction is scheduled for February 2018 and we are already accepting consignments for that much anticipated sales event.”

 

38-White.jpgNew York—Swann Galleries’ biannual auction of African-American Fine Art on Thursday, October 5 promises never-before-seen art from the turn of the nineteenth century to the present. With just over 150 lots of scarce and important works by marquee artists including Romare Bearden, Elizabeth Catlett, Norman Lewis and Charles White, the sale carries an estimate of $2.3 to 3.4 million. The African-American Fine Art department at Swann Galleries, the only one of its kind in the world, celebrated its tenth anniversary this year, coinciding with the 75th anniversary of the house.

The top lot is a life-size pen-and-ink drawing by Charles White, titled Take My Mother Home, 1957, estimated at $250,000 to $350,000, the most significant drawing by the artist to come to auction since the house’s 2011 offering of Work, 1953 ($306,000). White is additionally represented by two oil monotypes, which are the first examples the artist’s work in the medium offered by Swann. Works by Elizabeth Catlett will also be offered: War Worker, 1943, is only the second painting by the artist ever to come to auction, valued at $60,000 to $90,000. The first, also offered by Swann, was Friends, 1944, which sold for $81,250 on December 15, 2015. Catlett is further represented by two bronze busts: Cabeza Cantolando (Spring Head), 1960, and Glory, 1981 ($8,000 to $12,000 and $30,000 to $40,000, respectively).

The selection of sculpture continues with two large works by Richmond Barthé: The Awakening of Africa (Africa Awakening), 1959 and Stevedore, 1937, cast 1986 ($50,000 to $75,000 and $30,000 to $40,000, respectively).

Fin de siècle paintings and prints by Edward M. Bannister and Henry Ossawa Tanner stand out in a modern-leaning sale. A large work from Tanner’s mid-career time in Paris, Flight into Egypt, circa 1920-25, illustrates one of the artist’s primary motifs ($200,000 to $300,000).

Haunting paintings by Hughie Lee-Smith are led by Untitled (Youths on a Lakeshore), 1952, valued between $100,000 and $150,000—one of his iconic depictions of young African-Americans in a desolate landscape. In a similar vein is The Encounter, a 1991 oil painting estimated at $50,000 to $75,000.

Abstraction is headed by Norman Lewis’s Untitled (Processional Composition), a 1960 oil painting of calligraphic figures on marbleized slate, expected to reach between $100,000 and $150,000. The sale also features two large 1950s abstract canvases by Alma Thomas as well as works by Ed Clark, Sam Gilliam, James Little, Al Loving, Sam Middleton and Haywood “Bill” Rivers.

A burgeoning section of photography includes a fine print of Roy Decarava’s Dancers, 1956, estimated at $15,000 to $25,000, as well as rare works by Louis H. Draper, Jeanne Moutoussamy-Ashe, P. (Prentice) Herman Polk and James VanDerZee. A quadriptych from Carrie Mae Weems’ Sea Island Series of silver prints and text panels interpreting the environs and lives of the Gullah people ($35,000 to $50,000) leads a selection of photographs and sculptures by the artist.

Proponents of the AfriCOBRA movement Wadsworth Jarrell and Nelson Stevens are well represented in the sale by colorful paintings and prints. Stevens’s Jihad Nation, 1970, is the first important painting and AfricCOBRA work by the artist to come to auction. It is expected to sell for $50,000 to $75,000. After achieving an auction record for a painting by Jarrell in fall 2016, Swann is pleased to offer Midnight Poet at 125th Street & Lenox, an acrylic street scene in the iconic style of the movement, valued at $25,000 to $35,000.

A run of figurative collages by Romare Bearden is led by Melon Time, 1967, at $80,000 to $120,000. Other unique works by the artist include the collage and watercolor The Evening Boat, 1984, of people waiting under an azure sky ($30,000 to $40,000), and At the Dock, 1984, valued at $20,000 to $30,000.

Contemporary art on offer includes The Emancipation Approximation (Scene 9), 2000, from Kara Walker’s important portfolio of screenprints of the same name, valued at $8,000 to $12,000 and works by Emma Amos, Eldzier Cortor, Jonathan Green and Julie Mehretu.

An illustrated auction catalogue is available for $35. For further information and to make arrangements to bid, visit www.swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 38: Charles White, Take My Mother Home, pen, ink and wash, 1957. Estimate $250,000 to $350,000.

New Book on Civil War Artifacts

9780764353918.jpgAtglen, PA--Schiffer Publishing, Ltd., would like to introduce J. Howard Wert's Gettysburg: A Collection of Relics from the Civil War Battle

J. Howard Wert was a recent college graduate when the armies of the North and South converged near his family's homestead just three miles outside Gettysburg in the summer of 1863. A militia member and anti-slavery supporter, Wert acted as a guide for Union General George Meade, helping position federal troops in the fields and hills around town. Perhaps more importantly, he collected and labeled artifacts from the battle, including a still-hot Confederate shell that almost hit him near Little Round Top. After the war, Wert resumed gathering relics of the three-day battle, many given to him by veterans of both sides, including weapons, clothing, letters, furniture, and even items related to Lincoln's Address. Now this amazing private collection can be appreciated through more than 120 color pictures and informative text about both the items and Wert's life.

About the Author
Bruce E. Mowday is an award winning journalist and author who has written more than 15 books on history, business, sports, and true crime. He has previously written books on the Civil War on Gettysburg and Fort Delaware. In connection with his books, Bruce has appeared on C-SPAN, Pennsylvania Cable Network, and the Discovery ID channel. G. Craig Caba is a charter member and past president of the Harrisburg Civil War Roundtable and Gettysburg Battlefield Park Associates. He has authored numerous Civil War books, and he is CEO and curator of the J. Howard Wert Gettysburg Collection.

Size: 9 1/8″ x 18 1/8″ | 127 color photographs | 144 pp

ISBN13: 978-0-7643-5391-8 | Binding: hard cover | $34.99

About the Publisher
Schiffer Publishing, Ltd. is an independent publisher. Since 1974, Schiffer has published thousands of titles on the diverse subjects that fuel our readers' passions. Visit schifferbooks.com to explore our backlist of more than 5,800 titles.

Manhasset, NY—The Congregational Church Of Manhasset and Flamingo Eventz are pleased to announce that the 67th Annual Manhasset Antiques, Vintage Books & Ephemera will be held Saturday & Sunday, October 28 & 29 in the Church School at 1845 Northern Boulevard (Rt. 25A), Manhasset, NY 11030. 

A benefit for the Ladies Club of the Church, and acknowledged to be one of the finest and longest running shows on Long Island, it is renowned for it’s presentation of the Classical Antiques, China, Pottery, Porcelain, Jewelry, Silver, Textiles, and exceptional Decorative Accessories. This year we are very pleased to include Vintage and Antiquarian Books alongside Vintage Paper & Ephemera!

Selected professional Exhibitors from New York, Connecticut, New Jersey, Massachusetts, Arizona, Maine, and Pennsylvania will present these exceptional items in designed displays and individual rooms throughout the Church school.

Items offered include 19th & 20th Century Porcelain & China; Vintage Books from Classical Literature to Modern Firsts; Vintage Paper & Ephemera from Advertizing to Manuscripts to Postcards; Furniture from Aesthetic to Victorian to Edwardian to Art Deco to Mid-Century Modern; 19th & 20th Century Glass from Commercial to Utilitarian to Depression-Era to Tiffany to Art; Bronze Statuary and Items of Design; Stained Glass from Lamps to Illuminated Windows to Decorative Panels; Asian Fine Arts from China, Japan, India, and beyond; 19th & 20th Century Paintings, Watercolors, and Photography;  Vintage Toys & Dolls; Fine and Antique Jewelry and Personals from Native American to European & Asian; and much, much more.

Special Features found only at Flamingo shows include antiques appraisals by well-known appraiser, television personality, and Star of Market Warriors on PBS; John Bruno, on Sunday 1-3pm at $5/item.

Show Hours: Saturday, October 28: 10am-5pm; Sunday, October 29: 11am-4pm.

Admission: $7/person, under 12 free with adult.

Directions: LIE to Exit 36N, Searingtown Road, to Northern Blvd. (Rt. 25A) west approximately 1/2 mile to the Church on the North side of Northern Blvd, directly opposite the Americana Shopping Center.

Appraisals: Non-jewelry appraisals provided by John Bruno, Star of PBS’s Market Warriors, Sunday, 1-3pm at $5/item.

Background: Flamingo Eventz, LLC presents the finest, most innovative and respected Antiques Shows, Book & Ephemera Fairs, and Antiques Appraisal Events in the Northeast. They have over 50 years experience as antique dealers and over 25 years experience as professional event promoters. They are members of the Antiques & Collectibles National Association, and John Bruno is an antiques appraiser and television personality who most recently appeared on Market Warriors on PBS.

Screen Shot 2017-09-05 at 10.15.27 AM.png“Le manuscrit franciscain retrouvé,” Paris, Bibliothèque nationale de France, MS n.a.l. 3245 (formerly our manuscript TM 686) was without question the most important Franciscan manuscript ever offered for sale by Les Enluminures (indeed, it would not be an exaggeration to state simply that it was one of our most important manuscripts ever). The publication in 2015 by Jacques Dalarun of the new, very early life of St. Francis found uniquely in this manuscript caused a worldwide sensation. Its complete contents and historical context will be explored at a colloquium sponsored by Bibliothèque nationale de France and the Institut de recherche et d’histoire des textes (CNRS) on September 20-22, 2017. 

In honor of this manuscript, we present a small group of manuscripts that illuminate the place of books in Franciscan life in the Middle Ages. Franciscans turned to books daily, to guide their public and private prayers, as sources of spiritual renewal, as aids to preaching and confession, and for study. The Franciscans were an international order, and these manuscripts were copied across Europe, with examples from Italy, France, England, the Low Countries, Germany, and Spain; they range in date from the thirteenth to the fteenth century. Some of the manuscripts were copied by Franciscans, others were used by them, still others include texts by Franciscan authors. Highlights include: a delightfully illustrated fourteenth-century Mammotrectus, a Franciscan educational text, signed by the scribe who was the leader of a Franciscan convent in Umbria; a tiny thirteenth-century portable Bible from Spain with evidence that it was used by Franciscans; and a collection of sermons by an important Franciscan preacher, copied in Paris during the author’s lifetime. 

IRHT colloquium program here 

ENLIGHTEN THE DARKNESS: An Exhibition in Honor of “Le manuscrit franciscain retrouvé” 

Opening and Reception: Wednesday, September 20th 2017, 7 PM to 9 PM 

Exhibition: September 21st through September 29th Monday through Friday, 11 AM to 7 PM 

ITHACA, NY—National Book Auctions, located in Ithaca, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog.   

This catalog features rare, antique and decorative books as well as select additions of ephemera. Important first editions and children's books are presented across the catalog, including many author-signed copies. An impressive array of early printings dating back to the 16th century will also be offered.           

Antique and rare books in this catalog include numerous titles. Among the earliest examples are the 1562 printing of Cicerone's "Le Orationi" in three volumes, "La II Parte delle Lettere del S. Diomede Borghesi," produced in 1584, and the 1653 printing of Bell'Haver's "Dottrine Facile et Breve," in a vellum binding. Additional rare selections include the 1872 printing of Darwin's "Expression of the Emotions in Man and Animals," Townsend's "Coats of Arms of Principal Families in Bedfordshire," produced c1784 with hand-colored plates, and first edition copies of both volumes of Carter's "The Tomb of Tut-Ankh-Amen," published in 1923 and 1927. Signed and limited editions include volumes from publishers such as the Limited Editions Club, Easton Press, Folio Society, Black Sparrow Press, and others.                     

Several pleasing collections will also be showcased. Highlighted is a sizable group of first printings of vintage and antique children's books, featuring such examples as the 1943 first American edition of Saint Exupery's "The Little Prince," an author-signed first edition of Roald Dahl's "Boy: Tales of Childhood," and the 1945 first edition of E. B. White's "Stuart Little," in the original dustjacket. Other author-signed children's titles include works by E. B. White, A. A. Milne, Dr. Seuss, Lois Lenski, Tasha Tudor, Walter Farley and others. Additionally included in this catalog are many modern first editions and signed books bearing important names such as J. Edgar Hoover, Tom Clancy, Stephen King, Frank Herbert, Julia Child, Edward Gorey, Alfred Hitchcock, James Thurber, and Frank McCourt.    

Found throughout this catalog are interesting ephemera offerings. These lots include categories such as incunabula, antique tintypes, vintage erotic comics (R. Crumb, etc.), antique billheads, lithographs, and more.    

National Book Auctions is a public auction service specializing in books, ephemera, and art. National Book Auctions is a targeted service offering experience and expertise unique to marketing antique and modern books and ephemera for consignors and collectors alike. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of collectible, signed, and first edition books. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-269-0101 or email mail@nationalbookauctions.com.

 

 

Alice Adams.jpgNorthhampton, MA - Flamingo Eventz and the Southern New England Antiquarian Booksellers have joined forces to present the 13th Annual Pioneer Valley Book & Ephemera Fair on Sunday, October 15, 10am - 4pm at Smith Vocational School, 80 Locust St (Rt. 9), Northampton, MA. Exhibitors from across the Northeast will fill the school’s cafeteria, stage, corridors, and lobby with collectible, rare, antique, modern, fine, scholarly and used books, manuscripts, prints, maps, autographs, photographs, postcards and every other sort of printed ephemera.

Exhibitor Specialties include: Advertising Covers, African American, Americana, Architecture, Art, Art Deco, Auctions, Autographs, Aviation, Baseball, Books, Bibles, Black History, Black Power, Calendars, Calling Cards, Christmas, Circus, Civil War, Cook Books, Charts, Children’s Books, Cocktails, Design, Dogs, Die Cuts, Documents, Engineering, Engraving, Ephemera, Erotica, Esoterica, Fantasy, Fashion, Fishing, Floridiana, Folklore, Folk Music, Foreign Language, Furniture, Games, Gardens & Horticulture, Graphics, Historic Documents, Horses, Hunting, Illustrated Books, Interior Design, Japan, Judaica, Letters, Logbooks, Manuscripts, Maps, Maritime, Medicine, Middle East, Military, Modernism, Music, Native American, Natural History, Nautical, Naval, New York City, New York State, New Jersey, Novelties, Olympic Games, Pacifica, Photographs, Photography, Pochoir, Polar, Pop-Ups & Moveable Books, Poetry, Postcards, Posters, Presentation Copies, Presidential Archives, Press Books, Prints, Pulitzer Prize Winners, Psychedelica, Puppetry, Puzzles, Railroad, Reference, Revolutionary War, Russia, Scholarly, Science, Science Fiction, Sports, Sporting, Technical, Theatre, Theology, Trade Cards, Trade Catalogues, Travel & Exploration, Travel Brochures, Typography, U.S. Coastal History, Vanity Fair Prints, Valentines, Voyages, Watercolors, Whaling, Wine, Yachting. These, and many other specialties, will be found at this event. Be sure to check our website, FlamingoEventz.com, for a full Exhibitor List and complete details.

The Pioneer Valley is a primary foliage destination in the fall, with many scenic hikes and drives, and you can pick your own apples and stock up on cider, pumpkins and chrysanthemums while visiting. Northampton and nearby Pioneer Valley towns provide a great variety of restaurants and entertainment. The Five Colleges, Smith College, University of Massachusetts, Amherst College, Hampshire College, and Mount Holyoke College offer library and museum exhibits and cultural events, but if it is Parents Weekend, hotels may fill quickly, so book early. Old Deerfield is nearby, Yankee Candle, too.

The school is on Route 9, near Cooley-Dickinson Hospital; there’s plenty of free parking. The event is catered by Black Sheep Deli from Amherst. Admission is $6, $1 off with a card or advertisement; $3 ages 12-21; under 12 free with paid Adult. Click flamingoeventz.com and pioneervalleybooks.com for more information as many local SNEAB members always exhibit. All are cordially invited.

Dates/Hours: Sunday October 15, 2017; 10am-4pm.

Location: The Smith Vocational School, 80 Locust Street (Rt. 9), Northampton, MA 01060.

Admission: Adults: $6, Students & Young Collectors 12-21: $3, under 12 free w/Paid Adult.

Directions: I-91 Exit 18, left on Pleasant Street, left on Rt. 9, Elm St, follow Rt. 9, it becomes Locust St.

Miscellaneous: Plenty of free parking and Refreshments will be available at an on-site café during show hours.

~ MORE ~

Background: SNEAB was born in 2014 as an expanded incarnation of Massachusetts and Rhode Island Antiquarian Booksellers, which began in 1976. Southern New England Antiquarian Booksellers encompasses Connecticut, Massachusetts and Rhode Island. The organization's members include bookselling firms founded as early as 1825. Our booksellers offer books from the 16th through the 21st Centuries, plus broadsides, maps, manuscripts, prints and ephemera. You can find an index of specialties on their website: www.sneab.org. Many of their members also purchase books and other material, and you are invited to contact them directly. 

Flamingo Eventz, LLC presents the finest, most innovative and respected Book & Ephemera Fairs, Antiques Shows, and Antiques Appraisal Events in the Northeast. They have over 50 years experience as antique dealers and over 25 years experience as professional event promoters. They are members of the Antiques & Collectibles National Association, and John Bruno is an antiques appraiser and television personality who most recently appeared on Market Warriors on PBS.

 

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced the winners of the 2017 Library of Congress Literacy Awards at the Library of Congress National Book Festival gala.

Three organizations received awards from Hayden and philanthropist David M. Rubenstein: the Children’s Literacy Initiative; the National Center for Families and Learning; and Pratham Books.

Originated by Rubenstein in 2013, the Literacy Awards honor organizations working to promote literacy and reading in the United States and worldwide. The awards recognize groups doing exemplary, innovative and replicable work, and they spotlight the need for the global community to unite in striving for universal literacy.

“Literacy is the first line of defense against so many problems—unemployment, hunger, poor health—and gives people a foundation for a brighter future,” Hayden said. “Through the generosity of David M. Rubenstein, the Library of Congress is proud to honor these exemplary organizations for their continued efforts to raise reading levels. Their work is moving and truly life-changing, and it is our privilege to recognize them here tonight.”

Prizes and Recipients

  • David M. Rubenstein Prize ($150,000): Children’s Literacy Initiative, Philadelphia

Children’s Literacy Initiative (CLI) works with pre-K through third-grade teachers to improve early literacy instruction so children become powerful readers, writers and thinkers. CLI creates a sustainable, school-wide culture of literacy that introduces students to the joys of reading, writing and lifelong learning. The organization coaches teachers one-on-one and in small groups in the classroom—providing demonstrations and feedback that help teachers incorporate effective literacy practices into their daily work with students. It stocks classrooms with learning materials and collections of high-quality children’s literature and extends its services with online professional development resources. CLI provides workshops and seminars to build a teacher’s knowledge of literacy content and pedagogy.

  • American Prize ($50,000): National Center for Families Learning, Louisville, Kentucky

Established in 1989 by its current president, Sharon Darling, the National Center for Families Learning (NCFL) works to eliminate poverty through educational solutions for families. Throughout its 28-year history, NCFL has changed the lives of millions of families across the country by providing literacy strategies, programming and resources. Engaging multiple generations together has been a fundamental and distinguishing aspect of NCFL’s work, because it knows this creates a stronger impact and greater success for families.

  • International Prize ($50,000): Pratham Books, Bangalore, India

Established with the mission of “a book in every child’s hand,” Pratham Books has helped millions of children have access to engaging, affordable, multilingual books. In order to scale the creation and distribution of multilingual content, Pratham Books launched StoryWeaver, India’s first open-source, digital repository of multilingual stories. All content on StoryWeaver is openly licensed. Users can read, download, print and share stories for free as well as use tools embedded on the platform to create and translate content into local languages.

The Library of Congress Literacy Awards program is also honoring 15 organizations for their implementation of best practices in literacy promotion. These organizations are:

  • The Asia Foundation, San Francisco
  • Canadian Women for Women in Afghanistan, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  • Center for Teaching and Learning, Edgecomb, Maine
  • Centre for Knowledge Assistance and Community Development, Hanoi, Vietnam
  • CODE, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada
  • CommonLit Inc., Washington, D.C.
  • Louisiana Endowment for the Humanities/PRIME TIME, New Orleans
  • Reading Partners, Oakland, California
  • Reading Works Inc., Albuquerque, New Mexico
  • Sealaska Heritage Institute, Juneau, Alaska
  • Serve Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • State Library of Western Australia - Better Beginnings Family Literacy Program, Perth, Australia
  • Story Share Inc., Boston
  • Tales and Travel Memories, Elgin, Illinois
  • Yayasan Sulinama, Ambon, Maluku, Indonesia

Rubenstein is the co-founder and co-chief executive officer of The Carlyle Group. He is a major benefactor of the Library of Congress and the chairman of the Library’s lead donor group, the James Madison Council.

The Library of Congress Literacy Awards are administered by the Library’s Center for the Book, which was created in 1977 by Congress to “stimulate public interest in books and reading.” A public-private partnership, the center sponsors educational programs that reach readers of all ages, nationally and internationally. The center provides leadership for affiliated state centers for the book and nonprofit reading-promotion partners and plays a key role in the Library’s annual National Book Festival.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

Backstage Dressing Room.JPGFRANKLIN, Mass. - A collection of 25 limited edition prints, all signed and numbered by the legendary singer-songwriter Bob Dylan and all 25 from his Drawn Blank Series of artworks based on drawings done between 1989 and 1992, will be sold Wednesday, Sept. 20, online-only, by Woodshed Art Auctions, at 11 am Eastern. A Prestige Collection sale will follow at 12 noon.

Each giclee carries a pre-sale estimate of $2,000-$3,000, although the sky could be the limit for a signed print from a man with the star power and cache of Bob Dylan. The circa 2013 prints are from the heirs of a private estate in London, England and all are framed in silver-finish wooden molding, with deep mats and glass glazing. They’re large (42 inches by 32 ¾ inches, framed).

“Last year I saw an exhibition of Bob Dylan’s paintings at the New Orleans Museum of Art,” said Bruce Wood, the owner of Woodshed Art Auctions. “It was my first introduction to his work and I was impressed by the directness of his technique. When I was approached by the inheritor of his collection, my first thought was to mix them into auctions over several months.”

But when he saw the print collection en masse, Mr. Wood had a change in strategy. “It was obvious that the strength of the images obviated the need for dilution among better-known artists,” he observed. “We decided to give Mr. Dylan’s works the spotlight, as a ‘back-up act’ to our next Prestige Signature Collection sale. I’m confident the group will perform quite well.”

Dylan the musician became Dylan the artist during the three-year period. The resulting collection was published in a book titled Drawn Blank, which became the moniker for the collection as a whole. They were expressive drawings, capturing Dylan’s chance encounters and observations on tour. They were a blend of portraits, interiors, landscapes, still lifes, nudes and street scenes.

At the time, Dylan said producing art helped him to “relax and refocus a restless mind.” It was a personal exercise more than anything, but in 2006 Ingrid Mossinger, the curator of a German art museum, came across Drawn Blank (published in 1994) during a visit to New York. She got in touch with Dylan’s team about exhibiting his art in public, something that had never been done.

Much to Mossinger’s amazement and elation, Dylan said yes. When Dylan told Mossinger it was always his plan to eventually create paintings based on the drawings in Drawn Blank, she made the suggestion that he do just that for the exhibition, working in watercolor and gouache. The paintings, which formed a collection titled The Drawn Blank Series, were expressive and vibrant.

Dylan said at the time, “I was fascinated to learn of Ingrid’s interest in my work, and it gave me the impetus to realize the vision I had for these drawings many years ago.” Dylan painted several versions of the same image for The Drawn Blank Series, using different colors and tones, which resulted in a dynamic variety of impressions, feelings and emotions, on display in the exhibition.

The choice and skill in applying different color arrangements to the same original drawing enabled Dylan to express his feelings and perceptions of an idea or a view, continually evoking different feelings and reactions and thereby creating evolving works of art. This technique, as it turns out, is intrinsic to Dylan in all aspects of his creative life, both as a musician and an artist.

After World War II, when the epicenter of printmaking shifted from Europe to America, many artists began to dedicate their entire oeuvres to print, as it came to be viewed as being on the same level as painting and sculpture. Artists such as Andy Warhol were committed to the medium - repeating an image in many different colors and ways. That’s what Dylan has done.

As part of this tradition, a carefully selected collection of Dylan’s paintings was chosen to be published as signed limited edition graphics (or prints), giving collectors and art lovers around the world instant access to Bob Dylan’s works of art. Each edition was published in a limited number of 295 copies worldwide. All are printed on soft texture paper and come with a COA.

Woodshed Art Auctions’ Prestige Collection sales are so-named because they are smaller events focused on modestly priced works by big-name artists. Already consigned for the September 20th sale, starting at noon, are paintings and drawings attributed to Franz Kline, Joan Mitchell, Andy Warhol, Pablo Picasso, Vincent Van Gogh, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Roy Lichtenstein and others. 

The catalog will be posted online in early September. Bidders can register on the Woodshed Art Auctions website (www.woodshedartauctions.com) and online bidding will be facilitated by Invaluable.com and Auctionzip.com. Telephone and absentee (or left) bids will also be accepted.

Woodshed Art Auctions is a family-owned art gallery specializing in oil painting restoration and live and online art auctions, celebrating its 50th anniversary. The firm is always accepting quality artworks for future auctions. To inquire about consigning a single piece or an entire collection, you may call Bruce Wood at 508-533-6277; or, e-mail him at bruce@woodshedartauctions.com

For more information about Woodshed Art Auctions and the Bob Dylan signed limited edition prints collection auction and the Prestige Collection sale, both planned for Wednesday, Sept. 20, please visit www.woodshedartauctions.com

Image: Giclee print titled Backstage Dressing Room, from Bob Dylan’s (Am., b. 1941) Drawn Blank Series, pencil signed and numbered (189/295) by Dylan and nicely framed (est. $2,000-$3,000).

student_poets_2017_pr_486x506.jpgThe Library of Congress today announced the winners of its A Book That Shaped Me: Letters About Literature Summer Writing Contest, a program that asks rising fifth- and sixth-graders to reflect on a book that has made a personal impact in their lives.

More than 300 young readers submitted essays to participating public libraries in the Mid-Atlantic region in this sixth year of the contest. Launched in 2012 with the DC Public Library, "A Book That Shaped Me" expanded with the help of public libraries in Washington, D.C., Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. The local libraries offered the contest as part of their summer-reading programs.

Five finalists per state were chosen in an initial round of judging. The finalists each will receive a $50 gift-card prize.

Judging was conducted by members of the American Association of School Librarians (AASL), a division of the American Library Association (ALA). The AASL works to ensure all elementary- and secondary-school librarians participate as collaborative partners in the teaching and learning process.

The grand-prize judging round, which selected state and grand-prize winners from the pool of state finalists, was conducted by a panel assembled by the Library of Congress that included educators, children’s authors and Library of Congress staff.

Each state winner will receive another $50 gift-card prize. The first-, second- and third-place grand-prize winners will be awarded additional gift-card prizes in the amounts of $200, $150 and $100 respectively.

Grand-prize winners will read their essays during the "A Book That Shaped Me" awards presentation at the Library of Congress National Book Festival. The contest presentation will take place at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, Sept. 2, 2017 at 11:50 a.m. at the Children’s Green Stage and will be emceed by Eun Yang, NBC4 Washington television anchor.

Grand Prize & State Winners

1st Place Grand Prize & Virginia State Winner
Suzahn Vollstad, Prince William Public Library, who wrote about “A Dog’s Purpose: A Novel for Humans” by W. Bruce Cameron

2nd Place Grand Prize Winner
Isla Rodriguez, Richmond Public Library - Ginter Park Library, who wrote about “Hidden Figures” by Margot Lee Shetterly.

3rd Place Grand Prize & Pennsylvania State Winner
Megan S. Garrabrant, Bucks County Free Library System - Langhorne Branch, who wrote about “Courage to Soar” by Simone Biles.

Delaware State Winner
Molly Amerling, Frankford Public Library (of Sussex County Department of Libraries), who wrote about “The Journey” by Francesca Sanna.

Maryland State Winner
Lily Luther, Montgomery County Public Library, who wrote about “Smile” by Raina Telgemeier.

Washington, D.C., Winner
Safya Biswal, DC Public Library - Northeast Library, who wrote about “Pax" by Sara Pennypacker.

West Virginia State Winner
Alexander Irby, Cabell County Public Library - Gallaher Village Public Library, who wrote about “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone" by J.K. Rowling.

State Finalists (winners indicated by asterisks)

District of Columbia Finalists
* Safya Biswal, DC Public Library - Northeast Library
Nekole Isaac, DC Public Library
Sienna Morgan, DC Public Library

Maryland Finalists
Rushi Jain, Montgomery County Public Library - Germantown Public Library
* Lily Luther, Montgomery County Public Library
Josiah Main, Montgomery County Public Library
Raniya Najih, Montgomery County Public Library
Sidney D. Robinson, Montgomery County Public Library

Virginia Finalists
Devin Dunn, Alexandria Library - Beatley Central Library
Lucy Garfield, Prince William Public Library System
Olivia Hana Lee, Prince William Public Library System - Montclair Public Library
Isla Rodriguez, Richmond Public Library - Ginter Park Library
* Suzahn Vollstad, Prince William Public Library System 

Delaware Finalists
* Molly Amerling, Frankford Public Library (of Sussex County Department of Libraries)
Catherine Cole, New Castle County - Kirkwood Library
Kestra Cole, New Castle County - Brandywine Hundred Library
Maggie Clarke-Fields, New Castle County - Brandywine Hundred Library
Kate McGowan, Delaware Library System - Dover Public Library

Pennsylvania Finalists
Shannon Connor, Indian Valley Public Library
* Megan S. Garrabrant, Bucks County Free Library System - Langhorne Branch
Isabella Peli, York County - Guthrie Memorial Library
Annabelle Troup, Bucks County Free Library System - Quakertown
Eliana Whing, York County - Collinsville Community Library

West Virginia Finalists
Kathryn Bell, Cabell County Public Library
Brooke Hayden Carey, Cabell County Library
Alivia Harley, Putnam County Library
* Alexander Irby, Cabell County Public Library - Gallaher Village Public Library
Kaylee J. Polk, Putnam County Library

The detailed list of current and previous winners, along with more information about the "A Book That Shaped Me" program, is available at loc.gov/bookfest/kids-teachers/booksthatshape/. For further details, contact booksshapecontest@loc.gov.

The Library of Congress National Book Festival, now in its 17th year, will gather more than 100 authors for readers of all ages to offer talks, Q&As and book-signings. The festival will be presented free of charge at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center on Saturday, Sept. 2, from 9 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. Doors open at 8:30 a.m. For more information, visit loc.gov/bookfest/.

The National Book Festival is made possible by the generous support of private- and public-sector sponsors who share the Library’s commitment to reading and literacy, led by National Book Festival Co-Chairman David M. Rubenstein. Charter Sponsors include the Institute of Museum and Library Services, The James Madison Council, The Washington Post and Wells Fargo; Patron sponsor is the National Endowment for the Arts; the Contributor-level sponsors are Thomas V. Girardi, Beverly and Lyman Hamilton, the National Endowment for the Humanities, Scholastic Inc. and the Junior League of Washington; and, in the Friends category, Booklovers Circle members, Candlewick Press, Marshall B. Coyne Foundation Inc., Democracy Fund, Joseph and Lynn Deutsch, Embassy of Ireland, Embassy of Sweden, The Hay-Adams, J.J. Medveckis Foundation, Mensa Foundation, the Mexican Cultural Institute, Timothy and Diane Naughton, Reading Is Fundamental, the Nora Roberts Foundation, Patricia Glass Schuman and Vincent Civello, Small Press Expo (SPX), Split This Rock and the White House Historical Association. Media Partners are C-SPAN2’s Book TV, NPR and PBS Book View Now. Those interested in supporting the National Book Festival can contact the Library at devofc@loc.gov.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

Image: 2017 National Student Poets

 

1 Goya Leave it to Providence.jpgNew York, NY—The Thaw Collection is considered among the foremost private collections of drawings assembled over the last half century. It was first promised to the Morgan in 1975 by Eugene V. Thaw, now a Life Trustee, and the museum received the full collection of 424 works in early 2017. In honor of this extraordinary gift—one of the most important in the history of the museum—the Morgan presents Drawn to Greatness: Master Drawings from the Thaw Collection.

On view from September 29 through January 7, 2018, the exhibition includes more than 150 masterworks from the Renaissance to the twentieth century. A partial list of artists represented includes Mantegna, Rubens, Rembrandt, Canaletto, Watteau, Piranesi, Fragonard, Goya, Turner, Ingres, Daumier, Degas, Cézanne, Redon, Gauguin, van Gogh, Matisse, Picasso, and Pollock.

“It is difficult to summarize in a few words what the acquisition of the Thaw Collection means to the Morgan but ‘transformative’ may be the best single way to describe it,” said Director Colin B. Bailey. “The great range of artists, schools, and regions represented is remarkable. Moreover, the quality of the individual drawings reflects Gene Thaw’s exceptional critical eye—and his keen intellectual curiosity. Over the years Gene’s passionate commitment to the Morgan has never wavered and we can think of no better way to honor him and his late wife, Clare, than to present this exhibition of some of the greatest works from their collection.”

THE EXHIBITION 

The exhibition is organized in a series of sections that illustrate key moments in the history of draftsmanship while also highlighting the work of artists whom the Thaws collected in depth, among them Rembrandt, Goya, Redon, and Degas.

I. The Renaissance and the Rise of the Artist

During the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, a dramatic shift occurred in the theory and practice of drawing. It came to be conceived not merely as a mechanical practice but as an intellectual one associated with invention. Artists made many more preparatory drawings than ever before, and even the most sketchy, exploratory sheets came to be sought and preserved by a new class of collectors and connoisseurs.

Andrea Mantegna (1431-1506) was among the leading lights in the new generation of intellectual artists in the Italian Renaissance. His study of Three Standing Saints in the Thaw Collection is one of the treasures not only of the Thaw Collection, but of the Morgan’s Italian drawings collection as a whole. In the later fifteenth century, sketching like that seen in this sheet would become the defining feature of Renaissance draftsmanship, but this is a notably early example, and a rare survival from one of the most important artists of the period.

Alongside the rise of the working drawing, Renaissance artists also created new categories of drawings that were independent pictorial works, and important examples by Albrecht Altdorfer (ca. 1480-1538) and Jörg Breu (ca. 1510-1547) are included in this section as well.

II. Looking at the World in the Seventeenth Century

While maintaining the intellectual approach to drawing that began in the Renaissance, seventeenth-century drawing represents a revitalized interest in both observation and imagination. Often specializing in a particular subject, artists looked closely at the world around them. This naturalism can be found in many genres ranging from Claude Lorrain’s landscapes to Saenredam’s church interiors to Nanteuil’s portraits. The greatest artists of the age, including Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640) and Rembrandt van Rijn (1606-1669), focused not only on the appearance of their subjects, but also on the emotional states evoked in the stories of these figures.

Four Musicians with Wind Instruments (ca. 1638) shows Rembrandt’s experimentation with an elaborate technique that included pen, ink, wash, and a rare yellow chalk. The lively procession of musicians in old-fashioned costumes seems to celebrate a prominent wedding or festivity. Though Rembrandt’s bravura style suggests that he drew these lively figures from life in the street, recent evidence suggests that he recorded them in the studio by placing models in front of a mirror.

III. Contemporary Life and Fantasy in Eighteenth-Century Italy 

In the eighteenth century, Italian artists developed new and distinctive types of drawings. Infused with sparkling light and even, at times, a sense of humor, these works showcase subjects that dance on the edge between fantasy and reality. Artists were also eager to illustrate astonishing views of their cities along with many imagined scenes, or capricci. Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo (1727-1804) also produced sheets and series of independent drawings, which were avidly collected by a growing number of connoisseurs. In his series Scenes of Contemporary Life, The Picture Show (1791) illustrates an itinerant showman or storyteller with a guitar slung over his shoulder, attracting a crowd that contains both sailors and aristocrats. In this intriguing scene, the showman presents a picture mounted on the wall before him, but it is not clear what it represents or which story is being told. 

IV. Artists Drawing Everywhere: Rococo and Enlightenment in France

In Paris and at the French Academy in Rome, drawing was a firmly established element of academic practice, but it also became a valuable tool for artists who worked mostly outside the Academy, such as Antoine Watteau (1684-1721), who produced a vast repertoire of life studies that he kept in albums for future use. These artists grew to prefer natural chalks and the exquisite effects they produced. They developed an interest in the individual and the foreign as well, which can be seen in Watteau’s study of a Persian soldier. Watteau drew A Member of the Persian Embassy (1715) after the Persian envoy Mehmet Reza Bey and his retinue arrived in Paris to pay a visit to Louis XIV on February 7, 1715. Watteau sketched many of the members of the embassy during their six-month stay, vividly portraying their exotic clothing in drawings of red and black chalk. He drew this slender young man with a thin mustache wearing a peaked fur-trimmed cap and cloak at least twice. 

V. Visionaries: British and German Romantic Drawings

In the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries, drawing in England and Germany became a forum for social issues and deeply subjective explorations. Artists valued expression over academic correctness. As drawing societies formed, it became common practice to produce, exhibit, and collect drawings. Artists embraced watercolor as a medium and investigated subjects related to literature, philosophy, history, and religion with a particular fervor. As Caspar David Friedrich (1774-1840), Philipp Otto Runge (1777-1810), and William Blake (1757-1827) began earnestly exploring spirituality, Samuel Palmer (1805-1881) and J. M. W. Turner (1775-1851) searched for the divine in sublime mountain landscapes or a single oak tree.

On a tour of Switzerland in 1842, Turner traveled the Gotthard Pass in the Alps and made a rapid sketch that he showed to John Ruskin on his return to England: Ruskin promptly commissioned a finished watercolor from Turner, a work that Ruskin later described as “the greatest work he produced in the last period of his art.” The Pass at St. Gotthard, near Faido (1843) illustrates the melting ice that would turn the Ticino River into a torrent capable of sweeping rocks downstream.

VI. Revolutionary Artists

After the disruptive political and social upheaval that followed the French Revolution in 1789, the traditional art world established by the ancien régime collapsed; in its place, new systems, paths, and possibilities for becoming a successful artist emerged. Artists fluidly adapted varied practices and materials of drawing to their individual circumstances. 

The prevalence of finished pictorial sheets suggests that drawing was held in high standing. In sketchbooks and independent sheets, Théodore Géricault (1791-1824) explored ideas for his ambitious projects, and Eugène Delacroix (1798-1863) produced scenes he would revisit and revise over the years. Francisco de Goya (1746-1828) made incisive and amusing vignettes for his private albums, such as Leave It All to Providence from the Black Border Album (1816-20). Although the caption may carry a sardonic tone, here Goya shows empathy for the downtrodden and an awareness of the larger forces at play in life. 

VII. From the Quotidian to the Sublime: Drawing in France After the Revolution

By the middle of the nineteenth century, many artists worked closely with dealers to produce a remarkable variety of finished drawings for sale at art markets and galleries in Paris. Artists were often politically engaged, creating scenes of modern life that were often infused with pathos or humor. In the same era, independent artists like Odilon Redon (1840-1916) experimented with materials and developed a personal and unconventional visual language that rejected realism and embraced dark visions and emotions. Beginning in the late 1870s, Redon entered an extremely productive creative period in which he worked almost exclusively in black chalk. These so-called noirs began to convey an esoteric symbolism, drawing on a broad range of sources and references. The Fool (1877) portrays a figure that has variously been described as an embodiment of intuition, the demon Mephistopheles, and an archetypal fool. It is one of Redon’s most enigmatic imagined portraits. Here, the fool subverts expectations: instead of looking comical, his penetrating gaze and threateningly lifted fingernail appear foreboding. 

VIII. Charting New Territory: Impressionist and Post-Impressionist Drawings 

Avant-garde artists in France during the late nineteenth century continued to use drawing for more varied purposes than ever: not only did they record observations from life and nature, but they also used drawing to replicate compositions, rework ideas, and produce finished works for exhibition and sale. They drew on diverse media, including modern manufactured materials such as the Conté crayon preferred by Seurat, which allowed for novel effects. Paul Cézanne (1839-1906) in particular used innovative techniques in watercolor and tested the boundaries of traditional materials, while Hilaire-Germain-Edgar Degas (1834-1917) expanded the definition of drawing: he used thinned oil paint and applied pastel over prints. Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890) developed a particularly modern role for drawing: he sent letters from Arles with sketches of paintings in progress to his Parisian friends. In a letter to Paul Gauguin (ca. October 17, 1888), Van Gogh extolled the attractions of Arles and chronicled his progress on one of his masterpieces from the period, Bedroom at Arles, even including a sketch. He described the colors and composition of the painting as well as his intention that it “express an absolute restfulness.”

IX. Modern Forms

Twentieth-century artists continued to depict traditional subjects in conventional materials—as is evident in the portraits of Pablo Picasso (1881-1973), the still lifes of Henri Matisse (1869-1954), and the landscapes of Piet Mondrian (1872-1944). But these artists also generated new forms as a response to modern life. They reflected new ways of seeing and thinking about space, time, and movement. Cubism perhaps best demonstrates this new approach, as Picasso, Juan Gris (1887-1927), and Fernand Léger (1881-1955) began to challenge the very notion of drawing with inventive techniques such as collage. 

This paved the way for artists like Jackson Pollock (1912-1956) to experiment with levels of abstraction and to explore the subconscious and the irrational. Untitled [Drawing for P.G.] (ca. 1943) is an important example of the fusion of primitivism and modernism that characterized Pollock’s art in the first half of the 1940s. This drawing reveals the wide range of his sources, from the masklike figures, mythic animals, and pictographs of primitive art to the imagery and style of Paul Klee (1879-1940) and Picasso. This sheet is dedicated to Peggy Guggenheim, who played a vital role in fostering Pollock’s career. The sheer diversity of his influences—from Native American art and Mexican mural painting to Picasso, Surrealism, and Jungian theory—indicates just how much drawing has evolved throughout the course of Western art. 

Eugene Thaw and the Morgan

One of the leading art dealers of his day, Eugene Thaw, who was born in Manhattan’s Washington Heights neighborhood, initially was drawn to contemporary artists before focusing on major masters of the first decades of the twentieth century. He soon expanded his range to include earlier work, with a particular penchant for nineteenth-century French artists. Not long after his marriage to Clare Eddy in 1954, he was encouraged by his wife to keep some of the drawings for which he was particularly enthusiastic, and their private collection began to take shape. 

Thaw acquired these great objects from a variety of sources: from art dealers and their galleries, through fellow collectors, at bookshops, and, perhaps most spectacularly, at auction. A major early purchase, in 1980, was the rare sheet by the Renaissance master Andrea Mantegna that set a record price for a drawing by the artist. Later, Thaw had the opportunity to acquire one of the last significant landscape drawings by Rembrandt still in private hands.

The Thaws first became involved with the Morgan in the 1960s. The relationship deepened during the tenures of Morgan directors Charles Ryskamp (1969-86) and Charles E. Pierce, Jr. (1987-2007). In 1975, on the occasion of the collection’s first exhibition at the Morgan, the Thaws announced that they were making a promised gift of their drawings.

Over the years Thaw has contributed other important works to the Morgan including a superb group of landscape oil sketches which the museum shares with the Metropolitan Museum of Art. He also gave a collection of early Medieval ornamental objects currently installed in the McKim building’s North Room, and a cache of nineteen illustrated letters by Vincent van Gogh to his protégé, Émile Bernard.

In addition to his gifts of art, Eugene underwrote the museum’s state-of-the-art Thaw Conservation Center, which opened in 2002. He also endowed two galleries in his wife’s name—most recently, the Clare Eddy Thaw Gallery in 2006. His donation in 2011 helped establish the Morgan’s Drawing Institute, a center for the study of works on paper. In 2013, an additional gift endowed the position of the Eugene and Clare Thaw Curator in the Department of Drawings and Prints.

In discussing his passion for collecting and his gift to the Morgan, Thaw said, “All true collectors want a group of works that reflects their own taste and judgement of what’s best. But critical to this drive or need to accumulate objects that excite the eye and mind, and to put them in order, is also the art of sharing them. I can think of no better place to do that than the Morgan Library & Museum.”

Image: Francisco Goya (1746-1828), Leave it all to Providence (Dejalo todo a la probidencia), 1816-20, black ink and gray wash, Thaw Collection, The Morgan Library & Museum, 1999.22.

26-Medical copy.jpgNew York—On Thursday, September 28, Swann Galleries will offer Printed & Manuscript Americana, with highlights that span nearly 500 years and several continents.

A fine selection of unique material features the archive of the Ponds, a missionary family living on the Minnesota frontier, valued at $30,000 to $40,000. Spanning nearly the entire nineteenth century, their correspondence recounts interactions with local Native Americans and attempts to convert them to Christianity.

A number of ships’ logs, both military and merchant, is led by an unpublished medical journal kept by physicians aboard the USS Deane and other ships in the Continental Navy from 1779 to 1788, estimated at $20,000 to $30,000. One of the doctors who contributed to the journal was a man named Peter St. Medard, who is additionally represented in the sale by the journal he kept between 1772 and 1822, during which he observed an American naval attack on Tunisia ($6,000 to $9,000). A whaling journal from a mutinous 1839-46 voyage to the South Pacific is valued at $8,000 to $12,000, while several logbooks feature ever-popular examples of whale stamps.

Making its auction debut is one of two known first editions of The Honolulu Merchants' Looking-Glass, an 1862 pamphlet printed and distributed anonymously that slanders many of the city's leading merchants and makes for a titillating glimpse into the lives of nineteenth-century Hawaiians. The present copy is believed to have belonged to the instigator’s compatriot, and passed by descent to the current owner ($6,000 to $9,000). Hawaiian material continues with The Second Interregnum: A Complete Resume of Events from the Death to Burial of His Late Majesty Lunalilo, 1874, with a tipped-in albumen portrait of the new King Kalakaua, expected to sell between $2,500 and $3,500.

A blossoming section of photography includes fine vernacular albums and portraits, led by a book of cyanotypes showing the construction of the Williamsburg Bridge from 1897 to 1903, compiled by W. Radford Bascome ($4,000 to $6,000). Also available is McClees' Gallery of Photographic Portraits of the Senators, Representatives & Delegates, 1859, one of the earliest photographically illustrated books published in the United States, valued at $10,000 to $15,000.

From the Revolutionary War, a New Hampshire broadside proclaiming the cessation of hostilities on April 24, 1783, is valued at $20,000 to $30,000.

Astonishingly, the first printed eyewitness report of the Wright brothers' flight appeared in the January 1, 1905 issue of the periodical Gleanings in Bee Culture. Amos Ives Root, the publisher and author of the magazine, confesses that he had asked the brothers how they got the plane back up to the top of the hill after flying it off ($1,500 to $2,500).          

An illustrated auction catalogue is available for $35. For further information and to make arrangements to bid, visit www.swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 26: Medical journal kept by surgeons aboard the Continental frigate Deane and other vessels, 1777-88. Estimate $20,000 to $30,000.

WOPchabot 1 copy 2.jpg“Bill Kent is the world’s greatest living carver of wood.  There is not anyone else even close,” wrote the New York Times in rare superlative praise for a contemporary artist.

Born in 1919 in Kansas City, William Kent, the son of hard-working, modest-income parents, often felt himself a loner artistically and out of sync with mainstream art. He lived and worked, for much of his life, in a barn in Durham, Connecticut, where each year he created five or six large works often standing taller than he, carved from single pieces of wood purchased at local sawmills.  His subjects were morphic, life size figures, insects and sea creatures, and much later in his career, surreal political effigies and quirky monumental everyday objects such as giant shoe-horns, scissors, rubber chickens, light bulbs and spark plugs.

Deeply affected by the political and social upheaval of the early 1960s, Kent was driven to express his moral outrage, dissent and activism through his art. He created low relief slate carvings combining pithy slogans and political imagery, inking and pulling graphically striking colored prints from them with titles such as “Who Killed Kennedy “, “Mob Control, and “Chiefs of Staff”, along with nature many themed and erotic prints as well. Through the over 100 slate prints he created between 1963-1976, William Kent strove to express universally recognizable truths, condemn false or hypocritical political statements, and memorialize iconic moments in American history and American popular culture. 

At the upcoming Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair, September 8-10 at the Brooklyn Expo Center in Greenpoint, over twenty colorful slate prints by William Kent from the 1960s-70s will be available from exhibitor Marc Chabot, of Marc Chabot Fine Arts.  Among these is “Nation is in Good Shape,” based on a newspaper press photo with from left: House Speaker McCormack, Senate President pro tem Hayden and Senate majority leader Mansfield after meeting with President Johnson on U.S. security affairs.  A seismic graph below the text seems to reflect the steady pulse of the nation; or at least no inbound missiles. Over 50 years later the subjects of Kent's prints remain as fresh and relevant as when they were created. 

Image: HUAC (House Un-American Activities Committee) slate print by William Kent, is as relevant today as when it was created a half century ago.  Photo courtesy of:  Marc Chabot Fine Arts, an exhibitor in the new Works on Paper gallery section of the Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair.

LOCATION:

Brooklyn Expo Center

79 Franklin Street

Greenpoint, Brooklyn

ADMISSION PRICES:

Friday Night Preview Benefit $25.00

General Admission Weekend Pass for $15 or $10 on Sunday

HOURS:

Friday Preview, benefiting Rare Book School, September 8 - 5:00 pm to 9:00 pm.

Saturday, September 9 -11:00 am to 7:00 pm.

Sunday, September 10 - 11:00 am to 5:00 pm.

 

737209 copy.jpgNew York—On Tuesday, September 19, Swann Galleries will offer 19th & 20th Century Prints & Drawings. One of seven auctions the house devotes to prints and drawings annually, this sale is notable for its wealth of original artworks in addition to iconic multiples by great masters from the last 200 years.

A selection of works by the father of surrealism Salvador Dalí is led by the brilliant watercolor Elephant Spatiaux, 1965, with an estimate of $60,000 to $90,000. René Magritte’s Poisson fumé provides comic relief in the form of a flying cigar-fish ($10,000 to $15,000). Additional unique highlights include a pen-and-ink drawing by Paul Klee titled Durch Poseidon, 1940, and Space, 1954, an abstract watercolor by Lyonel Feininger ($25,000 to $35,000 and $20,000 to $30,000, respectively).

Portrait of Ralph Stackpole as a Young Man, 1932, is a pencil portrait by Diego Rivera of his friend, likely drawn from an earlier photograph. It was completed the year after Stackpole helped Rivera secure the commission at the San Francisco Stock Exchange, and is valued between $20,000 and $30,000. Also available are nude sketches by Henri Matisse and Pierre-Auguste Renoir, and a lively undated oil painting by Jean Dufy of the Place de la Concorde, estimated at $30,000 to $50,000.

Scarce lithographs by Pablo Picasso lead the sale, topped by the dramatic monochrome portrait Françoise sur fond gris, 1950, estimated at $70,000 to $100,000. A fine selection of works by artists of the Barbizon School will be offered, as well as innovative examples of woodcuts by Paul Gauguin, such as Mahna no Varua Ino, 1893-94 ($15,000 to $20,000) and lithography by Henri Toulouse-Lautrec. Celebrated masters Georges Braque, Marc Chagall, Käthe Kollwitz, Fernand Léger and Joan Miró will be represented by prints, drawings and sculptures. A color woodcut by Maurits C. Escher in his iconic style, Day and Night, 1935, is expected to sell between $20,000 and $30,000.

James A. M. Whistler leads an illustrious array of works from the American Etching Revival, with Nocturne, 1878, estimated at $40,000 to $60,000. Regionalist artists are well-represented with important works by Thomas Hart Benton and Grant Wood, providing a pastoral contrast to gritty urban scenes by protagonists of the Ashcan School, George Bellows and John Sloan. A run of prints by Martin Lewis includes his most beloved views, such as Rain on Murray Hill, 1928, as well as scarce works like Which Way?, 1932 ($15,000 to $20,000 and $30,000 to $50,000, respectively). Additional highlights by the visionary include Bedford Street Gang, 1935, which has been seen at auction only three times in the last 30 years ($20,000 to $30,000).

An illustrated auction catalogue is available for $40. For further information and to make arrangements to bid, visit www.swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 338: Pablo Picasso, Françoise sur fond gris, lithograph, 1950. Estimate $70,000 to $100,000.

 

The Library of Congress has put the papers of Alexander Hamilton online for the first time in their original format.

The Library holds the world’s largest collection of Hamilton papers—approximately 12,000 items concentrated from 1777 until Hamilton’s death in 1804, including letters, legal papers and drafts of speeches and writings, among other items. Now, for the first time, these original documents—many in Hamilton’s own hand—will be available for researchers, students or the generally curious anywhere in the world to explore, zoom in and read at loc.gov/collections/alexander-hamilton-papers/.

“The Library of Congress is home to millions of one-of-a-kind manuscripts that reveal America’s history directly from the minds of the individuals who helped shape it,” said Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress. “Alexander Hamilton is certainly having his moment and I am so thrilled that people can learn more about him—actually read his descriptions of Revolutionary War battles, read letters to his wife, see the cross-outs in his draft of George Washington’s farewell address and so many other things. Sharing this history is what the Library is all about.”

Items in the collection include:

  • A letter written when Hamilton was 12 or 13 to his friend Edward Stevens describing his wish to raise his station in life;
  • The outline of Hamilton’s speech at the Constitutional Convention;
  • Hamilton’s draft of George Washington’s farewell address;
  • His draft of the infamous Reynolds pamphlet;
  • A letter to his wife, Eliza, written shortly before his fatal duel with Aaron Burr.

In addition, the Library recently acquired 55 items, previously privately held—mostly letters from Hamilton’s powerful father-in-law, General Philip Schuyler, to him and his wife—that have also been digitized and made available for the first time. Most of these have never been published.

Congress appropriated $20,000 in 1848 to buy the papers of Alexander Hamilton from his family, including his widow, Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton. The papers were originally housed at the U.S. Department of State and came to the Library in 1904, along with all the department’s historical papers, at the direction of President Theodore Roosevelt.

The Library supplemented the collection over time with additional gifts and purchases. The papers cover almost every aspect of Hamilton’s career and private life: growing up in St. Croix, as George Washington’s aide-de-camp during the Revolutionary War, New York delegate to the Constitutional Convention of 1787, the first U.S. treasury secretary, New York lawyer, and more.

The papers also include correspondence with and among members of his family, including his wife Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton, his sister-in-law Angelica Schuyler Church, and his father-in-law Philip Schuyler.

The Hamilton Papers are among collections newly available online during the past year. Others include the papers of U.S. Presidents Millard Fillmore, Franklin Pierce and William Henry Harrison; the papers of Sigmund Freud; a collection of more than 4,600 newspapers from Japanese-American internment camps; a collection of web-based comic books; and 25,000 fire insurance maps from communities across America, the first installment of 500,000 that will be accessible online.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

Vallard-Atlas_500.jpgSAN MARINO, Calif.— A sweeping international loan exhibition at The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens opens on Sept. 16, 2017 to explore how the depiction of Latin American nature contributed to art and science from the late 1400s to the mid-1800s. “Visual Voyages: Images of Latin American Nature from Columbus to Darwin,” presented in the MaryLou and George Boone Gallery through Jan. 8, 2018, features more than 150 paintings, rare books, illustrated manuscripts, prints, and drawings from The Huntington’s holdings as well as from dozens of other collections. Many of these works will be on view for the first time in the United States. It is complemented by a richly illustrated book, along with an array of other programs and exhibitions, including an installation created by Mexican experimental composer Guillermo Galindo. The exhibition is a part of the Getty’s Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA initiative, an exploration of Latin American and Latino art that involves more than 70 arts institutions across Southern California.

“Despite notorious depredation of people and resources during the period, the brilliant work of a number of Latin Americans and Europeans helped to illuminate our understanding of the natural world,” said Catherine Hess, chief curator of European art at The Huntington and co-curator of “Visual Voyages.” “We aim to shed light on this relatively unexamined piece of the story—to show how beautiful, surprising, and deeply captivating depictions of nature in Latin America reshaped our understanding of the region and, indeed, the world—essentially linking art and the natural sciences.”

“Visual Voyages” looks at how indigenous peoples, Europeans, Spanish Americans, and individuals of mixed-race descent depicted natural phenomena for a range of purposes and from a variety of perspectives: artistic, cultural, religious, commercial, medical, and scientific. The exhibition examines the period that falls roughly between Christopher Columbus's first voyage in 1492 and Charles Darwin’s publication of On the Origin of Species in 1859, a work based largely on Darwin’s own voyage to the region in the 1830s.

“Information and materials circulated at an unprecedented rate as people transformed their relationship to the natural world and to each other,” said Daniela Bleichmar, associate professor of art history and history at the University of Southern California (USC) and co-curator of the exhibition. “Images served not only as artistic objects of great beauty but also as a means of experiencing, understanding, and possessing the natural world. These depictions circulated widely and allowed viewers—then and now—to embark on their own ‘visual voyages’.”

Bleichmar, who was born in Argentina and raised in Mexico, is an expert on the history of science, art, and cultural contact in the early modern period. Her publications include the prize-winning book Visible Empire: Botanical Expeditions and Visual Culture in the Hispanic Enlightenment (University of Chicago Press, 2012).

The Huntington’s three collection areas—library, art, and botanical—all contribute to “Visual Voyages.” Its Library is one of the world’s greatest research institutions in the fields of British and American history, art, and the history of science, stretching from the 11th century to the present, and includes such treasures as the first European depiction of a pineapple and a rare 16th-century manuscript atlas that includes three stunning maps of the Americas. From The Huntington’s art holdings, Frederic Edwin Church’s monumental painting Chimborazo (1864) will be on display, depicting a Latin American landscape both real and imaginary. The Huntington’s 120 acres of gardens include several thousand plant species from Latin America, including pineapple, cacao, various orchids including vanilla, and succulents.

Visitor Experience

Designed by Chu+Gooding Architects of Los Angeles, “Visual Voyages” engages visitors through an evocative installation that includes interactive media, display cases of specimens and rare materials, and visually arresting depictions of botanical specimens and still lifes.

The exhibition opens with a display of taxidermy mounts to make vivid the rare animals that captured the imagination of Europeans and were avidly collected during the period.

“Visual Voyages” then begins with a section on “Rewriting the Book of Nature,” in which manuscripts, maps, and publications show how nature came to be reconsidered in the first century of contact. This section includes a copy of the 1493 letter Christopher Columbus wrote to the King and Queen of Spain while on the return leg of his first voyage to the New World. He writes that the region is “so fertile that, even if I could describe it, one would have difficulty believing in its existence.” This section highlights the many works by indigenous peoples to the exploration of New World nature, among them two large-scale maps painted by indigenous artists in Mexico and Guatemala; a volume from the Florentine Codex, a 16th-century Mexican manuscript on loan from the Laurentian Library, Florence; and a spectacular feather cape created by the Tupinambá of Brazil in the 17th century.

Next, a gallery called “The Value of Nature” explores the intertwining of economic and spiritual approaches to Latin American nature. Commercial interests resulted in the investigation, depiction, and commodification of such natural resources as tobacco and chocolate. Indigenous religions considered the natural world to be infused with the divine, while Christian perspectives led observers to envision Latin American nature as both rich in signs of godliness as well as marked with signs of the devil—and needing eradication. Various depictions of the passion flower, a New World plant, show how the flower’s form recalled to missionaries the instruments of Christ’s Passion.

A third section, “Collecting: From Wonder to Order,” shows how the “wonder” that European collectors held for the astonishing material coming from the New World became a desire to possess and, later, to “order” this material, following systems of taxonomy and classification. On view will be a set of large and impressive paintings depicting Brazilian fruits and vegetables by the Dutch painter Albert Eckhout (ca.1610-1665) as well as 20 artful, vivid, and detailed drawings of botanical specimens painted by artists from New Granada (present-day Colombia, Ecuador, Panama, Venezuela, Peru, northern Brazil, and western Guyana), never before seen in the United States.

The final section of the exhibition, called “New Landscapes,” examines scientific and artistic perspectives on Latin America created in the 19th century, a period when a new wave of voyagers explored the region and wars of independence resulted in the emergence of new nations. The Romantic and imperial visions of artists and scientists from Europe and the U.S. are juxtaposed with the patriotic and modernizing visions of artists and scientists from Latin America, who envisioned nature as an integral part of national identity. This juxtaposition can be seen visually in the pairing of The Huntington’s monumental Chimborazo by Church with the equally monumental Valley of Mexico (1877) by Mexican painter José María Velasco, on loan from the Museo Nacional de Arte in Mexico City.

Gallery text is in Spanish and English.

Exhibition Catalog

“Visual Voyages: Images of Latin American Nature from Columbus to Darwin” is accompanied by a hardcover book of the same title written by Daniela Bleichmar, co-curator of the exhibition. In a narrative addressed to general audiences as well as students and scholars, Bleichmar reveals the fascinating story of the interrelationship of art and science in Latin America and Europe during the period. Published by Yale University Press in association with The Huntington, the 240-page book contains 153 color illustrations. $50.00. Available beginning in September 2017 at the Huntington Store and online.

Related Exhibitions and Programs

“Human Nature: Sonic Botany”

Sept 16, 2017-Jan 8, 2018

Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art

A mix of audio and visuals created by experimental composer, sonic architect, and performance artist Guillermo Galindo, this installation features a series of graphic representations of musical scores inspired by the “Visual Voyages” exhibition. The installation is part of USC Annenberg’s Musical Interventions, a series of public events organized for Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA by Josh Kun, historian of popular music and recently named MacArthur Fellow.

“Visual Voyages in the Gardens”

Sept 16, 2017-Jan 8, 2018

Throughout the Botanical Gardens

Visitors can enrich their experience of “Visual Voyages” by strolling the botanical gardens in search of the real-life specimens of plants they have seen depicted in the gallery. Keep your eyes peeled for two dozen “Visual Voyages” signs, pointing to cacao, pineapple, tobacco, and other plants indigenous to Latin America.

“Nuestro Mundo”

Sept. 16, 2017-Jan. 8, 2018, weekends only

Floralegium gallery, Brody Botanical Center

The two dozen paintings in this installation are the work of young adults ages 18 to 26 who are mentored by Art Division, a nonprofit organization that provides training and support for Los Angeles youth from underserved communities pursuing careers in the visual arts. The students used “Visual Voyages” as inspiration.

“In Pursuit of Flora: 18th-Century: Botanical Drawings from The Huntington’s Art Collections”

Oct. 28, 2017-Feb. 19, 2018

Huntington Art Gallery, Works on Paper Room

European exploration of other lands during the so-called Age of Discovery revealed a vast new world of plant life that required description, cataloging, and recording. By the 18th century, the practice of botanical illustration had become an essential tool in the study of natural history. From lusciously detailed drawings of fruit and flowers by Georg Dionysius Ehret (1708-1770), a collaborator of Swedish botanist Carl Linnaeus, to depictions of more exotic examples by Matilda Conyers (1753-1803), “In Pursuit of Flora” reveals 18th-century European appreciation for the beauty of the natural world.

Taste of Art: Visual Voyages through Latin America

Sept. 30 or Oct. 7 (Saturday)

9 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

Explore connections among art, science, and the environment in the exhibition, then head to the kitchen to prepare a Latin American-inspired meal. Maite Gomez-Rejón of ArtBites leads the workshop. Members: $85. Non-Members: $100. Register online.

Talk and Book Signing: The Invention of Nature: Alexander von Humboldt’s New World

Oct. 15 (Sunday) 2:30 p.m.

Rothenberg Hall

Join best-selling author Andrea Wulf for a talk about the life of explorer, scientist, and early environmentalist Alexander von Humboldt (1769-1859), the subject of her most recent book, The Invention of Nature. Her talk will focus on Humboldt’s explorations of Latin America. Free; no reservations required.

Wark Lecture

Seeing and Knowing: Visions of Latin American Nature, ca.1492-1859

Oct. 16 (Monday) 7:30 p.m.

Rothenberg Hall

Historian Daniela Bleichmar, co-curator of the exhibition, discusses the surprising and little-known story of the pivotal role that Latin America played in the pursuit of science and art during the first global era. A book signing and coffee reception will follow the talk. Free; no reservations required.

Curator Tour: Visual Voyages

Oct. 18 (Wednesday) 5-6 p.m.

Join exhibition co-curator Daniela Bleichmar for a private tour of “Visual Voyages.” Members: $15. Non-Members: $20. Register online.

Guillermo Galindo Performance

Human Nature: Sonic Botany

Nov. 4 (Saturday), noon - 1 p.m.

Rose Hills Garden Court

Experimental composer, sonic architect, and performance artist Guillermo Galindo presents a work inspired by “Visual Voyages.” The program is part of USC Annenberg’s Musical Interventions, a series of public events organized for Pacific Standard Time: LA/LA by Josh Kun, historian of popular music and recently named a MacArthur Fellow. Free with admission.

Conference at the Getty Center

Indigenous Knowledge and the Making of Colonial Latin America

Dec. 8-10, 2017

This symposium will bring together an interdisciplinary group of scholars to explore the role of indigenous knowledge in the making of colonial Latin America. Curator-led visits to two related exhibitions—“Visual Voyages” at The Huntington and “Golden Kingdoms: Luxury and Legacy in the Ancient Americas” at The Getty—will allow participants to view examples of work by indigenous artists and authors, including several rare pictorial manuscripts (codices). The symposium is organized by Daniela Bleichmar, co-curator of “Visual Voyages” and Kim Richter, co-curator of “Golden Kingdoms” and senior research specialist at the Getty Research Institute, with funding from the USC-Huntington Early Modern Studies Institute, the Seaver Institute, and the Getty Research Institute. For registration and more information, visit getty.edu.

Lecture
Cochineal in the History of Art and Global Trade

Dec. 10 (Sunday) 2:30 p.m.

Rothenberg Hall

Alejandro de Ávila Blomberg of the Oaxaca Ethnobotanical Garden and Oaxaca Textile Museum will explore the historical and cultural significance of this natural crimson dye. Used from antiquity, cochineal became Mexico’s second-most valued export after silver during the Spanish colonial period. Free; no reservations required.

Image: Le vrais Bresil es province du Quito (The true Brazil, a province of Quito), in Vallard Atlas, Dieppe (France), 1547, tempera, gold paint, gold leaf, and black ink on parchment, 14 ½ × 18 ¾ in. The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens.

 

Screen Shot 2017-08-21 at 9.01.34 AM.pngThe Folio Society is delighted to announce that six of their titles have been selected as finalists in five categories of the prestigious British Book Design & Production Awards 2017. 

Emily Dickinson: Selected Poems (illustrated by Jane Lydbury) in the Literature category 

The Folio Science Fiction Anthology (illustrated by Florian Schommer) in Best Jacket/Cover Design category 

The Malay Archipelago and Micrographia in the Scholarly, Academic and Reference Books category 

The Call of Cthulhu and Other Stories (illustrated by Dan Hillier) in the Limited Edition and Fine Binding category 

The Douglas Adams Hitchhiker’s Series (illustrated by Jonathan Burton) in the Brand/Series Identity category 

Kate Grimwade, Production Director at The Folio Society said: ‘We are delighted to be a finalist in five categories for the prestigious BBDP awards. Each of the books shortlisted reflect Folio’s aesthetic: to treat every book we publish as a unique object, to be innovative in design approach and the materials we select, and to continuously strive for the very highest quality in all aspects of its production.’ 

The British Book Design & Production Awards is one of the most prestigious literary events of the year, the awards recognise and promote the excellence of the British book design and production industry by celebrating the best books of the year. The judges look for exceptional design, free of typographical errors, with particular emphasis given to excellent layout and standards of typography. 

Entries for the awards must be published, designed, typeset, printed or bound by the entrant in the UK. The winners will be announced at a gala dinner to be held on Thursday 16 November in London. 

 

AntiquarianAuctions.com is an online auction site dedicated to the sale of rare and out-of print books, maps & prints, documents, letters, ephemera and vintage photography.

All pricing is done in US$. No buyer’s premium is charged.

Screen Shot 2017-08-21 at 8.55.22 AM.pngLot 1

Wharton (Edith) The Book of the Homeless

Published: Scribners, New York, 1916 Estimate: $2,500/3,500

Unbound in sheets, contributors include: Henry James, Joseph Conrad and Édouard Manet.

The Book of the Homeless (Le Livre des Sans-Foyer) edited by Edith Wharton. Original Articles in Verse and Prose Illustrations reproduced from Original Paintings & Drawings. The book is sold for the Benefit of the America Hostels for Refugees (with the Foyer Franco-Belge) and of the Children of Flanders Rescue Committee. [Introduction by Theodore Roosevelt]

Unique unbound, uncut and unopened copy of the limited edition: "Of this book, in addition to the regular edition, there have been printed and numbered one hundred and seventy-five copies deluxe, of larger format [all signed by Updike]. Numbers 1-50 on French hand-made paper ... Numbers 51-175 on Van Gelder paper." This copy on Van Gelder paper is numbered 65.

Lot 2

Cruikshank (George) Illustrator: The Life of Napolean

Published: T. Tegg and J.Dick, London and edinburgh, 1915 Estimate: $1,750/2,000

A Hudibrastic Poem in Fifteen Cantos, by Doctor Syntax, embellished with Thirty Engravings by George Cruikshank.

260 pages, 30 hand coloured aquatint plates (including the hand coloured title page), original grey paper boards without a title label on the spine - the backstrip has been expertly restored, edges uncut, some slight off-setting of the plates but otherwise the text and plates are crisp and free of foxing, contained in mauve cloth solander case titled in gilt on the spine, a very good copy.

 Lot 5

Coronelli (Vincenzo) L'Africa divisa nelle sue Parti secondo le piu moderne, relationi colle scoperte dell'origine e corso del Nilo

Published: Domenico Padouani, Venice, 1691 Estimate: $4,750/6,000

This is the first state of the beautiful map of Africa that was the first to show the origin of the Blue Nile. It was produced by Vincenzo Coronelli, a famous Italian cartographer.

This is a landmark map in the history of the mapping of Africa, and, in particular, of the Nile River which long had been depicted, according to the tradition of Ptolemy, to arise from lakes about the Mountains of the Moon. This beautiful map is in A+ condition; presented on two separate sheet and uncoloured - as issued. The halves readily can be joined so that there is no gap between them.

 Lot 62

Butler (Arthur G.) Birds of Great Britain and Ireland, Order Passeres, Complete in Two Volumes Published: Brumby & Clarke, Hull, 1904-1908 Estimate: $350/500

107 chromolithograph plates of birds and 8 of bird eggs with tissue-guards. A very attractive set of an informative text and classification. Hard to find complete sets as they were dis-bound for their decorative plates.

 Lot 150

Netto (Dr. Friedrich) Bubenstreiche in Lustigen Versen und Ulkingen Bildern

Published: [circa 1900]

Estimate: $1,500/2,000

Dr Friedrich Netto lived from 1868 -1926. The Children's Division of the Staatsbibliotek zu Berlin records 5 other books by him published between 1900 and 1915, but not this one. A biography written by Inge Laude: Ärzte als Schriftsteller - Ernst Philipp Lange and Friedrich Netto was published in Munich in 1970. No further details of his writing or his life have been traced. No copies of this title were retrieved in any international database.

Bubenstreiche is a children's book, which, translated into English means childish pranks. The text and images are satirical and the cameos portray the events of the Anglo Boer War in a rather derogatory light.

 Lot 158

War on Want Jigsaw Puzzle, Nelson Mandela and the ANC flag Published: London, no date [circa 1980's]

Estimate: $400/500

War on Want works to challenge the root causes of poverty, inequality and injustice through partnership with social movements in the global South and by running hard-hitting campaigns in the UK in support of radical change. War on Want's slogan is "poverty is political" and its stated focus is on the root causes of poverty rather than its effects; it raises public awareness of the root causes of poverty, inequality and injustice, and empowers people to take action for change.

Lot 181

In March 1947 the first issue of Piscator, the Society's journal appeared. A. C. Harrison was its editor and, in a tribute to AC in December 1977 when the 100th edition of Piscator was published, the then CPS President, the late Dr. Frank Bradlow, wrote: "There can be few people who have met "AC" whose lives have not been enriched; his direct courteous manner, his dry sense of humour, his encyclopaedic knowledge of nature and fishing, and his human and humane wisdom are but a few of the qualities which make those who know him realise they have been in the company of a very unusual individual; one of those rare human beings whose personality makes an indelible impression on one's memory".

Lot 235

Bhavnagar (India) Album of Captioned Architectural and Other Nineteenth Century Photographs Published: Faber & Faber, London, 1956

Estimate: $600/800

Buildings and Civil Engineering Works Designed and Built by Richard Proctor-Sims between 1875 and 1900, and the state visit to Bhavnagar by the Prince of Wales

Most of the photographs are of buildings - planned, under construction and completed - and civil engineering works, but include a sequence on the reception for the Prince of Wales and of Bhavnagar's horse-breeding activities, the organisation of which was one of the RPS interests referred to in the obituary below.. There is still a memorial to RPS in Bhavnagar town centre and tours have been arranged to inspect his architectural, building and civil engineering works, which have all been well maintained.

Cape Piscatorial Society, Piscator

Published: Cape Town, 1947 -1979 Estimate: $600/700

Lot 235

Myanmar (Burma) School, Red and Gold lacquered manuscript, Kammavaca. Published: Burma, c. 1900

Estimate: $800/1,200

A fine highly decorative early-20th-century Burmese Kammavaca (possibly eve late-19th century?). Considered to be one of the most sacred of Burmese religious texts, the Kammavaca was typically commissioned by lay-people, when their son entered a Buddhist monastery, as a work of merit.

In the 17th century, folios began to be made of pieces of cloth coated with lacquer and painted with cinnabar, and the square letters were written in thick, black lacquer. On rare occasions, folios were of ivory. Designs in gilt, which had been reserved for the ends of folios, end papers, and wooden coverboards, now began to appear between the lines of text. By the end of the 19th century, the lines of script on the folio increased to six or seven and sheets of brass or copper were introduced as folios.

AntiquarianAuctions.com is an online auction site dedicated to the sale of rare and out-of print books, maps & prints, documents, letters, ephemera and vintage photography. 

Dealers and collectors worldwide have been selling and bidding on the site since 2010.
Only established booksellers who are members of major national trade associations such as ABA, ABAA, PBFA or SABDA or are of good standing in the trade are permitted to sell on the site. 

Auctions are held every five weeks and run on the model of a timed auction for one week. 

All pricing is done in US$. No buyer’s premium is charged. 

Next auction: Auction #58: 25 May - 1 June 2017 

Contact:
Antiquarian Auctions: Paul Mills P.O. Box 186 7848 Constantia, Cape Town South Africa E-mail: support@antiquarianauctions.com Tel: +27 21 794 0600 

 

Twice signed Lincoln.jpgWESTPORT, Conn. - A fantastic selection of autographed documents, manuscripts, books and relics are up for bid in an internet-only auction already online by University Archives, based in Westport. The auction will go live on Tuesday, August 29th, on Invaluable.com. The catalog may be viewed right now by visiting the University Archives website at www.universityarchives.com

Choice offerings will include a larger-than-life portrait of inventor Thomas A. Edison, signed by Edison and the artist, Ellis M. Silvette; a letter hand-written and signed by Marilyn Monroe when she was just 17 and still Norma Jeane; a war letter twice-signed by President Abraham Lincoln in 1862, nicely framed; and a letter handwritten and signed by Morse code inventor Samuel Morse.

Also sold will be a pair of letters written and signed by the famously reclusive and enigmatic writer J. D. Salinger. Both were written to Joyce Miller, a lifelong friend and confidante. One is typewritten (except for the signature) and dated 1950, about the time he was finishing writing Catcher in the Rye and living in Westport. The other is a 1969 letter handwritten in New York.

Other items of interest will include a George Washington signed note with his original hand drawing, Winston Churchill’s Cuban cigar with case from 1954, John F. Kennedy’s family-owned oak press-back chair, George W. Bush’s worn pair of Mizuno sneakers, Muhammad Ali’s 1978 contract to fight boxer Ken Norton, and a Yale University track team photo from 1903.

“I love this sale for the breadth of material and the quality of the items,” said John Reznikoff, founder and president of University Archives. “Of course the Edison and the Morse are the best money can buy, but there are many little gems of fantastic content that would rate at the top of the autograph food chain. The Obama and Bush items cover both ends of the political spectrum.”

With an estimate of $70,000-$80,000, the large painting of Edison (1847-1931) by Silvette (Am., 1876-1940) could be the sale’s top lot. The work - 47 inches by 96 inches, in the frame - was commissioned by the New York State Chamber of Commerce in 1929 on the 50th anniversary of the invention of the light bulb and depicts Edison standing in the library of his New Jersey lab.

Marilyn Monroe was Norma Jeane Dougherty and already two years into her first marriage when she hand-wrote a four-page letter in January 1944 to her legal guardian from 1935-1942, Grace (McKee) Goddard. In it, the teenager enthuses about her Christmas purchase of a “Gold Coast monkey coat. Oh, it’s simply beautiful!” The signed letter has an estimate of $18,000-$20,000.

The single page handwritten letter signed by Samuel Morse (1791-1872) is believed to be the finest Morse handwritten letter available. Dated Nov. 11, 1862, the letter is written entirely in Morse’s hand, wherein he proclaims he was the inventor of the telegraph and describes its first use and operation. The lot includes a fine engraving of Morse and should bring $15,000-$20,000.

The Civil War-era letter twice signed by Lincoln is dated Dec. 15, 1862 and was written to Navy Secretary Gideon Welles, with Naval Academy content. Lincoln signed the letter, then added an addendum the following day, which he also signed and dated. The letter is nicely displayed to the left of a color engraving and bust portrait of Lincoln. The lot should gavel for $15,000-$20,000.

The excellent and well-used Kennedy family-owned chair is a classic black painted and stamped press-back oak chair, with a seat height of 17 ½ inches and an overall height of 38 ½ inches. It was made around the middle of the 20th century and would be wonderful as décor in an antique setting, especially considering all of the Kennedys who no doubt sat in it (est. $2,500-$3,000).

At a party held at 10 Downing Street in London, England on Dec. 21, 1954, Winston Churchill presented Roderic Bowen (England’s Liberal Parliamentary Deputy-Speaker) with a fine Cuban cigar and attractive custom case. Both have made their way to this auction, but not before a 19-year embargo. A letter by Bowen confirming the gift is included in the lot (est. $3,500-$4,500).

Owning a signed note handwritten by George Washington would be enough for most autograph collectors, but when the note includes a drawing by Washington of a hand pointing a finger at his message, that’s icing on the cake. The heavily penned note, 2 inches by 3 inches on laid paper, is not dated but it’s believed to have been written around 1789. It has an estimate of $6,000-$8,000.

In 1978 Muhammad Ali signed a four-page contract to fight his nemesis Ken Norton, but Ali’s loss to Leon Spinks that year in what was supposed to be a tune-up fight for Norton voided that contract (and a promised $12.5 million payday for Ali). The contract, actually a photocopy of the original, but still signed by Ali and promoter Bob Arum, is expected to command $3,000-$4,000.

George W. Bush’s personally owned and well-worn Mizuno sneakers, designed by Bush while he was president and showing the personal presidential stitched monogram on the tongue of each sneaker (“President / G.W. Bush”), no doubt graced golf courses, Camp David and elsewhere. The shoes come with a COA from Bush’s valet Samuel Sutton and should reach $2,000-$2,500.

The impressive gelatin silver print photograph of Yale University’s men’s outdoor track and field team from circa 1903 shows 44 varsity and junior varsity team members all dressed in black tanks and white shorts, standing and seated in four rows. All sport white “Y” letters on their tops. The 22 ½ inch by 30 ¾ inch photo is nicely matted and mounted on board (est. $1,500-$2,000).

The large, top-secret dispatch lock box with black leather covering and travel handle owned by David Lloyd George (1863-1945), a key figure in Great Britain during that conflict and the holder of several important government positions after the war, has a pre-sale estimate of $1,000-$1,200. The wood framed box has a beveled top with George’s name embossed, in rubbed gilt. 

John Reznikoff started collecting stamps in 1968, while in the third grade, and in 1979 he formed University Stamp Co., Inc. In 1984, he joined forces with Bryan Camarda, a specialist in philatelic material, and the two have been partners ever since. By the late ‘80’s and early ‘90’s, Reznikoff was exclusively dealing in manuscript material under the name University Archives.

For more information about University Archives and the Tuesday, August 29th auction, please visit www.universityarchives.com.

Image: Civil War-era letter twice signed by Abraham Lincoln, dated Dec. 15, 1862 and was written to U. S. Navy Secretary Gideon Welles, with Naval Academy content (est. $15,000-$20,000).

Madonna 7.jpgNEW YORK CITY, N.Y. - A complete set of 66 original Polaroid photos of Madonna, taken in 1983 by the noted portrait photographer Richard Corman (Am., b. 1954), just six weeks before the release of the young singer’s debut album and eventual skyrocket to fame, is for sale through Manhattan Rare Books, located inside Gallery 90 in New York City, at 1050 Second Avenue.

The sale price of the set is $350,000. “We are offering these unique Polaroids of Madonna until September 5th,” said Michael DiRuggiero owner of Manhattan Rare Books. “After that, if there is no buyer, the set will be dispersed and the images offered individually.” The photos are featured in Corman’s limited-edition fine art book Madonna 66, which was released in November 2016.

Harper’s Bazaar said of the book, “Corman’s Polaroids prove with utter certainty that Madonna was destined for icon status.” Mr. DiRuggiero added, “This is a unique opportunity for a serious collector to own a complete collection, documenting an important moment in art and cultural history, one that will be available only as a complete and intact collection until September 5th.”

The sale price includes all 66 original Polaroids, each one signed and numbered by Corman (1-66), housed in a custom case by the noted book artist Sjoerd Hofstra, plus a copy of Madonna 66. The book was widely praised by The New York Times, New York Magazine, Elle, Harper’s Bazaar, Vanity Fair and other newspapers and magazines. Corman signed the copy being sold. 

In the photos, Madonna (full name, Madonna Ciccone) is dressed in full Material Girl regalia, a look that launched a fashion revolution among young women of the time: white lace leggings under torn jeans, jean jacket with graffiti on the back and the sleeves cut off, and rubber bangles (or friendship bracelets). She sports bright red lipstick and a fake mole on the side of her face.

The 66 images were taken as test shots for a movie that Corman’s mother, a casting director, was screen-testing actors for but never got made. She saw in the budding star potential, and she urged her son to photograph her. “I knew this was somebody special right away,” Corman said of their first meeting, which took place in Madonna’s apartment on East 4th Street in Greenwich Village.

He remembered, “She was funny in the most beguiling way. As soon as I walked up, she served me espresso and bubblegum on a silver plate and tray.” Over a period of months and for several sittings, Corman photographed his subject, usually at Madonna’s brother’s house in Manhattan. The end result is the trove of 66 Polaroids Corman used for his book and which is now for sale.

Corman had previously worked for legendary photographer Richard Avedon (Am., 1923-2004), but observed that even with all of his experience around the celebrities who would parade in and out of Avedon’s studio, the Madonna spark was special. “When you look at somebody through a camera you either see behind somebody’s eyes or you don’t,” he said. “With her it was, ‘wow’.”

Corman said there is a looseness to the Madonna Polaroids that would be difficult to orchestrate today. “Now, we’d have 20 bodyguards and 30 assistants,” he said. “They’d have to cordon off the street. Beyoncé, Rihanna, Nicki Minaj - people like that, who I’d love to spend time with - it would be a much different experience nowadays. But Madonna was accessible. And it was raw.” 

Also for sale through Manhattan Rare Books is a set of three silver gelatin prints of photographs Corman took of the late boxing legend Muhammad Ali. It is the only set in which all three of the 11 inch by 14 inch prints is signed by Ali, in silver marker on the front of the image. Each image is also signed by Corman on the verso and marked (“1 of 1”). The set is priced to sell at $22,500.

Two autobiography books about the life Richard Avedon, Richard Corman’s mentor, are also for sale. One is a signed limited first edition copy (#44 of only 250 copies signed by Avedon), with a special engraver’s proof of his iconic image of the late Marilyn Monroe laid-in. The book, which is lavishly illustrated with 285 of Avedon’s most celebrated photographs, is for sale at $4,900.

The other book, titled Richard Avedon, An Autobiography, with: Evidence, 1944-1994, is a special limited edition boxed set, with two original hand-stamped engraver’s proofs. Although the limitation states 250 copies, only about 100 were actually produced. Signed and numbered in the box by Avedon, and chronicling his career over a 50-year span, the book is for sale at $6,500.

Manhattan Rare Books specializes in outstanding and rare books in fine condition. The firm only offers books that have been carefully selected to meet its stringent standards of high quality and importance. Anyone interested in discussing their collecting interests is encouraged to visit the gallery (hours by appointment); call (212) 326-8907; or, visit www.manhattanrarebooks.com

Image: Up on the roof and soon-to-be on top of the pop culture world, little does Madonna know in this devil-may-care shot the riches and fame that await her. Courtesy of Manhattan Rare Books. 

Lot 86, W.B. Olivia Shakespear letters copy.jpg18 August 2017—The collection of one of Ireland’s most important families of the last century will be offered for sale at Sotheby’s in London on 27 September 2017. Illuminating the private world of the Yeats family, the auction will comprise literary material, paintings, drawings and the personal effects of artist John Butler Yeats and his four children: poet W.B, embroidery designer Lily, printing press pioneer Lolly, and artist Jack. 

The sale will not only cast new light on the artistic development of these important figures, but also reveal a little of what life was like inside the Yeats family home. Alongside significant paintings, letters and drawings are unseen family sketch books, a family scrapbook, illustrated ‘scribbling’ diaries, photographs, hand-decorated furniture, Jack’s model boats, personalised silver, a top hat, a hand-painted trunk, and the family dining table.

With over 220 lots in total, estimates in the sale start at £80-120 (€100-150) for W.B.’s retractable telescope, and go up to £250,000-350,000 (€281,000-394,000) for the star lot: over 130 letters between W.B. and his life-long friend and first lover, Olivia Shakespear. 

Highlights from the collection will be unveiled for the first time in a public exhibition at the Royal Hibernian Academy in Dublin from 14-16 September, ahead of an exhibition in London from 22-26 September (please see further details in notes to editors). The majority of artworks in the collection have not been seen in public for over 30 years, and the personal effects have never been exhibited before. 

The collection has been cared for by the descendants of W.B. Yeats in the family home near Dublin for over 75 years. For three generations, the family has provided a huge wealth of material to the Irish nation, including last year’s donation to the National Library of Ireland of W.B. Yeats’s Nobel Prize medal, valued at €1.5 million. 

Ahead of Sotheby’s sale, Ireland’s national institutions were given the opportunity to acquire any of the items in the collection. Consequently, the National Library has made private purchases of a number of items, including correspondence between W.B. Yeats and James Joyce, the ‘Dream Diary’ of W.B. Yeats’s wife George, and the Yeats family library. The Art & Industrial Division of the National Museum of Ireland, following inspections of the Yeats Collection in March and April 2017 also acquired seven works (including a walnut reading/writing table owned and used by WB Yeats, WB Yeats’ home-made series of ‘occult’ artefacts, his series of Japanese Noh theatre masks and a silver box containing 8 coins, inscribed SAORSTÁT ÉIREANN. PRESENTED BY THE MINISTER FOR FINANCE TO W.B. YEATS ESQ. A MEMBER OF THE ADVISORY COMMITTEE ON DESIGNS FOR THE COINAGE, 1928.) for the national collection. The acquisitions by both institutions were made possible by the generous financial support of the Department of Culture, Heritage and the Gaeltacht.

Additional works from the Yeats family collection will be offered in Ireland by Fonsie Mealy Auctioneers, in November and December, at Castlecomer and Dublin. 

A spokesman for the family said: “Our family has enjoyed these items for many years. We are delighted that they will now be exhibited and available for everyone to see in Dublin and in London and for collectors to have the opportunity to acquire their own piece of Irish history.”

Charlie Minter, Head of Irish Art at Sotheby’s, said: “This is an intimate, personal collection of many never-before-seen works that shed light on the fabled Yeats family, their influence and personal connections. All the family are represented in this sale. There is a particularly impressive group of works by John, too often the forgotten father of the Yeats family. His work appears rarely at auction; this is our chance to revaluate his pictures and appreciate the great intimacy of his sketches.”

Sale Highlights

W.B.’s Letters to his life-long friend and first lover, Olivia Shakespear

This collection of over 130 handwritten letters spanning more than 40 years, from 1894 to 1936, is of the highest importance to literary history and of exceptional rarity on the open market (est. £250,000-350,000 / €281,000-394,000). Olivia Shakespear was Yeats’s first lover and the subject of early love poems, but over the decades their erotic entanglement transformed into one of Yeats’s most important and stable friendships. Following her death Yeats commented that “For more than forty years she has been the centre of my life in London”. She was a significant cultural figure in her own right and shared many of Yeats’s intellectual interests; she also introduced Yeats to Ezra Pound and to George Hyde-Lees, who became Yeats’s wife. In this extraordinary series of letters - totalling some 350 pages - Yeats sends her drafts of poems, gives advice on her novels, writes of his work, life, and reading, and describes the changes in Irish politics and society from before Independence through to the 1930s. 

The sale also includes W.B.’s writing bureau, on which he would have written many of these letters to Olivia (est. £20,000-30,000 / €22,500-33,800). It was used regularly for his correspondence in later years, a period during which he both wrote some of his most memorable verse, and was newly engaged in Irish political affairs. 

W.B. was, like the rest of the family, also a trained artist. The sale includes both an early sketchbook (which also contains very early poetic drafts) and two pastels of coole, the estate of Lady Gregory which Yeats described as ‘the most beautiful place in the world’ (est. £7,000-10,000 / € 7,900-11,300 and £8,000-12,000 / €9,000-13,500).

John Butler Yeats’ Sketchbooks and Final Self-Portrait

The sale will include the largest ever offering of works by John B. Yeats. He is best known for his drawings, of which over 85 are included in the sale along with 11 sketchbooks, depicting his family, the Irish countryside and celebrated contemporaries and friends, such as John O’Leary, Hugh Lane, Sarah Purser and Mary Walker (Máire NicShiubhlaigh). The paintings include his important final self-portrait, commissioned by the New York lawyer, collector and patron of the arts, John Quinn in 1911 (est. £30,000-50,000 / €33,800-56,500).

This self-portrait became somewhat of an obsession for the artist. Though work on the picture began in 1911, it would occupy Yeats for the rest of his life, until his death in 1922. “It fills my life. I have never an idle moment or idle thought. It is a long revel, just as satisfying to me as Gibbon’s Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, and I think I have been at it almost as many years.” - John Butler Yeats

Works by Jack Butler Yeats 

The Runaway Horseis the most valuable of the 35 artworks by Jack Yeats in the sale (est. £150,000-250,000 / €169,000-281,000). Painted in 1954, and one of his final works, the painting depicts a golden-haired child playing. Towards the end of his career, the theme of memory in his work became more enhanced - here the intoxicating impact of a youthful memory is conveyed not only though the artist’s choice of subject but also in the exuberant way in which he paints it.

The Sunset Belongs to You (1951), showing a dramatic encounter betweentwo anonymous figures, embodies a key theme in Yeats’s later work (est. £100,000-150,000 / €113,000-169,000). Transient meetings between travellers on the road fulfil an existential idea explored in the artist’s own novels and plays, and most notably in the plays of his friend, Samuel Beckett. The theatrical poses of the figures, with their bodies silhouetted against an expanse of sky, together with a dynamic application of paint, are evident of Yeats’s keen understanding of drama.

The extraordinary range of material in the sale produced by Jack encompasses original sets of broadside drawings, printed by Lolly and Lily’s Cuala Press, led by a group of four ink drawings (est. £15,000-20,000 / €16,900-22,500); his childhood sketchbook, aged 12, comprising numerous delightful drawings in pencil and pastel (est. £10,000-15,000 / €11,300-16,900); three of the artist’s scribbling diaries for the years 1888 and 1889, when he was a teenager during his second year in London, containing entries of great colour and detail recoding Jack’s new London life (each £8,000-12,000 / €9,000-13,500); a collection of early sketches and illustrationsdating largely from the time when he was beginning to make a career for himself as a contributor to various publications (est. £7,000-10,000 / €7,900-11,300).

Ahead of the publication of the catalogue, here is a glimpse of what to expect from the exhibition and sale, for items at all price points:

Items estimated at £500 and under

• Jack’s collapsible silk top hat (est. £500-700 / €600-800)

• A present to W.B. from his future wife, George: a silver box inscribed ‘Willy from George / July 1915’ (est. £100-120 / €150-150)

• John’s silver ring, engraved inside with his name (est. £400-600 / €450-700).

• Jack’s artist’s palette (est. £200-300 / €250-350)

• Photographs of W.B.’s greatest muse and love, Maud Gonne. He unsuccessfully asked her to marry him multiple times. She was the inspiration for more than eighty poems (est. £800-1,200 / €900-1,350).

Items estimated at £1,000 and under

• Jack’s collection of nine model boats or hulls (est. £1,000-1,500 / €1,150-1,700)

• W.B.’s rosewood monogrammed brushes (est. £800-1,200 / €900-1,350)

• A large pair of brass spiral twist altar-sticks, that stood before the great fireplace at W.B.’s castle in Galway, Thoor Ballylee (est. £800-1,200 / €900-1,350)

• A handmade boat by the Poet Laureate John Masefield, given to W.B. and his wife George (est. £700-900 / €800-1,050) 

• A portrait by W.B.’s muse and sometime lover Maud Gonne of her daughter Iseult (est. £2,000-3,000 / € 2,250-3,400)

Items estimated at £3,000 and under

• W.B.’s chess set, Canton, late 19th century (est. £2,500-3,500 / €2,850-3,950)

• The Yeats family dining table, acquired by W.B. with the money awarded to him from winning the Nobel Prize in 1923 (est. £1,500-2,500 / €1,700-2,850).

• W.B.’s metal deed box, painted “W.B. Yeats” on side (est. £2,000-3,000 / €2,250-3,400)

• A textile by Lily illustrating W.B.’s poem The Lake Isle of Innisfree (est. £1,500-2,500 / €1,700-2,850).

• Three embroideries by Lily Yeats (est. £3,000-5,000 / €3,400-5,700)

• Jack’s artist’s wooden box for pencils, decorated by Jack with a pirate theme, including a skull and crossbones together with the artist’s monogram (est. £3,000-5,000 / €3,400-5,700) 

• W.B.’s desk chair (est. £3,000-5,000 / €3,400-5,700)

• A sketch portrait of Jack, drawn by John in 1889 (est. £3,000-5,000 / €3,400-5,700)

• A self-portrait sketch by John, 1921 (est. £3,000-5,000 / €3,400-5,700)

Items estimated at £5,000 and under

• The Yeats Family Scrapbook, comprising 47 childhood drawings by William, Jack, Lily and Lolly. All the Yeats children had drawn, sketched, and painted since they were old enough to carry a brush. Alongside portraits of each other, is what can be considered Jack’s very first self-portrait aged eight, depicting him in a farmer’s field (est. £4,000-6,000 / €4,500-6,800)

• Eight photograph albums of the Yeats family, mostly assembled and captioned by Lily or Lolly Yeats (est. £5,000-7,000 / €5,700-7,900)

• A group sketches of family life by John, including pictures of W.B. as a baby and child, the children being read a story by their mother Susan (est. £5,000-7,000 / €5,700-7,900)

Image: William Butler Yeats. Highly important series of 133 autograph letters signed to his close friend and early lover Olivia Shakespear (£250,000-350,000).

Ukranian postcards - The children's book illustration.jpg“Two bears, two bears, thrashed the peas,

  Two roosters, two roosters took it to the mill,

  And the sparrow, a fine fellow, played the fiddle.”

Where had he seen them before?  Among the collection of a thousand books Emil Allakhverdov acquired at auction was a little gem - a children’s book titled “Fun World, A Folk Song,” The drawings, illustrating a song in the book, “Two Bears, Two Bears,” looked very familiar. And then, it dawned on him. 

Of the seven drawings in the children’s book, five were used as templates for a series of Ukrainian propaganda postcards entitled “Fun Work, A Folk Song in a New Way,” which Emil had acquired some time ago.  When Emil compared the postcard illustration to those in the children’s book, the resemblance was quite startling!  

The postcards seemingly cheerful illustrations for children were actually powerful anti-Soviet and Anti-Nazi political cartoons printed shortly after the defeat of Nazi Germany in 1945 - a time when Ukrainian nationalists were equally intent on seeing the demise of the Soviet regime as well.  Their origin had been unknown to Emil.  Here was a piece of the puzzle. 

At the upcoming Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Show, Emil will be making this historically important set of Ukrainian language propaganda postcards available to the public.  The cover postcard in the set shows two tattered bears, symbolizing Russia and Germany, carrying Bolshevism and Nazism to the trash heap of history. These delicate, exquisitely drawn illustrations, printed on the front side of the postcards, carry a heavy message of moral resistance.

It was thought that the artist of these propaganda postcards was likely Sudomora, the same illustrator of the small children’s book, although it was uncertain.  A Ukrainian born in 1889, Sudomora was a celebrated illustrator, having studied at the Kiev Art School.    He worked with Kiev publishers on a wide variety of books and magazines, including “Oktober” and the Soviet youth organization’s “Pioneer” magazine. 

He moved to Lviv, but after the city was captured by the Soviet army, continued his commercial artistic work in Kharkov.  He was arrested in 1949 on charges of anti-Soviet activities and sentenced to 25 years in prison.  He was granted amnesty in 1955 and returned to Kiev where he lived with his wife and children until his death in 1965.

The unique and beautifully illustrated set of postcards may have been inspired by a charming children’s book, but the underlying message is a serious call to resistance.  The Ukraine’s liberation in 1945 by the Russian army brought no relief for the hard-pressed Ukrainians.  The long struggle for independence, not yet achieved today. The postcards, marrying art and history, document a pivotal time in Ukrainian 20th century experience. 

Image: The children’s book illustration on the left and a vivid example on the right of how the drawing was altered for propaganda purposes.  The Russian bear (right), identified by the hammer-and-sickle armband, is threshing victim nations like the Ukraine, Bulgaria, Lithuania, among others.  The Anti-Nazi, Anti Soviet Ukrainian postcard collection will be available at the upcoming Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair, September 8-10 at the Brooklyn Expo Center in Greenpoint.

PBA Galleries saw strong prices realized in their August 10th sale of Americana - Travel & Exploration - World History - Cartography. A number of lots sold for well over the presale high estimate and many lots saw spirited bidding, including an autograph letter by the first African-American Harvard graduate, early 20th century photographs of Hangzhou, China, and Captain F. Brinkley’s ten volume set of Japan: Described and Illustrated by the Japanese; Written by Eminent Japanese Authorities and Scholars.

A fascinating and rare album with 46 gelatin silver photographs of Hangzhou, China sold for $2,400, three times the presale high estimate. The prints depict various locales around the area in the early 20th century. Hangzhou, formerly Romanized as Hangchow, is the capital and most populous city of the Zhejiang Province in eastern China. Each view has an accompanying tissue guard and a paragraph of detailed description both in Chinese and English.

Another lot about the mysterious East, a limited Edition de Luxe of Captain F. Brinkley’s ten volumes on Japan sold for $3,300, more than four times the presale high estimate. Dating from the late 19th century the set is illustrated with classic hand-colored albumen photographs of various Japanese views, including tea ceremonies, bridges, gardens cherry blossoms, flower and produce vendors, temples and the Bronze Buddha at Kamakura. Also pictured is Mt. Fuji, theatre scenes, city and rural life, rickshaws, fishermaidens, and women in traditional dress.

A WWII French map of Germany, almost certainly a battlefront map, sold for $1,560, triple its presale estimate. The map was possibly used by U.S. Intelligence officers watching Soviet movements in German-held territory as there are red pencil writings indicating Soviet Russian troop movements in Germany and Czechoslovakia. Also appearing are names of Russian commanders and the date May 6 [1945], which is the day the Soviet battle for Prague began, just before the Nazi German capitulation.

Richard T. Greener was the first African-American graduate of Harvard and the first black faculty member at the University of South Carolina. An autograph letter signed by him on hotel stationery, written while he furiously campaigned among black voters in Ohio for the Republican presidential candidate James G. Blaine, sold for $1,440. Greener was considered an African-American visionary and was well-regarded by Republican Party managers whom he served as an orator of black audiences during the campaign. Despite his work, Blaine lost the election to Grover Cleveland.

Other lots doing well in the sale were a rare first edition of the first Peter Parley book, selling for $6,000, a respectable price despite lacking one leaf and being rebound in modern morocco & cloth; an early copy of the subscriber’s edition of Anson’s famous voyage around the world, selling for $3,600; the Pioneers Edition of The World in the Air: The Story of Flying in Pictures, signed by important figures in aviation history and selling for $3,300; the striking clipper ship sailing card Wild Rover! with iconic image representing sail versus steam selling for $1,800; and a Custer fight survivor's copy of Longstreet’s Civil War memoir From Manassas to Appomattox, selling for $1,680, well over the presale estimate.

PBA Galleries holds sales of fine, rare and collectible books every two weeks.  For more information regarding upcoming sales, consignments, or auction results, please contact PBA Galleries at (415) 989-2665 or pba@pbagalleries.com.

DALLAS, Texas (Aug. 15, 2017) - Singer/songwriter Graham Nash’s collection of Underground Comix art realized more than $1.1 million to lead Heritage Auctions’ summer Vintage Comics & Comic Art Auction in Dallas. The $6.3 million auction presented fresh-to-market art and key books to more than 2,800 bidders in person and via HALive!. 

“The market for original comic art continues to show its strength - especially for works by Robert Crumb,” said Ed Jaster, Senior Vice President Heritage Auctions. “This is the second auction in a row in which we achieved six-figure selling prices of Robert Crumb’s art for our clients.”

The highlight of Nash’s collection was art by Crumb. The artist’s 1967 Original Cover Art for ZAP Comix #1 soared to $525,800 (the cover was never was used for the publication and was thought lost for years). The People's Comics Complete Four-Page Story Original Art sold for $203,150. Even Crumb’s later works bested high estimates as Weirdo #22 Complete 4-Page Story Original Art from 1988 sold for $131,450 and Crumb’s 1991 ID #2 Original Cover Art ended at $101,575, to round out the collection’s top six-figure lots.

Additional examples of Crumb’s art continued to beat expectations as Your Hytone Comics #nn Complete 9-Page Story "Pete the Plumber" Original Art sold for $89,625 and Mr. Natural #2 Complete 6-Page Story Original Art hammered for $77,675.

Key Comics Command Five Figures

An important private collection from Mister Magik Woo offered several key books in outstanding condition: The Amazing Spider-Man #14 (Marvel, 1964) CBCS NM/MT 9.8 sold for $71,700 and The Amazing Spider-Man #1, with a verified Stan Lee signature (Marvel, 1963) CBCS VF/NM 9.0, ended at $65,725.

A copy of Detective Comics #35 (DC, 1940) CGC VG+ 4.5, shot to $56,165 and 17 bidders competed to own All Star Comics #8 (DC, 1942), CGC VG 4.0 - featuring Wonder Woman's first appearance and origin - and pushed the auction price to $53,775. A coveted copy of Amazing Fantasy #15 (Marvel, 1962), CGC VG/FN 5.0, sold for $38,240. 

Additional highlights include, but are not limited to:

·         From the Eric Sack Collection, Robert Crumb Snoid Comics One-Shot Complete Nine-Page Story Original Art (Kitchen Sink Press, 1980): realized $74,687 

·         Steve Ditko’s Original Art from Strange Tales #141 Story Page 8 featuring Doctor Strange (Marvel, 1966): realized $65,725

·         Steve Ditko’s Original Art from Amazing Spider-Man #22 Story Page 17 Original Art (Marvel, 1965): realized $52,580

·         Barry Windsor-Smith’s Original Cover for Marvel Comics Presents #83 featuring Wolverine/Weapon X (Marvel, 1991): realized $52,580

Consignments are now welcomed for Heritage Auction’s Nov. 16-17 Comics Auction in Beverly Hills. To consign and to learn more about the upcoming auction, please visit the Comics Auction Portal on HA.com.

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

3384-09.jpgThe August 12, 2017 sale at National Book Auctions (NBA) featured a broad range of rare and collectible books and ephemera.

Figuring prominently were titles relating to travel, exploration, and opening of the American West as well as vellum-bound books dating back to the early 17th century. Other standout offerings were a portfolio of folding geological surveys of England and Wales by Sir Roderick Impey Murchison ($1,812) and Cornelius Gurlitt's profusely illustrated architectural study "Die Baukunst Konstantinopels" ($1,312).

Image: From Sir Roderick Impey Murchison geological survey

Further complementary material will be featured in NBA's upcoming sales throughout the year. For more information about bidding or consigning, email mail@nationalbookauctions.com or call 607-269-0101.

BOW TIES copy.jpgPHILADELPHIA, PA - On September 18, Freeman’s will present at auction works from the Patricia and John Roche Collection, including 100 paintings, prints and watercolors from highly regarded European and American artists. Proceeds from the sale of the collection will go to fund the Patricia Kelly Roche Scholarship at St. John’s University in New York. Mrs. Roche was herself the beneficiary of a scholarship to St. John’s, awarded by the Catholic Diocese of Brooklyn. She was the first of her family to go to college, an opportunity that would not have been possible without the financial assistance her scholarship provided. 

Patricia and John Roche were married just out of college in 1957. After graduating from Harvard Law School, Mr. Roche began his legal career at the firm of Shearman & Sterling in New York in 1963. He became a partner in 1971, specializing in banking law. In 1989, Mr. Roche left Shearman & Sterling to become the chief legal officer of Citicorp and Citibank. He retired in 2000 as the co-general counsel of Citigroup. 

Mrs. Roche received a Master’s degree in English from New York University. It was while raising their two children, Janet and Keith, and reading to them at the family’s home in Brooklyn Heights, that Mrs. Roche discovered she wanted to tell stories of her own. She took courses in art and writing children’s books at the New School and, combining her interest in drawing and painting, began to write and illustrate stories for children, many of which were inspired by her deep love for her own son and daughter. Mrs. Roche found a receptive editor at Dial Press in New York, and began her career as an author. She has since published seven books.

Later, as her interest turned to landscape painting in watercolors, the couple began collecting watercolors and prints. On their trips to London for vacation or for Mr. Roche’s business, Mrs. Roche visited art galleries and fell in love with the work of artists of the 19th century, the “golden age” of English watercolors. 

Mr. Roche was a willing partner in acquiring what was to become a large and varied collection of artists such as William Lionel Wyllie, Charles Bentley and William Cornwallis Harris. Her interest was also sparked by contemporary artists in England, Scotland and the United States. Soon, their collection expanded to include works by American painter and printmaker, Wayne Thiebaud and, in a nod to Mrs. Roche’s background in children’s book, the drawings of Maurice Sendak. 

Highlights of the collection include a group of six works on paper by Wayne Thiebaud. Two, ‘Bow Ties’ and ‘Dark Cake’, are prints from published editions. Executed in lithography, the first is a quintessential Thiebaud composition, comprised of rows of brightly patterned subjects. The medium showcases Thiebaud’s skill as a draftsman, and presents his delight in color and repetition, a style and subject that echoes fellow pop artist, Andy Warhol. Packed tightly together and extending beyond the picture plane, each tie is offered up like so many bespoke cupcakes or desserts for our delectation. ‘Dark Cake’ is another joyful exercise for the artist. This time, however, he executes the print in a lush, richly layered woodcut process which showcases the artist’s hand and the three dimensionality of the cake. Here, one of the oldest modes of printmaking is manipulated in a way that reveals Thiebaud’s delight in process as well as subject.

In his forward to a 2013 exhibition featuring his hand-colored prints, Thiebaud writes, “When is a work finished? And how does that differ from work that feels complete?” The four additional works from the Roche collection are examples of the artist’s quest to answer these questions. Three of the four are unique works executed in watercolor, gouache and other media over existing printed matrices. Each work represents the artist’s exploration of an image after and beyond a ‘finished’ print. In one, an etching of a songbird momentarily poised on a perch, the background has been richly colored with pastels and gouache focusing our attention on the bird itself. In another, extensive watercolor additions bring to life the interplay of light and sky upon a sunny California hillside. And finally, in what may well be the jewel of the collection, a jar of brightly candy sticks pops off the paper in a hand-colored triumph, ‘Glassed Candy.’

After decades of collecting, Mr. and Mrs. Roche have decided to part with their lovingly curated collection and, with the proceeds, fund a scholarship in Mrs. Roche’s name, as it was her artistic talent that was the guiding force behind the selection of many of the individual works.

As with the recent Kaplan Collection in April, and the Forbes and Brewster Collections in December of 2016, Freeman’s understands the art and passion of collecting, and has long held that keeping a collection together and offering it as a whole allows the vision of the collector to shine through. Freeman’s is honored to steward the Patricia and John Roche Collection to auction this fall.

Image: WAYNE THIEBAUD (AMERICAN, B. 1920), “BOW TIES”, Color lithograph on wove paper, $20,000-30,000.

hihi.jpgNew York - Christie’s announces Photographs from The Museum of Modern Art, a selection of over 400 photographs to be sold at Christie’s New York starting with four highlights in the October 10th Photographs Day Sale. A subsequent series of online auctions will be held in October, concurrently with the live Day Sale, and in December 2017, as well as January and April 2018. The online sales are carefully curated to encompass several important themes and genres of the medium, including Pictorialism into Modernism, Women in Photography, and several sales on individual photographers will be featured. 

The works offered include iconic photographs by many of the most well-known names from the early 20th century to the post-war period, including Alfred Stieglitz, Edward Steichen, Man Ray, Edward Weston, Henri Cartier-Bresson, and Walker Evans, to name a few. The selection is led by two unique Rayograph works by Man Ray from 1923 and 1928, to be offered in the live auction in New York on October 10. All proceeds from the sales will go into an acquisitions fund for the Museum’s Department of Photography.

Highlights will be previewed during a multi-city tour, with exhibitions in San Francisco, Los Angeles and New York starting in September 2017. Cataloguing and complete details of the sales will be available on Christies.com in September 2017.

Darius Himes, International Head of Photographs, Christie’s, remarks: “Christie’s is honored to offer for sale a selection of photographs from The Museum of Modern Art, New York. In 1940, the Museum became the first in the country to form a Department of Photography. Many of the artists represented in this series of live and online auctions will be deeply familiar to any student of photography, and are beloved on an international scale. These auctions represent a unique opportunity to support the Museum and own a piece of photographic history.”

Tour Dates and Locations:

Los Angeles | Highlights Exhibition | September 5-9

San Francisco | Highlights Exhibition | September 19-23

New York | Auction Preview | October 5-9

Upcoming Auctions:

October 5-11/12, 2017

MoMA: Pictorialism into Modernism

MoMA: Henri Cartier-Bresson

December 2017

MoMA: Women in Photography

January 2018

MoMA: Garry Winogrand

MoMA: Bill Brandt

April 2018

MoMA: Walker Evans

MoMA: Tracing Photography's History

Image: MAN RAY (1890-1976), Rayograph, 1928. Image/ sheet: 15 1/2 x 11 3/4 in. (39.2 x 29.8 cm.) Estimate: $150,000-250,000.

2012-03.jpgThe July 29, 2017 sale at National Book Auctions (NBA) featured a broad range of rare and collectible books and ephemera.

Figuring prominently were titles relating to the opening of the American West as well as vellum-bound books dating back to the early 17th century. Other standout offerings included a first Canadian edition of Mark Twain's "Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" ($2,375) and a first edition of Paul Allen's "History of the Expedition under the Command of Captains Lewis and Clark" ($1,250).

Noteworthy ephemera lots included a c. 1780 map of ancient Germany by De Vaugondy and Groux; a c. 1936 photogravure print of Dorothea Lange's iconic image "Migrant Mother;" and an extensive archive of manuscript records from the Ilion Bank that incorporated several documents signed by Eliphalet Remington, founder of both the bank and of the legendary Remington Arms Company.

Further complementary material will be featured in NBA's upcoming sale on August 12, 2017. NBA's cataloged live sales take place in the Galleries at Worth Asset Brokerage in Freeville, New York (just six miles north of Cornell University) and are simulcast to a global bidding audience via Invaluable. NBA's sister company, Worth Auctions, will be holding a sale the following morning that will include a 1965 Buick coupe, an important Bauhaus porcelain dinner service, the contents of two private binderies, and much more. For more information about bidding or consigning, email mail@nationalbookauctions.com or call 607-269-0101.signing, mail@nationalbookauctions.com or call 607-269-0101.

The Center for Book Arts, the nation’s first institution dedicated to teaching and promoting the art of the book and related arts, is pleased to announce that it is the recipient of a New York City Cultural Tourism Grant, presented on August 9, 2017 by Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer. The grant program promotes culture and the arts across all of New York City’s five boroughs by supporting the promotion of cultural events and exhibits and increasing visitor awareness of each borough’s cultural offerings.

Stephen Bury, Board Chair of the Center for Book Arts and Chief Librarian at the Frick Reference Library, remarked that “we are especially pleased to see these funds awarded to the Center as a way to encourage New Yorkers to re-discover one of this city’s cultural jewels-the only organization offering instruction and exhibitions in book art is a short walk from Penn Station and the Flatiron building. This is good news for culturally curious New Yorkers and all lovers of the book.”

“Funds from the Cultural Tourism Grant are vital to marketing book art and the Center to New Yorkers,” said Alexander Campos, Executive Director & Curator of the Center. He added, “On our busy New York City block, our visitors, who are amazed by our exhibitions and antique equipment, tell us that our street banner convinced them stop by. Funds from this award will replace the banner and pay for a new stanchion and for printing program inserts.”

Manhattan Borough President Gale Brewer presented a check for $2,000 to Mr Bury, Mr Campos, and other members of the Center’s board on August 9. Ms Brewer thanked the Center for its contributions to New York’s cultural life.

“Manhattan’s greatest wealth is its array of cultural gems, and not just our massive institutions known all over the world but our neighborhood museums, studios, and cultural institutions that both preserve old traditions and incubate innovative new works and artists,” said Manhattan Borough President Gale A. Brewer. “The Center for Book Arts does exactly this important work. I know that exposing visitors to the true diversity of experiences in our borough’s neighborhoods increases tourism, enhances local neighborhoods and businesses, and reveals the true breadth of what our city has to offer the world.”

Fred Dixon, President and CEO of the NYC & Company Foundation added that, “Supporting new cultural opportunities keeps New York City exciting and vital. Encouraging cultural tourism increases visitor spending and job creation essential to the local economy.”

About the Center for Book Arts

The Center for Book Arts is dedicated to exploring and cultivating contemporary aesthetic interpretations of the book as an art object, while preserving the traditional practices of the art of the book. The Center seeks to facilitate communication between the book arts community and the larger spheres of contemporary art and literature through exhibitions, classes, public programming, literary presentations, opportunities for artists and writers, publications, and collecting. Founded in 1974 and still located in Manhattan, it was the first not-for-profit organization of its kind in the nation, and has since become a model for others around the world. Visit our website for up-to-date details on all events and programs:  www.centerforbookarts.org

About New York City Cultural Tourism Development Grants

New York City Cultural Tourism Development Grants are privately funded by donations to the NYC & Company Foundation, the mission of which is to support tourism in all five boroughs by promoting local cultural events and institutions. The grant program is administered by the Borough President’s Office, and cultural groups are invited to apply for funding annually through the Borough President’s online grant portal. Recipients are selected by the Borough President based on the merit of the program.

 

Unknown-1 copy.jpgThe oldest, continually running regional Antiquarian Book Fair in the U.S. takes place in downtown Rochester, N.Y. at the Main Street Armory on Saturday, September 9, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.

            Presented by the Rochester Area Booksellers Association (RABA) and RIT Press, annually the Fair attracts an increasing number of visitors and exhibitors. Currently, nearly 50 dealers from across the nation and Canada will bring rare antiquarian titles along with good secondhand books of wide subject breadth and reader interest, including scholarly texts. Additionally, exhibitors will feature prints, maps, photographica and collectible ephemera embracing equally diverse subject categories.

            The Book Fair also features readings and book signings by local authors. And, for the second time, displays by several special collections libraries will be presented. For six hours, the Armory reverberates with a lively, festive atmosphere populated by those who appreciate the aesthetic and intellectual dimensions of the book.

            The Fair’s venue is the castle-like turn-of-the-century Armory. Spacious (35,000 square feet) and well-lit, the building’s assembly room - originally used as a drill floor - comfortably accommodates the casual reader as much as the fussiest and most demanding collector.

            The Rochester Antiquarian Book Fair is co-sponsored by the 10-member Rochester Area Booksellers Association and RIT Press. The scholarly book publishing enterprise of the Rochester Institute of Technology, RIT Press will feature selections from their impressive catalogue of books on typography, printing and the history of the book.

            The Rochester Antiquarian Book Fair is held at the Main Street Armory, 900 East Main St., Rochester, N.Y. from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission is $5, and is free to students who present a current student ID. Coupons offering a $2 discount on admission are available at area libraries, bookshops and cafes.

            This year advance admission tickets are available online through RABA’s website: (www.rochesterbooksellers.com) . And discount tickets for couples and families are available.

            For more information, visit www.rochesterbooksellers.com or call Jonathan Smalter (of Yesterday’s Muse Books) at 585-265-9295.

Image: A customer peruses one exhibitor’s inventory at last year’s Rochester (N.Y.) Antiquarian Book Fair. (Photo by A. Sue Weisler)

image002.jpgIOLA, WI - Featuring more than 300 outstanding objects gathered from private and public collections, Harry Potter - The Unofficial Guide to The Collectibles of Our Favorite Wizard provides the first comprehensive survey of the rich art, books, and memorabilia created during the last 20 years of Pottermania. First-edition copies of J.K. Rowling’s epic now command nearly $50,000 and special items created for collectors are rising in value every day. The esoteric knowledge, visual symbols, and moral teachings revealed in Rowling’s writings have inspired an entire generation of readers young and old and have formed an important facet of American popular culture.

In this beautifully illustrated and lavishly designed book, author Eric Bradley introduces readers to the broad world of these collectibles and explores the fandom surrounding the mystique behind the world’s boy-wizard. From the Holy Grail chair Rowling used to write her epic series, which sold for a spellbinding $394,000, to a $40,000 Potter-themed wedding and those who tattoo their bodies with symbolism from the books, this guide appeals to dedicated Harry Potter fans and the curious alike.

   “Twenty years on, the world of Harry Potter is expanding quickly, and with it comes the usual flurry of new films, books, plays, amusement parks, and more on the horizon. Each one will come with a blur of collectibles, posters, figurines, and limited-edition items (not to mention movie props!) available for collectors. In fact, the season for Harry Pottery never has been hotter. It’s easy to see why.

   Don’t worry if that phrase is new to you: Harry Pottery is the collecting genre that includes all things related to this wizarding world. Whereas rare items sell between $10,000 (a complete set of all seven UK Harry Potter titles) and $43,000 (a first edition, first printing of the first book, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone), values for mass produced Harry Potter collectibles are also on the rise...” —From the book’s introduction

Telling the story behind Harry Potter through its art and collectibles, Bradley examines how fans and the marketplace contribute to the enduring love behind these enigmatic characters and the books that launched a million imaginations.

Harry Potter - The Unofficial Guide to The Collectibles of Our Favorite Wizard opens the door to private collections and invites the reader to explore the compelling world of wizardry now coveted by collectors.

Eric Bradley is the author of several collectibles books, including the critically acclaimed Mantiques: A Manly Guide to Cool Stuff and Antique Trader Antiques & Collectibles, the No. 1 selling guide on the market. He has appeared in The Wall Street JournalGQFour Seasons Magazine and PARADE, among others. Bradley is the Public Relations Director at Heritage Auctions, ha.com, the world's largest collectibles auctioneer. He lives near Dallas with his wife and three children.

Harry Potter - The Unofficial Guide to the Wonders of Our Favorite Wizard

By Eric Bradley
8 x 8, hardcover, 208 pages, $22.99
250+ color photos
ISBN-13: 978-1-4402-4802-3
Krause Publications
www.krausebooks.com

Prints, rare first editions, and out-of-print books from the 17th-19th centuries headline StoryLTD’s Antiquarian Books and Prints online auction on 29-30 August. Estimates range from INR 15,000-20,000 to 16-18 lakhs for the 81 lots on offer. Replete with battle accounts and travels across India, Afghanistan, Burma and Sri Lanka, the books on auction cover themes including observations of local customs and architectural wonders, as well as lighter ones on cookery. Many feature lavish illustrations, and are presented in attractive leather binding with rich gilting and lettering. This is StoryLTD’s third auction in the category, with two highly successful auctions held in past years. The auction is preceded by viewings at Saffronart, Mumbai.

Auction Highlights

Screen Shot 2017-08-10 at 9.22.12 AM.pngScenery, Inhabitants, and Costumes of Afghaunistan , a book with detailed accounts and illustrations of individual battles, Afghan cities, local people and customs, geographic features, and indigenous soldiers, authored by James Rattray and published in 1848 by Hering & Remington. James Rattray was a lieutenant in the British Bengal Army, who recorded his experiences and produced sketches during the first Anglo-Afghan War (1839-1842). Published after the war, the text and illustrations are autobiographical and recount many of the positive aspects and pitfalls of an ultimately unsuccessful campaign. Featuring 29 coloured plates with a descriptive letterpress, it has a contemporary dark green half morocco binding.

Estimate: Rs 16-18 lakhs ($25,000-$28,125)

Select Views in India , authored by William Hodges and published in 1786 by J Edwards. Hodges was the first Englishman to document India. This is an excellent copy of his pioneering work on India’s architecture and landscape. It features 48 aquatint plates, and is beautifully presented in period calf leather and embellished with a Greek key scroll border. Hodges also served as an inspiration to Thomas Daniell, the illustrious English landscape painter who became known for his aquatints.

Estimate: Rs 16-18 lakhs ($25,000-$28,125)

Portraits of Princes and People of India , authored by Emily Eden and published in 1843 by Dickinson & Son. With 24 coloured lithographic plates depicting the lives of Indian rulers and their families, it is presented in an original contemporary half moroccan and cloth cover.

Estimate: Rs 11-14 lakhs ($17,190-$21,875)

Scenery and Reminiscences of Ceylon, authored by John Deschamps, Esq., and published in 1844 by by Ackermann & Co. With coloured lithographic plates, this is a significant and ambitious survey of mid-19th century Sri Lanka, where Deschamps spent nine years as an officer in the Royal Artillery. It is presented in a contemporary green cloth binding.

Estimate: Rs 4.5-5.5 lakhs ($7,035-$8,595)

Set of Two Highly Decorated Books: “Sakoontala, or The Lost Ring ” , and “Folk Tales of Bengal”.  Sakoontala , Kalidasa’s famous Sanskrit play, was translated into English by Monier Williams and published in 1855 by Stephen Austin. The book is bound in full calf, with decorated endpapers and gilt edges.  Folk Tales of Bengal by Lal Behari Dey was published in 1912 by Macmillan & Co., Limited. Each tale is beautifully illustrated in colour by Warwick Goble.

Estimate: Rs 50,000-60,000 ($785-$940)

Set of Two Early Indian Cookery Books:  Indian Domestic Economy and Receipt with Hindustanee Romanized Names  by R Riddell, published in 1871 by Thacker Spink & Co., comprises directions for both Western and Indian cookery, while also instructing the reader on more practical matters connected with household affairs of the time.  Culinary Jottings for Madras by Colonel Arthur Robert Kenney-Herbert “Wyven”, was published in 1883 by Higginbothams & Co. Colonel Wyvern’s book offers an intriguing look into Anglo-Indian cuisine, instructing readers on how to produce English and French food using locally available and imported ingredients, as well as managing and running a kitchen.

Estimate: Rs 30,000-50,000 ($470-$785)

Women Travellers in India (Set of Three Books)

This is a set of three fascinating accounts by women travellers who accompanied their husbands to India.  The Diary of a Civilian's Wife in India, 1877-1882,  by Mrs. Robert Moss King, published in 1884 by Richard Bentley & Sons, is a two-volume set with drawings made by her. In  Our Visit to Hindostan, Kashmir & Ladakh,  published in 1879 by W H Allen & Co., Mrs J C Murray Ayensley describes her impressions of the cities she travelled to, with brief mention of tea cultivation in Kulu, an opium factory in Ghazipore, Sikh festivals, camp life in Kashmir, and sheep as beasts of burden.  The Indian Alps and how We Crossed Them  was authored  by Nina Elizabeth Mazuchelli, the first Englishwoman to have travelled far into the eastern Himalayas. Published in 1875 by Dodd, Mead & Co., it is an early mountaineering classic of Himalayan travel, and one of the few early exploration books that was not primarily a hunting expedition.

Estimate: Rs 60,000-80,000 ($940-$1,250)

A Discoverie of the Sect of the Banians,  authored by Henry Lord and published in 1630 by F. Constable. The oldest book in this auction, it is one of the earliest accounts of Hinduism and Zoroastrianism by Europeans. The book is bound in a modern brown calf cover with marbled boards and a red morocco label.

Estimate: Rs 2.5-3 lakhs ($3,910-$4,690)

Views in Burman Empire  is a collection of ten plates by Captain James Kershaw and William Daniell that illustrates Prome, Rangoon, Melloon and Pagham-Mew. Published in 1831 by Smith, Elder & Co., each print is individually mounted and presented in a yellow cloth Solander box.

Estimate: Rs 11-14 lakhs ($17,190-$21,875)

Views in the Himalayan Mountains,  a set of four aquatints, was touted by Godrej & Rohatgi as “the finest aquatints of mountain scenery ever produced”, and was published in 1820 by Messrs. Rodwell and Martin.

Estimate: Rs 5-5.5 lakhs ($7,815-$8,595)

The Glorious Conquest of Seringapatam  is a striking triptych depicting Tipu Sultan’s magnificent but failed attempt at defending the fortress of Seringapatam from British troops. Each section of the triptych is a hand-tinted mezzotint by J. Vendramini (after Robert Ker Porter), made in 1802-03.

Estimate: Rs 7.5-8.5 lakhs ($11,720-$13,285)

About StoryLTD and Saffronart

Launched in 2013, StoryLTD is an e-commerce and auction service offered by Saffronart, India’s leading auction house. StoryLTD provides a unified and convenient shopping experience encompassing diverse categories. Our fixed price collections include prints, paintings, photography, design and jewellery, offered at accessible price points. We have held several successful auctions of modern and contemporary Indian art, antiquarian books and prints, ephemera on Indian art, folk and tribal art, and sports and film memorabilia.

Founded in 2000 by Minal and Dinesh Vazirani, Saffronart is a leading international auction house, and India’s most reputed, with over a hundred auctions to its credit. It is headquartered in Mumbai, with offices in New Delhi, London and New York. At the forefront of selling Indian art, we hold online and live auctions, exhibitions, and prime property sales throughout the year. Our focus is to bring transparency to the auction process, and provide easy access to bidders around the world.

Saffronart’s services go beyond auctions to include private sales, art storage, appraisals and valuations for our clients, and supporting the efforts of the Indian art world by holding fundraiser auctions. We have set several global benchmarks for online auctions, and were the subject of a case study at Harvard Business School in 2005.

Website:   storyltd.com 

Facebook:   @storyltd 

Instagram:   @storyltd

ITHACA, NY—Worth Auctions, located in Dryden, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog.   

This auction features a broad range of art and antiques from multiple estates and collections nationwide.

Leading off the sale is a 1965 Buick Wildcat. Consigned to us by the initial owner, this classic American sport coupe is in pleasing garaged condition with 59,000 original miles and plenty of deluxe options including power steering and brakes.          

Another exceptional lot is an important porcelain dinner service manufactured by KPM Berlin under the direction of Bauhaus designer Marguerite Friedlaender Wildenhain. This thirty-nine piece set was brought to the United States by a judge involved in the Nuremberg trials.

Also showcased in this auction will be the contents of two private binderies. Tools include an Altair laying press, four wooden finishing presses, a Duplo mini-collator, numerous leather carving and stamping tools, hand-marbled endpapers, and more.                      

Of interest to antique firearms collectors is a Colt Model 1849 cartridge revolver and a collection of powder horns and flasks.

Fine art offerings of note will include a monumental autumnal landscape by Walter King Stone, a Lincoln campaign lithograph by Currier & Ives, a suite of paintings by Miriam Ruchames, a large-scale Calder lithograph, an albumen photograph by William Henry Jackson, and an extensive collection of photogravures by prominent photographers dating from the 1920s to the 1970s.    

Other items of interest are a pre-1927 Martin ukelele, several sets of contemporary furniture, a colorful hanging textile from Colombia, nineteenth-century decorative glassware, vintage Bakelite bangles, Disney collectibles, NASA memorabilia, a large Coca-Cola sign, various wind-up toys, a squirrel cage, a marble headstone, early Wonder Woman comics, antique astronomy tools, a robot dial radio, historical firefighting equipment, and much more.

Further complementary material will be featured in future sessions in 2017. These cataloged live sales will take place in the Galleries at Worth Asset Brokerage in Freeville, New York and will be simulcast to a global bidding audience via Invaluable, LiveAuctioneers, and eBay Live.  

Worth Auctions is a public auction service specializing in estate work and collections.  The company conducts fully cataloged auctions with global bidding activity over three platforms. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of items, from pencils to airplanes. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-330-0358 or email mail@worthauctions.com.

 

ITHACA, NY—National Book Auctions, located in Ithaca, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog.  

This catalog features rare, antique and decorative books as well as select additions of ephemera. Travel and exploration figures prominently across the catalog, include titles relating to the opening of the American West.  A fine selection of important first editions will be offered, alongside special signed and limited editions.           

Antique and rare books in this catalog include numerous titles.  Among the earliest examples are the 1678 printing of la Fayette's "Memoires de Hollande," "Pontificale Romanum Clements VIII and Urbani VIII," published in 1683, and the 1641 printing of Sibbes' "The Returning Backslider."  Additional rare selections include a signed copy of Andy Warhol's "Philosophy of Andy Warhol," in the original dust jacket, an 1883 first printing of Twain's "Life on the Mississippi," and the decorative "Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant," produced in two volumes in 1885.                       

Several pleasing collections will also be showcased.  Highlighted is a sizable group of antique volumes relating to travel and exploration, featuring such examples as the 1881 first edition of Ellis' "On a Raft and through the Desert," produced in two volumes, and a variety of antique titles chronicling expansionism in Africa.  Early exploration in the American West is covered by scarce works such as Stevens' "Narrative and Final Report of the Explorations for a Route for a Pacific Railroad," printed in 1860 with folding maps, and Fremont's "Report of the Exploring Expedition to the Rocky Mountains in the Year 1842 & Oregon and North Carolina in the Years 1843-'44."  Other vintage and antique works also include decorative bindings, books-on-books, military history, theology, travel & exploration, art history, special printings (Folio Society, Easton Press, etc.), Civil War, children's, multi-volume sets, and much more.   

Found throughout this catalog are interesting ephemera offerings. These lots include bound compilations of Civil War issues of "Harper's Weekly" and important autographs such as Henry Morton Stanley, Richard Evelyn Byrd and others.  Additional ephemera categories include rare photographs, antique scrapbooks, black Americana, antique magazines, vintage comic books and more.   

National Book Auctions is a public auction service specializing in books, ephemera, and art. National Book Auctions is a targeted service offering experience and expertise unique to marketing antique and modern books and ephemera for consignors and collectors alike. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of collectible, signed, and first edition books. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-269-0101 or email mail@nationalbookauctions.com.

BLOOMFIELD, N.J. - Paintings by the Russian Federation artist Kharlampi Kostandi (1868-1939), Reginald Marsh (Am., 1898-1954) and Ogden Minton Pleissner (Am., 1905-1983), plus items from the collection of Academy Award-nominated actress Grayson Hall (1925-1985) and her writer-husband Sam Hall (1921-2014) will all come up for bid on Wednesday, August 16th.

They’re part of what awaits bidders at Nye & Company Auctioneers’ Summer Estate Treasures Auction, online and in the firm’s gallery at 20 Beach Street in Bloomfield, just north of Newark and not far from New York City. For those unable to attend live, online bidding will be provided by LiveAuctioneers.com and Invaluable.com. Phone and absentee bids will also be accepted.

Around 700 lots will come up for bid, including about 50 lots of silver, Mid-Century Modern furniture, doctors’ and medical books, and property from a member of the Russian Royal Family, prominent New York and New Jersey estates, and property from a UN Plaza private collector.

“As a result of local estate liquidation, the August auction has some unexpected highlights,” said John Nye, president and principal auctioneer of Nye & Company Auctioneers. “They’re the type of strong lots usually associated with a fall sale. We anticipate international interest in the major paintings, both from the internet and phone bidders.” The sale will begin at 10 am Eastern time. 

The oil on canvas painting by Russian Federation artist Kharlampi Kostandi, a pretty moonlight seascape measuring 24 inches by 30 inches, is a strong candidate for top lot of the auction, with a pre-sale estimate of $40,000-$60,000. The work, artist signed, and has just some small paint loss.

Reginald Marsh was an American painter who was born in Paris and is best known for his depictions of life in New York City in the 1920s and ‘30s. His watercolor and ink rendering of tugboats at sea, titled simply Tugs, is signed and dated (1944) and should bring $8,000-$12,000.

Ogden Minton Pleissner was an American painter specializing in landscapes and war art related to his service in World War II. But the watercolor depiction of homes in a bucolic countryside setting is anything but warlike. His signed painting, titled Avallon, is estimated at $2,000-$4,000.

Also offered will be a large-size Manhattan riverscape engraving, 32 inches tall by 51 inches wide, from a painting by J. W. Hill titled New York. The framed piece, engraved by C. Mottram and published by F. & G.W. Smith (N.Y.), has some tears and is expected to hit $800-$1,200.

The items from the estate of Sam and Grayson Hall came out of the 1799 house the couple bought together on the Hudson River in Rhinebeck, N.Y. The home was a showplace, featured in the January 1983 issue of Architectural Digest. Many of its appointments are in the auction.

Grayson Hall was nominated for an Academy Award for her performance in John Houston’s 1964 film Night of the Iguana. But she’s best remembered as Dr. Julia Hoffman, the doctor who fell in love with the vampire character Barnabas Collins on the cult classic soap, Dark Shadows. Sam Hall was a writer on the show; he was also head writer for the soap opera One Life to Live.

The Mid-Century Modern furniture will feature tables by Gilbert Rohde (1894-1994) for Herman Miller. Rohde’s career as a furniture and industrial designer helped define American Modernism during its first phase, from the late 1920s to World War II. He is credited today for inaugurating Modern design at Herman Miller, Inc. Rohde lived in and around New York City his entire life.

Rohde’s tables in the sale include a Paldao coffee table (stenciled #4186), having a biomorphic top supported on one tapering leg and one curved support, both covered in tan, circa 1940 (est. $800-$1,200); and a Cloud occasional table (model #4187, stenciled #4186, circa 1940s), with acacia burl, brass nailheads and vinyl wrapped wood legs. It’s expected to finish at $400-$600.

Additional furniture pieces in the sale will include a Dutch Baroque-style inlaid chest of drawers with mirror, produced in the late 19th or early 20th century, with four drawers on bun feet (est. $800-$1,200); and a figural steel bistro set consisting of two “he-she” barstools and a table, designed by Fred Garbotz and manufactured by Rockledge Design Studios (est. $500-$700).

Other items up for bid will include an 18th/19th century French Louis XV gilt wood oval mirror, 73 inches tall by 49 inches wide, with two candlearms (est. $1,500-$2,500); a 14kt yellow gold diamond and sapphire necklace, stamped Italy, with 35 small round prong set diamonds (est. $1,500-$2,500); and a J.E. Caldwell sterling silver teapot with stand and burner (est. $500-$800).

John Nye had a long and fruitful career at Sotheby’s before he and his wife, Kathleen, acquired Dawson’s in 2003 and started Dawson & Nye. With the move to Bloomfield seven years later, they renamed the business to Nye & Company (Auctioneers, Appraisers, Antiques). The firm is nationwide, but the vast bulk of the business comes from trusts and estates in the tri-state area.

For more information about Nye & Company Auctioneers and the Summer Estate Treasures Auction scheduled for Wednesday, August 16th, please visit www.nyeandcompany.com.

Shanghai Luggage Label copy.jpgIn the mid-1850s, ocean liners began attaching labels to passenger luggage to indicate the passenger’s cabin class and travel destination, making it easier for porters to sort luggage upon arrival. Hotels quickly followed suit, particularly Grand hotels in exotic cities that provided great comfort, elegance and luxury for their guests. The hotel label not only facilitated baggage handling, it became a status symbol. Functional labels quickly evolved into beautiful, sophisticated graphic design.  

A single collection of over three thousand international travel labels, selected for their graphic appeal and quality, from grand hotels, luxury steamship lines and romantic train routes such as the Orient Express, will be featured at the Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair, September 8-10, 2017 at the Brooklyn Expo Center in Greenpoint. Exhibitor Sheryl Jaeger of Eclectibles is showcasing labels from the private collection of Jane Goodrich, world traveler and co-founder of Spectrum Publishing. 

Ms. Goodrich’s collection of 3,550 labels, dating from the 1920s to World War II  include colorful labels from such wonderful old hotels as the Luna House in Venice, the Grand  Continental Hotel in Cairo, the Mayfair Hotel in London, and many more. Lovers of Agatha Christie’s famous novel, Murder on the Orient Express, will find a label from this iconic line, which epitomized the ultimate in luxury train travel. 

The 1920s marked the Golden Age of luggage labels due to a huge economic boom just prior to the Wall Street Crash of 1929. It was the age of the steamer trunk and travel was associated with comfort, luxury and adventure.  Many of the artists who designed these distinctive and beautiful labels belonged to the Art Deco period. Italian painter and decorator Mario Borgoni, for example, designed labels for the Swiss printing firm of Richter and Co. during this period.  His use of elegant lettering and red/orange shading became a trademark of the Richter Co. 

Labels helped not only to promote hotels and steamship lines, but attracted tourists to great cities such as Cairo and the pyramids, St. Moritz in the Winter snow, Luxor amid the ruins, and the hotel Le Meurice in the City of Light, Paris. It could be said that travel labels became advertisements for the location more than the hotels themselves. For example, a Hotel Viking label depicts a colorful streetscape with a crossing guard stopping traffic for a family of ducks. The title is “Wonderful Copenhagen.”

Image: International luggage labels, such as this one from the Cathay Hotels in Shanghai, circa 1920s, makes one dream of faraway lands with their iconic sites and luxurious grand hotels.  A single collection of over 3,000 luggage labels will be made available by exhibitor Sheryl Jaeger, at the upcoming Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair, which returns to the Brooklyn Expo Center in Greenpoint, Sept. 8-10, 2017.

218-KeepCalm.jpgNew York— More than 600 colorful advertisements and announcements crossed the block at Swann Auction Galleries’ sale of Vintage Posters on Wednesday, August 2. The encyclopedic selection represented a century’s worth of development in graphic design, history and technology.

In honor of the centennial anniversary of the U.S.’s entry into WWI, the sale featured the largest selection of war propaganda the house has ever offered. According to Nicholas D. Lowry, Swann Galleries’ President and Director of Vintage Posters, the varied designs from 1917 are the result of the government giving illustrators free rein to create striking imagery that continues to resonate today. Highlights from this category include works by James Montgomery Flagg, lead by I Want You for U.S. Army, which sold for $14,300*, and Wake Up America Day ($5,250).

The top lot was the iconic British directive Keep Calm and Carry On, 1939, which was purchased by a collector for $15,000. Additional highlights from WWII included Join the ATS, 1941, a poster by Abram Games considered so scandalous it was never published ($6,500), and a suite of patriotic works by Leo Lionni, titled Keep ‘Em Rolling!, 1941, purchased by an institution for $8,750. Lowry added, “As expected, the war posters and propaganda sold exceptionally well, with nearly 80% of lots offered finding buyers.” War poster sales accounted for nearly half of the total revenue of the auction.

Fin de siècle works performed well, with a pencil drawing by Alphonse Mucha nearly doubling its estimate to sell for $10,400. The Art Nouveau master was also represented by Zodiac, 1900, Job, 1898, and Salon des Cent, 1896 ($11,250, $6,563 and $6,500, respectively). A monumental circa 1905 advertisement for Abricotine liqueur by Eugène Grasset reached $8,125, while Ausstellung für Amateur - Photographie, a 1908 ad for cameras by Burkhard Mangold, was purchased for $4,750, a record for the work. Walter Schackenberg’s complete 1920 portfolio of striking costume designs, Ballet und Pantomine, reached $11,250.

Posters promoting performers spanned a century and encompassed a variety of acts. One of the oldest works in the sale depicted the heavily tattooed Captain Constentenus at P.T. Barnum’s New American Museum in 1876; it reached more than five times its high estimate, finally selling to a buyer on the phone for $6,750. Nearly 100 years later, Rick Griffin created the well-known eyeball design for the Jimi Hendrix Experience, 1968 ($11,875). An undated, life-size advertisement for Danté, often considered the last Golden Age magician, was purchased by a collector for $12,500.

The next sale of Vintage Posters at Swann Galleries will be Rare & Important Travel Posters on October 26, 2017. For more information or consign quality materials, contact Nicholas D. Lowry at posters@swanngalleries.com.

Image: 218 Keep Calm and Carry On, designer unknown, 1939. Sold August 2, 2017 for $15,000. (Pre-sale estimate $12,000 to $18,000)

 

CHICAGO, August 3, 2017 - The Chicago Tribune today announced Marilynne Robinson as the recipient of its prestigious 2017 Literary Prize.

Robinson will receive the award and open the 28th Annual Chicago Humanities Festival on Saturday, October 28. She will appear in conversation with Chicago Tribune columnist Heidi Stevens. The recipients of the Heartland Prize for Nonfiction and the Heartland Prize for Fiction, Matthew Desmond and Colson Whitehead, will also appear at the Humanities Fest, receiving their awards on Saturday, November 11. The Heartland awards were announced earlier this year. 

Chicago Tribune Literary Prize

Marilynne Robinson will be honored with the 2017 Chicago Tribune Literary Prize at 11 a.m. Saturday, October 28, at Alice Millar Chapel, 1870 Sheridan Road, in Evanston.

One of the most revered writers in America, Robinson transcends genre in her fiction and essays, speaking to the arc of history and the ambiguities of the human connection. 

When Rev. Clementa Pickney died tragically in South Carolina, President Barack Obama quoted his friend Marilynne Robinson in the eulogy, calling on others to find “that reservoir of goodness, beyond, and of another kind, that we are able to do each other in the ordinary cause of things.”  

Through her astonishing powerful use of language, with its special cadences, Robinson eloquently segues between the magisterial and the quotidian. 

Robinson’s Pulitzer Prize-winning novel Gilead, was previously awarded the Tribune’s Heartland Prize. She has also won the National Humanities Medal, the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction, and two National Book Critics Circle Awards.

In addition to her fiction, Robinson’s far-ranging, insightful essay collections deal with subjects ranging from the relationship between science and religion, to nuclear pollution and American politics.

“Marilynne Robinson, like many of the winners of the Chicago Tribune Literary Award, has international stature and deep ties to the Midwest,” said Chicago Tribune publisher and editor-in-chief Bruce Dold, who will make introductory remarks at the event on Oct. 28. “She’s a wonderful fiction writer and a brilliant essayist. She challenges every reader to respect the deep mystery of faith. We’re honored to recognize her with this award.” 

The Chicago Tribune Literary Prize was established to honor a great writer whose work has had a great impact on American society. First awarded in 2002, previous recipients of the Literary Prize include the late Arthur Miller, Elie Wiesel, August Wilson and E.L. Doctorow. More recently, the award has gone to Margaret Atwood, Joyce Carol Oates, David McCullough, Stephen Sondheim, Patti Smith, Salman Rushdie, and last year, Philip Glass. 

Chicago Tribune Heartland Prize for Nonfiction and Fiction

Matthew Desmond will be honored with the 2017 Heartland Prize for Nonfiction for Evicted: Power and Profit in the American City at 11 a.m. Saturday, November 11 at the First United Methodist Church at the Chicago Temple, 77 W. Washington St.

In Evicted, Desmond followed the lives of eight Milwaukee families to show how mass evictions are less a consequence of poverty than a cause of it. Through his immersive reporting, Desmond transforms our national understanding of poverty and the profoundly devastating process of losing a home, and offers solutions to this widespread problem.

Evicted won the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Nonfiction, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the PEN/John Kenneth Galbraith Award for Non-Fiction, and the Andrew Carnegie Medal.

Colson Whitehead will be honored with the 2017 Heartland Prize for Fiction for his novel, The Underground Railroad, at 3 p.m. Saturday, November 11 at the Art Institute of Chicago’s Rubloff Auditorium, 230 S. Columbus Drive. 

Whitehead’s novel uses both realism and allegory to reimagine the Underground Railroad as a train through American history, and recounts the horrors of slavery and the elusive search for freedom that still echoes today.

The Underground Railroad won the 2017 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction, National Book Award and the Carnegie Medal. 

“Evicted and The Underground Railroad reset the conversation about poverty and race. They are written with eloquence that elevates them into great literature,” said Elizabeth Taylor, Chicago Tribune literary editor at large. “These are ambitious, brave books that speak to American promise in profoundly resonant ways.”

Chicago Tribune established the Heartland Prizes in 1988 to annually recognize a novel and work of nonfiction that reinforce and perpetuate the values of heartland America. 

The Literary and Heartland Prizes are a part of the Tribune's steadfast support of literacy and the written word.

These awards, along with the Nelson Algren Short Story Award and Young Adult Literary Prize, reflect the Tribune's ongoing commitment to inspiring reading and readers through literary coverage in the Chicago Tribune, on chicagotribune.com, and at the annual Printers Row Lit Fest.

BOSTON, MA - The annual fall gathering for booklovers, the Boston International Antiquarian Book Fair, will return to the Hynes Convention Center in Boston’s beautiful Back Bay for its 41st year, November 10-12, 2017. More than 120 dealers from the United States, England, France, Germany, Netherlands, Spain, Denmark, Argentina and Australia will exhibit and sell a vast selection of rare, collectible and antiquarian books, as well as illuminated manuscripts, autographs, maps, atlases, modern first editions, photographs, and fine and decorative prints.   

One of the oldest and most respected antiquarian book shows in the country, the event offers the top selection of items that are available on the international literary market. Whether you are buying or just browsing, the Fair offers something for every taste and budget—books on art, politics, travel, gastronomy, and science—to sport, natural history, literature, music, children’s books, and an increasing representation of graphic and art works on paper.

The Fair gives visitors the opportunity to see, learn about, and purchase the finest in rare and valuable books and ephemera. Attendees who want to start collecting without breaking the bank can browse the booths of select dealers offering “Discovery” items priced $100 or less and attend a “Discovery” panel on Saturday to learn tips for starting a personal collection.  

Tickets are $20 for Friday night’s exclusive Opening Night preview event, an opportunity for the public to get a first look at items for sale at the Fair, and admission is free on Saturday and Sunday.

“We were so thrilled with last year’s attendance, that we’ve decided to continue to offer free weekend admission at this year’s event,” says show producer Betty Fulton. “We especially saw an increase in younger audiences, who are discovering that holding a book with an amazing history in their hands is a uniquely satisfying experience.“

Seminars and events will be featured throughout the weekend, including the annual Ticknor Society Collectors’ Roundtable. More events will be announced in early fall, and folks can visit www.bostonbookfair.com for up to the minute details.

Friday, November 10           5:00-9:00pm           Tickets: $20.00 - Opening Night

Saturday, November 11     12:00-7:00pm          Free Admission
Sunday, November 12       12:00-5:00pm         Free Admission

Hynes Convention Center
900 Boylston Street
Boston, MA
www.mccahome.com 

The Boston International Antiquarian Book Fair is sponsored by the New England Chapter of the Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association of America. A portion of the ticket sales will benefit the Boston Public Library and the American Antiquarian Society. Tickets will be sold online at www.bostonbookfair.com and at the show’s box office during Friday evening show hours. For more information, please visit www.bostonbookfair.com or call 617-266-6540

The Fine Literature and Fine Books auction at PBA Galleries on July 27th showed an upswing in prices of modern literature. Sales were strong with nearly 80% of lots sold and heating bidding on a number of the high spots.  It appears from these results and strong sales at other auction houses, the 19th & 20th century literature market has recovered from the lows of a few years ago. 

The first American edition of Moby-Dick; or, the Whale, though rebound in 20th century full brown levant morocco, sold for a healthy $9,600. Melville’s book is considered to be one of the most important American novels of the 19th century and is based on his experiences at sea and the actual sinking of the whaling boat, Essex, by a sperm whale in 1820. This edition followed the English edition by a month and contains thirty-five passages and the “Epilogue” omitted in the London printing. 

Selling for its presale high estimate of $6,000 was a first edition of J. D Salinger’s Catcher in the Rye in a first issue jacket in very good condition. The jacket has the original "$3.00" printed price present and the photo credit of Salinger's portrait by Lotte Jacobi on rear panel, and with Salinger’s hair just touching the top edge of the rear panel. One of the best novels of the 20th century, it tells the classic story of the "cynical adolescent" Holden Caulfield.

The Works of Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in 24 volumes topped its presale estimate, selling for $5,400. Quite rare in the original paper dust jackets, this is one of 750 copies of the “Crowborough Edition,” signed by Doyle on the limitation page. The set has all of Doyle's major works, including The Sherlock Holmes series, The Lost World, The White Company, Sir Nigel, The Refuges, Memories, etc.

Other highlights of the sale selling above the presale high estimates include Estelle Doheny’s copy of The Red Badge of Courage. The first edition, first issue of Stephen Crane’s most enduring work about the American Civil War and a true high spot of American literature sold for $5,400. A First Edition, first issue of The Two Towers, by J. R. R. Tolkien sold for $5,100. A near fine copy of the second title in the high fantasy series Lord of the Rings trilogy, it contains a folding map of the Middle Earth tipped to the rear endpaper. A First edition of F. Scott Fitzgerald's great masterpiece, The Great Gatsby, sold for $5,100, nearly twice its presale estimate. Considered to be the epitome of the Jazz Age in American literature, this copy is a first issue in the original dark green cloth housed in a custom cloth box.

PBA Galleries holds sales of fine, rare and collectible books every two weeks.  For more information regarding upcoming sales, consignments, or auction results, please contact PBA Galleries at (415) 989-2665 or pba@pbagalleries.com.

About PBA Galleries

PBA Galleries is a San Francisco-based auction house rooted in nearly 60 years of service to the collectors’ community. Auctions are held every-other week in a variety of specialties and genres, including rare books, manuscripts, maps, Americana, and related materials. For information regarding bidding or consignment, please call 415.989.2665 or email pba@pbagalleries.com. PBA Galleries is located at 1233 Sutter Street, San Francisco, CA 94109.

Casab.jpgDALLAS, Texas (July 30, 2017) - The only known surviving Italian issue movie poster for Casablanca sold Saturday, July 29, for a record $478,000 at a public auction of vintage movie posters held by Heritage Auctions in Dallas, Texas. Measuring a massive 55.5 by 78.25 inches, the 1946 Casablanca Italian 4 Fogli poster matched the world record for the most valuable movie poster ever sold at public auction.

“The buyer has just set a world record and acquired what we in the poster collecting world would equate to a masterpiece,” said Grey Smith, Director of Vintage Posters at Heritage Auctions. “The stunning artistry put into this poster makes it stand head and shoulders above any paper produced for the film.”

Previous Italian posters for the film have sold for as much as $203,000 and U.S. issues of the poster have fetched $191,200. Each of the previous record holders were sold by Heritage Auctions, the world’s largest auctioneer of vintage movie posters.

The poster is the first of its kind to surface in recent history. Featuring artwork by Luigi Martinati, the image of the cast of characters is considered the best image found in any of this film's numerous advertisements, Smith said.

The auction featured additional rare posters from the film with a half sheet poster auctioned for $65,725 and a post-war Spanish release poster selling for $35,850. 

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

Maurice Sendak.jpgAt the upcoming Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair, September 8-10 at the Brooklyn Expo Center in Greenpoint, the world of Maurice Sendak comes vividly alive. In celebration of the inauguration of a new Works on Paper section, the fair will mount a gallery-style exhibition and sale of Sendak’s original works - his first solo show to be held in his native Brooklyn, now more than five years after his death in 2012.

He is considered the most important children’s book artist of the twentieth century.  When his iconic book, “Where the Wild Things Are,” was published more than fifty years ago, his editor commented that it was “the first American picture book for children to recognize that a child has powerful emotions - anger and fear, and after the anger is spent, to be where someone loves him best of all.”

Show goers will see first-hand why Sendak’s illustrations continue to be internationally beloved by children and adults all over the world. This special event will feature original drawings, watercolors, vintage posters, signed prints and etchings, most of which have never been offered for public sale. They have been collected over a period of more than a half century and largely acquired directly from the artist himself. This is an unprecedented opportunity to own a fine art print, actually produced under the artist’s supervision in 1971 from some of his favorite book images. A selection of first edition books will also be available, many of them hand-signed by Mr. Sendak, including a signed first printing of his 1963 Caldecott Award masterpiece.

His love of books began at age four when he was confined to bed with scarlet fever, and he approached his early illustration work with deep attention to accuracy and close observation of nature and animals.  He also knew that every book must have a dimension of the fantastic, where the mundane and the magical freely mix.  In “Where the Wild Things Are,” Max’s rambunctiousness, the fearful “Wild Things” themselves and the poetry in Sendak’s writing all have contributed to the book’s popularity and longevity.  

The son of Polish immigrant parents, Sendak decided to become an illustrator at age 12, after watching Walt Disney’s Fantasia.  He came of age as an illustrator in the 1950s when the market for children’s books was growing due to an historic surge in the birthrate.  When “Where the Wild Things Are” was first published, the illustrations created some controversy, as they were so different.  Little could he have foreseen the book’s enormous success and the influence he would have overall. 

Comedian Stephen Colbert spoke for the world when he said, “we are all honored to have been briefly invited into his world.”

Image: Ink and watercolor original drawing of two “Wild Things” viewing an exhibition of their creator Maurice Sendak, 11-3/4 x 10-1.4 inches. Copyright © The Maurice Sendak Foundation. The exhibition and sale of works by internationally beloved children’s book author, Maurice Sendak, at the upcoming Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair, September 8-10 at the Brooklyn Expo Center in Greenpoint, is the first to be held in his native Brooklyn. 

Boxborough Paper Town Show, Sept. 16

Startling Stories.jpgBOXBOROUGH, MA - SEPTEMBER 16, 2017: Flamingo Eventz is pleased to announce the return of the popular Boxborough Paper Town - The Vintage Paper, Books & Advertising Collectibles Show. This is the original Boxborough Paper Show where you’ll find all things Paper - from classic Ephemera to Books, Board Games, Postcards, Advertising, Classic Vinyl, and more! A long time favorite of both dealers and customers, we continue to make changes and improvements to ensure continued growth and success. We’re bigger, better, more diverse, and with lots of new dealers…this is the paper show to attend for the rare, unusual and hard-to-find treasure!

Scheduled for Saturday September 16, 2017 at the Boxborough Regency Hotel & Conference Center - previously known as the Holiday Inn - in Boxborough, MA, Exhibitors from across the Northeast will gather to present an outstanding array of fine, rare & unusual old books, maps, postcards, autographs, prints, posters, advertising, and much, much more. Plus, we have appraisals by well-known appraiser John Bruno, star of the PBS series Market Warriors, and guest appraisers from 12-2pm. Interested parties - both dealers & customers - should contact Flamingo Eventz at 603.509.2639 / info@flamingoeventz.com.

Exhibitor Specialties include: Advertising Covers, African American, Americana, Architecture, Art, Art Deco, Auctions, Autographs, Aviation, Baseball, Books, Bibles, Black History, Black Power, Calendars, Calling Cards, Christmas, Circus, Civil War, Cook Books, Charts, Children’s Books, Cocktails, Design, Dogs, Die Cuts, Documents, Engineering, Engraving, Ephemera, Erotica, Esoterica, Fantasy, Fashion, Fishing, Floridiana, Folklore, Folk Music, Foreign Language, Furniture, Games, Gardens & Horticulture, Graphics, Historic Documents, Horses, Hunting, Illustrated Books, Interior Design, Japan, Judaica, Letters, Logbooks, Manuscripts, Maps, Maritime, Medicine, Middle East, Military, Modernism, Music, Native American, Natural History, Nautical, Naval, New York City, New York State, New Jersey, Novelties, Olympic Games, Pacifica, Photographs, Photography, Pochoir, Polar, Pop-Ups & Moveable Books, Poetry, Postcards, Posters, Presentation Copies, Presidential Archives, Press Books, Prints, Pulitzer Prize Winners, Psychedelica, Puppetry, Puzzles, Railroad, Reference, Revolutionary War, Russia, Scholarly, Science, Science Fiction, Sports, Sporting, Technical, Theatre, Theology, Trade Cards, Trade Catalogues, Travel & Exploration, Travel Brochures, Typography, U.S. Coastal History, Vanity Fair Prints, Valentines, Voyages, Watercolors, Whaling, Wine, Yachting. These, and many other specialties, will be found at this event. Be sure to check our website, FlamingoEventz.com, for complete details and easily downloaded Discount Coupons.

Date/Hours: Saturday, September 16, 2017, 9am-3pm

Location: The Boxborough Holiday Inn, 242 Adams Place, Boxborough, MA 01709. Directly off I-495, exit 28.

Admission: Adults: $7 ($1 Discount with Ad or Website Coupon), Young Collectors 12-21: $4, plenty of free parking.

Appraisals: By John Bruno, Star of Market Warriors, and guest appraisers 12-2pm at $5/Item.

Directions: I-495 Exit 28, East on Massachusetts Ave (Rt. 111), right on Adams Place to Hotel. Check our website: flamingoeventz.com for easily downloaded maps.

Miscellaneous: Food & refreshment available at the Hotel restaurant during show hours.

Information: For Dealer or Customer information, please call or click 603.509.2639 / info@flamingoeventz.com

Background: Flamingo Eventz, LLC presents the finest, most innovative, successful, and respected Book & Ephemera Fairs, Antiques Shows, and Vintage Flea Markets in the Northeast. The Brunos have over 25 years experience as antique dealers and over 22 years experience as professional show promoters. They are members of the Antiques & Collectibles National Association (ACNA), and John Bruno is an antiques appraiser and television personality who can be seen on the PBS series Market Warriors.

The Library of Congress Junior Fellows Summer Interns yesterday presented more than150 rare and unique items from 15 Library divisions. “Display Day” was open to the public for the first time since the program’s inauguration in 1991.

The display provides the opportunity for fellows to discuss the historic significance of the collection items they have researched and processed during their 10-week internships. Examples included:

  • An early draft and a stage manager’s copy of playwright Tennessee Williams’s “The Glass Menagerie” from approximately 1944
  • Blueprints for the Statue of Liberty’s pedestal
  • A letter handwritten by Abraham Lincoln on the subject of Shakespeare
  • Undergraduate lab drawings and Boy Scout and Eagle Scout membership cards that belonged to Pulitzer Prize-winning entomologist E. O. Wilson
  • Preliminary drawings of the Louvre Pyramid and presentation drawings of the East Building of the National Gallery of Art created by architect I. M. Pei
  • A postcard from Jackie Kennedy Onassis to I. M. Pei, sent in 1989
  • Paper samples cut from books of various ages to demonstrate paper deterioration
  • A Theobald Boehm and Rudolph Greve flute in C, created in Munich between 1839 and 1846
  • Spanish legal documents, including a will and a land receipt from the 1500s and trial proceedings from the 1850s
  • Cassette tapes with audio of Chilean poet and Nobel laureate Gabriela Mistral and Argentine poet Jorge Luis Borges, recorded in the 1950s
  • Images of bald eagles from the Library’s digital collections used in a new educational activity booklet for student visitors to the Library
  • Letters, artwork, and papers sent by prominent writers, including Ted Berrigan and Charles Bukowski, to the St. Mark’s Poetry Project
  • Illustrated children’s books translated into Yiddish, including fairytales by the Brothers Grimm and “The Elephant’s Child” by Rudyard Kipling, from the 1910s and 1920s

To view the complete list of display items, visit this Library link.

Working under the direction of Library curators and specialists in various divisions, 37 Junior Fellows—selected from more than 900 applicants across the country—explored the institution’s unparalleled collections and resources. They were exposed to a broad spectrum of library work: research, copyright, preservation, reference, access, standards, information management and digital initiatives.

Through the Junior Fellows Program, the Library of Congress furthers its mission to provide access to a universal record of knowledge, culture and creativity as exemplified by its collections, while supporting current and future generations of students and scholars.

The Junior Fellows Program is made possible through the generosity of the late Mrs. Jefferson Patterson and the Knowledge Navigators Trust Fund. A lead gift from H. F. (Gerry) Lenfest, former chairman of the Library’s James Madison Council private-sector advisory group, established the Knowledge Navigators Trust Fund with major support provided by members of the council. For more information about the Junior Fellows Program, visit loc.gov/hr/jrfellows/.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov, and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

(CONCORD -July 2017) The Concord Museum recently announced Doris Kearns Goodwin as the Honorary Chair of the public phase of Revolution: The Campaign for the Concord Museum, which will support a new 13,000 square foot Education Center and courtyard, a new Gateway to Concord Orientation Center, and expanded Museum gallery space to showcase the Museum’s extensive collections. Goodwin, a world renowned presidential historian, Pulitzer Prize-winning author, and Concord resident, is known as “America’s historian-in-chief.”

We are thrilled that Doris Kearns Goodwin is serving as Honorary Chair of the Campaign for the Concord Museum,” said Executive Director Margaret Burke. “Doris is a strong advocate for the value of history and history education. Her leadership signals the importance of what we are trying to achieve at the Museum.” 

The new Education Center and Museum expansion is being developed to address the Museum’s burgeoning needs. Over 12,000 students and teachers participated in the Museum’s curriculum-based school programs last year - nearly double the number of students served in 2011. The Museum through its Paul Reveres Ride program provides free transportation to the Museum and waives program fees for more than 3,000 students from Lowell, Lawrence, and Everett.

Doris explained, “For someone who has loved history for as long as I can remember, to enjoy and share the riches of the Concord Museum is such a pleasure. I’m proud to be involved in helping expand the physical space and the reach of this museum that tells not only the history of Concord, my home town for the last 40 years, but also the history of this country.”

To date the Campaign for the Concord Museum has raised $11.7 million towards the $13 million goal. Approximately $10 million of the Campaign funds will support the new Education Center and Museum renovations. The remaining $3 million will be added to the Museum’s endowment to support enhanced programs. Visit https://concordmuseumcampaign.org/ Revolution: The Campaign for Concord Museum for more information. Any size donation is greatly appreciated.

DALLAS, Texas (July 26, 2017) - Thought lost for more than a generation, a cover to Zap Comix #1 - a masterpiece of Underground Comix art by master Robert Crumb - may sell for as much as $100,000 in Heritage Auctions’ Aug. 10-12 Comics & Comic Art Auction in Dallas. The three-day event features early, key books in high-grade condition and original comic art never before seen at auction.  

“According to singer/songwriter Graham Nash, who has owned this art for many years, the Zap #1 cover is a very important piece in the arc of Robert's journey as a great artist,” said Ed Jaster, Vice President at Heritage Auctions. “This long-lost piece is a wonder to behold." 

A Mile High Pedigree copy of Science Comics #2 (Fox, 1940) graded at a CGC 9.2 is on offer and is expected to surpass $25,000. This classic Lou Fine Dynamo cover is 77 years old, and the next-highest-graded copy to come to public auction was a FN- 5.5 in 2008. 

Wonder Woman’s first appearance in All Star Comics #8 (DC, 1942) may cross the block for roughly $75,000. In addition to All Star Comics #8, the first appearance of the Justice Society of America in All Star Comics #3 (DC, 1940) CGC 5.5 FN- copy is being offered, as well, and could exceed $25,000.

The Amazing Spider-Man #14 (Marvel, 1964), graded NM/MT 9.8 by CGC, is expected to sell for at least $60,000, and The Amazing Spider-Man #1 (Marvel 1963), Stan Lee Verified Signature, graded by CBCS at a 9.0 is projected to realize $40,000.

Heritage’s first-ever presentation of Steve Ditko’s Doctor Strange artwork -  Strange Tales #141 Page 8 Original Art - features not only the good doctor, but also the Ancient One and Dormammu (est. $45,000). X-Men #2 Page 6 Original Art depicts the first appearance of the evil mutant The Vanisher, and is expected to cross the block at $35,000. A Tarzan Comic Strip Original Art from Hal Foster in 1933 depicts Tarzan’s face-off against the “Waters of Death” (est. $30,000). 

Watchmen #12 Story Page 3 (DC, 1987) is expected to surpass $25,000, and this is not the only Watchmen original art in the auction. Other Watchmen original art gems that will be available include Watchmen #8 Story Page 24 (est. $20,000) and Watchmen #11 Story Page 24 (est. $20,000).

Additional highlights include, but are not limited to:

o   Dick Sprang The Batcave Revealed Batman and Robin original art: est. $25,000

o   Thor #197 21-Page Story original art: est. $20,000

o   Richard F. Outcault Buster Brown Sunday Comic Strip from May 31, 1903: est. $35,000

o   The Amazing Spider-Man #5 (Marvel, 1963) CBCS NM+ 9.6: est. $25,000

o   Detective Comics #35 (DC, 1940) CGC VG+ 4.5: est. $50,000

o   Masked Marvel #2 Mile High Pedigree (Centaur, 1940) CGC NM 9.4: est. $12,500

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

Bloomsbury Auctions  - The Glory of Science .jpegThis Autumn Bloomsbury Auctions celebrates the study and observation of the physical and natural world in The Glory of Science. The auction will take place on 14th September at 24 Maddox Street, London W1S 1PP and will include striking photographs, maps prints and autographs.

A single owner collection of vintage NASA photographs from the Gemini missions 1965-1966 will be on offer. The Gemini program was the bridge between the Mercury and Apollo programs and was created in order to test equipment and mission procedures in Earth orbit and to train astronauts and ground crews for future Apollo missions. There were also 14 scientific, medical and technological experiments on board. 

Astronauts Jim Lovell and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin were part of the Gemini Missions and an auction highlight is a photograph of Buzz Aldrin from 1966 (pre-selfie sticks), thought to be the first self-portrait taken space (est. at £800-£1,200).

Also in the auction is a rare astronomical reference work dated 1681 and compiled by Stanislaw Lubieniecki which provided information about recent comets of the day as notified by contemporary astronomers to Lubieniecki. TheTheatrum Cometicum contains numerous engraved illustrations, many folded, and is bound in contemporary mottled calf, (est. £10,000-15,000).

The correspondence of Nikola Tesla, the Serbian-American inventor best known for contributing to the design of the alternating current electricity supply system, is another auction highlight. In a typed letter, signed ‘N. Tesla’ and dated 1898, he explains to the Editor of The Photogram that he regrets ‘not to be able to oblige you in the matter at present’, (est. £1,500-1,800). And, in a fragment of an autograph letter, signed ‘Ch. Darwin’, the world-famous naturalist and geologist writes to George Cupples, the author of Scotch Deer Hounds and their Masters (1894), and signs off with ‘Pray give my very kind remembrance to Mrs Cupples’, (est. £2,000- 3,000).

The auction is open for consignments until 1st August. 

 

July29_01_pics.jpgITHACA, NY--National Book Auctions, located in Ithaca, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog.  

This catalog features rare, antique and decorative books as well as select additions of ephemera. American history figures prominently across the catalog, include titles relating to the opening of the American West. A private estate library being presented includes volumes dating back to the 17th century.             

Antique and rare books in this catalog include numerous titles. Among the earliest examples are the 1609 printing of Lugduni's "Pavli Comitoli Perusini Societatis lasu Theologi," bound in vellum, Grose's "Antiquities of England and Wales," produced in eight volumes in 1784 and featuring folding hand-colored maps, and the two-volume 1749 printing of de Puysegur's "Art de la Guerre," ("Art of War") with folding maps, charts and diagrams. Additional rare selections include the 1868 printing of Baird's "Cabinet Maker's Album of Furniture," the three-volume 1794 printing of Payne's "Universal Geography," with hand-colored engravings and folding maps, and Ludlow's "The Hasheesh Eater," produced in 1857.                     

Several pleasing collections will also be showcased. Highlighted is a sizable group of antique volumes relating to American history, including the opening of the West, and featuring such examples as 1845 printing of Fremont's "Report of the Exploring Expedition to the Rocky Mountains," retaining the original folding map, and the decorative "Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant," produced in two volumes in 1885. Other vintage and antique pieces also include decorative bindings, books-on-books, book binding, military history, theology, travel & exploration, history, Civil War, children's, multi-volume sets, and much more.   

Found throughout this catalog are interesting ephemera offerings. These lots include bound compilations of Civil War issues of "Harper's Weekly," the 1951 Picasso issue of "Verve" magazine, and Frederik de Wit's hand-colored engraved map of "Brabantiae," produced c1680. Additional ephemera categories include rare photogravures, postcards, black Americana, antique autograph albums and others.   

National Book Auctions is a public auction service specializing in books, ephemera, and art. National Book Auctions is a targeted service offering experience and expertise unique to marketing antique and modern books and ephemera for consignors and collectors alike. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of collectible, signed, and first edition books. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-269-0101 or email mail@nationalbookauctions.com.

 

 

A RARE PAIR OF VINCENZO CORONELLI 18 12-INCH TERRESTRIAL AND CELESTIAL GLOBES on stands, ITALIAN, PUBLISHED 1696 copy.jpgThis August, Bonhams Knightsbridge will showcase highlights from its autumn and winter auctions. The exhibition will run from Tuesday 1 August to Friday 1 September inclusive, Monday - Friday, 9.00am - 5.00pm. It will be closed on Monday 28 August for the Bank Holiday.

The exhibition of exceptional works of art include:

  • A very rare pair of 18 inch Coronelli globes dated 1696 by the Venetian cosmographer and cartographer Vincenzo Coronelli, who made globes for, among other important figures, Louis XIV of France. They will be offered in the Important Instruments of Science and Technology Sale, 31 October. Estimate: £100,000-150,000.
  • A collection of items relating to Admiral Lord Nelson, including a Chamberlain's Worcester Fine Old Japan pattern plate from Nelson's service (£25,000-30,000). The Admiral commissioned the service on a visit to Worcester in 1802, but it was unfinished at the time of his death in 1805. He bequeathed it to his paramour, Emma, Lady Hamilton who was not amused to also receive the bill. Also on show will be Nelson’s armchair from H.M.S. Victory, a gift from Lady Hamilton (£30,000-50,000). Both the armchair and the plate will be offered in the Marine Sale at Knightsbridge,18 October.
  • The large bronze sculpture ‘Perseus Arming’ by Sir Alfred Gilbert, one of several versions created by the artist of his famous statue of the same name now in Tate Britain. It will be offered for sale in Bonhams Important Design Sale at New Bond Street on 25 October and is estimated at £40,000-60,000.

Managing Director of Bonhams Knightsbridge, Jon Baddeley said, “We have a number of exceptional auctions at Knightsbridge over the coming six months. Our August preview can include only a small fraction of the rare and important things we have to offer, but it will give a fascinating insight into what’s on the horizon.”

Other highlights include:

  • The Castillo de San Juan de Ulúa, Veracruz, Mexico by the British landscape painter Thomas Egerton (1797-1842) to be offered in the Travel and Exploration Sale in Knightsbridge on 7 February 2018.  Egerton spent much of the latter part of his life in Mexico, where he and his eight-month pregnant teenage lover were mysteriously murdered in 1842. (£200,000-300,000). The painting will be on display until 18 August.
  • An important unrecorded London Delftware puzzle jug, Pickleherring Quay pottery, circa 1649-51 in the Fine Glass and British Ceramics Sale at Knightsbridge on 15 November (£15,000-25,000).
  • A wonderfully evocative depiction of the battle of Trafalgar, Oak, Hemp, and Powder, Trafalgar, 1805 by Charles Edward Dixon in the Marine Sale at Knightsbridge on 18 October (£20,000-30,000).
  • A screen-used costume made for David Bowie as Jareth the Goblin King, in the 1986 cult film Labyrinth.  Bowie also provided music for the soundtrack. To be offered in the Entertainment Memorabilia Sale in Knightsbridge, on 13 December (£20,000-30,000).
  • A striking red Poissons vase by the French glass designer and maker René Lalique. The highly successful and influential Poissons series was introduced in 1921, and this example is estimated at £12,000-15,000. It will appear in the Decorative Art and Design Sale on 26 September
  • A German Enigma Machine built in 1933.  A rare example of the cypher machines used by the German military to transmit secret information. The work of Alan Turing in breaking the German code is said to have shortened World War II by several years and saved countless lives. Estimated at £60,000-80,000 it will be offered in the Important Instruments of Science and Technology Sale, 31 October.

Pieces from the following auctions will be on display. These auctions will take place at Bonhams Knightsbridge unless otherwise indicated.

Decorative Arts and Design    26 September

The Marine Sale   18 October

Important Design (New Bond Street)   25 October

Important Instruments of Science and Technology   31 October

Fine Books and Manuscripts   15 November

Fine Glass and British Ceramics   15 November

Coins and Medals   22 November

Antique Arms and Armour   29 November

Entertainment Memorabilia   13 December

Travel and Exploration (until 18 August)   7 February 2018

Minnesota Center for Book Arts (MCBA) is proud to announce the winner of the 2017 MCBA Prize, The Book of Disquiet by London-based book artist Tim Hopkins.

For the 2017 competition, a three-member jury reviewed over 100 submissions representing 12 nations around the world, and narrowed the field to five finalists. These five works were judged at MCBA during Book Art Biennial 2017 (BookArtBiennial.org), a program series including exhibitions, workshops, and a two-day symposium. The winner was announced at a gala award ceremony on Saturday, July 22. 

Hopkin’s 2017 edition of Fernando Pessoa’s The Book of Disquiet takes a recognized classic and builds out from that book’s unique history, form, and content to create a viable reading experience that adds to the feeling and atmosphere of the novel itself. The texts that make up The Book of Disquiet were found in a box in Pessoa’s room after his death, in bundles of manuscript and typescript fragments and in no fixed order. It consists of the everyday thoughts of a single character, Bernardo Soares. The Half Pint Press edition of The Book of Disquiet takes 61 of the hundreds of fragments and presents them on a variety of paper and non-paper ephemera (some found, some made). Each fragment was typeset by hand and printed by hand on an Adana Eight-Five tabletop letterpress in an edition of 80. The fragments are presented unbound and with no fixed order in a hand-printed box. 

This edition responds to the original’s form, or lack of form, by restoring disorder to The Book of Disquiet: the fragments are to be picked out as the reader pleases. This reflects the origin of the text itself and also makes possible connections between fragments which may be less available in a bound, ordered edition; Soares was prone to letting his mind wander during long nights in his room and the book gives a sense of that wandering mind.

In addition to the title, Tim Hopkins receives a $2,000 cash prize. The four finalists each receive a $500 cash award.

The MCBA Prize 2017 jury consists of: 

Steven Daiber, of Red Trillium Press/ Aqui en la lucha in Massachusetts;

Simon Goode, co-founder of London Centre for Book Arts;

Karen Kunc, of Constellation Studios, and Cather Professor of Art at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Finalists for The MCBA Prize 2017 included:

Hannah Batsel (Chicago, IL ), Maneater

Tim Hopkins (London, England), The Book of Disquiet

Ines von Ketelhodt (Flörsheim, Germany), Alpha Beta

Ellen Knudson (Gainesville, FL ) Ingress / Egress

Nader Koochaki (Beasain, Guipúzcoa, Spain), Soineko Paisaia / Dorsal Landscape 2009-2015

The jury also awarded three Special Recognitions of Merit:

Ann Kalmbach & Tatana Kellner (Rosendale, New York), The Golden Rule

Christine McCauley (London, England), Mist 

Sue Huggins Leopard (Rochester, New York), This Past Winter

View all of the entries for The MCBA Prize 2017 in MCBA's online gallery, MCBAPrize.org.

The MCBA Prize was presented in conjunction with Book Art Biennial 2017 (July 15-23), a series of events, exhibitions and workshops that explore contemporary practice in the book arts. This year's theme— Shout Out: Community Intervention, Independent Publishing, and Alternative Distribution—featured programming that amplifies individual and collective voice through grassroots artistic practice.

To learn more, visit BookArtBiennial.org.

LOS ANGELES, July 24, 2017 - Alfred Eisenstaedt’s signed photographs of some of his most memorable subjects including the Kennedys, Richard Nixon, Winston Churchill and Katherine Hepburn will be auctioned by Nate D. Sanders Auctions on July 27, 2017. 

Eisenstaedt was one of America’s most treasured photographers. As a photojournalist for Life Magazine, Eisenstaedt took some of the most memorable images of the 20th century including V-J Day in Times Square, the unforgettable photo of a GI kissing a nurse during a parade in Times Square to celebrate the end of World War II.

Eisenstaedt traveled around the world to shoot captivating and important subjects from world leaders to famous show business performers. President John F. Kennedy gifted Eisenstaedt with two of his signed books, Profiles in Courage and To Turn the Tide, as a token of gratitude for photographing Kennedy and his family on numerous occasions for Life.  Frequent Eisenstaedt subjects Harry Truman and Charlie Chaplin also provided “Eisie” with autographed memoirs. The Kennedy, Truman and Chaplin books are featured in the auction.

Eisenstaedt died in 1995.

This auction features 12 Eisenstaedt-signed photos from his personal collection, which belonged to his late sister-in-law Lucille Kaye after his death.

Additional information on the Eisenstaedt collection can be found at 
http://natedsanders.com/catalog.aspx?searchby=3&searchvalue=eisenstaedt

About Nate D. Sanders Auctions

An industry leader in documents and autographs, Nate D. Sanders Auctions has conducted auctions in Los Angeles since 1990 and now holds major auctions on a monthly basis. Owner Nate Sanders is recognized for his knowledge of sports, historical and Hollywood memorabilia. To learn more visit natedsanders.com

249- AL HIRSCHFELD (AMERICAN, 1903-2003) copy.jpgPhiladelphia, PA - On Wednesday, August 9 at 10am, Freeman’s will present The Collector’s Sale. With more than 400 lots spanning the breadth and depth of almost every specialist department, the sale offers something for everyone and for every budget. 

The sale will be of particular interest for the budding community of young collectors developing in Philadelphia. The city was recently named by the real estate website, Trulia, as the best place for millennials, as the vibrant age group were most likely to be homeowners here than elsewhere in the country. With a trend of new and affordable housing, buying at auction allows one to own a unique piece of furniture or décor, imbued with history and timeless style for not much more—and in many cases, less—than the cost of an item from the ubiquitous Scandinavian flat-packed home store. Many of the items in the sale have estimates below $1,000. For those needing to furnish and decorate new home, The Collector’s Sale is an immediate solution to a daunting task. In addition to the affordable estate property, the auction also includes property originally unsold in one of our numerous fine sales each year. This premium property, now reduced in estimate, could not be more attractive on the market. 

Illustrator and caricaturist Al Hirschfeld was a longtime staple on the pages of The New York Times and New York Magazine, among various publications. His classic black ink drawings, made with a crow’s quill, of celebrities and Broadway stars have become synonymous with his name. Freeman’s is pleased to include more than 30 Hirschfield works in the sale, including drawings of the cast of “Friends,” jazz age dancer Josephine Baker, Ringo Starr, Bette Davis, Clint Eastwood, and two self-portraits. Each of the prints comes framed and ready to hang on your wall. 

Design enthusiasts will enjoy a selection of pieces by some of the biggest names in mid-century modern furniture, including Harry Bertoia, Eero Saarinen , Florence Knoll, and Hans Wegner, whose “wishbone” chairs have been imitated but never duplicated. The sale includes a Saarinen “Tulip” dining table and four matching chairs, as well as a side table. The iconic fluted shape of the enameled aluminum defined design in the 1970s, and each of the pieces in The Collectors Sale can be purchased for significantly less than buying a new production model today. 

With close to 100 items from our Asian Arts department, including a massive Chinese celadon jade mountain, and a variety of Chinese porcelain, hardstone, and jadeite vases, your mantelpiece will never look bare. The sale also includes decorative silver items, such as ornate silver serving trays and tea services, to elevate your next book club meeting or weekend brunch. 

Whether your style is traditional, mid-century modern, art deco, Victorian, French provincial, or an eclectic mix of everything, The Collectors Sale has the décor you are looking for. The exhibition will open with a preview party on Friday, August 4th from 6:00-8:00pm, to coincide with First Friday.

THE VIEWING AND AUCTION WILL TAKE PLACE AT 1808 CHESTNUT STREET

Saturday, August 5, 12-5pm 

Sunday, August 6, 12-5pm 

Monday, August 7, 10am-5pm 

Tuesday, August 8, 10am-5pm 

By appointment only on the morning of the sale 

AUCTION

Wednesday, August 9 at 10am at Freeman’s

PR_Expired_Book_02.jpgExpired (October 2017) is an exquisite new monograph by American photographic artist Kerry Mansfield that pays homage to the beauty and grace found in the collective and shared experience of time worn and well-read library books. The book's title is drawn from an official designation bestowed by a librarian upon a library book that is considered too damaged to be borrowed and read any longer. Some of these "expired" books are sent to be pulped and recycled, while others languish in storage or turn up in garage sales and on eBay.

This is where Mansfield steps in. For her, the discarded library book is a relic to be cherished and revered. Over the course of several years, she embarked on a mission to locate expired library books across the country and bring them back to life through her photography. With meticulous composition and artful lighting, Mansfield lovingly illuminates every damaged detail elevating these aging books into permanent works of art.

In her artist statement, Kerry Mansfield writes: "The volumes documented in 'Expired' serve as specimens akin to post-mortem photography in the Victorian Era, when family members only received the honor of documentation upon their demise. Each picture serves as an homage, calling out palpable echoes etched into the pages by a margin-scrawled note, a yellowed coffee splatter or sticky peanut butter and jelly fingerprints. It's easy to feel a sense of abuse and loss, but they say much more. They show the evidence of everyone that has touched them, because they were well read, and often well loved. They were not left on shelves, untouched."

In Expired, we witness beauty and poignancy in the tattered edges, torn covers, broken spines, water logged pages, and other defects brought on by time and neglect. Mansfield also photographs the ephemera of the library going experience: the little paper check-out cards where alongside the stamped due date the borrower's signature signifies a sacred promise to return the book on time or face a fine, or, worse, a scolding from the librarian.

The titles Mansfield captures range from the classics we love such as Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird," Dr. Seuss's "Hop on Pop," and "The Hardy Boys" series to more obscure books such as Evelyn Sibley Lampman's "The Shy Stegosaurus of Cricket Creek" and "The Flutes of Shanghai."

The Process

After culling through thousands of books, Mansfield chose each title based on specific characteristics that she felt best displayed the love poured into library books over their years on the stacks. Currently, over 180 ex-library books have been individually photographed by Mansfield. Every book was carefully assessed, documented and alphabetically archived. The series is comprised of 175 photographs. The book presents 73 of these images. Mansfield still has over 75 books left to shoot and is planning Expired (Volume II).

Book Design

Expired is elegantly designed to have the look and feel of a novel. The book features a red ribbon page marker, a tipped in image on the back cover, and mounted on the inside of the back cover is a physical library check-out card that is signed by the artist on the author line and inserted into a pocket stamped "Expired."

"We must take time to celebrate the swiftly disappearing communal experience offered by library books as they are being replaced by downloads, finger swipes, and plastic newness. If you listen carefully, you can hear the aching poetry -- the burden of the years that calls from their tattered pages," says Mansfield.

Expired will appeal to art and photo book collectors, writers, avid readers, librarians, sociologists, and anyone who cherishes the fading emblems of our collective reading history. 

About the Artist:

Kerry Mansfield is a San Francisco based photographer whose work explores time and how it effects our perceptions of what we see. Born in New Jersey in 1974, Kerry graduated with a Bachelor's Degree in Photography from UC Berkeley and did further studies at CCA (California College of the Arts) to refine her sense of space and architecture. Her work has been exhibited globally and garnered numerous honors including LensCulture's Single Image Award, multiple World Photography Organization and IPA Awards, and as a Critical Mass Finalist for three straight years. A host of press and publications, ranging from the PDN Photo Annual to The New York Times, have featured several of her bodies of work, including the most recent Expired series. For more information, go to: www.kerrymansfield.com

Book Specifications:

The Trade Edition

12"x12" 120 Smyth sewn pages 

Case bound linen cover

Leather wrap spine

Library check-out card in envelope

Red page marker ribbon

Blind embossed title

Tipped-in back cover image

$65 US

The Limited-Edition Box Set

SIGNED Limited Edition PRINT

Only 50 numbered copies

Linen clamshell case

Blind embossed title

Hand signed

Linen covered clamshell case

Includes all Trade Edition details

$350 US 

Both editions can be purchased by going to: www.kerrymansfield.com

 

Milton in Translation (Cover) copy.jpgThe works of John Milton have been translated more than 300 times and into 57 different languages - including onto sheets of toilet paper by a Yugoslavian political prisoner - extensive new research has revealed. 

A new book titled ‘Milton in Translation’ has been put together by Milton scholars and translators from across the globe to explore how wide reaching the impact of the 17th Century poet is and mark the 350th anniversary of his masterpiece ‘Paradise Lost’ (1667).  

It represents the world’s first detailed research into how Milton has been translated and read across the globe, and reveals previously unknown stories of the writer’s significance.

It has been produced by Prof Angelica Duran, Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Purdue University (USA), Dr Islam Issa, Lecturer in English Literature at Birmingham City University (UK), and Dr Jonathan R Olson, newly appointed Assistant Professor of English at Grand Canyon University (USA).

They recruited a global array of contributors who researched the number of translations, the languages and the significance of Milton across dozens of countries and hundreds of texts.  

Among stories uncovered, they found that in the 1960s, imprisoned Yugoslav communist party official turned dissident, Milovan Djilas, translated Milton onto rolls of toilet paper using a three-inch pencil hidden inside an orange and smuggled it out of prison. 

They also discovered a wide range of previously unknown facts. For instance, that translations were produced to replace lost manuscripts during China’s Cultural Revolution and that Josef Jungmann, the poet and linguist considered to be largely responsible for creating modern Czech language, took delight in translating Milton’s work. 

Dr Islam Issa, Lecturer in English Literature at Birmingham City University, who came up with idea, said:

“The inspiration for this book came in 2012 after the 10th International Milton Symposium in Tokyo, the first time the gathering had been held outside Europe or North America. It hit us how international Milton had become. It became particularly exciting finding how many languages Milton's work had been translated into since he was famously a multilingual himself.

"This book shows the real reach of literature, even if it's from 350 years ago. It also confirms that Milton's works, particularly ‘Paradise Lost’, have themes that are both universal and adaptable to different contexts.”

Among other findings, the book explores the relationship between Milton and politics across the world, reflecting the anti-establishment character of the author who played a role in ordering the execution of King Charles I. 

Translations were often found to mirror periods of rebellious ideology or nationalism such as in Soviet Estonia where the translation was an act of national resistance, during the Winter War of Finland when the country was gaining independence from Russia, and in the Middle East during the recent Arab Spring uprisings.

The book finds that translations of Milton’s work have been closely linked to religion in Iran and Israel, and specifically with Christianity in Italy, Poland, Portugal and Spain, where the Catholic Inquisition played a part in limiting and delaying some translations. 

Dr Issa added:

"The book isn't just about Milton. For me, the most fascinating thing was seeing how all around the world, religion and politics have been so closely linked with what people choose to translate and how they go about it.

“There were many common trends. So readers going through independence took real interest in Milton's revolutionary ideas. Or interestingly, translators in Egypt, Estonia and Spain from completely different times self-censored the exact same sexual scenes". 

Discoveries also include that Milton's works have been translated into more languages in the last 30 years than in the previous three centuries combined, emphasising the global political liberation and changing landscape of the 21st Century. 

‘Milton in Translation’ has been published by the Oxford University Press. 

 

1007.jpgThe July 15, 2017 sale at National Book Auctions (NBA) featured a broad range of rare and collectible books and ephemera.

Figuring prominently were titles relating to the opening of the American West as well as emblem books dating back to the early 17th century. Another standout offering was an early edition of Alexander von Humboldt's magnum opus "Voyage aux Regions Equinoxiales du Nouveau Continent." This highly decorative set with calf-backed, marbled, and gilt-stamped boards fetched $1,125 against a high estimate of $400. This pleasing result reflects the recent resurgence of interest in von Humboldt thanks to Andrea Wulf's 2016 bestseller "The Invention of Nature," which credits the German geographer with "forever chang[ing] the way we see the natural world."

Noteworthy ephemera lots included a very early issue of Detective Comics featuring Batman and Robin, which was discovered among personal papers during a complete estate clean-out conducted by NBA's full-service sister company Worth Auctions. Also showcased were an envelope franked by James A. Garfield; an original drawing by Rube Goldberg inscribed to the famous conservationist Horace Marden Albright; and a suite of vintage gravure prints by such iconic early 20th century photographers as Imogen Cunningham and Charles Sheeler.

Further complementary material will be featured in NBA's upcoming sale on July 29, 2017. NBA's cataloged live sales take place in the Galleries at Worth Asset Brokerage in Freeville, New York (just six miles north of Cornell University) and are simulcast to a global bidding audience via Invaluable. For more information about bidding or consigning, mail@nationalbookauctions.com or call 607-269-0101.

Image: Voyage aux Regions Equinoxiales du Nouveau Continent.

Hippie sex commune007 copy.jpgCambridge, MA (July 2017) -- The search for something beyond the limits of ordinary experience—for transcendence—has preoccupied humankind for millennia. Religion, the occult, philosophy, music, endorphins, sex, Ecstasy: various paths have been taken in the hope of achieving it. In Altered States: Sex, Drugs, and Transcendence in the Ludlow-Santo Domingo Library, on view at Houghton Library 5 September-16 December, one collector’s quest to document the history of this search through rare books, manuscripts, photographs, posters, prints, comics, and ephemera is celebrated. 

Investment advisor Julio Mario Santo Domingo, Jr. (1957-2009) assembled the world’s largest private collection documenting psychoactive drugs and their physical and social effects. His interest was broad, from cultivation and synthesis to the many cultural and counter-cultural products such altered states of mind have inspired and influenced. Rich in scientific, medical, legal, and literary works, the Ludlow-Santo Domingo (LSD) Library documents in depth both the benefits of controlled use and the horrors of addiction. 

The exhibition, curated by Leslie A. Morris, Curator of Modern Books and Manuscripts at Houghton Library with the assistance of colleagues throughout the Harvard Library system, focuses on eight major topics represented in the LSD Library: opium, cocaine, hallucinogens, marijuana, sex, social protest, underground comix, and ephemera. “The incredible variety of material in the LSD Library has transformed our collection,” said Morris. “The Library can now support innovative new research on 20th-century culture and counterculture. And it’s very cool stuff!” 

Highlights include illustrations of poppies in a 16th-century doctor’s manual; an album of delicate 19th-century Chinese paintings showing stages of opium production; a binding with mirror and Amex card for cutting cocaine by artist Damien Hirst; self-portraits drawn under the influence of LSD; and posters from the Black Panthers and the May 1968 student protests in Paris. A selection of classic literature, including work by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Thomas De Quincy, Charles Baudelaire, William S. Burroughs, and Allen Ginsberg; and association copies such as Adolf Hitler’s annotated Kokain by Pitigrilli and Timothy Leary’s notes on Aleister Crowley’s Diary of a Drug Fiend, rub shoulders with pulp fiction such as Marijuana Girl, and underground comix illustrated by R. Crumb and Trina Robbins. Medical works on therapeutic drug use, and true-life tales of crime and addiction, provide a sobering reminder of the danger of excess. 

Sex, another path towards transcendence, is explored through poet Pierre Louÿs’s sex diary; erotica by Rachilde, Guy de Maupassant, and Pauline Réage; the first X-rated comic, Barbarella; and Jeffrey magazine. Works on birth control, AIDS prevention, and the Illustrated Presidential Report of the Commission on Obscenity and Pornography, and a female condom, show the individual and social consequences such exploration may provoke. 

The LSD Library came to Harvard in 2012. The collection is shared between various libraries at the University; this exhibition includes material from the Botany Library, Countway Medical Library, Fine Arts Library, Harvard Film Archive, Houghton Library, Law Library, Schlesinger Library, and Widener Library. “Since its arrival at Harvard in 2012, the Ludlow-Santo Domingo Library has been one of our most heavily used collections for research and for teaching,” said Thomas Hyry, Florence Fearrington Librarian of Houghton Library. “With this exhibition, we now look forward to presenting selections from this remarkable collection and to welcoming a broad audience of visitors who can engage with and learn from it.” 

Programs 

Complementary events include:
o Lectures by Don Lattin, author of the Harvard Psychedelic Club, and Laurence Bergreen, author of Casanova: The World of a Seductive Genius
o A film series at the Harvard Film Archive
o Social protest inspired poetry readings and other events hosted by Houghton 

Library’s Woodberry Poetry Room
o Altered Gazes: Sex, Drugs, and Rock & Roll at Schlesinger Library, an exhibition at Harvard University’s Schlesinger Library 

Houghton Library 

Houghton Library is Harvard University’s principal repository for rare books and manuscripts, literary and performing arts archives, and more. The library’s holdings of primary source material are managed by an expert staff and shared with scholars, students and the public in the reading room, and through exhibitions, lectures, seminars, publications and courses. 

Houghton Library is located in Harvard Yard, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. It is open Monday, Friday and Saturday 9am-5pm, and Tuesday through Thursday 9am-7pm. Houghton Library is closed on Sundays. Exhibitions are free and open to the public. 

Image: Ronald Jamer. Hippie Sex Communes. Los Angeles: Echelon Book Publishers, 1970. SD Library Pulp Fiction Collection, Houghton Library, Harvard University.

Symposium_banner.jpgCambridge, MA (July 2017) - Houghton Library, Harvard College’s primary rare books and manuscripts library, recently announced the capstone event of its 75th anniversary year, a symposium that asks bluntly, “Houghton Library: Who Cares?” The event, scheduled for this October 5th-6th, will examine the library’s legacy, mission, and path forward through the lens of that central question and provocation. 

Florence Fearrington Librarian of Houghton, Tom Hyry looks forward to “an engaging symposium that will address, from a variety of perspectives, many of the most pressing challenges and promising opportunities faced by Houghton Library and the special collections and archives profession. We hope and expect,” he continues, “that the symposium will result in a renewal of mission and the development of new directions for the library.” 

Fourteen speakers and panelists who connect to Houghton’s collections in a range of ways - as creators and collectors, readers and interpreters, colleagues in cultural heritage from around the world - will join the audience to grapple with questions around care and concern for the collections, as well as the scholarship, art, and inquiry that come out of engagement with libraries like Houghton. Organizers of the event hope to face boldly questions and concerns, cultivating an informed optimism about the future of special collections and archives that is tempered with an understanding of the problems they face in our current cultural climate. 

“Anniversaries tend toward the celebratory and self-congratulatory; our organizing committee hoped instead to use this opportunity to self-challenge and really do the work of building a case for care with this dynamic group of speakers and thinkers,” says Emilie Hardman, Houghton’s Research, Instruction, and Digital Initiatives Librarian, chair of the organizing committee. 

Each day of the symposium will feature a keynote lecture, the first delivered by Jamaica Kincaid, the world-renowned novelist and essayist. Kincaid will be followed by Johanna Drucker, internationally known for her work in the history of graphic design, typography, experimental poetry, fine art, and digital humanities. Symposium attendees will also hear opening remarks from Henry Louis “Skip” Gates, Director of the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University, and Drew Gilpin Faust, president of Harvard. For a full schedule, presenter profiles, registration for the waitlist, and other information, please visit: houghton75symposium.org. 

Want to know more? houghtonlibrary_events@harvard.edu or +1 617-998-5210 

Houghton Library 

Houghton Library is the principal repository for Harvard University's collections of rare books, manuscripts, and archives. The library’s holdings of primary source material are managed by an expert staff and shared with scholars and the public in the reading room, and through exhibitions, lectures, seminars, publications and courses. 

Houghton Library is located in Harvard Yard, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. It is open Monday, Friday and Saturday 9am-5pm, and Tuesday through Thursday 9am-7pm. Houghton Library is closed on Sundays. Exhibitions are free and open to the public. 

 

old ny photo 1.jpgThere’s even more to experience, more to enjoy and - best of all -- more to buy, when the Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair returns to the Brooklyn Expo Center in Greenpoint, September 8-10, 2017. One of New York City’s most eagerly awaited fall events, the 100-exhibitor fair, produced by the Impact Events Group, is among the largest regional antiquarian book fairs in the country.  

This year show goers will be introduced to a whole new world of collectible treasures with the debut of a “Works on Paper” gallery. Sunlight from the exhibition hall’s large windows will flood into individual gallery spaces where exhibitors have brought together outstanding collections of prints, drawings, etchings, engravings, lithographs and photography to add to the fair’s abundance of rare and vintage books from top dealers from across the U.S., Canada and Europe. Whether you’re looking for a book under $50, a rare edition, or a fine print to cherish for years to come, you’ll find it at this fair. With the addition of the Works on Paper gallery, the Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair’s expanded offerings make it feel like two great shows in one!

To celebrate the debut of the Works on Paper gallery, the Fair will mount an exhibition and sale of works by the late Maurice Sendak, beloved children’s author and illustrator. The first gallery-style showing and sale to be held in the artist’s native Brooklyn, this special event will feature original drawings, watercolors, vintage posters, signed prints and etchings, most of which have never been offered for public sale. 

These have been collected over a period of fifty years and were largely acquired directly from the artist himself. This is an unprecedented opportunity to own a fine art print, actually produced by the artist in 1971 from some of his favorite book images, for as little as $25.  For the serious collector, an exceptional signed first edition of the artist’s most famous children’s book, “Where the Wild Things Are,” is being offered by Enchanted Books for $22,500.  

If the work of Matthew Carter looks familiar, it’s because you might use it yourself - on your computer. The Center Street Studio is bringing a dramatic exhibit of a print portfolio by the renowned digital type designer, who has seven of his designs in the collection at the Museum of Modern Art. This portfolio consists of the 26 letters of the alphabet in his favorite typefaces of his own creation, which will be displayed on a 24-foot wall.  Some of the fonts include his best known, such as Verdana and Georgia, as well as some from type designs still in progress. 

Pop-up Mania is a series of events devoted to books filled with characters that pop right up out of its pages. Ellen Rubin, known as the Pop-Up Lady, is an expert on the history of moveable paper and will give an informative talk, “A History of Pop-up Books: 900 Years of Paper Engineering” on Saturday. She will also present an amazing exhibit from her massive collection of rare pop-up books from around the world.  On Sunday, parents and children alike will enjoy joining her for a 20-minute dramatic reading of the pop-up book, The Three Little Pigs. Fun for the entire family!

Joining her on Sunday is Matthew Reinhart, a world-renowned children's book author, illustrator and paper engineer. He will share the secrets of how to transform paper into magical, moving, three-dimensional structures that defy imagination in his demonstration, “Cut, Fold And Repeat.” Matthew is known best for designing the impossible in his acclaimed pop-up books, among them the New York Times bestselling “Star Wars: A Pop-Up Guide To The Galaxy, Cinderella: A Pop-Up Fairy Tale, Dc Super Heroes: The Ultimate Pop-Up Book and Mommy ?, produced with the legendary Maurice Sendak.. 

For people new to collecting rare books or prints, two talented professionals will present informative talks on Saturday. The History Channel’s “Pawn Stars” personality and rare book specialist, Rebecca Romney, will talk on “The ABC’s of Starting a Rare Book Collection,” and sign copies of her newly published book, “Printer’s Error:  Irreverent Stories from Book History.”  Art appraiser and renowned print specialist Jeannot R. Barr will share the fine points of getting started on a print collection in his presentation, “Starting a Print Collection on Any Budget. It’s a unique opportunity for collectors at all levels to learn directly from experts.

One of the signatures of this show is its depth of variety. Visitors could spend hours combing the aisles for personal favorites:  nostalgic snapshots of early New York from the vast collection of Stacy Waldman, owner of the House of Mirth; Brooklyn-based bookseller Lizzy Young’s vintage cookbooks and ephemera, including menus from the ocean liner RMS Lusitania. A collection of beautifully bound books from Austin Abbey Rare Books, has gilt-embossed covers that turn into glowing miniature works of art under direct light; and a huge collection of vintage luggage labels from Sheryl Jaeger of Eclectibles is sure to induce romantic visions of faraway places. World War II history buffs will be drawn to two important and very rare propaganda postcard collections that demonstrate how history unfolds on paper. Exhibitor Kurt Sanftleben’s Black Album, a collection of ten propaganda postcards, is the earliest depiction of Nazi atrocities against Poland’s Jewish citizens. Emil Allakhverdov’s Anti-Nazi, Anti-Soviet postcards, were reconfigured illustrations from a Ukrainian children’s book, published after the defeat of Nazi Germany in 1945. 

A Friday evening preview benefiting Rare Book School, is a must for those wanting to get first pick from the fair’s thousands of rare items before doors open on Saturday.  

LOCATION:

Brooklyn Expo Center

79 Franklin Street

Greenpoint, Brooklyn

HOURS:

Friday Preview - 5:00-9:00 pm (benefit for Rare Book School)

Saturday, September 9 -11:00 am to 7:00 pm

Sunday, September 10 - 11:00 am to 5:00 pm.

ADMISSION PRICES:

Friday Night Preview Benefit -- $25.00

General Admission Weekend Pass for $15 or $10 on Sunday 

Visit: www.brooklynbookfair.com for more information and discount admission tickets.

9781783301874.jpgFacet Publishing have announced the release of Freda Matassa’s new book Valuing Your Collection: A practical guide for museums, libraries and archives 

Assigning a financial value to a cultural object is always difficult, as there is no right answer. It is one of the many tasks of the curator, whether they work in a gallery, museum, archive or library, yet it is a role for which few have had any training and that many approach with a lack of confidence. Even if there is a profound knowledge of the subject matter, there may be insufficient experience in the market for cultural objects. However, although it may not be easy, it has to be done.

In Valuing Your Collection, collections management expert Freda Matassa examines the issues around valuing objects in cultural collections, describing current practice in museums, libraries and archives, and giving practical advice on how to assign values. Matassa looks at the difference between value and worth and at how cultural value can be translated into monetary terms. She outlines the arguments over whether financial values should be assigned at all and provides guidance on how to approach a valuation by making comparisons and using a step-by-step process for which templates for a wide range of collections are provided.

Matassa said, “Valuation is fraught with difficulties for cultural collections. Finance is not their core business. Curators have little or no training and are reluctant to mention money as it may detract from significance. My book is designed to give the non-specialist confidence in their decision making.”

Valuing Your Collection: A practical guide for museums, libraries and archives | Jul 2017 | 240pp | paperback: 9781783301874 | £59.95 | hardback: 9781783301881 | £119.95 | eBook: 9781783302147

Freda Matassa FRSA MA (Hons) DipAL DipEd is a well-known UK expert on collections management who advises, teaches and lectures internationally. Currently Director of Matassa Toffolo, a museum-standard art consultancy, former Head of Collections Management at Tate Galleries and co-founder of the European Registrars Conference, she is expert adviser on several European projects for museum standards and to the Minister of Culture on Immunity from Seizure. She was named one of the Top 50 Women to Watch in the arts and is the author of Museum Collections Management (Facet, 2011) and Organizing Exhibitions (Facet, 2014).

The book is published by Facet Publishing and is available from Bookpoint Ltd | Tel: +44 (0)1235 827702 | Fax: +44 (0)1235 827703 | Email: facet@bookpoint.co.uk | Web: www.facetpublishing.co.uk. | Mailing Address: Mail Order Dept, 39 Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 4TD. It is available in North America from the American Library Association.

Gigli copy.jpgDALLAS, Texas — Some of the most recognizable cultural figures and historical events are represented in the prints offered in Heritage Auctions’ Photographs Online Auction. Bids have been registered for a number of pieces with the end of bidding arriving July 19.

Highlighting the auction is long time LIFE magazine photographer Ormond Gigli’s Girls in the Windows, New York City, 1960 (est. $35,000-45,000), an impressive-sized (46 by 46 inches) print that is widely regarded as one of the most famous fashion shots of the 1960s.

“This auction is a testament to the evolving fine-art photography market and our over one million registered bidder-members that we are able to offer such high-value and iconic photographs in an internet-only format,” said Nigel Russell, Heritage Auctions Director of Photography.

Photographer and environmentalist Ansel Adams is represented with his Aspens, Northern New Mexico, 1958 (est. $15,000-25,000). This photo came to auction from the current owner who received it directly form Adams in 1977.

One of the most memorable photos ever published by LIFE magazine V.J. Day , Times Square, New York City, 1945 also referred to as “The Kiss” by Alfred Eisenstaedt (est. $8,000-12,000), numbered 175/250, captures the celebration of V-J Day in New York City. The Germany-born photographer recorded some of the most influential and iconic images of the 20th century.

Additionally, American photographer Herb Greene built his career around his portraits of the infamous band The Grateful Dead. This shot of the band with rock legend Bob Dylan aptly titled Bob Dylan and the Grateful Dead, 1987 (est. $1,500-2,500), is classic Greene and is one of many pop culture-themed photos available.

Other top lots include but are not limited to:

Hiroshi Sugimoto’s Saint Benedict Chapel from the series Architecture of Time, 2000: est. $10,000-15,000

Josef Hoflehner’s Jet Airliner #43, 2011: est. $6,500-7,500

Yousuf Karsh’s Winston Churchill, 1941: est. $3,000-5,000

Nicholas Nixon’s The Brown Sisters, Cambridge, 1986: est. $6,000-8,000

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

nielsen copy.jpgDALLAS, Texas - A record-breaking $1.4 million worth of rare animation art, concept drawings and poster art changed hands in Heritage Auctions’ Animation Art Auction July 1-2 in Dallas. The event featured a grand selection of original Fantasia artwork, and the leader of the famed Disney musical feature was Kay Nielsen’s depiction of the demon Chernabog in the Night on Bald Mountain Concept Painting, which sold for an astounding $59,750.

“This was our sixth consecutive Animation auction to top the $1 million mark,” said Jim Lentz, Director of Animation Art for Heritage. “Our formula has been to auction primarily fresh material that never had been offered for sale before, with almost no reserves, and to cross-promote it to a new generation of bidders as well as seasoned animation collectors. We plan to continue in this vein and also to continue emphasizing the whole range of animation from 1928-2000."

A beautiful Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs Old Hag and Snow White Production Cel exceeded expectations by closing $33,460, solidifying the fact that the cel was “no ordinary apple.” Also, a museum-worthy storyboard sequence from Song of the South appeared and its 23 pages of concept art from the “Tar Baby” scene by illustrator Ken Anderson sold for $15,535. Concept art from the classic by Mary Blair featuring Br'er Bear and Br'er Fox Concept Art (Walt Disney, 1946) sold for $10,157.

A lavish selection of Lady and the Tramp original artwork was offered, and some of the highlights included an alluring Production Cel Setup and Master Background that realized $14,340, a Production Cel Setup from the memorable “Bella Notte” scene received $11,950 and a Concept Art/Background Color Key by Eyvind Earle was auctioned for $6,572.50.

Additional animation and collectibles highlights included, but were not limited to:

·         Mary Blair’s The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad Concept Painting: realized $14,937

·         Mary Blair’s It’s a Small World Concept Painting: realized $14,340

·         Robin Hood Daffy Original Painting by Chuck Jones: realized $14,340

·         A bound Mickey Mouse Magazine Giveaway V1 #1: realized $13,145

Classics and Saturday Morning Cartoons

A gem from the Saturday morning cartoon arsenal of artwork Filmation’s The Adventures of Batman Publicity Cel and Painted Coconut came out on top, realizing $6,572. This cel was special because it was actually displayed in Filmation Studios’ offices for many years.

A rare, Rocky and His Friends Production Cel and Key Master Background realized $16,730.

An extraordinarily rare Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas Production Cel Setup and Master Background (MGM, 1966) - depicting the dastardly Grinch speeding away from Whoville on a sled packed with presents - sold for nearly three times its estimate to end at $6,572.

One of the first depictions of Mighty Mouse as “Super Mouse”- desired for being the first time art from the early cartoon was ever offered at auction - sold for $5,019. Also bringing $5,019 was a Production Cel and Master Painted Background Setup from the famous Tom and Jerry short “A Mouse in the House.”

Rare Disneyland Poster Art

Fans of Disneyland were treated to The Haunted House/Haunted Mansion Disneyland Notes and Plans group that are straight from the hands of Walt Disney and Ken Anderson, a longtime writer and art director at Walt Disney Animation Studios. These binder-bound notes went for $13,145 after a fierce battle among 13 bidders.

The “Haunted Mansion" Disneyland Entrance Poster Signed by Marc Davis (Walt Disney, 1969) sold for $4,899. The "Matterhorn Bobsled" Disneyland Park Attraction Poster (Walt Disney, 1959) sold for $3,585 as did the "Autopia" Disneyland Park Attraction Poster (Walt Disney, 1955).

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

casa.jpgDALLAS, Texas - A truly special piece from a film widely regarded as one of the greatest ever made, the 1946 Casablanca Italian 4 Fogli with Luigi Martinati Artwork is expected to sell for as much as $180,000 July 29-30 in Dallas. This 55.5-by-78.25-inch work of art is the first of its kind to surface in recent history; the poster, and many more, will hit the block on July 29-30 at Heritage Auctions’ Movie Posters Signature Auction.

“This Casablanca rarity is one of the finest in the entire hobby,” said Grey Smith, Director of Vintage Posters at Heritage Auctions. “To own this poster is on par with owning the pinnacle of poster art.”

Also on offer is a Frankenstein (Universal, 1931) One Sheet (est. $80,000), which is one out of six copies known to exist. The sequel to Frankenstein also makes an appearance at auction. A French Grande (46.5-by-62-inch) of The Bride of Frankenstein from 1935 is expected to bring in $40,000.

Other momentous Horror posters consist of a Supernatural One Sheet from 1933 (est. $45,000) and a never-before-offered Italian 4 Fogli from Horror of Dracula, a Universal production (est. $10,000).

From the depths of imagination came Metropolis, and with it came the revolutionary genre of science fiction. Two Australian pre-war daybills will cross the block and each is the only known copy of its kind. The two styles being presented are the Robotrix Style Daybill (est. $30,000) and the Flood Style Daybill (est. $20,000) which are genre-defining classics and must-haves for any serious collector. 

The Day the Earth Stood Still (est. $10,000) by 20th Century Fox in 1951 is arguably one of the best science fiction movies ever made, and Heritage is offering a classic Standee with retro imagery similar to the artwork found on the half sheets and title cards.

Additional highlights include, but are not limited to:

·         Casablanca Half Sheet (Warner Brothers, 1942): est. $50,000

·         Cavalcade One Sheet (Fox, 1933): est. $25,000

·         Morocco Double Grande (Paramount, 1931): est. $20,000

·         Spitfire One Sheet (RKO, 1934): est. $15,000

·         Moon Over Miami One Sheet (20th Century Fox, 1941): est. $12,000

Heritage Auctions’ Signature Movie Poster Auction takes place July 29-30 in Dallas and online at HA.com.

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

PBS presenters 1.pngThe lineup for the 3rd annual Picture Book Summit online writing conference, set to take place Saturday, October 7, has been announced. Early Bird registration is now open. 

Headlining the event is Tomie dePaola, author of Strega Nona and more than 200 additional children's books. The 2011 recipient of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award for lifetime contribution to American children's literature will appear live to provide the opening keynote address. 

The live online writing conference, reaching working and aspiring picture book writers across the globe, will feature a full day of keynotes, workshops and panels featuring top authors, editors and agents. 

Also providing keynote addresses will be superstar picture book authors Carole Boston Weatherford (multiple Caldecott honoree, author of Freedom in Congo Square, Moses: When Harriet Tubman Led Her People to Freedom and more than 50 additional books for children) and Adam Rex (New York Times bestsellers Frankenstein Makes a Sandwich and School’s First Day of School). 

Attendees will also enjoy workshops from author Steve Swinburne (Sea Turtle Scientist and Safe in a Storm), Julie Hedlund (My Love for You is the Sun), Greenburger Associates Literary Agent Brenda Bowen and Laura Backes, publisher and founder of Children's Book Insider, the Children's Writing Monthly. 

Panel discussions will include a selection of children's publishing's top editors and agents. There will also be networking and submission opportunities for attendees. 

The full day's lineup, along with registration information, can be found at http://PictureBookSummit.com 

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced today that Denis Johnson, author of the critically acclaimed collection of short stories “Jesus’ Son” and the novel “Tree of Smoke,” will posthumously receive the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction during the 2017 Library of Congress National Book Festival, Sept. 2.

The National Book Festival and the prize ceremony will take place at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C. The author’s widow, Cindy Johnson, will accept the prize.

Hayden chose Johnson based on the recommendation of a jury of distinguished authors and prominent literary critics from around the world.

“Denis Johnson was a writer for our times,” Hayden said. “In prose that fused grace with grit, he spun tale after tale about our walking wounded, the demons that haunt, the salvation we seek. We emerge from his imagined world with profound empathy, a different perspective—a little changed.”

In March the Librarian offered the prize to Johnson, and he enthusiastically accepted. He wrote, “The list of past awardees is daunting, and I'm honored to be in such company. My head's spinning from such great news!” After a long struggle with cancer, Denis Johnson died on May 24.

The annual Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction honors an American literary writer whose body of work is distinguished not only for its mastery of the art but also for its originality of thought and imagination. The award seeks to commend strong, unique, enduring voices that—throughout long, consistently accomplished careers—have told us something revealing about the American experience.

Previous winners of the prize are Marilynne Robinson (2016), Louise Erdrich (2015), E. L. Doctorow (2014) and Don DeLillo (2013). Under its previous name, the Library of Congress Creative Achievement Award for fiction, the awardees were Philip Roth (2012), Toni Morrison (2011), Isabel Allende (2010), and John Grisham (2009). In 2008, the Library presented Pulitzer-Prize winner Herman Wouk with a lifetime achievement award for fiction writing.

Johnson was born in Munich, West Germany, the son of an American diplomat, and spent his childhood in the Philippines and Japan before returning to spend the rest of his youth in the suburbs of Washington, D.C. He is the author of nine novels, as well as numerous plays, poetry collections, a short-story collection and a novella. Johnson won the National Book Award for his resonant Vietnam novel “Tree of Smoke” (2007), which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

His short novel “Train Dreams” (2012) was also a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. His most recent work, “The Laughing Monsters,” was published in 2014. Johnson’s many other honors include fellowships from the Guggenheim and Lannan Foundations and a Whiting Award.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

141-Flagg copy.jpgNew York—On August 2, Swann Galleries will close their spring-summer season with an extravaganza of Vintage Posters that span the last 150 years.

Marking the centennial anniversary of the U.S.’s entry into World War I, the sale will feature the largest number of posters from the conflict the house has ever offered. James Montgomery Flagg’s iconic I Want You for U.S. Army, 1917, estimated at $7,000 to $10,000, leads a group of galvanizing images from both sides of the Atlantic. Flagg is well represented in the sale, with several of his famous works promoting Wake Up America Day, as well as various factions of the military. Also available are patriotic works by Howard Chandler Christy, Joseph C. Leyendecker, William Dodge Stevens and Lucy Kemp-Welch.

A prodigious selection World War II propaganda brings the total number of war posters in the sale to nearly 250. Leading the way is the iconic Keep Calm & Carry On, published in 1939 by the British Ministry of Information and never officially distributed ($12,000 to $18,000). Similarly, 1941’s Join the ATS by Abram Games, valued at $3,000 to $4,000, was never released publicly because it was considered too suggestive. Additional highlights include popular works by Victor Ancona, E.B. Greenhaw, Leo Lionni and Karl Koehler.

From the nineteenth century comes a parade of Art Nouveau masterworks that includes Eugène Grasset’s Abricotine, circa 1905, and Babylone d’Allemagne, 1894, by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec ($7,000 to $10,000 and $20,000 to $30,000, respectively). The charming A la Bodiniére, 1894, by Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen, valued at $6,000 to $9,000, joins sensuous works by Jane Atché, Leonetto Cappiello, Ludwig Hohlwein and Alphonse Mucha.

A selection of circus and magic posters features highlights from Barnum & Bailey’s and the Ringling Brothers. A promotional poster for magician Harry Jansen displays his stage name and catch phrase: Danté / Sim - Sala - Bim! mysteriously bears the signature of Ted Henty, a policeman turned ghost-hunter ($12,000 to $18,000). A more modern assortment of entertainment images includes French music hall, theatrical and movie posters, including the renowned advertisement by Robert McGinnis for Breakfast at Tiffany’s, 1961, starring Audrey Hepburn as Holly Golightly, valued between $4,000 and $6,000.

Two colorful works by Roger Broders will be available: Menton, circa 1923, depicts a French seaside while La Côte d’Azur ses Montagnes, circa 1930, shows a vertiginous mountain valley ($1,500 to $2,000 each). Beach scenes by Maurice Lauro, Fortunino Matania and Alberto Vargas demonstrate the newfound popularity of coastal tourism in the first half of the twentieth century.

The auction will be held Wednesday, August 2, beginning at 10:30 a.m. and continuing at 2:30 p.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Thursday, July 27, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Friday, July 28, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Monday, July 31, through Tuesday, August 1, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

An illustrated auction catalogue is available for $35 at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information and to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Nicholas D. Lowry at 212-254-4710, extension 57, or via e-mail at posters@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 141 James Montgomery Flagg, I Want You For U.S. Army, 1917. Estimate $7,000 to $10,000.

 

Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind, poem inscription copy.jpgHollywood icon and incandescent star of one of the most beloved films of all time, Vivien Leigh (1913-1967) captured hearts and minds with her fiery, luminous performance as Scarlett O’Hara in Gone with the Wind in 1939. Her legendary status in the pantheon of all-time greats was assured when she secured what perhaps remains to this day the most coveted role in cinema history. Our perception of such legends is often imperceptibly entwined with the myths they come to embody. This September, a spotlight will reveal the inner person few people really knew, in effect Vivien’s private life, when Sotheby’s London brings to auction The Vivien Leigh Collection.

Passed down through Vivien’s family, the collection comprises paintings, jewellery, couture, books, furniture, porcelain, objets d’art and further items celebrating all aspects of her life, from the pre-war years in London, to Hollywood and beyond, up to her death in 1967. Myriad pieces drawn from the city and country homes Vivien shared with her husband Laurence Olivier will give a new perspective on Vivien, from her appreciation of art and patronage of Modern British artists, to her passion for books and fondness for entertaining and interior design.

Vivien Leigh’s family commented: “We hope people take as much pleasure from this collection as our grandparents, parents and families have done.”

Harry Dalmeny, Sotheby’s UK Chairman, commented: “This is our chance to discover the real, and unexpected, Vivien Leigh. We’re all guilty of confusing our favourite actresses with the heroines they portray, of blurring Vivien’s identity with that of Scarlett O’Hara or Blanche DuBois. But, behind the guise of the most glamorous and talked-about woman of her age we find a fine art collector, patron, even a book worm, who was the intellectual equal of the literati, artists and aesthetes she counted among her coterie. Her private collection does not disappoint. Vivien approached the decoration of her homes as if she were designing a set, incorporating influences and inspiration from a life spent on screen and on stage. These houses were an extension of the theatrical space, with medieval Notley Abbey looking positively Shakespearean. Fifty years on from her death, this sale opens the door into Vivien’s private world, allowing us a privileged and fascinating glimpse into a world that otherwise only her closest friends could ever have known.”

Vivien Leigh’s Personal Copy of Gone With The Wind

Given to her by the author Margaret Mitchell 

£5,000-7,000

The quest to find an actress to play Scarlett O’Hara is one of the most enduring stories enshrined in the annals of Hollywood. Margaret Mitchell’s novel, winner of the 1937 Pulitzer Prize, was a best-seller in every sense, not only selling in staggering numbers, but striking a chord with female readers who fancied themselves as Scarlett. Among these fans was Vivien, one of the book’s earliest readers: “From the moment I read [it], I was fascinated by the lovely wayward, tempestuous Scarlett. I felt that I loved and understood her, almost as though I had known her in the flesh. When I heard that the book was to filmed in Hollywood early in 1939, I longed to play the part.”

A dedicated reader of the book, Vivien kept a copy close at hand during filming and deeply resented any divergence from Margaret Mitchell’s text. On the final day of shooting, Olivia de Havilland (‘Melanie Hamilton’) walked past Vivien, failing to recognise her. “She looked so diminished by over work... Her whole atmosphere had changed. She gave something to that film that I don’t think she ever got back.” Vivien went on to win her first Oscar for her performance in 1939. She was just 26 years old at the time.

Her copy of Gone with the Wind is inscribed by Margaret Mitchell with a hand-written poem: “Life’s pattern pricked with a scarlet thread / where once we were with a gray / To remind us all how we played our parts / In the shock of an epic day”.

 

Lot 82 - Jane Austen - autograph letter, written in third person to her niece Anna Lefroy (nee Austen) copy.jpgSotheby’s London, July 2017-Almost exactly 200 years to the day of Jane Austen’s death in 1817, a masterly comic letter written by the author to her favourite niece will come to sale for the very first time at Sotheby’s London on 11th July with an estimate of £80,000-100,000. The celebrated novelist, whose own literature has remained the subject of critique for over two centuries, is here seen exercising her own critical opinion of another writer’s work in a light-hearted jeu d’espirit which exudes not only Austen’s supreme intellect, but also her comic charm.

Dating from 29-30 October 1812, a critical time in Austen’s career - immediately after the publication of Sense and Sensibility and around the time that the manuscript of Pride and Prejudice was sent for publication - this unique correspondence provides a rare insight into how Austen thought about fiction. The object of her censure is a “most tiresome and prosy” Gothic novel titled Lady Maclairn, the Victim of Villainy, published by her contemporary Rachel Hunter. 

Both Austen and her niece Anna Lefroy, the eldest daughter of Rev. James Austen, Jane’s eldest brother, had thoroughly enjoyed reading the novel together. And this letter, addressed as if to the author Rachel Hunter herself, brims with the shared pleasure the two women had taken in this over-plotted melodrama, relishing its clichés and absurdities,from the heroine’s relentless tears to the verbose repetitions of character and plot.

Mrs Hunter’s novel cannot, of course, survive the mock-enthusiasm of perhaps the wittiest pen in the language, but it is at least clear that Austen had found the novel to be enjoyable nonsense. 

Indeed, this satirical exposure of the clichés of the Gothic novel is strikingly reminiscent of Northanger Abbey, in which Austen gleeful parodied the conventions of Gothic novels. The link to Austen’s own oeuvre is furthered when the novelist turns the attention toward her personal style of writing, pleading for ‘at least 4 vols more about the Flint family’ and demanding a more extensive examination of the lover’s courtship, which Hunter ‘handled too briefly’. Referring to herself in the third person, she asserts:‘it is certainly not hard to imagine that Austen could have made much of an episode’ of ‘the arrival of a handsome young curate’. Indeed, her comments mock the iconic style for which Austen’s novels are famed, alluding to the lengthy passages of characterisation and courtship which perpetually preside.

The letter is significant then, not only because it is littered with a delightfully light-hearted irony shared exclusively between close family members, but because it illuminates the remarkable relationship which existed between the author, her novels, and the novels of her contemporaries, at the very peak of her literary career.

For full details click here

Two Further Fragments of Correspondence between Jane Austen and her Favoured Niece Anna Lefroy 

Sotheby’s sale will also include two fragments of handwritten letters addressed to Lefroy, which disclose the intricacies of Austen’s family life and leisure.

The first of these fragments (lot 83) was written during Austen’s ten day visit to London in November 1814, the main object of which was to meet with her publisher to discuss a second edition of Mansfield Park, following a sell-out first run. The letter recounts the lively family gossip circulating in the weeks following Anna’s marriage to Benjamin Lefroy, and discusses the family trip to the theatre to see David Garrick’s popular production of Isabella, or the Fatal Marriage.It is hardly surprising that Jane would take the opportunity that the visit to London gave her to visit her "literary niece" for the first time since her marriage, and this engaging letter expresses her pleasure in Anna's new life. 

Perhaps most importantly however, this fragment exemplifies the emphasis which Austen placed on a close-knit extended network of family, a theme that bears out in many of her most-loved novels. As with many of Jane Austen's letters, it gives a powerful sense of her life within an extensive familial network of immediate family and cousins: ‘I like first Cousins to be first Cousins, & interested about each other’. 

Lot 84 comprises the second fragment of this same letter. Here, the importance with which Austen regards family is again the foremost theme, as she describes a visit to her nieces whose mother had recently passed away; Charles Austen’s wife had tragically died following childbirth in 1814, and the baby was lost two weeks later. The fragment recalls the ‘thousand questions’ put forth by her young inquisitive nieces, aged five, four, and two, and by Francis Austen’s daughter, aged seven. Together, these letters have a combined estimate of £118,000 -162,000. 

Newspaper copy.jpgOn the weekend of October 7-8, 1871, fire ripped through downtown Chicago, Illinois, destroying thousands of blocks, killing upwards of 300 people and leaving nearly 100,000 residents homeless.  Artifacts from the fire are incredibly rare, especially printed materials. On Saturday, July 8, Potter and Potter Auctions will be offering two of the rarest items to survive from the fire, specifically a near fine copy of the only newspaper printed in Chicago during the fire and a rare broadside, issued by mayor Roswell B. Mason, turning over control of the city to General Sheridan.

The Chicago Post Extra! newspaper page, dated October 9, 1871, bears headlines such as “Chicago on Fire!”, “The Fire Fiend Rampant”, and “An Area of 700 Acres Completely Devastated!”. Only two copies are known, one at the Newberry Library and the other at the Chicago History Museum. The broadside is even rarer, with only one copy located at the Newberry Library. Together, they are expected to sell over $10,000. Two large wall maps showing real estate from the turn of the century round out the Chicago offerings.

The items are among an impressive collection of rare books, autographs and historic ephemera being offered for sale on Saturday, including Walter Gibson’s own full run of The Shadow, a strong session of beat literature, a copy of Andy Warhol’s Index Book signed five times, a number of presidential signed items, numerous French exhibition posters from the 1950s-60s and a rare engraving of The Declaration of Independence.

For more information, contact Potter & Potter Auctions, Inc., at 773-472-1442 or info@potterauctions.com. The sale will take place live at 10am on Saturday, July 8, at 3759 N Ravenswood Ave, Chicago. Bidding is also available online on Live Auctioneers, Bidsquare and Invaluable.

Titanic letter.jpgLYNBROOK, N.Y. - Ocean liner memorabilia took top lot honors at Weiss Auctions’ June 22 sale, as a letter handwritten aboard the ill-fated RMS Titanic on April 13, 1912 sold for $22,600, an original life ring from the SS Andrea Doria brought $8,050 and a glass clock presented to first class passengers on the maiden voyage of the SS Normandie in 1935 changed hands for $4,560.

Those three items were top achievers in an auction that was packed with hundreds of lots of antique advertising, rare books, historical memorabilia, autographs and more. Along with the ocean liner items was the lifetime coffee advertising collection of Lowell and Barbara Schindler, featuring not just coffee items but also syrup dispensers, talcum tins, signs and other rare pieces.

“It was a great auction across all categories, with internet and floor bidding very strong,” said Philip Weiss of Weiss Auctions, adding the final gross was around $220,000. Online bidding was by Proxibid.com and LiveAuctioneers.com. Phone and absentee bids were also accepted. The Thursday auction was held in Weiss Auctions’ gallery, at 74 Merrick Road in Lynbrook.

The 2 ½-page letter penned aboard the Titanic was on Titanic stationery, with the raised White Star Line and proper watermarks on the paper, which was water-stained in areas. The letter was unsigned, but was consigned by descendants of the author, a member of the Holverson family. They were en route to New York at the time. The letter was hand-addressed, “My Dear Mother.”

Oscar Alexander Holverson and Mary Aline Holverson were passengers aboard that fateful maiden voyage. Mrs. Holverson, 35, was rescued in lifeboat #8, but Oscar, 42, wasn’t so lucky. He perished in the disaster. It’s assumed, since the unposted letter was written aboard the ship, that the couple’s intent was to mail it, along with some postcards, after arriving in New York. 

The SS Andrea Doria, of the Italian Line, was approaching the coast of Nantucket, Mass., on its way to New York City on July 25, 1956 when it collided with the Swedish vessel MS Stockholm, resulting in one of history’s most famous maritime disasters. The original life preserver ring was recovered the following day by Alan Ades, a Naval officer aboard a rescuing Coast Guard cutter. 

The pale blue, tinted glass clock presented to just a handful of first class passengers aboard the SS Normandie’s maiden voyage was produced as a collaboration between the renowned French designer Lalique and Leon Hatot of the ATO clock company. The letters NORMANDIE spelled out nine of the clock’s twelve face numbers. The hands were made of tin and showed light wear.

Following are additional highlights from the auction. All prices quoted include an 18 percent buyer’s premium.

Albert Einstein and Abraham Lincoln both made guest appearances. A six-cent U.S. air mail stamp signed in pen by Einstein and dated (“4.1.39”) flew off for $1,860. The stamp was a Scott Catalogue C23 example. Einstein’s signature was bold and clear. A lock of Abraham Lincoln’s hair finished at $1,680. Also, a collection of cigar labels and salesman samples fetched $3,680.

A folio from 1976 titled Nudes by the noted British artist Henry Spencer Moore, copy #2 in a limited press run of 50, consisting of 10 chromolithos, each one signed and numbered in pencil, sold for $3,565. Also, a mixed media on canvas artwork by Kevin Red Star (Am., b. 1943) titled Mr. and Mrs. Choke Cheeries, 33 inches by 44 inches, signed upper left, topped out at $2,300.

A Disney Melody Time animation production set-up cel trimmed to image size and presented on a beautiful Courvoisier background, depicting a teary-eyed Little Toot tugboat sailing past a mile marker, realized $2,530. Also, a crisp and clear Confederate 1/9th scroll pattern ambrotype in a thermoplastic case, identified as Matthew McCauley (Danville, Va.) changed hands for $2,100.

An 1865 lithographed sanitary map of New York City, titled Sanitary and Topographical Map of the City and Island of New York (Egbert L. Viele, Robert Craighead), hand-colored and printed on two joined sheets, brought $2,530. Also, a derby hat worn by then-President William Howard Taft on a visit to El Paso, Texas on Oct. 16, 1909, to meet the President of Mexico, made $1,840.

Weiss Auctions’ next big sale is fast approaching. It will be held on Wednesday, July 19th, also online and in the Lynbrook, NY gallery. Headlining will be Part 1 of the Jerry and Nina Greene collection of toys, trains, soldiers and toy castles, as well as European trains and accessories from the Finger Lakes collection, toy soldiers and accessories from all makers, Lionel trains and more.

Also offered will be a Steiff collection (including larger pieces), dolls (including French fashion dolls, German bisque, vintage Barbie dolls and more), die-cast vehicles (including mint-in-box Matchbox and Dinkys), and pressed steel (including boxed Tonka, Structo, Buddy L railroad pieces, NyLint, Doepke and Smith Miller). There will be something for every taste and budget. 

Weiss Auctions is always accepting quality consignments for future auctions. To consign an item, estate or a collection, you may call them at (516) 594-0731; or, you can send an e-mail to Philip Weiss at Phil@WeissAuctions.com. For more information about Weiss Auctions and the big auction planned for Wednesday, July 19, visit www.WeissAuctions.com. Updates are posted often.

Image: Handwritten letter, penned on actual RMS Titanic stationery and written aboard the ship by a member of the Holverson family, en route to New York ($22,600).

Constant Contact Image.jpgOrganized to commemorate the centennial of World War I, this exhibition will focus on the impact of the war on the visual arts. Moving chronologically from its outbreak to the decade after the armistice, World War I and the Visual Arts will highlight the diverse ways in which artists both reacted to and represented the horrors of modern warfare. The works on view will reflect a variety of responses, ranging from nationalist enthusiasm to more somber reflections on the carnage and mass devastation that resulted from the war. 

The exhibition is made possible by The Schiff Foundation. 

Drawn mainly from the collection of The Met and supplemented with select loans, the exhibition will include prints, drawings, photographs, illustrated books, posters, periodicals, trading cards from the Museum's celebrated Jefferson R. Burdick Collection, and other materials such as medals, examples of trench art, and helmets designed in the Department of Arms and Armor. World War I and the Visual Arts will reveal how artists-including Otto Dix, Fernand Léger, George Grosz, Käthe Kollwitz, C.R.W. Nevinson, Gino Severini, and Edward Steichen-reflected a myriad of styles, approaches, ideologies, and mediums in response to the war. Among the styles represented are Cubism, Dada, Futurism, Expressionism, Neue Sachlichkeit ("New Objectivity"), and Vorticism.

Like their countrymen, many artists, writers, and intellectuals initially welcomed the war for a range of reasons—some because of nationalist sentiments, others due to a naïve desire to experience an adventure they assumed would be over in a few months, and still others because of a mistaken belief that, after this final conflict, a more peaceful, spiritual, and anti—materialist era would begin. Numerous artists experienced combat firsthand, either as soldiers, medics, or war artists documenting life at the front; many suffered severe injuries and some even death. As the reality of the war became apparent, several figures changed their positions to express fierce condemnation, mournful regret, or pacifist sentiments. 

Artists had various responses to the inconceivable carnage and destruction that had occurred. While some proposed rebuilding, others reflected on the trauma that befell both individuals and societies. Artists who served in the war, such as Barlach, Beckmann, Dix, Grosz, and Marinetti, used a variety of methods and techniques to express their conflicting reactions. Barlach and Kollwitz, the latter of whom lost her youngest son, created elegiac works about the devastation experienced by families and communities. By contrast, the work of Beckmann, Dix, and Grosz expressed a profound rage at the societies, institutions, and individuals who promoted and profited from war. 

Because they could be distributed more widely than unique works, prints were especially effective at influencing public opinion and could be made available to large audiences. These works could also be reproduced in publications and as posters, thus reaching even more people. Many artists developed portfolios that commemorated the war, several of which were released on the 10th anniversary of its beginning or end, thus reflecting the enduring trauma caused by the conflict.

An armistice was declared on November 11, 1918, and, after the Paris Peace Conference, World War I officially ended on June 28, 1919, with the signing of the Treaty of Versailles. By that time, over 9 million soldiers had died in combat, with over 21 million injured; civilian deaths from combat, illness, and starvation also numbered in the millions. Called "The War to End All Wars," World War I had a devastating impact on all participants and forever changed the societies to which the soldiers returned.

World War I and the Visual Arts is organized by Jennifer Farrell, Associate Curator in The Met's Department of Drawings and Prints, with contributions from Donald LaRocca, Curator, Department of Arms and Armor, and Allison Rudnick, Assistant Curator, also of the Department of Drawings and Prints. 

The exhibition will be accompanied by a Bulletin to be published by The Metropolitan Museum of Art in November.

Education programs will include a Sunday at The Met event on December 10 and exhibition tours.

The exhibition is featured on the Museum's website, as well as on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter.

Exhibition Dates

 July 31, 2017-January 7, 2018

Exhibition Location

 The Met Fifth Avenue, Galleries 691-693,

 The Charles Z. Offin Gallery,

Karen B. Cohen Gallery,

Harriette and Noel Levine Gallery

Image: Christopher Richard Wynne Nevinson (British, 1889-1946). Returning to the Trenches (detail), 1916. Drypoint, plate: 6 x 8 1/16 in. (15.2 x 20.4 cm); sheet: 8 3/8 x 11 in. (21.3 x 28 cm). The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Rogers Fund, 1968 (68.510.3)

 

 

 

The Library of Congress and The Royal Archives today announced plans for a landmark joint exhibition in 2021 that will explore the overlapping yet distinct worlds of two globally significant figures of the late 18th century: the two Georges - King George III (1738-1820) of England and George Washington (1732-1799).

The joint project will draw on the considerable collections held by the Library of Congress in the United States and The Royal Archives in the United Kingdom. It builds on a memorandum of understanding among the two organizations and King's College London, signed at the British Embassy in Washington last autumn.

The exhibition will be seen first at the Library of Congress in Washington, D.C. and subsequently at a major venue in the U.K.  It will explore both commonalities and contrasts between the two men and also the global political, cultural and social contexts for their lives and leadership. Linked and then ultimately separated by empire, the two Georges offer a distinctive perspective on this vital historical period.

The exhibition marks a significant milestone in public engagement with the Georgian Papers Program (GPP), which aims to digitize and publish online, by 2020, a remarkable collection of 350,000 Royal Archive papers from the Georgian period, only 15 percent of which have ever been published before.

The GPP is a partnership among the Royal Collection Trust, lead academic partner King's College London and international participants, including primary U.S. partners the Omohundro Institute of Early American History & Culture, William & Mary, and other key U.S. institutions including the Library of Congress, Mount Vernon and the Sons of the American Revolution. 

The Library of Congress holds the papers of 23 U.S. presidents from George Washington to Calvin Coolidge. The George Washington Papers - some 65,000 items - are available online at loc.gov/collections/george-washington-papers/.

The Georgian Papers global online portal, royalcollection.org.uk/georgianpapers/, since January has enabled academics, students and history lovers worldwide to see George III,  other Hanoverian monarchs and the 18th century from new perspectives.  The GPP has brought together academic researchers, students, archivists and digital scholars to create new ways of exploring the world of these Georgians and new ways of approaching the materials that reveal that world. Crucially, this work will inform the exhibition.

“The entire world was changed, forever, because of the relationship between England and its colonies, as personified by these two leaders,” said Carla Hayden, the Librarian of Congress. “Because of the GPP and the fully digitized George Washington papers at the Library, we will now be able to present a joint exhibition that shows the two Georges’ similarities, their differences and the subtle details, made meaningful by comparison, that have never before emerged from these collections that are now being researched extensively.”

“This exhibition partnership with the Library of Congress is an incredibly important and exciting step for the Royal Archives and our GPP colleagues,” said Oliver Urquhart Irvine, The Librarian and Assistant Keeper of The Queen's Archives. “It will bring the story of two extraordinary men and their influence on the world today to a much wider public and is part of our long-term ambition to make the Royal Archives as open and accessible as possible through groundbreaking digitization technology, research and events."

“The exhibition will provide the ideal platform not only to display a quite remarkable array of documents and objects from world-class collections in a unique conjunction, but will also enable us to see these in a rich new context thanks to a wealth of new scholarship, cataloging and interpretation,” said Professor Arthur Burns, who teaches Modern British History at King's College London. “It will thus reflect the excitement and insights of the scholars, students and archivists working with the GPP across the world. 

“It will reveal how the individual lives of these two notable but also exceptionally privileged men reflected in all kinds of unexpected ways the complex and changing societies in which they lived, and the economic, cultural and political globalization that was as much a feature of their lives as our own, and as much a source of challenge and controversy then as now.”

By 2020, it is expected that the GPP portal royalcollection.org.uk/georgianpapers/ will enable users to enter a remarkable collection of 350,000 papers from the Georgian period, enabling academics, students and history lovers worldwide to see George III, Britain's longest-reigning king, from 1760 to 1820, from new perspectives.

In January 2017, the first tranche of GPP papers was published online, allowing the public and scholars alike a unique window into the life, reign and times of King George III, his impact then and his continuing influence on today's world. This marked a major milestone in a five-year project to enable anyone with an interest in George III and his world to discover the intricacies of his life, reign and the contemporary times. Already scholars and students are making use of this new resource and developing new insights, perspectives and projects as a result of the access now possible.

The papers include intimate letters between George III and Queen Charlotte, household bills, menus, copious letters between the king and his government, his many essays - including on despotism - meticulous, detailed notes about the war in America, and lucid, calm letters to family members during his bouts of illness.

With Her Majesty The Queen's full authority, the project is part of Royal Collection Trust's objective to increase public access to and understanding of primary-source material held in the collection.  It follows the success of the digitization of Queen Victoria's journals in 2012, which has encouraged wide public appreciation. 

The Royal Archives is a private archive offering public access to historical papers for educational purposes and academic study. Its work in Great Britain on the Georgian Papers Program is in partnership with the Royal Library and King’s College London.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

tn copy.jpgOn June 25, 2017, Worth Auctions offered a three-part Curator's Catalog featuring carefully selected offerings of rare and desirable maps and views, Western art, and Audubon bird prints.

The first portion of the sale was tailored to the interests of serious antique map collectors. It featured such early and important works as Saxton Ryther's 1577 map of Yorkshire ($3,125), Gasgoigne's 1776 plan of the River and Sound of D'Awfoskee ($2,750), and Mortier's circa 1700 map of the American colonies ($1,875). 

The second portion was devoted to fine prints by the major artists of the American West. These included McKenney & Hall's 1836 lithograph of the revered Sioux chief Wa-Na-Ta, which fetched $1,125.

The third portion showcased several large-scale Audubon images from both the Amsterdam and the scarcer Leipzig editions.

Further complementary material will be featured in future sessions in 2017. These cataloged live sales will take place in the Galleries at Worth Asset Brokerage in Freeville, New York (just six miles north of Cornell University) and will be simulcast to a global bidding audience via Invaluable, LiveAuctioneers, and eBay Live. For more information about bidding or consigning, contact Evan D. Williams, AAA, Director of Fine Art & Special Collections, at evan@worthauctions.com or 607-279-0607. 

Image: Saxton Ryther's 1577 map of Yorkshire.

NEW YORK, 26 June 2017-Sotheby’s is honored to announce that we will offer The Collection of Edward Albee in a dedicated auction this September in New York. The full proceeds of the sale will benefit The Edward F. Albee Foundation, which provides residencies for writers and visual artists in Montauk, Long Island.

One of America’s most-treasured cultural figures, Edward Albee (1928-2016) was a keen observer of modern life in the United States whose piercing dialogue and constant experimentation helped reinvent and define post-war theater internationally. Beginning with The Zoo Story in 1958, the dozens of plays he wrote over the following five decades include such icons as Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1962), A Delicate Balance (1966), Three Tall Women (1991), and The Goat, or Who Is Sylvia? (2000). 

For many, Sotheby’s September auction will offer a new window into Edward Albee’s life and creative mind. Sourced from artists, friends and galleries over several decades, the majority of the 100+ works on offer adorned the walls of Albee’s Tribeca loft, which he rehung often to explore new artistic connections. In keeping with his constant experimentation as a playwright, the collection focuses on the birth and evolution of Abstraction in 20th century art, and a highly-personal intellectual pursuit of the ephemeral and the elusive - from a stunning figural work by Milton Avery, to a whimsical relief by Jean Arp, a Bauhaus work by Wassily Kandinsky, and a group of geometric abstractions by John McLaughlin.

Portable Manuscript Latin Bible.jpgPhiladelphia, PA-On Friday June 16th Freeman’s presented the Books & Manuscripts sale, whose catalogue included more than 350 lots spanning everything from sacred texts to autographed letters, and even photographs of the moon taken by the Surveyor probe. The sale achieved a 90% sell-through rate and totaled over $800,000.

The two top-selling lots of the day were both sacred texts. Lot 156, a Single leaf Hebrew Bible pericope, printed by Gutenberg in 1455, sold for $53,125. As the first major book produced using moveable type, the Gutenberg Bible remains one of the scarcest books conceivable. The next lot, a Portable Manuscript Latin Bible composed in 13th-century France (Lot 157) sold for $50,000. The historic significance of both of these texts extends beyond any religious affiliation.

There was a palpable excitement in the room when bidding for a lithograph of the interior of the Hebrew Synagogue of Charleston, South Carolina (Lot 212) skyrocketed, eventually selling for $25,000, one hundred times its initial estimate of $250-400. The building was destroyed by a fire in 1838 and was rebuilt several years later. One of the oldest Jewish congregations in the country, the synagogue is also the oldest in continuous use, since its founding in 1749.The lithograph was printed in Philadelphia, and shows the vaulted interior of the original structure, which is now known as the Congregation Kahal Kadosh Beth Elohim.

Another historical document from the south captured the attention of bidders that afternoon. A letter written by Confederate Army General Robert E. Lee (Lot 195) during the 1864 Second Battle of Deep Bottom, from his headquarters in Virginia, sold for $27,500 against an estimate of $8,000-12,000. Lee surrendered to Ulysses S. Grant just eight months after writing this letter to General Charles W. Field, in which he ordered him to ramp up troop presence against “the enemy.”

Freeman's dedicated team of specialists in the Books & Manuscripts Department, led by Department Head Ben Truesdale, has established an international reputation for their many notable sales and thorough cataloguing. Freeman’s next Books & Manuscripts auction is scheduled to take place on September 28, 2017. 

Top Lots of the June 16th Books & Manuscripts Sale:

-Lot 156: Sacred Texts, Bible in Latin. [Mainz: Johann Gutenberg and Johann Fust, 1455]. Sold for $53,125.

-Lot 157: Sacred Texts, Portable Manuscript Latin Bible. [Paris, mid-13th century] Complete, comprising Old and New Testaments. Sold for $50,000.

-Lot 195: American Autograph, Civil War. Autograph Letter Signed. Lee, Robert E. Sold $27,500.

-Lot 13: Early Ethnography, Eden, Emily. Portraits of the Princes & People of India. Sold for $26,250.

-Lot 212: Americana : Social History, Lithograph. (Bowen, J. T., publisher) Interior of the Hebrew Synagogue of Charleston S. C. [ca. 1840]. Sold for $25,000.

Image: Portable Manuscript Latin Bible. SOLD FOR $50,000

MINNEAPOLIS - (June 26, 2017) - Join Minnesota Center for Book Arts (MCBA) for their 5th Book Art Biennial July 15-23, 2017 including workshops, lectures, and 7 exhibitions feature programming that encourages people of all disciplines and skill levels to amplify individual and collective voice through grassroots artistic practice.  Enjoy two-day Pre-Biennial Workshops hosted by visiting national and international artists, from July 15-21, including: Alternative Printmaking with Rubber Stamps with Stephen Fowler (UK); Papermaking in the Islamic World with Radha Pandey (Ohio); Innovative Books from Head to Tail: Ideas-Content-Making with Angie Butler (UK); and Approachable Metalworking for Book Artists with Shanna Leino (Michigan).

This year’s MCBA Biennial Symposium, July 22-23, explores the broad definition of “book” in contemporary artistic practice, stimulating critical thinking and dialogue. Speakers include: Amos Paul Kennedy Jr., Detroit-based printer, Keynote Address; Simon Goode, Founder and Director of the London Centre for Book Arts Making Books; Karen Kunc, Artist, Educator, and Founder of Constellation Studios, The Constellation Metaphor; Steven Daiber, Proprietor of Red Trillium Press, Book Arts in Havana; Angie Butler, Artist and Scholar, University of the West of England, We Are What We Do; and Mary Hark, Professor in Design Studies at the University of Wisconsin Madison, Report from the Field:  Papermaking as Community Catalyst. Medium to Message: Art As Culture-making/Public-making is presented by Sam Gould, Lacey Prpic Hedtke, and Regula Russelle; and finally an informal round table discussion where participants share practical techniques for teaching the book arts with special emphasis on social engagement, accessibility, and grassroots practice.

Seven stimulating exhibitions provide an engaging ambience for the 2017 MCBA Book Art Biennial, including: Amos Paul Kennedy Jr.’s Open Book Takeover, featuring 5,000 community-made prints; Heid Erdrich, guest curator, gathers Native American voices in (About that) Water is Life; Mary Bruno, Bruno Press, has enlisted the help of forty print makers from around the world to present End of Times 2: The Time is Now; Alyssa Baguss, environmental artist, presents Meander; Twin Cities Zine Fest hosts an interactive zine reading lounge Free for All, Stamp of Disapproval showcases counter-culture from MCBA’s Helmes and W. Gaglione Rubber Stamp Archive, and finally, Reader’s Art: Control/Alt/Shift, a juried exhibition of artists books exploring the politics of control and alternative methods of public discourse.

The Biennial culminates with the 2017 MCBA Prize Gala. Toast the best new artist books in the world on Saturday evening, July 22, 7:30 pm - 10:30 pm. Enjoy refreshments by Common Roots and live music by The King Baron Hot Club while mingling with artists, collectors, and special guests. The 2017 MCBA Prize competition includes work from over 100 entries representing 12 nations. Over $9,000 will be awarded. The finalists for the 2017 MCBA Prize include:  Hannah Batsel (Chicago, IL) Maneater; Tim Hopkins (London, England) - The Book of Disquiet; Ellen Knudson (Gainesville, FL) Ingress/Egress; Nader Koochaki (Astigarreta, Spain) - Soineko Paisaia/Dorsal Landscape; and Ines von Ketelhodt (Flörsheim am Main, Germany) - Alpha Beta. The winner will be announced Saturday evening, July 22 at the 2017 MCBA Prize Gala.

The MCBA Prize is the first honor to celebrate the diversity of book art and recognize work from across the field and around the world. This year, the jury consisted of three distinguished leaders in the field of book arts. They were: Steven Daiber, book artist and proprietor of Red Trillium Press; Simon Goode, founder and executive director of London Center for Book Arts; and Karen Kunc, book artist and proprietor of Constellation Studios. The works of the five finalists and three special merit will be on view at Minnesota Center for Book Arts from July 20-23rd during the 2017 Book Art Biennial. 

For more information about this event, contact Amanda Kaler, Development Director of Minnesota Center For Book Arts. To order tickets or be a sponsor, please visit BookArtBiennial.org. Additional information can be found at facebook.com/mnbookarts, twitter.com/mnbookarts, and instagram.com/mnbookarts.

The Minnesota Center for Book Arts #bookartbiennial

WHEN: July 15-23, 2017. Visit BookArtBiennial.org for specific dates/times for Workshops, Symposium, 7 Exhibits, and Gala.

WHERE: Minnesota Center for Book Arts, 1011 Washington Avenue South, Suite 100, Minneapolis, Minnesota 55415

 

SAN MARINO, Calif.— The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens will present new work and related programming this fall by seven artists who conducted research in The Huntington’s collections during the second year of a five-year initiative called /five, which this year is based on the theme of “collecting” and “collections.” The exhibition “Collection/s: WCCW/five at The Huntington,” on view in the Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art from Nov. 18, 2017, through Feb. 12, 2018, will feature an installation of paintings, sculpture, textiles, video, writings, and other new works along with performances, talks, and tours by the artists, all of whom are women. They include Olivia Chumacero, Sarita Dougherty, Jheanelle Garriques, Zya S. Levy, Soyoung Shin, kerrie welsh, and Juliana Wisdom, who were selected in collaboration with the Los Angeles-based Women’s Center for Creative Work (WCCW).

Collection/s: WCCW/five at The Huntington” comes out of /five, a contemporary arts collaboration between The Huntington and five different organizations over five years. /five invites artists to respond to a range of themes drawn from The Huntington’s deep and diverse library, art, and botanical collections. The initiative is led by Jenny Watts, The Huntington’s curator of photography and visual culture, and Catherine Hess, The Huntington’s chief curator of European art and acting director of its art collections. In /five’s first year (2016), The Huntington collaborated with JPL/NASA to present the JPL sound sculpture “Orbit Pavilion,” which referenced The Huntington’s history of aerospace, astronomy, and earth science collections.

For the second year of the initiative, The Huntington chose WCCW, a nonprofit organization that cultivates feminist creative communities and practices, to explore the theme of collecting and collections. The resulting projects for “Collection/s: WCCW/five at The Huntington” are described below. The seven artists will engage with The Huntington’s three collecting areas, with two projects each exploring the library, art, and botanical collections. As they become available, details about related events will be posted at huntington.org.

The Library Collections

Jheanelle Garriques

Garriques is the founder and executive director of Naked Narratives, a writing program that encourages its participants to confidently express themselves while resolving past traumas. Her project for “Collection/s: WCCW/five at The Huntington” is called “Storytelling, Solidarity, and the Blue Stockings Society,” and uses The Huntington’s Elizabeth Montagu archive as inspiration for a mixed-media spoken word performance. Montagu (1718-1800) was a founder of the Blue Stockings Society, a British movement that encouraged intellectualism among women through literary discussions—or, as Garriques defines it: “one of the world’s first feminist writing salons.” The archive contains some 7,000 letters written to or by Montagu. Garriques’ project will juxtapose a handful of letters with new writing produced by a local writing salon of eight participants. Her performance piece will involve the participants and dance choreographed by Rissi Zimmermann.

kerrie welsh

Welsh’s work pushes the boundaries between personal and cultural memory and between social and artistic conventions. A Ph.D. candidate at UC Santa Cruz focusing on female authorship, LGBT desires, and the birth of cinema, she also co-founded the Women in the Director’s Chair Oral History Project at the New York University Tisch School of the Arts. Her project, “What You Love,” collects LGBT letters, testimonies, and diaries to create an archive of contemporary love stories. Inspired by The Huntington’s rare book and theatre holdings relating to the ancient Greek poet Sappho, the project investigates the story of Olga Nethersole (1863-1951), a controversial and popular British actress who portrayed Sappho on stages across Europe and the United States. It will include correspondence with the local LGBT community and collected ephemera evidencing LGBT lives and loves, and the vulnerability of these kinds of materials to destruction, due to secrecy, shame, and fear.

The Art Collections

Soyoung Shin

Shin is a multidisciplinary Korean-American artist working in textiles, performance, zines, and new media. Her project for the exhibition, “Picture Elements,” is drawn from the word “pixel,” which is an abbreviation of “picture element.” Centered on The Huntington’s historic carpet Astrology (on view in the Huntington Art Gallery’s large library), one of 93 carpets commissioned around 1665 by King Louis XIV to line the Grand Gallery of the Louvre, Shin’s project investigates the anonymity of women who engaged in the creation of textiles without receiving credit, in the same way contemporary women rarely receive credit for their roles in emerging technologies. “Picture Elements” will take the form of textiles, including fragments of a Savonnerie carpet currently in storage, a computer program, a book, and a series of lectures.

Juliana Wisdom

A sculptor and porcelain production assistant, Wisdom is developing new work in response to The Huntington’s 18th-century French porcelain collection. Emulating the Sèvres Porcelain Manufactory’s techniques with both traditional and new materials, four new works will seek to broaden the historical narrative of the Sèvres Manufactory by including the often-uncredited women who were both makers and benefactors of Sèvres.

The Botanical Gardens

Olivia Chumacero

Chumacero studied film at UC Santa Cruz and is the founder of Everything Is Medicine, a project that involves workshops, hikes, and other initiatives to raise awareness of native California flora, sustainable water use, and the respectful use of lands belonging to indigenous groups. Working in conjunction with Sarita Dougherty, her contribution to “Collection/s: WCCW/five at The Huntington,” will be a video, “When Light Married Water,” in which the relationship of light and water gives birth to native California flora in both the manicured and the uncultivated areas of The Huntington’s grounds. Chumacero is working with Sarita Dougherty on a collaborative project.

Sarita Dougherty

Dougherty generates and paints habitats from found plants and cultural ephemera. With an MFA from UCLA, she is currently researching the Inca fertility goddess Pachamama in connection with aesthetics, ecology, and education. Her project for the exhibition, “Domestic Flora Familiars,” consists of four paintings relating to plants on The Huntington’s grounds along with a printed cloth screen, of the type used in home décor, inspired by Chumacero’s video.

Zya S. Levy

Levy is the co-founder of “We the Weeds,” a collaborative botanical arts project based in Philadelphia that highlights the presence of the natural world within the manmade landscape. Her project, “Green-Gold,” explores the desert garden collection at The Huntington to draw links between early plant collectors, botanical origins, migration stories, a sense of place, and the future of biological diversity. “Green-Gold” will consist of a visual catalogue of cacti diversity in The Huntington’s Desert Garden, a short audio collage, and sculpture, as well as a series of offsite urban plant tours.

 

HOT SPRINGS, ARK. - Eric Bradley, international spokesman for Heritage Auctions and author of more than a dozen books including the “Antiques and Collectibles 2017 Price Guide” will be the headline guest at the inaugural Antique Appraisal and Re-Sale Parade July 15, 2017 in Hot Springs, Ark. The event will be held at Central Avenue Market Place (CAMP), located at 4330 Central Ave., Hot Springs, in Temperance Hill Square. 

“Bradley is coming to assess the quality and quantity of antiques and collectibles we have in and around Hot Springs,” said Reagen Megee, CAMP co-owner. “This is a great opportunity for the people in Hot Springs and across our region of the country,” she said. “Most people from Hot Springs or who have visited know we are a hub for antique and collectible shops and flea markets but we are also rich with private collections and family heirlooms.” 

Bradley is editor of the annual “Antique Trader Antiques & Collectibles Price Guide,” America’s number one selling price guide, and the author of the critically-acclaimed “Mantiques: A Manly Guide to Cool Stuff.” He also wrote the “Picker’s Pocket Guide: SIGNS - How to Pick Antiques Like a Pro” and “Picker’s Pocket Guide - TOYS: How to Pick Antiques Like a Pro.” Bradley also is author of the upcoming “Harry Potter - The Unofficial Guide to the Collectibles of Our Favorite Wizard.” He has appeared in The Wall Street Journal, GQ, Four Seasons Magazine, Bottom Line/Personal, USA Today and The Detroit News, among others.

The Appraisal Parade is free. The public is welcome to attend. People are welcome to bring their most unique antiques, collectibles and collections either to the parade or bring photos. Items don’t necessarily have to be appraised or sold. With pictures, please try to include any markings on the items such as names on pottery, jewelry, furniture, etc. Non-disclosure agreements will also be available upon request, Megee said. 

“We want Hot Springs to be this region’s “Hub for Antiques,” we want people to get top dollar for the valuables they’re looking to sell and we want our state and its treasures to be seen by the world,” Megee said.

Heritage Auctions (HA.com) has the distinction of being the largest collectibles auction house in the world. Founded in 1976, Heritage also is recognized as the undisputed leader in Internet auctions. 

A panel of local experts will sit under the veranda of Central Avenue Market Place to tell people about the origins and value of their artifacts. Bradley will be available to meet and greet visitors, too.

Parade lineup begins at 10 a.m. People with trucks that can display large items or collections in the truck bed or on trailers will line up on Central Avenue going north toward downtown. The public is welcome to stand under the verandas around the square at Temperance Hill. People with photos, collections to unload or individual items to walk will pull in the main parking lot and look for signs. At noon, there will be a brief opening ceremony before the parade begins on the square and the appraisal event begins.

For more information contact Reagen Megee at Central Avenue Market Place at (501) 623-4484 or visit 4330 Central Avenue in Temperance Hill Square, Hot Springs, Ark.

Lot 90 envelope copy.jpgLondon - A remarkable collection of letters from Albert Einstein to his closest friend, Michele Besso, will star in Christie’s Classic Week. Einstein: Letters to a friend, a dedicated online sale from 6 to 13 July, will present 50 lots from Einstein to Besso, with a further six letters offered in the Valuable Printed Books and Manuscripts sale on 12 July. The collection provides a rare insight into the life and personal thoughts of one of the world’s most celebrated scientists. Estimates range from $1,000 in the online sale to £150,000 in the live auction, and selected lots will be on view to the public at Christie’s London from 8 to 12 July.

Einstein and Besso first met as students in Zurich in the late 1890s, and their friendship was cemented during their time working together in the early 1900s in the Swiss federal patent office in Bern. When Einstein changed the world of physics in 1905 with four ground-breaking papers, Michele Besso was his only acknowledged collaborator. Einstein’s letters to Besso discuss freely and in detail the key scientific concepts of his career including: special and general relativity, the ‘cosmological constant’, the red shift of spectral lines, ‘time’s arrow’, unified field theory and quantum mechanics. Alongside this, there is the human side of Einstein: walking in the mountains with his young son, the breakdown of his first marriage and his humour in discussing colleagues, the League of Nations, fame and getting old.  Above all, there is his delight in his work, his relish for a new theory and sense of elevation when grasping at fundamental truths, which he expresses in one letter as ‘getting closer to God’.

Michele Besso died in March 1955, and the very last letter in the correspondence is written to members of Besso’s family a few days later, shortly before Einstein’s own death at the age of 76. The letter ends with a famous sentence which brings together their friendship and the scientific understanding they shared: ‘Now he has again preceded me a little in parting from this strange world. This has no importance. For people like us who believe in physics, the separation between past, present and future has only the importance of an admittedly tenacious illusion’.

Einstein: Letters to a Friend Part I

London, King Street

Auction: 6 Jul, 10am (Lots 1 - 50)

Books & Works on Paper 20.07.17.jpegBloomsbury Auctions will host an auction of Rare Books and Works on Paper including Photographs and Autographs on 27th July 2017, commencing at 1pm.

Leading the sale is a first edition Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by J.K. Rowling, from 1997, which includes the original pictorial boards and those with beady eyes will notice “1 wand” listed twice on page 53. J.K Rowling’s Harry Potter series has been published in over 2,200 languages and dialects worldwide demonstrating the strength of interest in her work. This summer marks twenty years since this phenomenal book first enchanted millions of readers spanning all generations and it is expected to attract intense bidding from collectors.

Two very rare atlases after Claudius Ptolemaeus are the auction’s top lots by value and both were acquired by the present owner’s great uncle in the 1940s from the famous library in Egypt of Dr Max Meyerhoff. Ptolemaeus’ Cosmographia, the second Ulm edition from 1486, translated from Greek into Latin by Jacobus Angelus, is the older of the two Atlases. The maps, printed from the same blocks as the 1482 edition, with headings added, were cut by Johannes of Armsheim, whose name is found at the head of the world map, which is thus the first printed map to be signed, and is also the first to depict Iceland, Greenland and the North Atlantic.   All the maps are in contemporary hand-colouring. 

The fourth Strassburg edition of Ptolemaeus’ Geographicae Enarrationis libri octo from 1525 includes contributions attributed to German Renaissance artists Albrecht Dürer and Hans Holbein, amongst the diagrams and decorative woodcut borders. Among the 50 woodcut maps, one in particular includes the first appearance of ‘America’ on a printed map.  

Both works are complete early editions of the first Atlases ever printed and their appearance at auction is an exceptional event. They are likely to appeal not only to collectors of atlases but those in search of a rare and unique historical item. 

Further sale highlights include a 1902 musical score for Pelleas et Melisande, signed by Claude Debussy, (est. £700-£900), as well as a document signed by the last Tsar of Russia, Nicholas II (est. £1,200-£1,800). The document was the granting of a new standard to the 7th Ulan Olvio-Polish Regiment, originally the 4th Ukranian Cossack Regiment, on the occasion of the 100th anniversary of their foundation by Tsar Alexander I. 

Two diaries written by an English soldier fighting in the Afghan war between 1880-1881 are included in the auction (est. £1,200-£1,500). The diaries are first- hand accounts but the soldier’s identity is sadly unknown. The first volume covers his description of the long relief march from Kabul to Kandahar, with the second mostly describing his march through India and the journey back across Europe. 

Striking photographs will also be on offer, including one of Argentinian revolutionary, Che Guevara, who died 50 years ago this October, taken by Osvalod Salas. Two photographs by the pioneer of colour photographer, Ernst Haas, feature in the sale, each estimated at £3,000-£5,000. Ansel Adams’ beautiful landscape photographs also compliment this photography section. 

A unique photogram by British photographer Adam Fuss is estimated at £4,000- £6,000. Dating from 1995 the work was commissioned by Alain Levy, President and CEO of PolyGram. Of his own works, Fuss states “I would much prefer people looked at my photographs as if they were paintings... Because when we look at paintings we look only at the image; we experience it. Somehow when people look at photographs they want an answer to a question that they feel can be answered through technical information.” 

 

Screen Shot 2017-06-22 at 7.33.37 AM.pngDALLAS, Texas (June 21, 2017) - Dashiell Hammett’s Red Harvest (est. $30,000) is expected to be the leading feature in The KoKo Collection, part of the September 14 Rare Books Auction at Heritage Auctions. Drawing on his experience as a Pinkerton operative, Hammett’s momentous debut novel, published in 1929, defined the archetype for the literary private investigator. Also offered is Hammett’s 1930 follow-up, The Maltese Falcon (est. $20,000), his most popular work and among the most beloved of the genre, thanks in no small part to Humphrey Bogart’s brilliant turn as Sam Spade in John Huston’s 1941 cinematic adaptation.

“The KoKo Collection will mark the auction debut of several historically important novels,” said James Gannon, Director of Rare Books. “A collection like this only comes along once in a lifetime and indeed required a lifetime to assemble.”

The collection features several books by authors who, like Hammett, wrote for the hard-boiled pulp magazine Black Mask. Perhaps the most famous of these authors, Raymond Chandler, has several works featured in the sale, including a presentation copy of his last masterpiece, The Long Good-Bye (1954) (est. $4,000). More Black Mask contributors crossing the auction block will be Paul Cain with his tough-as-nails Fast One from 1934 (est. $4,000) and Raoul Whitfield with his 1930 uncommon debut Green Ice (est. $2,000).

The enduring popularity of crime literature owes no small debt to the frequency of successful film adaptions made during the Classical Hollywood era, and The KoKo Collection includes several of these landmark books into film. Little Caesar by W.R. Burnett (est. $3,000), published in 1929 and adapted two years later, provided the standard by which all gangster portrayals are judged with Edgar G. Robinson’s Rico. The nearly impossible to find If I Die Before I Wake (1938) by Sherwood King (est. $2,500), served as the source for Orson Welles’s The Lady from Shanghai (1947). 

Few writers’ bodies of work provided as many beloved films as Cornell Woolrich’s. His cycle of “Black” novels were adapted by the likes of Jacques Tourneur and François Truffaut; among the available Woolrich titles is a copy of The Black Curtain (1941, adapted as Street of Chance the next year), inscribed by the notorious recluse (est. $3,000).

Other top lots from this collection include but are not limited to: 

·         Tales (1845) by Edgar Allan Poe; which contains “Murder in the Rue Morgue,” recognized as the first modern detective story (est. $10,000)

·         The Sign of Four (1890) by Arthur Conan Doyle; the second Sherlock Holmes novel (est. $6,000)

·         An inscribed copy of The Conjure-Man Dies (1932) by Randolph Fisher; considered the first published mystery novel by an African-American (est. $4,000)

·         Fer-De-Lance (1934) by Rex Stout; Nero Wolfe’s debut (est. $8,000)

·         The Dark Tunnel (1944) by Kenneth Millar; Millar, who later wrote under the name Ross Macdonald, is considered the third member of the Holy Trinity of Detective Literature with Hammett and Chandler (est. $3,000)

The auction consignment window closes July 24. Visit the auction homepage to learn how to consign rare books, manuscripts and more to Heritage Auctions’ Sept. 14 Rare Books Auction.

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

Lot 432a copy.jpgNew York-Christie’s New York Books and Manuscripts sales realize $9,690,563, across three auctions that took place on June 15, 2017, with an overall 75% sold by lot. The various owner sale totaled $6,894,875, setting the highest total ever for a single-session various-owners Books sale at Christie’s New York. The auctions witnessed active online participation, with top lots selling to online buyers including the record-setting Enigma Cipher Machine, which sold for $547,500, and there was global bidding with registrants across 22 countries.

Sven Becker, Head of Books and Manuscripts, comments, “We are thrilled by the strong results achieved across these three sales and their broad range of subjects: from musical manuscripts - with the highest price paid for Schubert at auction in over 20 years - to scientific instruments, including the record price at auction for an Enigma machine. We saw strong participation across the usual virtual sale channels, but we were particularly happy to see a new generation of collectors represented in person in the room: a very young bidder, in his school uniform, underbid and purchased a number of rare historical items, including one relating to Lewis & Clarke. He was a diligent bidder and avoided being dragged into bidding wars.”

Strong results were achieved for single owner collections, including the two dedicated auctions, The Metropolitan Opera Guild Collection, which totaled $1,463,063, with 81% sold by lot, and The Ornithological Library of Gerald Dorros, MD, which totaled $1,332,625, with 80% sold by lot, and The Eric C. Caren Collection, the single-owner selection of the various owner sale, with many lots greatly exceeding initial estimates, including The Star-Spangled Banner, Daily Federal Republic, 22 September 1814, which sold for $168,750, more than twenty times the low estimate.

The top lot of the three sales was a presentation copy of the first edition of Francisco Goya y Lucientes’ Los Caprichos, 1799, which realized $607,500. World auction records were set for A Four-Rotor Enigma Cipher Machine, 1944, which sold above the high estimate for $547,500 to an online bidder, and A Manuscript Document from the Salem Witch Trials containing the deposition of Mary Daniel, from The Eric C. Caren Collection, which sold for $137,500.

Other highlights from the day of sales included Franz Schubert (1797-1828), Autograph Music Manuscript for the Piano Sonata in A flat major, D.577, May 1817, from The Metropolitan Opera Guild Collection, which sold for $475,500, the highest price paid for Schubert at auction in over 20 years, A Working Apple-1 Personal Computer, Palo Alto, 1976, which sold for $355,500, John Gould (1804-1881), The Birds of Australia, from The Dorros Collection, which sold for $295,500, and John Hill (ca 1714-1775), The Vegetable System, which sold for $199,500.

Fine Printed Books & Manuscripts Including Americana and the Eric C. Caren Collection

Thursday, 15 June 2017 | New York

Total: $6,894,875

 The various owner sale of Fine Printed Books & Manuscripts Including Americana and the Eric C. Caren Collection totaled $6,894,875, with 72% sold by lot and 83% sold by value. The top lot of the sale was Francisco Goya y Lucientes’ Los Caprichos, 1799, which realized $607,500. Lots from The Eric C. Caren Collection performed exceptionally well against estimates, with highlights including The Star-Spangled Banner, Daily Federal Republic, 22 September 1814, which sold for $168,750, more than twenty times the low estimate. Full results can be viewed here.

The Metropolitan Opera Guild Collection

Thursday, 15 June 2017 | New York

Total: $1,463,063

The dedicated auction of The Metropolitan Opera Guild Collection, totaled $1,463,063, with 81% sold by lot and 85% sold by value. The top lot of the sale was Franz Schubert (1797-1828), Autograph Music Manuscript for the Piano Sonata in A flat major, D.577, May 1817, which sold for $475,500. Additionally, two exquisite pieces of jewelry will be sold in the Magnificent Jewels auction on June 20, 2017. Funds from the sale will benefit the Opera Guild and the Metropolitan Opera. Full results can be viewed here.

The Ornithological Library of Gerald Dorros, MD

Thursday, 15 June 2017 | New York

Total: $1,332,625

The Ornithological Library of Gerald Dorros, MD, totaled $1,332,625, with 80% sold by lot and 74% sold by value. The top lot of the sale was John Gould (1804-1881), The Birds of Australia, which sold for $295,500. Full results can be viewed here.

Image: GOYA Y LUCIENTES, FRANCISCO (1746-1828). [LOS CAPRICHOS. MADRID: PROBABLY PRINTED BY RAFAEL ESTEVE FOR THE ARTIST, 1799.]
PRICE REALIZED: $607,500

475297-7_a_Archi-Tetes - Prince Charles.jpegTwo fascinating collections of caricatures make up Bloomsbury Auctions’ sale on 13th July 2017; one from journalist, writer and caricature historian, John Wardroper, and the other from architectural journalist and campaigner, Charles Knevitt. There will be around 150 lots on offer in the sale, ranging from the early 18th to the early 21st century.

William Hogarth (1697-1764), James Gillray (1756-1815), Thomas Rowlandson (1756-1827) and George Cruikshank (1792-1878) are all well represented in the first collection, which focuses largely on the Regency and the Napoleonic era. With the exception of Hogarth this group was active from 1780 to 1830 a period for satirical prints which became known as the ‘golden age’. At this time, prints were mostly produced in London and sold singly by publishers and booksellers. By contrast, from the 1840s prints tended to be published as part of newspapers and in periodicals.  

One of the highlights in the auction is Thomas Rowlandson’s Fighting a Fire, dated 1800, (est. £3,000-4,000). This large watercolour depicts his keen eye for social observation.

The 1770s tradition of grotesque characters is exemplified in caricatures by Timothy Bobbin, such as “The Human Passion Delineated” and the set of Hogarth’s A Harlot’s Progress (issue 1744), (est. £800-£1,200). 

Honoré Daumier’s Gargantua is a scathing caricature of King Louis Phillippe as an obese giant being fed money by the starving poor, and excreting favours on the nobility. This rare plate was intended for distribution in the journal La Caricature in December, 1831, the year after Louis Philippe's accession to the throne. Its aim was to highlight the vast sums paid to the king. However, it was never published as the police and censors seized the publisher, Aubert, and obliged him to destroy the lithographic stone. Daumier, then only 24 years old, Aubert and the image's printer were all put on trial in February 1832, sentenced to 6 months in prison and heavily fined. Although the print never appeared in the publication, an article ridiculing the trial and describing the caricature was published.

Though the collection from Knevitt includes much later works, the great tradition of caricatures continues. Depictions of Prince Charles and Lady Diana feature in the sale. Knevitt was an advisor to Prince Charles and in 1985 he published One’s Life: A Cartoon Biography of HRH the Prince of Wales which became a top twenty bestseller. Both Knevitt and Wardroper recognised the power of humour as a vehicle for expressing contemporary views and opinions.  

Bloomsbury Auctions’ specialist Robert Hall comments “We are the only auction house offering dedicated sales of caricatures. Our last auction on this subject achieved some outstanding prices and have proven this to be a strong niche market. From a commercial point of view, they are robust… There is definitely a hunger for caricatures.”

Image: Louis Mario Hellman, Archi-Tetes - Prince Charles, an original drawing of Prince Charles separate to the artist's series of 24 caricatures, ink, pencil and watercolour on paper, 300 x 195mm, signed, framed and glazed Est. £350-£450 

 

June25_01_pics.jpgWorth Auctions, located in Dryden, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog.  

On June 25, 2015, Worth Auctions will offer a three-part Curator's Catalog featuring carefully selected offerings of rare and desirable maps and views, Western art, and Audubon bird prints.          

The first portion of the sale, commencing at 11:00 AM, is tailored to the interests of serious antique map collectors. It will feature such early and important works as Moll's "New and Exact Map of the Dominions of the King of Great Britain" (c. 1730), de Brahm's "Caroline Meridionale" (1777), Gascoigne's "Plan of the River and Sound of D'Awfoskee" (1776), Mercator's "America Sive India Nova" (c. 1609), and Saxton's "Eboracensis Comitatus" (1577).                       

The second portion, commencing around 1:00 PM, will be devoted to fine prints by the major artists of the American West. These include Bierstadt's steel engraving "The Rocky Mountains," Remington's chromolithograph "Arizona Cowboy," Catlin's hand-colored lithograph "Buffalo Hunt on Snow Shoes," McKenney & Hall's hand-colored lithograph "Hoo-Wan-Ne-Ka," and Bodmer's hand-colored aquatint "Scalp Dance of the Minatarres."    

The third portion, commencing around 1:30 PM, will showcase several large-scale Audubon images from both the Amsterdam and the scarcer Leipzig editions. Many of the most striking bird species are represented, like the Wild Turkey, Carolina Parrot, Hooping Crane, Snowy Owl, and White Ibis. 

Further complementary material will be featured in future sessions in 2017. These cataloged live sales will take place in the Galleries at Worth Asset Brokerage in Freeville, New York (just six miles north of Cornell University) and will be simulcast to a global bidding audience via Invaluable, LiveAuctioneers, and eBay Live.    

Worth Auctions is a public auction service specializing in estate work and collections.  The company conducts fully cataloged auctions with global bidding activity over three platforms. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of items, from pencils to airplanes. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-330-0358 or email mail@worthauctions.com

978-0-7643-5341-3 copy.jpgAtglen, PA— Schiffer Publishing, Ltd., would like to introduce This Day In Collecting History, by Mike McLeod and Marla McLeod.

A calendar year's worth of historical events are presented along with auctions of related collectibles in this fun and informative compilation. The day-by-day historical entries and corresponding sales are arranged chronologically from January 1 to December 31. Many of the sales, both public and private, were for fabulous sums. The Cowardly Lion’s costume from The Wizard of Oz auctioned for $3+ million. Joan of Arc's ring sold for almost $425,000. The most expensive album wasn’t by the Beatles, but by Wu-Tang Clan, whose Once Upon a Time in Shaolin sold for a reported $2 million. More than 650 images further illustrate the antiques, artworks, pop culture memorabilia, and ephemera. Did you know the largest sum paid for an artwork by a living artist was more than $57 million? Turn to the November 12 listing to learn more. This Day In Collecting History should be considered an essential book for those both in collecting, and those with an interest for the astonishing facts and figures behind it. 

Size: 6" x 9" | 679+ color and b/w images | 272 pp

ISBN13: 9780764353413  | Binding: soft cover | $24.99

About the Author

Mike McLeod has been the editor of Southeastern Antiquing and Collecting Magazine for 16 years. His wife, Marla McLeod, inspired him to write this book and was the fact checker. They have been married for 36 years and are the parents of five children. Marla was born and raised in Idaho and Mike in Alabama. Before marriage, Mike served in the Marine Corps for four years, two in Spain. He also served a two-year mission for The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints on the Navajo Reservation, teaching in Navajo. Marla was raised on a potato farm in Idaho. She has mastered many handcrafts including tatting, chair caning, macrame, basketweaving, clay pot making, sewing, quilting, knitting, needlepoint, and the like. They have eight grandchildren.  

About the Publisher

Schiffer Publishing, Ltd. is a family-owned, independent publisher of high-quality books. Since 1974, Schiffer has published thousands of titles on the diverse subjects that fuel our readers' passions. From our traditional subjects of antiques and collectibles, arts and crafts, and military history, Schiffer has expanded its catalog to publish books on contemporary art and artists; architecture and design; food and entertaining; the metaphysical, paranormal and folklore; and pop and fringe culture, as well as books for children. Visit www.schifferbooks.com to explore our backlist of more than 5,800 titles.

For more information or to request a review copy or interview the author, please contact Meghan Schaffer at 610.593.1777 or meghans@schifferbooks.com. To receive regular announcements about new releases from Schiffer Publishing, sign up for our e-newsletter.

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