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Mitchell-LeRouge 1756 copy.jpgGlen Allen, Virginia—May 24, 2017—Over 400 lots focused on the history, discovery, and evolution of the United States will be offered by Old World Auctions in a special single-owner sale, "Evolution of a Nation: The David J. Morgan Collection." The auction runs from June 7-14, 2017 and includes important works by Humboldt, Pike, Carey, Melish, Filson, Mackenzie, Darby, and Hennepin, as well as dozens of items that rarely come up for sale. 

A highlight of the sale is the 1756 Le Rouge French second edition of John Mitchell's monumental wall map of North America, focused on what would become the United States in two decades. Often described as "the most important map in American history," the map was used for boundary determinations at the Treaty of Paris in 1783, as well as other significant boundary disputes. Other notable items include Juan Corradi's 1802 rare map of the Southwest and its companion Gulf Coast map, the 1793 Filson/Stockdale embryonic map of Kentucky, the 1817 issue of Lewis & Clark's landmark map of the West, the complete first edition of David Burr's A New Universal Atlas, and Jean Frederic Bernard's 1720 volume with important accounts by Tonti and Hennepin.

David J. Morgan, a well-known collector of cartography, has curated his collection of the political evolution of the United States for nearly 50 years. A geologist by trade, Dave's interest in maps ignited as a result of his work with the Attorney General's office of Louisiana to prepare its case against the federal government in the tidelands controversy. Over the years he has created a comprehensive collection of the progression of knowledge of the United States. Barry Ruderman, of Barry Lawrence Ruderman Antique Maps, commented, "Dave is one of the most astute collectors with whom I've worked. I've been most impressed with his ability to appreciate and integrate into his collection unusual material. His depth of knowledge and appreciation for integrating standard material with rarities, and for identifying maps that were often under-appreciated in the market, made his collection special." 

This extraordinary collection of American material will include historical books, maps, and other cartographic items. The auction catalog will be available online on June 7, 2017 and interested bidders can register for the sale at www.oldworldauctions.com.

Image: Mitchell/Le Rouge, Amerique Septentrionale avec les Routes, Distances en Miles, Limites et Etablissements Francois et Anglois..., 1756.

Screen Shot 2017-05-25 at 10.24.21 AM.pngNew York—Christie’s is pleased to present The Ornithological Library of Gerald Dorros, MD, a superb selection of important works from the heyday of beautifully illustrated natural history books, taking place on Thursday, June 15 at 11:30am, Christie’s Rockefeller Plaza. The Gerald Dorros Collection encompasses the iconic volumes created in the late eighteenth and the nineteenth centuries, which transformed the world’s understanding of nature through the diligent research and artistry found in these tomes. This choice collection highlights works by the masters of ornithological art — John James Audubon, John Gould, and Saverio Manetti — and includes several fine presentation copies.

Featured in the sale are fine examples of first edition ornithological studies from masters of the field, including John Gould’s The Birds of Australia, London, [1840]-1869, Gould’s major ornithological achievement (estimate: $250,000-350,000); Saverio Manetti’s Storia degli Uccelli, Florence, 1767-1776, one of the greatest 18th century bird books (estimate: $150,000-250,000); and Daniel Giraud Elliot’s A Monograph of the Phasianidae or Family of the Pheasants, New York, 1870-1872 (estimate: $60,000-80,000).

Complementing the comprehensive ornithological library are a few of the great works on mammals by these masters, including a first edition in exquisite condition of John James Audubon’s The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America, New York, 1845-54, featuring 150 broadsheets of hand-colored lithographic plates (estimate: $250,000-350,000); and Elliott’s Cats and Gould’s Mammals of Australia, illustrating the full power of natural history art, from the skies to the sylvan expanses across the globe.

On June 15, 2017, the Books & Manuscripts department will also be auctioning The Metropolitan Opera Guild Collection at 10am and the various owner sale of Fine Printed Books & Manuscripts Including Americana and the Eric C. Caren Collection at 2pm, at Christie’s New York.

Image: John James Audubon (1785-1851) and Rev. John BACHMAN (1790-1874).The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America. New York, 1845-54. Estimate: $250,000-350,000

 

crossing_the_delaware_and_the_battle_of_trenton_great_news_from_new-yo_d6082779g.jpgNew York—Christie’s announces the sale of the Eric C. Caren Collection: How History Unfolds on Paper at 2pm on Thursday, 15 June 2017 as a single-owner selection beginning the Books & Manuscripts auction, at Rockefeller Plaza. The 109 lots of the Caren Collection comprise broadsides, manuscripts, newspapers and pamphlets from the 16th-20th centuries and are expected to realize in excess of $1,000,000.

Eric Caren is a well-known figure at the vanguard of collecting historical paper. He started at age 11, carrying home armfuls of old newspapers from a local abandoned house. Decades later he sold his first collection of rare newspapers to form the nucleus of The Newseum on Pennsylvania Avenue. Caren is the author of 12 books on media history, including co-author of The Civil War (Smithsonian Headliner Series, 2004). He has handled literally millions of examples of “how history unfolds on paper” and considers the examples being sold on June 15 some of the best of the best of what he has collected over many decades.

The Caren Collection is remarkable for the high degree of rarity from item to item. Like the broadside pictured above, many lots are either the only examples known, unique manuscript items, or the only examples known to have appeared at public sale. These leaflets, handbills and personal letters were made to convey the news of the moment; that they survive for posterity at all is extraordinary.

Christina Geiger, Senior Specialist in Books and Manuscripts, states, “To hold them in your hands gives a true thrill. One feels a visceral connection to the important news stories of the past and to the men and women who lived through them.”

Further highlights include: a manuscript deposition which led to the execution of a Salem witch, 1692 (estimate $50,000-80,000); a letter written from Little Big Horn by a participant describing how he discovered Custer’s body and blaming the massacre on Custer (estimate $40,000-60,000); a front-page newspaper printing of Thomas Paine’s “These are the Times that Try Men’s Souls” American Crisis #1 (estimate $25,000-35,000); the earliest newspaper announcing the surrender of Cornwallis and end of the Revolutionary War under a huge banner headline “Laus Deo!” (estimate $15,000-25,000); and the breakthrough 1974 article with the invention of the internet, signed and inscribed by both inventors (estimate $12,000-18,000).

Image: The only known copy of this “Great News” broadside announcing Washington’s Crossing of the Delaware and signal victory at Trenton. Salem, MA: E. Russell, January 7, 1777. Estimate: $40,000-60,000

 

Hess Nobel medal.jpgThe Nobel Prize Medal for Physics awarded in 1936 to the Austrian scientist who discovered cosmic radiation, Victor Hess, will be offered at Bonhams’ Fine Books and Manuscripts sale in New York on Wednesday June 7th. The medal, accompanied by its elaborate award document in its blue leather portfolio, is estimated at $300,000 to $500,000.

Before Hess’s ground-breaking discovery, scientists had assumed that radiation was emanating from the earth. A series of hot air balloon flights made between 1911 and 1913, in which Hess ascended into the atmosphere and measured the ionization, enabled him to prove the opposite. He demonstrated that the effect was stronger at higher altitudes than at ground level, indicating that the radiation being measured was not coming from naturally occurring radioactive elements on earth. Further experiments conducted during a solar eclipse, in which his measurements did not vary, ruled out the sun as a source of the phenomenon, and confirmed that these “rays” were coming from the vast expanse of space. This radiation would later come to be referred to as “cosmic rays,” and Hess’s discovery would open the door to vistas of space that are still being explored today, as scientists probe the outer reaches of the known universe.

In 1938, Hess fled Austria with his Jewish wife after the Anschluss with Nazi Germany incorporated the country into the Third Reich. He settled in the United States where he joined the faculty of Fordham University in New York, and enjoyed an illustrious career as a professor of Physics. 

Bonhams specialist Darren Sutherland said, “The solid gold Nobel medal and decorative document belonging to Victor Hess represent a high point in a long and distinguished career. They serve as a symbol of the selfless pursuit of knowledge by a devoted scientist whose discovery opened the door to the exploration of the outer universe.”

9279cb7f-11ca-415e-a66c-c2cab69036e6.pngLOS ANGELES—On June 9th in Los Angeles, Profiles in History will auction off 50 rare Disney theme park cast member attraction costumes. It is the largest collection to ever be offered at auction. Highlights include, a five piece Haunted Mansion gothic style costume and a four piece, Haunted Mansion, gothic style maid costume, each is estimated to sell for $900 - $1,500. Costumes from almost every Disney attraction are included like, Pirates of the Caribbean, Hall of Presidents, Tomorrowland, Animal Kingdom and they are each estimated to sell in the range of $100-$800.

Next up is Walt Disney's original hand-annotated working script for Cinderella. It is a 147 page draft from 5 years before the animated film was released. A total of 20 pages contain Walt Disney's handwritten notes. It is estimated to sell for $40,000-$60,000.

Also going up for auction is a Beauty and the Beast Main Street animated window display purchased at the Disneyana Convention at Walt Disney World in 2000. This is the actual window display with moving parts that all still work. It contains an iconic scene from the film. Only a handful of these animated window displays have ever been offered for sale by Disney. It is estimated to sell for $10,000-$20,000.

Finally, 120 gorgeously detailed Pinocchio paintings created by the top Disney animators stationed in England. The paintings were produced for the De Beukelaer Company, located in Belgium. When people bought a tin of cookies, they would receive collectible Pinocchio stickers. The goal was to collect all 120. These were the paintings for the stickers and included with the art are all 120 stickers. The lot is estimated to sell for $60,000-$80,000. 

Other treasures include a handmade stove, made by Walt Disney! In the late 1940's Disney built a small-scale railroad, the "Carolwood Pacific," in the backyard of his home on Carolwood Drive. He crafted a miniature pot-bellied stove for the caboose as a training project to acquaint himself with the tooling equipment. He enjoyed crafting the stove so much, he made several more. It is estimated to sell for $2,500-$3,500.

Image: Walt Disney's original hand-annotated working script for Cinderella.

ABOUT PROFILES IN HISTORY

Founded in 1985 by Joseph Maddalena, Profiles in History is the world's largest auctioneer & dealer of original Hollywood Memorabilia, historical autographs, letters, documents, vintage signed photographs and manuscripts. Born into a family of antiques dealers in Rhode Island, Joseph "Joe" Maddalena learned early on how to turn his passion of collecting historical autographs into a career. Upon graduation from Pepperdine, Joe pursued his passion to become a full-time dealer of historical documents, and opened his first office in 1985. Profiles in History has held some of the most prestigious and successful auctions of Hollywood memorabilia and own virtually every Guinness Book record for prices of original screen-used memorabilia.  Highlights from their previous auctions include the "Cowardly Lion" costume from The Wizard of Oz ($805,000); Steve McQueen's "Michael Delaney" racing suit from Le Mans  ($960,000); From the history-making Debbie Reynolds Auction in June 2011, Profiles in History sold the Marilyn Monroe "Subway" Dress from The Seven Year Itch for $5.52M and the Audrey Hepburn Ascot Dress from My Fair Lady for $4.44M. In February 2012, Profiles in History arranged the sale of a pair of Judy Garland screen-used Ruby Slippers from The Wizard of Oz  to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences. In addition, Joe Maddalena was the star of Hollywood Treasure, which aired on Syfy.  Hollywood Treasure took viewers into the fascinating world of showbiz and pop culture memorabilia.

For more information visit www.profilesinhistory.com

 

DALLAS, Texas (May 23, 2017) - Robert Crumb’s 1969 Fritz The Cat Cover Art set a world record May 18 for the most valuable piece of American comic art when it crossed the block for $717,000 in Heritage Auctions’ Comics & Comic Art Auction in New York. The headlining lot in the firm’s inaugural Platinum Night session, the classic Underground Comix art was also the most valuable lot in the $8.3 million auction May 18-20.

“Artworks from Underground Comix - especially from masters such as Robert Crumb - are becoming recognized in the fine art world as cultural cornerstones,” said Barry Sandoval, Director of Comic Operations at Heritage Auctions. “Three of the top four lots in the auction were by Crumb.”

Original Comic Art Scores Big

Crumb’s original art for a complete, four-page story from The People’s Comics (Golden Gate Publishing, 1972) and his ironic “Keep On Truckin’” sequel page from 1972 realized $191,200 each. These two pieces are now tied for the second highest price ever realized at auction for Robert Crumb artwork.

Frank Frazetta’s In Pharaoh’s Tomb Battlestar Galactica Painting Original Art from 1978 also ended at $191,200. Steve Ditko’s original art for Page 17 from Amazing Spider-Man #23, featuring an epic battle scene between Spidey and the Green Goblin, brought $104,562.

Original cover art by Jack “King” Kirby and Vince Colletta for Thor #136, which has resided in a private collection for the past 25 years, more than doubled its $40,000 estimate to end at $101,575.

A Platinum Age gem, the original Sunday Comic Strip Art from Winsor McCay’s Little Nemo in Slumberland, dated 1908 - one of just five full Nemo Sunday strips ever offered at Heritage - sold for $89,625.

Joshua Middleton’s NYX #3 Cover and Concept Art, featuring the first appearance of X-23 (Marvel, 2004) realized $71,700 - setting a record for a piece of 21st century comic art since none has sold for more.

Additional comic art highlights include:

Neal Adam’s Original Cover Art for Batman #222 featuring a riff on The Beatles (DC, 1970): $77,675

Dave Gibbons’ Watchmen #2 Cover Original Art (DC, 1986): $65,725

Dave Gibbons’ and John Higgins’ Watchmen Les Gardiens (French Edition) #1 Cover Painting Comedian Original Art (DC/Zenda, 1987): $65,725

Record-setting Comic Books

Suspense Comics #3 Mile High Pedigree (Continental Magazines, 1944), a Golden Age treasure with a NM- 9.2 grade from CBCS, was sold for $262,900 - setting a world record for the issue. This pulp-style comic book won top lot among the auction’s comic books. This issue triumphs over the Pennsylvania Pedigree VF/NM 9.0 CBCS copy that realized at $173,275 in 2015 at Heritage, which at the time was the highest price ever realized at auction for a non-superhero comic book.

The Avengers #4 (Marvel, 1964) rose above and beyond its pre-auction estimate of $120,000 to be auctioned for $143,400. This copy is one out of four copies with a CGC grade of NM/MT 9.8 - the highest reported grade of this issue.

Tales of Suspense #39 (Marvel, 1963), NM 9.4 CGC, famous for the first appearance of Iron Man, sold for $95,600.

Anticipating her own movie releasing in June, Wonder Woman #1 (DC, 1942) captivated the auction floor when this VF- 7.5 CGC-grade comic realized $95,600.

With only five copies known to receive a higher CGC grade, The Avengers #1 (Marvel, 1963) CGC NM 9.4, collected 14 bids to be sold for $89,625. In this edition, the Avengers (Thor, Iron Man, Hulk, Ant-Man and Wasp) make their first appearance as a team, and thanks to the current blockbuster movies, these comics remain in the spotlight.

Additional highlights include:

The Amazing Spider-Man #1, CGC NM- 9.2 Massachusetts Pedigree (Marvel, 1963): $95,600

The Incredible Hulk #1 CGC VF 8.0 (Marvel, 1962): $89,625

Superman #1 (DC, 1939) CGC FR 1.0: $83,650

All Star Comics #8 (DC, 1942) CGC VGF 5.0: $54,970

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

Books and Works on Paper copy.jpegBloomsbury Auctions will be hosting the auction of Books & Works on Paper at 24 Maddox Street, London W1S 1PP, at 12noon. The sale comprises 416 lots, ranging from in estimate from £100 - £6,000, with works from a wide range of collecting categories, notably English Literature & History, Autographs and Memorabilia, Art & Architecture, Travel and Sport, amongst others.

Of particular interest is an autograph letter signed by renowned English naturalist, Charles Darwin. The letter (lot 140, est. £4,000-£6,000) is written on mourning stationary to an unknown recipient, and reads: "Four editions of the Origin have appeared; that published last month is considerably added to and can be purchased through any bookseller. I am glad to hear that you are interested in the subject”, Down, Beckenham, Kent, 17 December [1866]. Darwin received a request from his publisher John Murray for a fourth edition of 'On the Origin of Species by Means of Natural Selection’ in February 1866. This edition was released in November and it featured several corrections and additions to the previous ones, including a discussion on whether one or many forms of life first appeared.

Other sale highlights include a first paperback edition of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone from 1997 (lot 214, est. £2,500-£3,500), as well as a first edition of Ian Fleming’s Diamonds Are Forever from 1956 (lot 193, est. £700-£900).

A beautiful engraved double-hemisphere world map with original hand-colouring is estimated to reach £700-£900. The 1746 map by Homann Heirs, Nuremberg, (lot 344) shows inset northern, southern and oblique hemispheres, diagrams of the earth's position at the solstices, and includes Latin and French title cartouches of allegorical figures in the upper corners.

From the Science & Natural History section, lot 369 is a first edition of The Historie of Foure-footed Beastes by Edward Topsell, from 1607 (est. £1,000-£1,500). Topsell’s fantastical works are remembered for their detailed illustrations, such as the rhinoceros based on Albrecht Dürer’s 1515 woodcut.

Six botanical engravings from Nuremberg, [c.1613 and later] by Basilius Besler also feature (lot 370, est. £2,500- £3,500). The engravings include irises, hyacinths, sweet peas, caryophyllus and campanula.

From the Sporting group, a set of first editions of Chinese Kung-Fu Karato by Leong Fu (lot 416, est. £250-£350) is offered. The set is in 21 original parts, with illustrations by the author, original illustrated wrappers and within its original postal box. The editions were self-published in Ipoh, Perak, Malasia, in 1958.

Auction time/date: 12pm, Thursday 22nd June 2017 Auction location: 24 Maddox Street, London W1S 1PP 

Image: Lot 140: Autograph letter signed by Charles Darwin, 1866, (est. £4,000-£6,000)

DSC_3574.jpegThe May 20, 2017 sale at National Book Auctions featured a vast array of rare and desirable printed material from multiple estates and personal collections nationwide.

Notable volumes included an early edition of Charles Wilkes's "Narrative of the United States Exploring Expedition" ($3,750); David Roberts's profusely illustrated six-volume set "The Holy Land" ($3,500); and the remarkable Pageant Books facsimile of the Gutenberg Bible ($2,125).

This sale was also particularly strong on antique prints and ephemera. Notable lots included Auguste Renoir's etching "Sur la Plage a Berneval;" Fremont's 1848 map of Oregon and California; a military certificate engraved by Paul Revere; a vellum manuscript dating to 1470; and an intriguing album of real photo postcards.

National Book Auctions' sales take place at the Galleries at Worth Asset Brokerage in Freeville, New York, just six miles from Cornell University, and are simulcast via Invaluable.com. Auctions are forthcoming on June 3, 2017 and June 10, 2017, with the latter being a special Curator's Catalog featuring such exceptional items as a two-volume composite atlas by Johann Baptist Homann (est. $30,000-40,000). 

For more information about bidding or consigning, email mail@nationalbookauctions.com or call 877-BOOK-070.

The May 21, 2017 sale at Worth Auctions comprised an extensive and carefully selected group of fine and decorative prints, watercolors, drawings, and maps.

Notable pieces included Bodmer's "Moennitarri Warrior in the Costume of the Dog Danse" ($4,062); Thomas Moran's "Grand Canyon of Arizona From Hermit Rim Road" ($2,500); and Peter Schenk's "America Septentrionalis Novissima" ($1,000). 

The sale also showcased a fine array of seventeenth- to nineteenth-century natural history prints by such masters as John James Audubon, Basil Besler, and Mark Catesby, as well as important equestrian, sporting, and nautical images.

Further complementary material will be featured in future sessions in 2017. These cataloged live sales will take place in the Galleries at Worth Asset Brokerage in Freeville, New York and will be simulcast to a global bidding audience via Invaluable, LiveAuctioneers, and eBay Live.

For more information about bidding or consigning, contact Evan D. Williams, AAA, Director of Fine Art & Special Collections, at evan@worthauctions.com or 607-279-0607.

h-map copy.jpgDALLAS--May 22, 2017--Three battle maps owned and used by Gen. Omar Bradley from the June 6, 1944 Allied invasion of occupied France at Normandy are expected to be among the most coveted lots at Heritage Auctions Arms & Armor Auction June 11 in Dallas.

The largest seaborne invasion in history, the assault included 156,000 American, British and Canadian forces landing on five beaches along 50 heavily fortified miles of French coastline. The day known as “D-Day is recognized as the start of the Allies' liberation of Western Europe from Nazi Germany’s control.

Omar Bradley’s D-Day Map for Operations Overlord and Neptune (est. $70,000 and up) was used by Bradley during the invasion at Normandy. Titled “Situation '2400 Hrs 6 June 1944 Hq. Fusag [First United States Army Group] Secret,' the map measures 20 inches high by 22-1/2 inches wide, and is printed with blue and black ink. Presumably prepared as the invasion was about to get underway, or perhaps when it was in progress, some enemy positions are marked “Not Confirmed or “Unconfirmed or simply marked with a question mark. Maps like this one were Gen. Bradley’s guide for formulating a daily plan of action; each morning, Gen. Bradley would review these maps with his staff to assess the battlefront, assets, risks and enemy strength. This is among several maps that were on board the U.S.S. Augusta (his makeshift headquarters) on the English Channel during the D-Day landings. This map is in pristine condition, having been cleaned recently by a conservator formerly affiliated with the Smithsonian Institution.

Another of Gen. Bradley’s D-Day maps (est. $40,000 and up) is similar in many ways, although the “Secret designation was downgraded to “Confidential. This map shows the position of American, British and German forces on the first full day of the Allied invasion that led to the defeat of Adolph Hitler and the subsequent liberation of Europe.

A third Gen. Bradley D-Day map (est. $40,000 and up) has the same measurements and also carries the “Secret designation. Like the first two, this map was produced by the 12th Army Group Engineering Department. It notes the location of German tanks, both inland and along the lines of defense, and shows higher troop concentration than that shown on the previous day’s map, as both sides dedicated extensive resources to the struggle that altered the course of the war. The three maps included in the Arms & Armor Auction were part of a set Gen. Bradley used in his capacity as commander of all U.S. ground forces in the invasion.

After examining these maps, Luther D. Hansen, curator of the U.S. Army Quartermaster Museum in Fort Lee, Va., vouched for their authenticity and rarity. "From my examination of these Omar Bradley WWII Headquarters FUSAG/12th AG battle maps, I conclude that they are original to WWII and one of only four original sets ever produced I believe that this Omar Bradley map set is the only set in private hands. To view Bradley's maps 70 years later, with the benefit of historical reassessment, we can see the omissions and intelligence failures that impacted his decisions and battle outcomes. Especially interesting is the map heading 'HQ FUSAG' on D-Day which represents the fictitious 'First U. S. Army Group' decoy Army Group from Operation Quicksilver. Omar Bradley's map headings changed to 'HQ Twelfth Army Group' after the enemy figured out the deception. In terms of rarity and historical significance, these maps are a perfect 10."

A Battle-Scarred Flag that flew from the LCT 540 (est. $40,000 and up) was consigned by Ensign (later Lieutenant) William L. Wilhoit. The professionally framed flag measures 36 inches long and is folded and mounted to a red velvet background with a metal plaque with an inscription that reads: “Flag of the US LCT 540/Normandy Invasion/June 6, 1944. The flag is accompanied by a letter of authenticity signed by Wilhoit dated June 16, 2016 and copies of the Presidential Unit Citation to United States LCT (landing craft, tank) 540 signed by Secretary of the Navy James Forrestal and a Navy Cross Citation to “Ensign William L. Wilhoit United States Naval Reserve that also was signed by Forrestal.

A Blood-Stained Flag from the Battle of Antietam (est. $30,000 and up) measures 77 inches wide by 46 inches high and features a canton (blue rectangle at the top hoist corner) with 34 stars six in each of the two bottom rows, and five and six more alternating in the top four rows, and is housed in a frame that measures 85 inches wide by 53 inches high. According to family lore, after the Battle of Antietam (Maryland), Gen. George B. McClellan and his troops were riding down a street in Sharpsburg when he directed that the flag be given to a local resident with the message that “here is something to remember us by. The flag remained in the recipient’s family for more than 90 years before being given to the consignor’s father, and was loaned to the Sharpsburg Museum in 1962 for the 100th anniversary of the Battle of Antietam. The flag, which is sewn on to a burlap backing and sealed against moisture, has 17 bullet holes and significant blood staining, mostly near the canvas hoist.

A set of Confederate Artillery Implements and Augusta Fuse Box (est. $24,000 and up) is marked “J. Darrow Augusta, GA in an oval stamp on the flap. The group includes a finely crafted lanyard that was used to set off the cannon blast; a Confederate-manufactured friction primer that was used to spark the cannon’s ignition; a vent pouch that would have cleaned out the fuse hole of the cannon; three shell fuses, two of which are wrapped; and a long steel cylinder with brass ends that was used to hold the bursting charge for an Armstrong cannon. Also included is a copy of the 2005 No. 2 edition of North South Trader magazine, which featured the implements and Augusta box on the front cover of that issue and an article detailing the pieces and showing images of the factory that manufactured the box.

A Confederate First National Flag Reportedly Captured from the Biloxi Courthouse in 1861 (est. $20,000 and up) measures 75-3/4 inches wide and 37 inches high; its frame increases the dimensions to 82-by-44. A 13-star variant of the First National Flag of the Confederate States of America, it reportedly was accompanied at one time by a now-lost label that said the flag was found in an old coffee can inside the vault of the Hancock County Courthouse that was being demolished to make way for construction of a new facility. The label said the flag flew on the Biloxi, Mississippi Courthouse and that was “captured by vile, Yankee, invading forces during the capture of Biloxi. The flag eventually was returned to the Biloxi-based Mississippi Division of the Sons of Confederate Veterans, and its size and use of the 13-star design is consistent with a dating of 1861, when neighboring states Missouri and Kentucky were on the verge of secession. Included are a letter of provenance written in 2005 by then-owner Michael Adamson, a 2005 letter from noted Civil War expert Les Jensen and a list of extant Mississippi Confederate flags.

One of the unique lots in the auction is an Original WWII German Navy (Kriegsmarine) Four-Rotor M4 Enigma Enciphering Machine Recovered from the Wreck of the German Submarine Tender Ammerland (est. $20,000 and up). One of what might be as few as 120 surviving examples, this Enigma machine was used in Germany during World War II to transmit coded information after the realization that Western Allies were intercepting German Navy signals, and is credited with playing a significant role in the development of modern computing. Because of the rarity of remaining machines, examples in any condition rarely find their way to the collector market; some that have gone to auction recently have realized sale prices between $150,000 and $300,000. Early Enigmas had three interchangeable rotors, which scrambled plain-text messages to produce a cipher text message, which then was sent via Morse Code to a receiver machine with the same settings, sparking efforts by opposing forces to crack the code that shielded the messages. The M4 model Enigma was ordered by German Admiral Karl Doenitz in 1941 after he feared the security of the M3 (three-rotor) machine had been compromised with the capture of the German submarine U-570 in August 1941. This M4 example was recovered by Swedish divers from the wreck of the German submarine tender Ammerland, circa 1990. The Ammerland was attached to Sicherungsflottille 9 in the Baltic Sea when it was sunk Feb. 10, 1945, southwest of Liepâja, Latvia. After being submerged for about 45 years, it is preserved in distilled water until it can be properly restored.

Other top lots include, but are not limited to:

A Scarce and Desirable High Condition Smith & Wesson .357 Registered Model Revolver With Original Box and Certificate: est. $15,000 and up

An Exceptional Boxed Pre-War Colt Single-Action Army Revolver: est. $12,000 and up

An Engraved Josef Fanzoi Sidelock Drilling: est. $10,000-12,000

A Civil War Union Staff Officer’s Chasseur Cap: est. $10,000 and up

A Fine Colt Model 1878 Frontier Double-Action Revolver: est. $10,000 and up

A Fine and Engraved L.C. Smith Crown Grade Double-Barrel Shotgun: est. $10,000 and up

A Superb Colt Bisley Model Single-Action Revolver: est. $10,000 and up

A Colt Model 1903 Hammerless Semi-Automatic Pistol Taken from Raymond Hamilton of Notorious Barrow Gang: est. $10,000 and up

A Rare Confederate Navy Cap Box Allegedly Taken as War Souvenir by Private Cyrus Adams, New York 72nd Infantry, Later Killed in Action at Williamsburg, Virginia in 1862: est. $10,000 and up

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

159-Szyk copy.jpgNew York—Swann Galleries has announced highlights from their June 13 auction of Art, Press & Illustrated Books, which will feature premier examples of printing that elevate the humble book to a noble art form.

The sale is led by an inscribed limited first edition on vellum of Arthur Szyk’s Haggadah, 1939, with 14 jewel-like full-page color plates by the artist. The work was illustrated by Szyk in Poland in the mid-1930s, and has been called the most celebrated modern Haggadah; it carries an estimate of $15,000 to $25,000.

An outstanding selection of press books by Bernhardt Wall from the Natalie Williams Collection features a number of presentation copies, including the 85-volume magnum opus Following Abraham Lincoln 1809-1865, with over 900 signed etchings ($10,000 to $15,000), as well as the signed complete set of The Etcht Miniature Monthly Magazine, 1948, ($3,000 to $4,000). A selection of Wall’s personal sketchbooks from the 1920s offers a glimpse into the mind of the artist. Further editions by fine private presses of the twentieth century include works from Doves and Gemini to Granary, Limestone and the Limited Editions Club.

A collection of French livres d'artiste includes a signed limited first edition of Henri Matisse’s Cinquante Dessins, 1920, with 50 images of his work, valued at $3,000 to $4,000, as well as Amour, 1899, by Maurice Denis, a complete set of 13 color lithographs illustrating a poem by the author to his wife ($10,000 to $15,000). Also available are works by Jean Cocteau, Jean Dubuffet and Raoul Dufy.

There is a fine selection of art journals and magazines, most notably the complete set of 12 volumes of the Art Deco periodical Feuillets d'Art, 1919-22, estimated to sell between $3,000 and $4,000. Portfolios include Salvador Dalí's limited edition Le Quête du Graal, 1975, with 12 color drypoints ($12,000 to $18,000). Also by Dalí is a limited special edition of Dante’s La Divina Commedia, bound in sculptural copper covers and printed on paper salvaged from the flood of Florence in 1966, valued at $6,000 to $9,000.

Mexican surrealist Nahui Olin (pseudonym of Carmen Mondragón) was a muse of Diego Rivera and an accomplished artist in her own right. In collaboration with her lover, Dr. Atl (a pseudonym meaning the Aztec word for water), she produced Optica Cerebral: Poemas Dinámicos, 1922, here offered in the exceedingly rare first edition, signed and inscribed to publisher, writer and politician José Martinez Sotomayor ($6,000 to $9,000).

Three volumes of the influential French fashion magazine Gazette du Bon Ton, 1912-14, featuring several single- and double-page pochoir plates, as well as seven original watercolor vignettes by George Barbier, are together valued at $8,000 to $12,000.

Several nineteenth-century American manuscript folios will be available, including Miss Ann Postley's Album, 1828, with six illustrations by Charles A. Baudouine—considered the first “interior designer”— and Gathered Blossoms, 1853, a handmade book of poems and illustrations by Pennsylvanian Thomas Lloyd Bailey for his fiancé, Caroline A. Smith (each $1,000 to $2,000). A group of 13 drawings on vellum for a German calendar titled Das Jahr une siene Kinder (“The Year and Her Children”), 1880s, by Frau Allwine Schroedker, accompanies the published calendar; together they are valued between $4,000 and $6,000.

The contemporary selection will feature a May 1970 issue of Gay Power, the cover of which is illustrated by what is believed to be Robert Mapplethorpe's first published photograph, valued at $2,000 to $3,000, and a limited edition catalogue, encased in a briefcase with assorted accoutrements, released in celebration of the thirtieth anniversary exhibition at the Walker Art Center, titled In the Spirit of Fluxus, 1993 ($1,000 to $1,500). Another scarce exhibition catalogue makes an appearance: Masters of Abstract Art: An Exhibition for the Benefit of The American Red Cross, 1942, features essays by noted artists including Stuart Davis, Fernand Léger, Jacques Lipchitz, and Piet Mondrian. On offer is a copy of the catalogue, signed by several of the contributors and artists, expected to sell between $5,000 and $7,000.

A signed and inscribed limited first edition of Grapefruit, 1964, one of Yoko Ono’s scarce performative and conceptual “event scores”—written instructions or suggestions for acts for the “viewer” to recreate—is valued at $4,000 to $6,000.

The auction will be held Tuesday, June 13, beginning at 1:30 p.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Friday, June 9, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, June 10, from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.; Monday, June 12, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Tuesday, June 13, from 10 a.m. to noon.

An illustrated auction catalogue is available for $35 at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information and to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Christine von der Linn at 212-254-4710, extension 20, or via e-mail at cv@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 159 Arthur Szyk, The Szyk Haggadah, number 22 of 125 copies on vellum, signed by Szyk and editor Cecil Roth, London, 1939. Estimate $15,000 to $25,000.

Screen Shot 2017-05-22 at 9.42.35 AM.pngBloomsbury Auctions will be hosting a sale of Vintage Posters at their new London base, 16-17 Pall Mall on 15th June 2017, from 11am. The auction comprises 216 lots, with estimates ranging from £500-£6,000.

Sale highlights include posters from the iconic spaghetti westerns, A Fistful of Dollars (est. £500-£800) and The Good, The Bad and The Ugly (est. £400-£600), as well as rare posters from the perennially popular James Bond films: Dr No (est. £3,000-£5,000), From Russia With Love, Goldfinger (est. £1,500-£2,500) and Thunderball (est. £1,200-£1,400).

The 1960s is also well represented with posters for the critically-acclaimed films, The Graduate, 1967 (est. £800-£1,200) and They’re Off (est. £1,500-£2,500) with the American thriller, Bullet from 1968 and starring Steve McQueen, estimated at £800-£1,200.

Posters for The Beatles’ films, Help! (est. £500-£700), Yellow Submarine (£400-£600) and Let It Be (est. £400-£600) feature in the auction. Alongside the Fab Four, The Who also appear in a poster of psychedelic design, (est. £200-£400).

Rare London Underground posters, signed by Henry Charles Beck, known more commonly as Harry Beck, will be on offer, one dating back to 1945 (est. £400-£600) and the other to 1948 (est. £300-£500). Beck’s London Underground tube map was produced in 1933, and was initially rejected by the publicity department as it was considered too radical in design. However, a successful trial print run proved it was just what the public needed. Today the map is regarded as a design classic and Beck is recognised globally for his work. 

Another well-loved London Underground poster is The Wonderground map of London by MacDonald Gill, first produced in 1914 (est. £2,000-£3,000). This comic depiction of London is said to have amused passengers so much that they would miss their trains! 

Further London Underground posters include a Wimbledon Championships poster by Leonard Appelbee from 1939 (est. £600-£800), a Davis Cup Wimbledon poster from 1936, designed by Walter Goetz (est. £500-£700) and a 1936 New Zealand cricket poster designed by Lancaster Gill (est. £600-£800). 

Continuing the transport theme is a nostalgic North Eastern Airways poster from 1930 (est. £300-£500), as well as a very rare East Coast LNER poster by Stanislaus Brien (£1,200- £1,400), depicting a beautifully painted beach scene, and a 1947 French travel poster by Henri Matisse (est. £800-£1,200). 

Signed works by iconic British artist, David Hockney, feature in the auction: Spoleto Festival USA 1997 (est. £300-£500) and Retrospective David Hockney (est. £200-£400). 

 

A celluloid of Snow White from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs.jpgNew York - On June 5, Bonhams and Turner Classic Movies (TCM) present An Important Animation Art Collection, The Property of a Gentleman, which features more than 290 original Disney animation drawings, storyboards, posters, concept art and celluloids. The collection, accumulated over 25 years, comprises a wide range of titles and items from over 60+ years of Disney animation, a fascinating history lesson on the studio’s changing styles and focus from its early 1930s shorts through to comic strips to the studio’s revival in the 1980s including Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Sleeping Beauty, and Pinocchio to The Little Mermaid and Aladdin.

The collection will be on preview at Bonhams Los Angeles from May 19-21 and then will be on display at Bonhams New York from June 2-5.

Highlights include:

  • An animation drawing from The Mail Pilot, Walt Disney Studios, 1933. Graphite and colored pencil on paper, matted and framed. Estimate: US$ 1,000-1,500.
  • A celluloid of Mickey Mouse from The Brave Little Tailor, Walt Disney Studios, 1938. Gouache on celluloid, multi-cell set-up, applied to Courvoisier wood veneer background, Walt Disney label on reverse, matted and framed. Estimate: US$ 4,000-6,000.
  • A celluloid of the Queen from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Walt Disney Studios, 1937. Gouache on trimmed celluloid, applied to a Courvoisier watercolor paper background, matted and framed. Estimate: US$ 10,000-15,000.
  • An animation drawing of Maleficent from Sleeping Beauty, Walt Disney Studios, 1959. Graphite on paper, matted and framed.. Estimate: US$ 500-700.
  • A celluloid of Geppetto, Figaro, and Pinocchio from Pinocchio with watercolor production background, Walt Disney Studios, 1940. Gouache on trimmed celluloid, applied to its matching watercolor production background, annotated, "F3 / 2 / 39 Oct 01 1939 Thor OK for / 10-18-39," and someone's initials, matted and framed. Estimate: US$ 20,000-25,000.
  • A Gustaf Tenggren original concept painting from Pinocchio. Walt Disney Studios, 1940. Black ink and watercolor on heavyweight paper, inscribed "Pinocchio" to upper left corner in watercolor in an unknown hand, matted and framed. Estimate: US$ 30,000-40,000.
  • A celluloid of Dumbo and Timothy Mouse from Dumbo, Walt Disney Studios, 1941. Gouache on celluloid, applied to a Courvoisier airbrushed background, stamped "WDP" lower right, matted and framed. Estimate: US$ 2,000-3,000.
  • A Mary Blair concept artwork from Cinderella, Walt Disney Studios, 1950. Gouache on board, matted and framed. Estimate: US$ 4,000-6,000.
  • A celluloid of the fairies from Sleeping Beauty, Walt Disney Studios, 1959. Gouache on trimmed celluloid, applied to an Eyvind Earle watercolor production pan background of the royal throne room, matted and framed. Estimate: US$ 20,000-30,000.

Image: A celluloid of Snow White from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs Walt Disney Studios, 1937. Gouache on celluloid, multi-cell set-up with an overlay, applied to its matching watercolor production pan background of the cottage, Estimate: US$ 25,000-30,000.

BOSTON, MA (May 19, 2017) — John F. Kennedy's Senate ID Card sold for $20,000 according to Boston-based RR Auction.

The one-of-a-kind historically significant official US Senate personal identification card issued to John F. Kennedy, featured an image of the young senator, neatly signed in full in fountain pen, "John F. Kennedy."

Accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Kennedy's longtime secretary Evelyn Lincoln on US Senate memorandum letterhead, April 27, 1987, to noted JFK collector Robert L. White, stating in part: “The I.D. card issued to the late John F. Kennedy, was carried by him in his wallet while he was a United States Senator." 

After serving three terms in the House of Representatives, Kennedy was elected to the Senate in 1952. His term began on January 3, 1953, and he served as the junior senator from Massachusetts until December 22, 1960, just before entering the presidency.

“This personal ID card is an absolutely amazing relic from this important stage in his political life,” said Bobby Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction. 

An additional highlight from the online offering was an incredible assortment of historic Kennedy photographs from The Ronnie Paloger Collection.

"Among the collection were rare seldom-seen photographs of a youthful-looking JFK during his first foray into politics from his 1946 congressional campaign— his 1952 senatorial race, and gorgeous wedding photos of Jack and Jackie,” said Tricia Eaton, Specialty Auction Director at RR Auction.  

Highlights from the sale include, but are not limited by:

Handsome set of gold-and-black eagle bookends displayed by John F. Kennedy in his Senate office and then later in the White House, sold for $19,500.

John F. Kennedy original portrait artwork by Louis Lupas, sold for $12,240.

John F. Kennedy family's china tea-cup used aboard the presidential yacht, the 'Honey Fitz,' sold for $6,063.

John F. Kennedy 1951 letter to a constituent, sold for $4,961.

The John F. Kennedy Auction from RR Auction began on May 11 and concluded on May 18. More details can be found online at www.rrauction.com.

61-Cruikshank copy.jpgNew York—First editions and inscribed copies filled the shelves at Swann Galleries’ May 16 auction of 19th & 20th Century Literature. The sale broke several auction records and encompassed a variety of genres, dates and media. The trifurcated Books department (specializing in Art Books and Early Printed Books as well as Literature), is the oldest at Swann Galleries, which celebrated its 75th anniversary in March.

The top lot of the sale was a complete privately printed edition of Seven Pillars of Wisdom, 1926, by T.E. Lawrence, the inspiration for the classic film Lawrence of Arabia. The stunning tome, bound in green leather, boasts 65 plates and color illustrations by contemporary artists. The present copy was inscribed by Lawrence and given to his dentist, Warwick James; it was purchased by a collector for $62,500*.

An auction record was achieved for the complete set of 12 volumes of The Scourge; or Monthly Expositor of Imposture and Folly, 1811-16, illustrated by George Cruikshank. This was only the third complete set ever to appear at auction; the final, twelfth volume is extremely scarce due to the dwindling subscriber numbers towards the end of the periodical. The set was especially unusual because it contained the rare suppressed plate of A Financial Survey of Cumberland, or Beggars Petition, 1815, which overtly suggested the disgraced Duke of Cumberland had murdered his valet, in both its censored and uncensored state. After breakneck bidding, a collector made the winning bid of $11,250.

The auction debut of the first American edition of Fyodor Dostoyevsky’s The Brothers Karamazov, 1912, set a strong precedent, exceeding its high estimate of $7,500 to reach $10,000.

Half of the highest prices in the sale went to first editions of cornerstones of American literature. Twentieth-century authors performed especially well, with William Faulkner’s first novel, Soldiers’ Pay, leading the pack at $21,250. The first edition of Main Street, 1920, by Sinclair Lewis, achieved a new auction record of $6,500. Harper Lee’s monumental To Kill A Mockingbird, 1960, sold for more than five times its high estimate of $1,000, finally finishing at $5,750. Similarly, a first edition with the dust jacket of The Pastures of Heaven, 1932, charmingly inscribed by author John Steinbeck to his friend Louis Paul, reached $13,750.

Works by American modernist author Ernest Hemingway were well received, with 100% of the 14 offered lots going to buyers after frenzied bidding. An inscribed first trade edition of A Farewell to Arms, 1929, reached $6,750, while a first edition of Death in the Afternoon, 1932, was purchased for $2,125.

Another highlight was a rare limited first edition on handmade paper of James Joyce’s magnum opus Ulysses, 1922, which exceeded its high estimate to sell for $33,750.

Specialist John D. Larson said of the sale, “The robust sell-through rate of 87% demonstrated the strength of the market and continued interest in historic literature from the last two centuries, especially, as always, well preserved examples. Multiple institutional purchases underline the importance of the material we’re handling, and the record achieved for the Cruikshank set typifies the appeal of exceedingly rare material.”

The next sale of 19th & 20th Century Literature at Swann Galleries will be on November 14, 2017. For more information or consign quality materials, contact John D. Larson at jlarson@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 61 George Cruikshank, The Scourge, first edition, complete set of 12 volumes, London, 1811-16. Sold May 16, 2017 for $11,250, a record for the work. (Pre-sale estimate $4,000 to $6,000)

 

AntiquarianAuctions.com is an online auction site dedicated to the sale of rare and out-of print books, maps & prints, documents, letters, ephemera and vintage photography.

All pricing is done in US$. No buyer’s premium is charged.

Screen Shot 2017-05-17 at 12.23.15 PM.pngLot 1

Fitzpatrick (Sir Percy) Jock of the Bushveld (This is the first copy of “Jock” - “belongs to the Likkle People”

Published: London, 1907 Estimate: $12,500/15,000

5000 copies of the first impression were printed at a total cost to Longmans of £416. 7s. 11d.

Signed on the title page by J Percy Fitzpatrick. His full name was Sir James Percy Fitzpatrick.

Inscription on the front paste-down end paper reads: This is the first copy of “Jock”- “ belongs to the Likkle People” and the mere narrator desires to acknowledge that fact in proper form. J Percy Fitzpatrick Hohenheim October 1907 The dedications page reads: It was the youngest of the High Authorities who gravely informed the Inquiring Stranger that “Jock belongs to the Likkle People!” That being so, it is clearly the duty, no less less that the privilege, of the mere Narrator to dedicate the Story of Jock to those Keenest and Kindest critics, Best of Friends, and Most Delightful of Comrades The Likkle People.

Fitzpatrick's adventures during this time of his life, when he was pioneering in the Bushveld, are vividly described in his book Jock of the Bushveld, which is generally accepted as a South African classic.

Lot 3

[Bay Psalm Book] The Psalms, Hymns, and Spiritual Songs of the Old and New Testament... For Use ... especially in New-England

Published: Edinburgh, 1759-1771

Estimate: $5,000/8,000

The very large and decorative title cartouche, copied from Jailot, includes a lion, an ostrich, an elephant, a crocodile as well as classical and native figures. William Berry changed the coat of arms to that of the Royal Arms and included a dedication to the then recently restored King Charles II. There is also a cartouche that includes five distance scales.

William Berry was a bookseller, geographer and engraver, who was active between about 1670 and 1703. His most enduring partnership was with map-maker Robert Morden and, together, they dealt in topographical works, prints, maps, charts and globes. In the title of the map, Berry added detail for his English audience.

Provenance: Thomas Hewston (inscription at front "Thomas Hewston was born May 18th 1757 at eleven o'clock in the forenoon", one possibility is a Thomas Hewston, of Bedford Co., Penn. who is listed amongst the 'new levies' in a list of 'Rangers on the Frontiers - 1778-1783' [see W.H. Egle (editor). 'Muster Rolls of the Navy and Line, Militia and Rangers 1775-1783.' Harrisburg, Pa.: 1898 p.353].

A very rare late edition of the famous Bay Psalm book (possibly the last edition to be published without the Rev. Prince's revisions of 1757/8), bound with an apparently unrecorded issue of the Bible. In addition, there are two further possibilities that would add considerably to the book's interest:

1. the binding may be by Scottish/American binder Andrew Barclay: the blind roll on the cover is an apparent match for roll 'T5' as pictured in Hannah French's 'Bookbinding in Early America' (Worcester, 1986) p.39, and see images.

2. the inscription at the front may refer to a Thomas Hewston who served as a 'Ranger on the Frontier' in Pennsylvania sometime between 1778 and 1783, raising the possibility that the present work, in its 'travelling binding' accompanied him during his service. Although there were apparently 22 editions of the Bay Psalm book published in Scotland, they are rare on the market: the records show just two examples, in 1938 Goodspeed's offered a 1741 18th edition with the upper cover of the binding missing, and in 1896 Littlefield offered a 1737 16th edition. None are listed as having been offered at auction.

Lot 4

Jefferson (Thomas), Wilberforce (William), Chatterton (Thomas) &c. - Barbour (John G.): Dialogues of the Dead, chiefly of the Moderns ... by the Author of "Evenings in Greece"

Published: Edinburgh, 1836

Estimate: $1,500/2,000

First and only edition - completely unrecorded in any of the standard bibliographies. There is one other copy known (which I used to own). See images for list of contents. The Wilberforce / Jefferson dialogue is particularly interesting, and of its time: Wilberforce berates Jefferson for allowing slavery to continue.

It is not clear why this work is so rare, Barbour was the author of a number of other works that do show up from time to time. The present work's politics sail quite close to the wind on occasion - was it perhaps banned or withdrawn or destroyed?

Lot 134

Kinza (Hirai), Piscator, [A Japanese writer writes, in English, on Japanese customs -] a 10pp. autograph manuscript article, titled ‘Visiting’

Published: New York?, 1893/94

Estimate: $1,500 /2,000

Hirai Kinza was an influential figure at the cultural crossroads between Japan and the United States during the final decade of the 19th century and into the early-20th century. In the present manuscript article, he offers a ‘modern’ view of the bow: the feature of Japanese etiquette that is still the best-known outside Japan.

Born in Kyoto in 1859, Hirai studied English from an early age. An interest in the west went hand-in-hand with his interest in religion. Initially, he quite vigorously opposed Christianity in general and its missionaries proselytizing in particular. In 1885 he set up an English school in Kyoto called ‘The Oriental Hall’ (Orientaru Horu), with the backing of Buddhist groups, and with the aim of countering the Christian influence of the Doshisha school established by Niijima Jo.

Lot 203

Churchill (Winston) The World Crisis, (First Editions Inscribed to Sir Abe Bailey)

Published: London, 1923 - 1929

Estimate: $7,500/9,000

Inscribed by Winston Churchill on a preliminary blank flyleaf of Volume 5 “Abe / from / Winston / with every good wish / 6th Mar 1929”. It is also signed by Abe Bailey on the front free endpaper in pencil and dated May 1929. Volume 1 is signed by Abe Bailey in ink and dated May 1923. Volume 2 has a presentation inscription from Bailey’s wife Mary “With Mary’s love to Abe/Nov 6th. 1923” on a preliminary blank flyleaf. (Presumably a birthday gift as he was born on November 6th 1864). Volumes 3 and 4 are signed in pencil by Abe Bailey on the front free endpapers.

The recipient Sir Abraham Bailey, 1st Baronet, KCMG

(1864-1940), known as Abe Bailey, was a prominent South African Randlord, diamond tycoon, politician, financier and cricketer. He was a good friend and sometime financial sponsor of Churchill and his son John married Churchill’s eldest daughter Diana in 1932. He was also active in the First World War, serving as Deputy Assistant Quartermaster-General to the South African forces and was involved in recruiting men for the army. He was awarded the Croix de Guerre by the French government and a baronetcy by the British one in recognition of these services. These features make the set an association copy of considerable importance and of especial interest to South African collectors.

Lot 5

Rackham (Arthur) The Arthur Rackham Fairy Book - De-Luxe Signed Edition

Published: London, 1933

Estimate: $2,000/2,500

No. 420 of a total of 460 copies of this limited de-luxe edition signed by Rackham. 287pp. In the original full vellum gilt decorated binding. Top edge gilt, fore and lower edges uncut and a few pages unopened. With 8 full page colour plates and numerous black and white illustrations including many wonderful silhouettes. A very fine (as new) unmarked and unfoxed sparkling copy with no flaws whatsoever. In the original publisher's cardboard slipcase which has some wear. Scarce in this pristine condition.

Lot 149

Fries (Laurent) Tabu Nova Partis Aphri

Published: London, Lyons, 1535

Estimate: $2,000/2,750

The map was printed from a woodblock and was one of the first printed maps of Southern Africa reasonably available to collectors.

The map is the Laurent Fries reduction of the map by Martin Waldseemüller, a German priest and cartographer who contributed to 16th century editions of Ptolemy’s Geographia. The map was printed from a woodblock; the title and scrollwork above the map make this the 1535 publication of the Geographia by Melchior & Gaspar Treschel in Lyons (there are four states of the map, 1522, 1531, 1535 & 1541).

This map is considered to be “one of the most important maps in the Ptolemy ....; the coastal detail on the map indicates that the map was “evidently based on the surveys undertaken during the first two voyages of Vasco de Gama”, The map now has three kings on their thrones, an elephant and two serpents next to a sugar loaf mountain, while the King of Portugal rides a bridled sea monster on the Mare Prassodum, holding the banner of Portugal in his right hand and the sceptre in his left. Mountains have been added and rivers appear south of the Mountains of the Moon.” (Norwich)The Latin text near the equator states that "this part of ancient Africa remains unknown". Above this text are the Mountains of the Moon (still so named today, AKA the Rwenzori Mountains), from which the Nile was thought, at that time, to arise.

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24642333-1-1 copy.jpgA signed collection of images picturing the late cultural legend, David Bowie, are to be offered as part of Bonhams Entertainment Memorabilia sale on 28 June, the month which marks the 50th anniversary of the release of Bowie’s first ever album, David Bowie. The images are thought to be one of the last items signed by Bowie before his passing in 2016.

The images were taken by Geoff MacCormack, a close friend of Bowie and travelling companion, whilst on a worldwide tour with the star in the early 1970s. MacCormack was a singer, percussionist, dance/mime member in several of Bowie’s bands. The journey took in New York, LA, San Francisco, Hawaii, Canada, Japan and a voyage on the Trans-Siberian express, which provides the backdrop to several of the photographs. The informal photographs show Bowie at his most relaxed and informal, a world away from the glamorous and outlandish personae he regularly adopted on stage.

Geoff commented on the image above; ‘I’d only just acquired a Nikkormat. I didn’t really know the camera at the time, and I pride myself on having got the composition right. I love that, although David clearly strikes a pose, the image still seems unguarded and natural. David later reciprocated by taking one of me in exactly the same sport. Believe me, mine is better!’

David Bowie, who had his breakthrough in 1969 with Space Oddity, won countless accolades and irrevocably changed the landscape of music, performance and fashion both in the UK and across the world. He was named as ‘the greatest rock star ever’ by Rolling Stone in 2016, and is estimated to have sold 140 million records worldwide.

Speaking of his friend, Geoff said: ‘For me, these images, which David loved, almost feel as if they belong in a family album. They capture the sense of two mates - one of whom just happened to have become a rock star - having the time of their lives.’

This carefree revelry is perfectly captured in one of the photographs, which depicts a slightly worse for wear Bowie asleep in their train berth aboard the Trans-Siberian Express. MacCormack explained: ‘We had drunk cheap Riesling and beer with a bunch of soldiers we’d met the night before. They were friendly and inquisitive as to what life was like in the West. In this image, you can just make out the bleak Siberian landscape through the window.

The photographs, signed by Bowie himself, provide a rare and honest glimpse in to the, then, life of arguably the world’s most influential artist.

The images will be on view at Bonhams Knightsbridge saleroom, Montpelier Street, from 25th June till the sale on 28th accompanied by a never-before-seen film of the journey from Japan to Moscow, for the ‘May Day Parade’, shot by Bowie himself and seen through his eyes, interspersed with MacCormack’s photographs. 

For more information and examples of Geoff MacCormack’s work, visit www.geoffmaccormack.com

Image: Heading back to London…the long way. Captured by Geoff MacCormack (£2,000-3,000).

 

60-Evans copy 2.jpgNew York—On Wednesday, June 7, Swann Galleries will hold an auction of Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books, with highlights from the colonization of the Americas, as well as botanical prints and original watercolors.

The sale is led by Samuel Baker’s untrimmed and unjoined A New and Exact Map of the Island of St. Christopher in America, 1753, which shows the island, now better known as St. Kitts, divided into parishes with a wealth of early information relating to structures on the island, as well as the surrounding waters. The borders of each of the four sheets are decorated in an elaborate Baroque style; the map is valued between $20,000 and $30,000.

Among other treasures, the sale promises a trove of rare early maps of the United States. Selections include a 1750 map of Pennsylvania by Lewis Evans, whose publication in Germany helped spark emigration to the state, resulting in the still-traditional Pennsylvania Dutch population ($10,000 to $15,000). John Ogilby and Arnoldus Montanus’s America: Being the Latest, and Most Accurate Description of the New World, 1673, will be offered at $10,000 to $15,000. There is also a run of rare island maps by Aaron Arrowsmith, including a 1830 chart of Hawaii, then called "The Sandwich Islands," which, according to an inscription on the back, was purchased in 1832 by a ship’s captain who made a voyage to the area two years later ($8,000 to $12,000). Also available is a map by Henry Briggs showing California as an island, 1625 ($8,000 to $12,000), the auction debut of a hand-colored chart by Joseph Frederick Wallet Des Barres depicting Revolutionary War battles that occurred near Charleston, NC, 1780 ($8,000 to $12,000) and colonial maps of America by English, Dutch and French artisans including Arnold Colom, Theodore de Bry, Herman Moll, Thomas Pownall and Pierre Francois Tardieu.

The 1740 through 1770 works of Jacques-Nicolas Bellin, official hydrographer to Louis XV, were compiled into L'Hydrographie Françoise, which boasts 92 charts at the forefront of contemporary scientific authority, accuracy and artistic appeal; the two-volume set will be offered in the sale with an estimate of $15,000 to $20,000.

Additional noteworthy atlases include a set of six double-page maps, circa 1600, by Matthias Quad, and the German edition of the popular small-format atlas by Jodocus Hondius and Gerard Mercator, Atlas Minor, Das ist, 1651, still in its original binding (each $8,000 to $12,000). Mercator is further represented in the sale by the first edition of his Ptolemaic atlas, Tabulae Geographicae, 1578. The present copy includes 26 additional maps from the seventeenth century by masters including Willem Blaeu, Abraham Ortelius and Nicolas Sanson, and is expected to sell between $7,000 and $10,000.

Swann Galleries consistently offers preeminent historical material relating to the city. Unusual maps include the “Water Map,” as Egbert Viele’s Topographical Map of the City of New York, 1865, is colloquially known, and an archive of finely drawn street plans delineating the sewers of lower Manhattan, 1865-68 (each $4,000 to $6,000). Also available in The History of the Province of New York from the First Discovery to the Year MDCCXXXII, 1757, by William Smith, valued at $1,500 to $2,500. Making its auction debut is an 1891 atlas of the island of Manhattan, created for tax purposes and boasting fold-out maps of the city, of which the only other known copy is currently in the collection of the New York Historical Society ($1,500 to $2,500).

Also in the sale are two large panoramic views of Prague, most notably an early state of Prag in Böhmen, circa 1740, the engraving by Johann Friedrich Probst after Friedrich Bernhard Werner, valued between $2,000 and $3,000.

The Natural History Books section of the sale is led by a rare complete run of The Naturalist’s Miscellany, 1789-1813, with engravings by Frederick Nodder and his son Richard, and text in English and Latin by George Shaw; the 24-volume set offers some of the earliest descriptions of several Australian species, including the Nonpareil Parrot and the Duck-Billed Platypus ($10,000 to $15,000). Also available are the hand-colored aquatint and engraving for the elephant folio plates of John James Audubon’s Herring Gull CCXCI, 1836, and Wood Ibiss CCVI, 1834 ($7,000 to $10,000 and $5,000 to $7,500, respectively).

There is a delightful selection of nineteenth-century watercolor portfolios: a set of 55 depictions of the life and deeds of Napoleon and 25 ink drawings by Robert Cruikshank, intended to serve as models for his “juvenile dramas,” 1830s, are each expected to bring between $8,000 and $12,000.

The auction will be held Wednesday, June 7, beginning at 1:30 p.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Friday, June 2, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, June 3, from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.; Monday, June 5, through Tuesday, June 6, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Wednesday, June 7 from 10 a.m. to noon.

An illustrated auction catalogue is available for $35 at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information and to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Caleb Kiffer at 212-254-4710, extension 17, or via e-mail at caleb@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 60 Lewis Evans, Speciel Land Charte von Pensilvanien, Neu Jersey, Neu York, Frankfurt, 1750. Estimate $10,000 to $15,000. Complete Auction Catalogue

Man Ray.jpgFRANKLIN, Mass. - A drawing in ink on paper attributed to Romanian artist Victor Brauner (1903-1966) and an ink drawing on buff toned paper, signed and dated by the renowned visual artist Man Ray (1890-1976), are expected top earners in Woodshed Art Auctions’ next Prestige Collection fine art sale, featuring 32 lots of Modern and Impressionist drawings and paintings.

The auction will be online-only - as are all Woodshed Art Auctions sales - and will be held on Wednesday, May 24th, at 12 o’clock noon Eastern time. Previews will also be held online, at the Woodshed Art Auctions website (www.woodshedartauctions.com), or by appointment in the firm’s gallery, at 1243 Pond Street in Franklin. To schedule a preview, call (508) 533-6277.

Internet bidding will be provided by LiveAuctioneers.com, Invaluable.com and Bidsquare.com.

Woodshed’s Prestige Collection sales are small auctions focused mainly on modestly priced works by big-name artists, and the names in this sale are indeed big. In addition to Victor Brauner and Man Ray, others include Theodore Seuss Geisel (aka Dr. Seuss), Roy Lichtenstein, Maurice Bernard Sendak, Pablo Picasso, Jean Cocteau, Mario Carreno and Andy Warhol.

“This auction is full of intimate, small-scale works that offer excellent glimpses into each artist’s mindset,” said Bruce Wood of Woodshed Art Auctions. “The Cocteaus are playful, the Picassos exude power and energy, and the Brauner and Lam drawings are iconic and full of metaphysical references. The price points are perfect for adventurous and knowledgeable collectors looking to acquire works associated with some of the greatest, most sought-after artists of the past century.”

The drawing in ink on paper attributed to Victor Brauner, titled Woman, was done in 1945 and is one of two Brauners in the auction. It carries a pre-sale estimate of $5,000-$7,000. Brauner was born in Romania, the son of a Jewish timber manufacturer. He went to school in Vienna and later settled in Paris in 1930. Brauner was an accomplished sculptor and painter of surrealistic images.

The ink drawing on buff toned paper by Man Ray (real name, Emmanuel Radnitzky), is titled Ship, Sailors and a Woman, signed and dated 1936. The woodcut should earn $6,000-$10,000. Man Ray was born in America but lived mostly in France. He contributed to both the Dada and Surrealist movements and regarded himself a painter, but he’s best known for his photography. 

There are two drawings attributed to Man Ray in the auction, and there are also two attributed to pop art icon Andy Warhol (Am., 1928-1987). One, titled Young Man, is a portrait drawing in ink and colored pencil on paper, signed and unframed. It’s expected to command $4,000-$8,000. The Warhol name and cache should mute any concerns about toning, light stains and handling marks.

Fans of Picasso will be pleased to know that three drawings attributed to (or in the manner of) the Spanish-born master will come up for bid. One is a signed and dated (1964) charcoal on bond paper titled Three Dancing Figures. The 4 ¾ inch by 8 inch drawing is showing a little age discoloration and toning, but it’s still a Picasso (attributed) and is expected to hit $2,000-$4,000.

A hat trick of three drawings attributed to Jean Cocteau (Fr., 1889-1963) will also come under the gavel, including a signed and titled (La Mediterranee) crayon drawing on buff paper, 11 inches by 8 ½ inches, unframed, that’s estimated to reach $3,000-$5,000. Cocteau was an artist, writer, designer, playwright and filmmaker. He wrote the novel Les Enfants Terrible in 1929.

The last of the multiples in the sale is Mario Carreno (1913-1999), the Cuban-born Chilean artist. His two attributions will include an ink drawing on paper titled Mascaron de Proa (Figurehead). The work is signed and dated (1973) and carries an estimate of $1,000-$2,000. It was consigned by a Chilean collector. Carreno studied in Cuba, Spain and France before settling in Chile.

An ink and dye on smooth card-weight paper, attributed to the pop art icon Roy Lichtenstein (Am., 1923-1997), titled Brush Stroke, is expected to change hands for $3,000-$4,000. The piece is signed and unframed and measures 3 ½ inches by 6 ½ inches. Lichtenstein defined the premise of pop art via parody, producing precise compositions of comic strips in a tongue-in-cheek way.

Who doesn’t love Theodore Geisel? Never heard of him? Yes you have. He’s Dr. Seuss (Am., 1904-1991), and the auction boasts an illustration attributed to Geisel of perhaps his best-known and best loved character, the Cat in the Hat. A drawing in red and black ink on white paper of Cat in the Hat, signed and inscribed “Best wishes, from Dr. Seuss,” should make $4,000-$6,000.

An ink drawing on paper attributed to Wilfredo Lam (Cuban, 1902-1982), titled Shaman, signed and dated (1941), in very good condition, is expected to breeze to $8,000-$12,000. The drawing is in very good condition. Lam sought to portray and revive the enduring Afro-Cuban spirit and culture, often utilizing a unique style that was characterized by the prominence of hybrid figures.

Maurice Bernard Sendak (Am., 1928-2012) was an American illustrator and writer of children’s books, best known for his book Where the Wild Things Are, published in 1963. An ink drawing on white card stock paper attributed to Sendak, titled Max in an Airplane, carries a pre-sale estimate of $2,000-$4,000. The drawing is artist signed and measures 6 ¼ inches by 7 inches.

This will be just the second Prestige Collection auction for Woodshed Art Auctions. The first was held April 26th, with positive results. “It paid off for consignors,” Wood said, “and it proved that we’re headed in the right direction for growing the company into a destination known for curated quality art.” The top lot was an ink drawing attributed to van Gogh that brought $12,000.

Woodshed Art Auctions is a family-owned art gallery specializing in oil painting restoration and live and online art auctions. The company is celebrating its 49th anniversary. 

Woodshed Art Auctions is always accepting quality artworks for future auctions. To inquire about consigning a single piece or an entire collection, you may call Bruce Wood at (508) 533-6277; or, you can e-mail him at bruce@woodshedgallery.com. To learn more about Woodshed Art Auctions and the online-only auction on May 24th, visit www.woodshedartauctions.com.

Image: Ink drawing on buff toned paper by Man Ray (1890-1976, real name Emmanuel Radnitzky), titled Ship, Sailors and a Woman, signed and dated 1936 (est. $6,000-$10,000).

joan copy.jpgDALLAS, Texas (May 15, 2017) - Four pieces by two famed illustration artists, Patrick Nagel and Gil Elvgren, set the pace for Heritage Auctions’ $1.7 million May 12 Illustration Art Auction as nearly 900 bidders vied for original and concept artwork. The auction exceeded its estimate by 61 percent with a sell-through rate of 99 percent by value and 96 percent by lot. Nagel’s Seductive Female in Profile sold for $125,000 and while his original Joan Collins, #411, 1982 sold for $100,000, each more than doubled their respective pre-auction estimate.

Recognized by many as one of the best pin-up artists in history, Gil Elvgren’s Fire Belle (Always Ready), 1956 sold for $112,500 and his eye-catching Cover, Girl!, 1965 sold for $100,000, doubling its pre-auction estimate. There was also sizeable interest in the pin-up art of Alberto Vargas whose Portrait of Carol Ohmart, 1956 sold for $40,000, double its estimate and the illustration story-telling artwork of Hy (Henry) Hintermeister whose  Rocket Pad Keep Out sold for $37,500, triple its pre-auction estimate and a record for the artist at auction..

"Once again the interest and demand for Pre-War Illustration art is very high from the likes of Nagel and Elvgren. Calendar, book cover and interior illustration artwork exceeded our expectation realizing double, triple or more above pre-auction estimates," said Ed Jaster, Senior Vice President at Heritage Auctions. “Overall the interest in illustration art continues to remain high across the board.”

A New Yorker magazine cartoon by Charles Samuel Addams Skier, New Yorker magazine cartoon, January 15, 1949, sold for $27,500, well over its $6,000-8,000 estimate; while the Brown & Bigelow calendar illustration Bait for Trapping a Man, Brown & Bigelow calendar illustration, June 1957 by Earl Moran captured $23,750 over its $3,000-5,000 estimate.

Book cover artwork was also of high interest as Roger Hane’s The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe, book cover, 1970 sold for $26,250, five times its low estimate and Robert McGinnis The Corpse that Came Calling, paperback cover, 1964 sold for $21,250 nearly seven times its estimate. A landmark illustration by artist Barbara Remington which was used for a trio of Ballantine Book covers for J. R. R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings Lord of the Rings, paperback cover study, 1965 sold for $17,500.

Magazine cover artwork from the 1940s saw interest as Peter Driben’s Pin-Up in a Bikini, Beauty Parade magazine cover, October 1947 sold for $21,250 setting a record for the artist at auction and early pin-up artist Enoch Bolles’ Steady Work, Judge magazine cover, October 31, 1914 which also realized $21,250. Interior illustration pieces were popular with bidders as Vargas’ Please Don't Peek Until I Finish Dressing, Playboy interior illustration, September 1962 sold for $27,500 and Garth Williams’ He Let Go of the Wheel for a Second and Did a Little Dance on the Slopping Deck, Stuart Little interior illustration, 1945 sold for $18,750.

Additional highlights include, but are not limited to: 

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

flag copy.jpgDALLAS (May 15, 2017) - A stunning, 1856 campaign flag for President James Buchanan set a world record at Heritage Auctions May 13 when it sold for $275,000, shattering the previous record for a campaign flag sold at auction, set by Heritage in 2009. The flag was the centerpiece of a $1.9 million Americana & Political sale that focused on memorabilia from the nation’s Founding Fathers and other historic figures.

“The previous record of $95,600 was set in November of 2009 for an 1860 John Breckinridge portrait flag,” said Jeff Bridgman, the winning bidder and owner of Jeff R. Bridgman American Antiques of York County, Pennsylvania. 

Colorful campaign banners in the style of American flags were produced for every winning presidential candidate from William Henry Harrison in 1840 up through, at least, Woodrow Wilson. Highly collectible, none is rarer than the 21-1/2" x 15" flag banner for James Buchanan. “As thrilling as it was to see it sell, I was not surprised to see this flag set a world record,” said Tom Slater, Director of Americana at Heritage. “It is the only Buchanan portrait flag ever to appear at auction and represented a perhaps not-to-be-repeated opportunity for the advanced collector.”

Not only did Bridgman purchase the Buchanan flag, he also was the winning bidder on a Monumental Silk Banner from the October 1789 Parade Welcoming the Recently-installed President to Boston.  “I have never owned an 18th century flag, almost nothing exists of that period, inside or outside of institutions, and this actually had Washington's name on it,” Bridgman said. “Amazing!”

The auction’s first session was devoted to material relating to the Washington and the Founding Fathers. A rare and important Lexington and Concord Broadside, reporting on the events which ignited the American Revolution, sold for $162,500. A remarkable Leopard-skin Saddle Pad owned by both George Washington and British General Edward Braddock ended at $150,000 following interest from multiple bidders. Since 1927 the leopard skin pad has been preserved and displayed by the Society of the Sons of the Revolution, until the decision of the organization's trustees to offer it at this auction.

A rare letter in which President Thomas Jefferson writes to Writes to Georgia Governor John Milledge Regarding the Removal of the Cherokees from Georgia as a Consequence of the Louisiana Purchase made $93,750.

Additional highlights include, but are not limited to:

A 50" tall metal & terracotta maquette of the Statue of Liberty sold for $45,000. 

A 21" x 30" hand-colored map from 1782 Battle of Yorktown sold for $42,500.

An extraordinary, Large, Powerful "Cigar Store Indian" Attributed to the Workshop of Samuel Robb sold for $37,500.

A 17" x 13" oil on canvas painting of George Washington Meeting at Fraunces Tavern ended at $35,000. 

Heritage holds major auctions of historical Americana twice yearly. Consignments are now being accepted for the next sale, slated for November.

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

153-Warhol copy.jpgNew York—Swann Galleries broke multiple established records for editions by important artists in their May 11 auction of Contemporary Art. This was the department’s seventh consecutive sale to exceed $1M. The house’s contemporary sales are notable for scarce multiples, though Thursday’s sale offered a premier selection of original works and sculpture as well.

The top lot of the sale was an important etching by David Hockney titled The Artist and Model, 1974, which was purchased for $52,500, above its high estimate of $30,000. Six of the seven offered lots by Hockney sold above or within their estimates, including the complete portfolio of Illustrations for Six Fairy Tales from the Brothers Grimm, 1970, with 39 etchings, some with aquatint, as well as an additional six etchings on handmade paper. The portfolio, in its original blue leather case, sold for $23,400, above a high estimate of $15,000.

Each of the eight offered works by Josef Albers was purchased, exceeding the $36,000 high estimate for the section by more than $11,000. The highlight was the fiery color screenprint DR-a, 1968, which nearly doubled its high estimate to reach $11,250 after rapid phone bidding, a record for the work. Additional runaway lots included two color screenprints featuring the squares for which Albers is known: Hommage au Carré, 1965, and Attic, 1965 ($7,280 and $6,000, a record for the work, respectively).

Julian Opie was represented in the sale by three works that all exceeded their high estimates. The highlight was Walking in the City, 2012, the complete set of six lacquered sculptures of anonymous businesspeople, which sold for $21,250; another highlight was This is Shahnoza 3, 2006, a screenprint depicting four stages of Shahnoza’s dance routine ($6,750, a record for the work).

All three offered works by Ellsworth Kelly found buyers, led by the 1964-65 lithograph Blue and Yellow and Red-Orange, which went to a collector for $16,250, a record for the work. Another lithograph from the same period, Black with White, surpassed its high estimate of $3,500 to sell for $5,000.

Additional records included $11,875 for Richard Diebenkorn’s 1969 color lithograph Untitled (Ocean Park). The previous record for Jean Arp’s Non loin du soleil, de la lune et des étoiles, 1962, stood at $2,000; in this sale, the brightly colored lithograph more than tripled that, flying to $7,250. New records were also achieved for works by Pierre Alechinsky, Chuck Close, Jim Dine, Robert Motherwell and David Wojnarowicz.

Todd Weyman, Director of Prints & Drawings at Swann Galleries, noted, “This sale’s active, competitive bidding signifies that the energy surrounding contemporary art is not going anywhere. Collectors especially exhibit a thirst for post-war works on paper.”

The next sale of Prints & Drawings at Swann Galleries will be held June 15, 2017. For more information or consign quality materials, contact Todd Weyman at tweyman@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 153 Andy Warhol, Geronimo, color screenprint, 1986. Sold May 11, 2017 for $30,000. (Pre-sale estimate $20,000 to $30,000)

ITHACA, NY—National Book Auctions, located in Ithaca, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog.  

This catalog features rare, antique and decorative books as well as select additions of ephemera. A vast array of antique volumes chronicling the opening of the American West will be featured, along with a private collection of original Currier and Ives plates.          

Antique and rare books in this catalog include numerous titles. Among the earliest examples are two tomes by William Camden, including the 1590 printing of his landmark chorographical work, "Britannia Sive Florentissimorum Regnorum," retaining the original wood cut illustrations, and "Remains Concerning Britaine," produced in 1614. Additional rare pieces include Roberts and Croly's "The Holy Land," published in six volumes in 1855, the 1801 first edition of Alexander Mackenzie's "Voyages from Montreal," featuring folding maps, and the limited first edition of Wheat's "1540-1861 Mapping the Transmississippi West," produced in six volumes.                     

Several pleasing collections will also be showcased. Highlighted is a sizable group of antique volumes relating to the American West, including such examples as the six-volume, 1845 printing of Wilkes' "Narrative of the United States Exploring Expedition," retaining the original hand-colored folding map, and numerous mid-nineteenth century titles by John Fremont including works relating to California, the Rocky Mountains, Oregon, Missouri, Native American Indians and more. Other vintage and antique pieces also include volumes from the celebrated Fruits of New York series, fancy Easton Press bindings, author-signed copies, and areas such as arctic and polar exploration, magic, books-on-books, military history, Civil War, decorative antique, multi-volume sets, and much more.   

Found throughout this catalog are interesting ephemera offerings. These lots include antique photographs and tintypes, 18th & 19th century maps and atlases, antique cartes-de-visite, Americana, Civil War-related, original antique correspondence, bound compilations of Harper's Weekly (including Civil War year issues), rare prints of photogravure works by Yousuf Karsh, antique lithographs and engravings, antique magazines, issues of Derriere le Miroir, stamps, Hollywood memorabilia, postcards, and other desirable items.   

National Book Auctions is a public auction service specializing in books, ephemera, and art. National Book Auctions is a targeted service offering experience and expertise unique to marketing antique and modern books and ephemera for consignors and collectors alike. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of collectible, signed, and first edition books. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-269-0101 or email mail@nationalbookauctions.com.

 

Lot_103.jpgDenver, Pennsylvania, May 11, 2017 - Morphy Auctions, the finest auction destination for fresh to the market collections, is excited to announce this exclusively comic books auction to be held on June 22, 2017.  Bidding starts promptly at 9:00 AM. All lots from this sale are on display in Morphy's Denver gallery and are available for preview now. 

This sale will undoubtedly weave a web of intrigue with its selection of titles featuring Spider Man.  Amazingly, over 40 fine lots are on offer featuring this favorite superhero.  Lot #46, an Amazing Fantasy #15 CGC Universal Grade 4.0 Silver Age Key Comic Book, is estimated at $12,000-18,000.  Considered a Holy Grail by many, it features off white pages and tells the origin of Spider Man through Stan Lee’s story, Stan Ditko’s art, and Jack Kirby’s cover.  And lot #1, an Amazing Spider Man #1 1963 Marvel Comic Book CGC Universal Grade 4.5, is one-derful in so many ways.  It retells the origins of Spider Man and is estimated at $5,000-6,500.

Comic books featuring Iron Man over time are a heavy metal favorite category in this comprehensive sale.  A great choice for summertime vacation reading would have to be lot #66, a lot of 33 The Invincible Iron Man #69 - #103 Bronze Age Key Comic Books.  This literal library, estimated at $600-1,200, consists of a run of the Invincible Iron Man Comic Books; all are ungraded and in excellent condition.  And it’s a nail biter with lot #104, a Tales Of Suspense #39 1963 CGC Universal Grade 4.0 Comic Book, estimated at $3,500-5,000.  This excellent, highly sought after book tells the tale of the origins of Iron Man, a.k.a. Tony Stark.    

X marks the spot when it comes to this sale’s offerings of premier X-Men comic books.  It’s a new beginning with lot #78, a Marvel X-Men #1 1963 Comic Book CGC Universal Grade 5.0, estimated at $4,000-5,000.  This important book has cream to off white pages and features the origin and first appearance of The X-Men.  Collectors are certain to make a big deal over lot #79, a Giant Size X-Men #1 NM CGC 9.4 Comic Book from 1975, estimated at $1,800-2,500.  This larger than life offering presents the new X-Men - First Storm, Nightcrawler, Colossus, and Thunderbird - for the first time. 

This auction also offers a heroic assortment of books featuring better and lesser known super heros.  Lot #48, a Marvel The Avengers #4 1964 Comic Book CGC Universal Grade 8.0 featuring the first Silver Age appearance of Captain America is estimated at $3,500-4,500.  Lot #61, an Incredible Hulk #181 CGC Universal Grade 8.0 1974 Bronze Age Key Comic Book debuting the first full appearance of Wolverine is estimated at $2,000-3,000.  Lot #103, a DC Comics Showcase #22 Comic Book 1959 CGC Universal Grade 5.5 is a shining example as well.  It features the origin of the Silver Age Green Lantern and is estimated at $4,000-5,000.  And it’s a most excellent adventure with lot #85, a Marvel Journey Into Mystery #83 Comic Book 1962 CGC Universal Grade 4.0.  This highly desirable book includes the origin and first appearance of Thor and is estimated at $4,000-5,000.

According to Dan Morphy, President of Morphy Auctions, “This comic book sale offers an exciting and comprehensive selection of some of the world’s most favorite and sought after titles.  Their illustrations and stories are riveting and it’s easy to get lost in their surreal worlds!  The Amazing Fantasy book featuring the origins of Spider Man is truly in a class by itself. Please visit our Denver, PA gallery to see these works of art firsthand - it’s worth a trip from anywhere!”

About Morphy Auctions:
Morphy Auctions, the finest auction destination for fresh to the market collectibles, is headquartered in Denver, PA. The company also has a satellite office in Las Vegas, NV. A full-service auction house, Morphy’s presents over 35 premier auctions annually. The company’s three-part mission includes ensuring consignor satisfaction with every auction, offering world-class customer service that goes above and beyond the call of duty, and providing relentless buyer support to create confidence for all clients seeking a trustworthy purchasing experience.  

Morphy’s team of specialists includes the nation's finest and most recognized experts in popular collecting categories including advertising; firearms; fine automobiles, automobilia and petroliana; coin-operated machines; antiques, fine, and decorative art; dolls, bears, toys, and trains; cast iron; coins; marbles; jewelry and wrist watches. Morphy Auctions is owned by President and Founder Dan Morphy, himself a lifelong and passionate collector of antiques, banks, and numerous other categories.  Morphy's has been in business since 2004 and has grown from two to over 65 employees in over a decade. 

Morphy Auctions is located at 2000 North Reading Road, Denver, PA 17517.  We can be reached by phone at 717-335-3435, by fax at 717-336-7115, and by email at info@morphyauctions.com.  Morphy Auctions is open seven days a week from 9am to 4pm.  For more information on Morphy's, please visit www.MorphyAuctions.com.

Image: DC Comics Showcase #22 Comic Book 1959 CGC Universal Grade 5.5. Estimate $4,000-5,000.

3374120_2 copy.jpgBOSTON, MA - In commemoration of JFK’s 100th birthday on May 29, 2017, RR Auction has curated an once-in-a-lifetime assortment of Kennedy artifacts, signed material, and photographs to celebrate the life of America’s beloved 35th president.  The special online offering is scheduled to begin on May 11 and will conclude on May 18, 2017.

A highlight is a John F. Kennedy 1955 'Profiles in Courage' hand-annotated speech manuscript page. 

A page from a draft of a speech given by Senator John F. Kennedy before the Sigma Delta Chi Journalism Fraternity at the University Club in Boston.

The annotated typed manuscript page with corrections in Kennedy's hand, from a speech given on October 27, 1955; the quotes featured in this speech were later published on pages 9 and 10 of his 1957 Pulitzer Prize-winning book Profiles in Courage. In part: "Still another pressure, and in a sense the most important one, is the desire to be reelected. This is not a wholly selfish motive—for those who go down to defeat in the hopeless defense of a single principle will not return to fight for that or any other principle in the future. A Senator must consider the effect of that defeat upon his party, his friends and supporters, and even his wife and children. Certainly in no other occupation is a man expected to sacrifice honor, prestige and his chosen career for the national good. And thus former Senator Ashurst of Arizona reportedly said to his colleague Mark Smith: 'Mark, the great trouble with you is that you refuse to be a demagogue. You will not submerge your principles in order to get yourself elected. You must learn that there are times when a man in public life is compelled to rise above his principles.' Finally, of course, is the pressure which embraces all other pressures—the pressure of a Senator's constituency, the interest groups, the organized letter-writers and, as you know, the newspapers. It is impossible to satisfy them all. Ex-Congressman McGroary of California wrote a constituent in 1934: 'One of the countless drawbacks of being in Congress is that I am compelled to receive impertinent letters from a jackass like you, in which you say I promised to have the Sierra Madre mountains reforested and I have been in Congress two months and haven't done it. Will you please take two running jumps and go to hell.' Few of us follow that urge—but the provocation is there, from unreasonable letters, impossible requests, hopelessly inconsistent demands and endlessly unsatisfied grievances."

Kennedy underlines several phrases in pencil and makes a few deletions, in addition to writing the politicians' names, "Ashurst" and "McGroary," in the left margin; the quotes from Ashurt and McGroary are what also appeared in Profiles in Courage.

Originally sold by Charles Hamilton in 1975. Accompanied by an early printing of Profiles in Courage, a photocopied typescript of Kennedy's final draft of this speech, and unsigned documents related to the German publication of the book.

“This speech was perhaps the first time that Kennedy revealed his thoughts on courage and politics, which would later be immortalized in Profiles in Courage,” said  Bobby Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction.

“Manuscripts related to the award-winning book are exceedingly scarce, and with numerous corrections made in Kennedy's hand this is a superb example.”

Another highlight is one-of-a-kind historically significant official US Senate personal identification card issued to John F. Kennedy.  

The ID Card features an image of the young senator, neatly signed in full in fountain pen, "John F. Kennedy." Accompanied by a letter of authenticity from Kennedy's longtime secretary Evelyn Lincoln on US Senate memorandum letterhead, April 27, 1987, to noted JFK collector Robert L. White, in full: "This United States Senate I.D. card issued to the late John F. Kennedy, with signature and photo, which you now have in your possession, was carried by him in his wallet while he was a United States Senator." Also includes an original Senate seating diagram from Kennedy's first term, one page both sides, which depicts Kennedy's seat as number 93.

After serving three terms in the House of Representatives, Kennedy was elected to the Senate in 1952. His term began on January 3, 1953, and he served as the junior senator from Massachusetts until December 22, 1960, just before entering the presidency.

“This personal ID card is an absolutely amazing relic from this important stage in his political life,” said Bobby Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction.

Also featured is an incredible assortment of historic Kennedy photographs from The Ronnie Paloger Collection. The 100 lots of photographs depict a fascinating and crucial period in JFK’s life from 1946-1953, chronicling JFK’s first political congressional campaign of 1946, his run for U.S. senator in 1952, and his marriage to Jackie in 1953. LIFE magazine featured six of these photographs in a twelve-page ‘photo essay’ chapter in their ‘special edition’ commemorating JFK’s centennial birthday.

Additional items include:

• Handwritten letter from Lt. Kennedy while on “PT Shakedown” duties in Miami, only months removed from his harrowing PT-109 rescue.

• Jackie’s 1960 Maternity dress, worn two months away from delivering JFK, Jr., and her husband winning the presidency

• Impressive Louis Lupa original pastel JFK portrait.

• Kennedy’s Stately Pair of Eagle Bookends.

The John F. Kennedy Auction from RR Auction will begin on May 11 and conclude on May 18. More details can be found online at www.rrauction.com.

 

Order of Surrender copy.jpgA typed Order of Surrender from the 1916 Rising, signed by the leader of the rebellion, Patrick Pearse, is to be offered at Bonhams Fine Books, Atlases, Manuscripts and Photographs sale in London on 14 June. It is estimated at £80,000-100,000.

The Order of Surrender is one of the most significant documents in Irish 20th century history. It ended the abortive attempt in April 1916 by Irish Nationalists in Dublin to overthrow British rule in Ireland, and establish an independent Irish State. The nationalist uprising, which broke out on 24 April, Easter Monday, under the overall leadership of Pearse, was met by the British authorities with uncompromising and overwhelming force. On Saturday 29 April, after six days of bitter fighting, Pearse, offered unconditional surrender in order to prevent further bloodshed. A schoolteacher by profession, Pearse was also leader of the Irish Volunteers and, as President of the Provisional Government, had read out the Proclamation of Independence outside the General Post Office on Easter Monday at the beginning of the Rising. 

The surrender order itself was hurriedly composed at the British army headquarters. In the name of the Provisional Government it called on commandants of the nationalist fighters to ‘order their command to lay down arms’.  Such was the haste of composition, that in the copy to be offered for sale at Bonhams the word ‘to’ appears as ‘tp’.  A small number of copies were made, signed by Pearse and distributed to rebel positions in Dublin and the outlying countryside by Nurse Elizabeth O’Farrell, who had acted as go between during the surrender negotiations, and members of the Capuchin community.

It is not known exactly how many typed copies were produced, but it is thought to be in single figures. Two surviving copies are held by the National Library of Ireland. Another, signed by Pearse and countersigned by James Connolly, is held at the Imperial War Museum, London. In addition, there are known to be three hand written drafts. Uniquely, the typed copy for sale bears a tricolour stamp printed by the rebels at the time of the Rising depicting William Allen, Michael Larkin and William O'Brien, the 'Manchester Martyrs', who were hung in Manchester for killing a police constable during a failed rescue attempt of two Fenian prisoners. The stamp was possibly affixed to authenticate the order, but may equally have been added at a later date.

Writing in the summer 2017 edition of Bonhams magazine the Irish writer, Ronan McGreevy editor of Centenary - Ireland Remembers 1916, which will be published in the autumn, explains the significance of the Surrender Order a follows:

“The terse document expresses Pearse’s belief that he would certainly be executed, but that all the others would be spared. Instead the British executed 15 leaders, including Pearse, and imprisoned thousands. This brutal military fiat turned Irish public opinion against British rule in Ireland exactly as the rebels had hoped”.

Bonhams representative in Ireland, manuscript specialist Kieran O’Boyle, said, “It is difficult to overstate the importance of this document to the history of Ireland. While in the short term, the surrender represented failure, the public reaction to the rising and in particular to the harsh way in which it was suppressed, galvanised the movement for independence and gave it the wide popular support it had previously lacked.”    

Image: Order of Surrender, 29 April 1916. Signed by Patrick Pearse. Estimate £80,000-100,000

vcsPRAsset_531423_105299_414756ac-1a03-434e-9c88-1f3ccf4cd74f_0.jpgLOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA - (May 10, 2017 ) - Van Eaton Galleries, one of the world’s premier animation and Disneyana auction houses, has announced a rediscovered original map of Disneyland co-created by Walt Disney himself when the park was still in its earliest days of inception. The exceptional artifact has never been offered at auction before and has not been viewed by the public in over 60 years. This map was pivotal in obtaining the finances Walt and his brother Roy needed to make their dream a reality, and is the single most significant piece of Disneyland memorabilia to come to auction to date.

With over 600 million total visitors since its opening day and nearing its 62nd Anniversary, it is hard to imagine that when Walt Disney first considered the possibility of building a theme park, he was often told that the idea would never succeed.

By the early 1950s, Walt Disney was already a household name. His studio had created memorable characters such as Mickey Mouse and Donald Duck, as well as breathtaking animated feature films such as Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs, Alice in Wonderland, and Cinderella. It was no doubt that Walt Disney was a man with creative ideas, but Disneyland was set to become the place where Walt could let his imagination flourish beyond any other.

Walt first considered building a theme park while watching his children play on a carousel in a local Los Angeles park. He wanted to build a place where both children and adults could have fun together. At first, Walt planned to build his park in an empty lot next to his Burbank Studio, however, as he began to imagine larger-than-life castles, wild Frontiers, and futuristic worlds of Tomorrow, his imagination and creativity quickly outgrew the small space and he set his sights on bigger locations.

In 1952, Walt had his team look into the costs of making his family-friendly theme park a reality. Unable to get funding from his Studio, Walt borrowed all of the money he could and even mortgaged his own home. The heavy financial costs made Walt realize he needed outside help to keep his dream alive.

In late 1953, Walt’s brother Roy Disney scheduled meetings in New York with leading banks and the three television networks; CBS, NBC, and ABC, to try and obtain financing for Disneyland. Walt knew that this was his best and possibly last chance to make a deal that could make Disneyland a reality. However, Walt realized that words alone would not be enough to convey the images he had in his head. He already had technical drawings and a few blueprints, but knew that if he could just show them a detailed picture of what Disneyland could become, then his chances of obtaining funding would greatly increase.

On the morning of Saturday, September 26, 1953, Walt called on his friend and former employee Herb Ryman to draw what would become one of the most important drawings in Disney history. Ryman, an established artist within the film industry, was familiar with creating detailed illustrations within short deadlines. However, when Walt told him that he needed a large aerial view of Disneyland by Monday morning for Roy to take to New York, Ryman did not think it was possible. The two men agreed that if they both stayed at the Disney Studio and worked nonstop both Saturday and Sunday, they could finish the drawing in time.

In what would be remembered as the “Lost Weekend”, Walt spent those two days narrating in fine detail every aspect of his park that he could muster, and Ryman, under Walt’s direction, turned his ideas into the first large, tangible visual representation of Disneyland ever created. This drawing was used to create a large tri-fold presentation board that Roy could take to New York as his main presentation piece.

Roy’s meetings with the banks and two of the networks proved fruitless, but his presentation proved successful with ABC, who agreed to give Walt the funding he needed to build his park in exchange for access to Disney’s film library, and a new Disneyland television show hosted by Walt himself, among other stipulations. The agreement remains the largest television network deal in history.

When Roy arrived back at the studio, the map was returned to Walt where he consistently used it in his meetings with developers and investors. When the map wasn’t being used by Walt, he had it displayed at the studio to inspire his team while they were further designing the park.

Walt was so impressed with this original map that in 1954, he had the map enhanced with additional black outlines and color, and included several new sketches within it so that it could be used as the first promotional image of Disneyland that the public would be able to see. The history associated with this piece is astounding.                             

In September of 1954, one year after the map was created; the newly enhanced original was shown to the public as the first ever image of the park. For the next six months, leading up to the grand opening of Disneyland in 1955, this map was used as a promotional image in magazines and newspapers, and could be seen in person at special events in order to promote the park’s opening.

By March of 1955, the map had a long list of achievements unparalleled by any other Disney artwork. The map was the first complete image of Disneyland, successfully sold the idea of the park to ABC, secured early investors and developers, became the basis for all of the later conceptual and developmental artwork for the park, was the first ever released image of Disneyland, and was used heavily in magazines, newspapers, and other promotional media prior to the park’s opening.

Then, in March 1955, during one of the final planning meetings for the park, Grenade Curran, a young Disney employee, noticed the original map abandoned in a corner of Walt’s office and asked Walt if he could keep the map as a memento. Walt had befriended Curran’s parents in the years before, and developed a playful banter with Curran during his time at the Disney Studio. Walt had affectionately come to nickname Curran “Shrapnel” due to his unusual first name. That friendly relationship is what led Walt to give Curran the original map to take home that day.

Curran, knowing that the map was important, stored it away carefully as a memento of his time at the Studio and his friendship with Walt. However, Curran was unaware that he was unknowingly preserving one of the most significant artifacts in Disney history.

Now, over 60 years later, this original Disneyland map has been re-discovered and is coming to auction at Van Eaton Galleries in Sherman Oaks, California. This map, the highlight of an approximately 800-item auction of original Disneyland props, costumes, souvenirs, and artifacts, is estimated to sell for $750,000-$1,000,000, making it the most valuable Disneyland artifact ever offered at auction.

Van Eaton Galleries, a now veteran of Disneyland and Disney-themed auctions including their “The Story of Disneyland” and “Collecting Disney” auctions, has seen prior items such as an original PeopleMover ride vehicle sell for upwards of $400,000, but has never seen a piece as significant to Disneyland history as this original map.

Mike Van Eaton, co-owner of Van Eaton Galleries, says, “That an artifact like this, which is so deeply rooted in the creation of Disneyland, still exists today is astonishing. With the discovery of this piece, we have an item that Walt Disney created during a 48 hour period of hard work and imaginative genius, which succeeded in getting him the funding he needed to build one of the most successful endeavors of his career, and which he continued to personally use throughout the entire building stages of Disneyland. Without this map, there would likely not be a Disneyland today. We’re very excited to be bringing this item to auction and to have the chance to share the story behind this map with the millions of people who love Disneyland just as Walt originally wanted”.

The auction is set to take place June 2017 at Van Eaton Galleries in Sherman Oaks, California, with an exhibition in May where the public can view the items in person.

DISNEYLAND AUCTION AND EXHIBITION LOCATION

Van Eaton Galleries                                                                                                       

13613 Ventura Blvd

Sherman Oaks, California 91423

(818) 788-2357

PRESS EXHIBITION  June 1, 2017

PUBLIC EXHIBITION will open June 2, 2017

On 19 May in London, Sotheby’s will offer at auction an outstanding single-owner collection of photographs, The Discerning Eye: Property from the Collection of Eric Franck, Part 1. The sale comprises 119 lots which showcase different shades of modernism around the world ranging from well-known Magnum photographers to lesser-known artists such as Heinz Hajek-Halke and Pentti Sammallahti.

Eric Franck has for many years been synonymous with both expertise and rarity in the photographic world. Through his decades of experience both as a fine art dealer and collector, his appreciation and curatorial influence has shaped our understanding of some of the most celebrated photographers of the 20th century, thus contributing substantially to the modern vision of photography.

Through his personal connections with photographers, such as his sister Martine Franck and her husband Henri Cartier-Bresson, Eric has had unique access to some of the most significant and iconic works of the photographic canon. In 2012 Eric and his wife Louise gifted the Tate over 1,400 photographs of London by 120 artists dating from the 1880s to the 2000s. This incredibly generous donation doubled the museums entire holdings of photographs, and has made a significant contribution to the nation’s understanding and appreciation of photography as an artistic medium.

Presented for auction in Part 1 is a carefully selected group of works from Erik’s personal collection, including rare prints by Henri Cartier-Bresson and Horacio Coppola amongst others. Part 2 will be held at Sotheby’s in Paris in November. 

 

323-Christie copy.jpgNew York—On Thursday, May 4, Swann Galleries held an auction of Autographs, with twentieth-century highlights by authors taking the spotlight. The sale performed well overall, with 88% of items offered finding buyers.

The top lot was a photograph by Elliot Erwitt of President Dwight D. Eisenhower with his successor John F. Kennedy, signed by both, during their historic transitional meeting at the White House on December 6, 1960, which more than doubled its high estimate of $15,000 to sell for $32,500.

Additional material from the three branches of American government included several group portraits of Supreme Court Justices, led by a photograph of all nine justices of the 1925 Taft Court, signed by each, which reached $10,625, above a high estimate of $2,000. This was followed by a photograph of each justice of the 1939 Hughes Court, also signed by all, which sold for $5,500.

Autographs by authors performed especially well, with highlights being an Autograph Letter Signed by Kahlil Gibran to a Mr. Horowitz on July 10, 1928, which reached more than ten times its high estimate of $1,200 to sell to a collector for $13,000, a record for an autograph by Gibran. Another record was achieved for an Autograph Manuscript by Agatha Christie that included drafts of various novels and plays, written circa 1948 in Baghdad, which reached $18,750, a record for a manuscript by Christie. Three drafts by Arthur Conan Doyle for the lecture he delivered on his 1894 North American Tour sold for $10,652.

Also among the top lots were love letters by Ernest Hemingway to Marlene Dietrich, led by a 1952 letter inviting her to visit him in Cuba and discussing his latest novel, The Old Man and the Sea, written on hotel stationery on August 12, 1952, which sold for $18,750. In another, written in Venice two years before, he tells her he does not believe in horoscopes; the two-page Autograph Letter Signed sold to a collector for $11,250.

Marco Tomaschett, Autographs Specialist at Swann Galleries, noted, “There continues to be a rapidly intensifying interest in high-quality autographs associated with past leaders in business, including Andrew Carnegie (in this sale, but also especially Alexander Hamilton and Robert Morris in other recent auctions).” The standout lot in question was a Photograph Signed and Inscribed by Carnegie, which carried an estimate of $600 to $900, but after rabid bidding reached $3,750.

The next sale of Autographs at Swann Galleries will be held November 7, 2017. For more information or consign quality materials, contact Marco Tomaschett at mtomaschett@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 323 Agatha Christie, Autograph Manuscript notebook with early drafts of her plays, Baghdad, circa 1948. Sold May 4, 2017 for $18,750. (Pre-sale estimate $4,000 to $6,000)

May21_01_pics.jpgITHACA, NY--Worth Auctions, located in Dryden, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog: May 21.   

Worth Auctions is pleased to present an extensive and carefully selected group of fine and decorative prints, watercolors, and drawings.

Central to this specialist art sale is a fine array of seventeenth- to nineteenth-century natural history prints by such masters as John James Audubon, Basil Besler, and Mark Catesby.          

The sale will also showcase numerous important views of the American West, such as Thomas Moran's "Grand Canyon of Arizona," George Catlin's "Wild Horses at Play," and Karl Bodmer's "Dog Dancer."

Equestrian enthusiasts will take interest in the trio of dressage scenes by George Simon Winter, the color print of polo ponies by W.S. Vanderbilt Allen, and the pair of race horse lithographs by Henry Stull.                     

Sporting art collectors will wish to inspect the early fencing engravings by Girard Thibault; the yachting lithographs by Frederic S. Cozzens, and the bare-knuckle boxing aquatint by Henry Heath.

Antiquarian cartography collectors will not want to miss the opportunity to acquire rare and desirable maps by the likes of Pieter van der Aa, Peter Schenk the Elder, and Jacques-Nicholas Bellin.    

Other works worthy of special mention include "The Old Violin" by William Michael Harnett, "Wreck of the US Steam Ship Arctic" by James Edward Buttersworth, and "The Vale of Calaat" by Henry Salt.

Further complementary material will be featured in future sessions in 2017. These cataloged live sales will take place in the Galleries at Worth Asset Brokerage in Freeville, New York and will be simulcast to a global bidding audience via Invaluable, LiveAuctioneers, and eBay Live.  

Worth Auctions is a public auction service specializing in estate work and collections.  The company conducts fully cataloged auctions with global bidding activity over three platforms. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of items, from pencils to airplanes. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-330-0358 or email mail@worthauctions.com.

 

Screen Shot 2017-05-08 at 8.50.42 AM.pngOn 18 May Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions will hold a sale of Fine Photographs and Photobooks at their new London base, 16-17 Pall Mall, St James’s. The auction features 175 lots with estimates from £100 up to £5,000, with works dating from the early years of the art right up to the present day.

Head of Department, Justine Gruser comments, ‘An extraordinary collection of photographs and photobooks covering an impressive range of subjects and photographers will be on offer in the sale this May, coinciding with the Photo London Fair and many satellite events related to the medium. From beautiful photographs of Japan and New York cityscapes to portraits of cultural icons including Marilyn Monroe and Madonna, the sale explores many sides of photography with several early American photographs and documentary photography.’

Highlights include fifty-two hand-coloured albumen prints of Japan from the 1860s-90s by a range of photographers including Felice Beato (1832- 1909), who was renowned for his views and panoramas of the architecture and landscapes of East Asia (Lot 13, Est £1,200-1,500). The lot includes portraits of tradesmen, geishas and street sellers and rare prints of hara-kiri and crucifixion, as well as street scenes and landscapes of Nagasaki, Kamamura and Tokyo.

The sale includes fascinating and vivid pictures of New York by various photographers such as William Gordon Shields with his iconic image of Brooklyn Bridge, 1916 (Lot 32, Est. £2,000 - £3,000) and William Klein, Staten Island Ferry, 1955 (Lot 92, Est. £2,000 - £3,000). Klein commented on photographing the city, “The kinetic quality of New York, the kids, dirt, madness - I tried to find a photographic style that would come close to it. So I would be grainy and contrasted and black. I’d crop, blur, play with the negatives. I didn’t see clean technique being right for New York. I could imagine my pictures lying in the gutter like the New York Daily News.’

Also featured is The New York Telephone Building, 1936, by Berenice Abbott (Lot 30, Est. £2,500 - £3,000). Abbott, an American, is known for capturing the city and chronicling the buildings and neighbourhoods of Manhattan, many of which are no longer in existence. Social Patron (1948) by Louis Faurer serves as another lively snapshot of the city (Lot 36, Est. £1,200 - £1,500).

An engaging photograph of G. F. Watts, the Victorian painter, sculptor and Royal Academician, Julia Margaret Cameron (1815- 1879) is another sale highlight. The work of Julia Margaret Cameron was recently recognised in a dedicated exhibition held at the V&A. This print was originally in a scrapbook belonging to the artist Edward Clifford which was gifted by Clifford to Henry Blackwell Harris, one of the founders of the Oriental Ceramics Society, who had lodged with him in his Kensington Square flat from 1898 until his death in 1907. This photograph carries an estimate of £1,200 - £1,500 (Lot 15). 

The May auction also includes works by Elsbeth Juda (1911 - 2014). Relatively little was known about Juda until her first major exhibition at the age of 98 which reflected on an accomplished career of 45 years. Juda worked for The Ambassador magazine in London, a publication her husband launched after the pair fled Nazi Germany. She was also a respected portraitist, photographing many artist friends such as Norman Parkinson and Graham Sutherland. A key highlight is a portrait of Henry Moore in his studio at Much Hadham, Hertfordshire, 1953, titled King and Queen (Lot 27 Est. £1,200 - £1,500). Juda was also asked to photograph Winston Churchill to provide visual references for Graham Sutherland’s portrait of the former Prime Minister, commissioned by the Houses of Parliament for his 80th birthday. Sir Winston Churchill, (at home in Chartwell, Kent), Lot 26, carries an estimate of £1,200 - £1,500.

A striking photograph of a down-to-earth 19- year-old Marilyn Monroe, then known as Norma Jean Baker, by Hungarian-Romanian photographer, Andre De Dienes (1913-1985) is a stand-out portrait from the auction, (Lot 44, Est. £800-1,200). 

Additional celebrity portraiture is well represented with a number of iconic portraits from a private collection including Madonna, True Blue, 1986, by fashion photographer Herb Ritts (Lot 65, Est. £5,000- 7,000); a beautiful photograph of Claudia Schiffer, Ellen Von Unwerth (Lot 66, Est. £2,000 - £3,000); Annie Leibovitz’s portrait of Meg Ryan on the beach, 1995 (Lot 72, Est. £3,000 - £5,000); and Michelle Pfeiffer by Terry O’Neill, 2010 (Lot 66, Est. £500 - £700). 

Four photographs by French photographer Yan Morvan are also presented. This series was unknown until a recent exhibition which explored the experience of this famous war-photographer in a suburban bike gang in the 1970s. These 'bad boys' of the time are captured in their more intimate environment and reflect a very outrageous and still beautiful representation of a rebellious French youth from a few decades ago (Lots 117-120, Est. £2,000- 3,000 each). 

Works by the following photography masters also appear: Felix Bonflis, Cecil Beaton, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Julius Shulman, Paul Strand, Ruth Bernhard, Mario Giacomelli, Horst P. Horst, Erwin Blumenfeld, Ansel Adams, Sebastiao Salgado, Steve McCurry and many others. 

Image: Lot 13: Japan, 1860s-90s, Felice Beato (1832-1909) and others, fifty-two hand-coloured albumen prints. Est. £1,200 - £1,500 

 

 

Rockwell copy.jpgDALLAS, Texas (May 4, 2017) - Norman Rockwell’s Study for Triple Self Portrait, an oil study for the artist's self-described 1960 Saturday Evening Post "masterpiece", sold for $1,332,500, a new world record for an oil study by the artist Wednesday during Heritage Auctions’ American Art Auction in Dallas.

The record-setting Rockwell led a $4.5 million auction of diverse American art pieces that realized a 96 percent sell-through rate by value and saw spirited bidding across all Heritage Auctions bidding platforms.

Other top lots include Birger Sandzén’s powerful Creek at Twilight. Once relegated to a Milwaukee school’s storage room, the masterwork soared to $516,500, well above its pre-sale estimate. Net proceeds of the work will be set aside to fund college scholarships for Washington High School graduates.

Thomas Moran’s visually stunning Mountain Lion in Grand Canyon (Lair of the Mountain Lion) fetched $612,500.

“Today’s American Art auction was unbelievably exciting,” said Aviva Lehmann, Director of American Art. “We exceeded the aggregate high estimate by over one million dollars. Setting a new auction record for a Rockwell study, combined with the number of active bidders for the Sandzén that reached a final sale price as the third highest price for the artist at auction, demonstrates Heritage Auctions’ solid strength across all categories of American art.”

Other highlights include:

Hermann Ottomar Herzog’s oil painting Fishing on the Gulf Coast, Florida sold for $150,000 well above its $30,000-50,000 pre-auction estimate.

Samuel Colman’s Autumn Landscape, 1864 achieved $137,500.

Milton Avery’s landscape Rippled Rock and Rippled Sea, 1938 realized $106,250.

Rockwell Kent’s Greenland (Spring) sold for $87,500.

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

Van Gogh.jpgFRANKLIN, Mass. - A dark brown ink drawing on heavy wove paper attributed to the famous Dutch Master artist Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890), titled Garden View of the Church at Auvers (1890), signed by van Gogh, sold for $12,000 in the premiere online-only fine art auction titled Prestige Signature Collection: Master Artworks, held on April 26th by Woodshed Art Auctions.

“The location in the drawing was positively identified as Garden View of the Church of Auvers, and the artwork dates from the last year of van Gogh’s life,” said conservator/auctioneer Bruce Wood of Woodshed Art Auctions (formerly The Woodshed Gallery), based in Franklin, Mass. (www.woodshedartauctions.com). “Without better paperwork, we had to call it an attribution, but there’s little doubt it is authentic and probably should have gaveled for $100,000 or more.”

Van Gogh lived just three months in Auvers-sur-Oise, a small village north of Paris. He moved there in 1890, after having spent a year at an asylum in Saint-Remy. The sketch in the auction has been identified as a view of the church in Auvers, the only gable-roof bell tower among the locations van Gogh lived in France. Tragically, van Gogh committed suicide that year, at age 37.

The Prestige Signature Collection: Master Artworks sale was something new for Woodshed Art Auctions - the confluence of a group of excellent pieces arriving at once in the gallery, and all having one thing in common: they were limited to artworks by internationally recognized artists. This, the debut auction, featured just 26 artworks, by names that are known to nearly everyone.

These included Andy Warhol (Am., 1928-1987), Pablo Picasso (Sp./Fr., 1881-1973), Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (Fr., 1864-1901), Fernand Leger (Fr., 1881-1955), and van Gogh. The next Prestige Signature Collection sale will be held on May 24th with market-fresh works by Wilfredo Lam, Mario Careno, Victor Brauner, Maurice Sendak, Roy Lichtenstein and Jean Cocteau.

“Moving forward, we’re dividing our sales into two categories,” Wood said. “These are Studio Art Sales, which are larger catalogs of fine and decorative art, and Prestige Signature Collection Sales, which will feature a smaller, refined selection of artworks by more recognized artists.” He added, “The April 26th Prestige Collection sale and its focused attention paid off for consignors.”

Internet bidding was facilitated by LiveAuctioneers.com and Invaluable.com, as well as the Woodshed Art Auctions website. Following are additional highlights from the auction. All prices include a 20 or 25 percent buyer’s premium, applied depending on how the bid was submitted.

The runner-up top lot was a mixed media on paper by Fernand Leger (Fr., 1881-1955), titled Composition with Three Women, artist signed and comes with a certificate of authenticity. The 18 inch by 13 ¼ inch work gaveled for $10,312. Leger was a painter, sculptor and filmmaker. His boldly simplified treatment of modern subject matter made him a forerunner of pop art.

Several drawings attributed to the pop art icon Andy Warhol were in the auction. These included a drawing in color markers on manila folder-weight paper titled Two Campbells Soup Cans that realized $3,125; and a drawing in ink on lightweight parchment paper titled Tap Shoe that went for $7,812. Both were signed by Warhol and were formerly the property of New York collector.

Several Picassos also came under the gavel. These included a pair of signed attributions that rose to identical selling prices of $2,500 each: an ink drawing on paper titled Reclining Woman and a pencil drawing on paper titled Woman Chased by Man and Dog. Both were unframed. Also, an autograph and drawing on a book page by Picasso, not an attribution, changed hands for $875.

A lithograph by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec from the painter’s Café Concert series titled Madame Abdala en Bebe (1893), unsigned (but identified with the artist’s monogram), finished at $500. Abdala, the subject, was a singer at the Ambassadeurs in Paris. The only state lithograph, made as one in an edition of 500, measured 10 ½ inches by 7 ¾ inches and was in very good condition.

An artwork in pencil and gouache on paper, attributed to the early American modernist painter Stuart Davis (1892-1964), titled Abstract, measuring about 20 inches by 25 inches, topped out at $3,750. Davis was known for his jazz-influenced, bold, brash and colorful proto pop art paintings of the 1940s and ‘50s, as well his Ashcan School pictures in the early years of the 20th century.

A signed, dated (1912) and numbered (7/7) bronze sculpture on a marble base by the French sculptor, painter and printmaker Aristide Joseph Bonaventure Maillol (1861-1944), titled Femme nue assise (“Seated Female Nude”), brought $676. The work was eight inches tall on a one-inch base, and was in good condition, except for some minor handling marks and a chip on the base.

Woodshed Art Auctions is a family-owned art gallery specializing in oil painting restoration and live and online art auctions. The company is celebrating its 49th anniversary. 

Woodshed Art Auctions is always accepting quality artworks for future auctions. To inquire about consigning a single piece or an entire collection, you may call Bruce Wood at (508) 533-6277; or, you can e-mail him at bruce@woodshedgallery.com. To learn more about Woodshed Art Auctions and the next auction planned for May 24th, visit www.woodshedartauctions.com.

Image: Original dark brown ink drawing attributed to Vincent van Gogh (1853-1890) on heavy wove paper, titled Garden View of the Church at Auvers ($12,000).

ITHACA, NY—Worth Auctions, located in Dryden, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog.  

This catalog features the fourth session of rare and desirable militaria from the estate of a prominent Civil War collector from Upstate New York plus a sizeable collection of large folio Currier & Ives lithographs and select other material from multiple consignors nationwide.          

Civil War items include a Confederate shell jacket with officer's shoulder boards; kepi caps; cartridge boxes; brocade sword belts; and canteens.

Currier & Ives titles include "Stars of the Trotting Track;" "Arguing the Point;" "A Stopping Place on the Road;" "Brush for the Lead;" and "American Country Life."                    

This sale will also feature a suite of original albumen photographs by George N. Barnard; an assortment of ornately carved Chinese inkstones; oriental rugs; vintage typewriters; a 906-carat faceted jade gemstone; a light-field camera; a working Victrola; and much more.   

Please bookmark this page and check back for the announcement of our next auction which will include a fourth session of Civil War rarities plus significant collections of Currier & Ives prints, dinosaur fossils, and vintage radios.    

Please check back soon for our next two auction catalogs, the first of which will focus on fine works on paper and the second of which will comprise a fifth session of Civil War rarities plus significant offerings of post-1898 firearms, dinosaur fossils, and ancient coins. 

Worth Auctions is a public auction service specializing in estate work and collections.  The company conducts fully cataloged auctions with global bidding activity over three platforms. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of items, from pencils to airplanes. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-330-0358 or email mail@worthauctions.com.

 

 

Alice.jpgA rare first edition of Lewis Carroll's enduring classic "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" fetched $9,062 at National Book Auctions' April 29, 2017 sale. Published by Macmillan in London in 1866, this highly sought-after volume featured the original fancifully illustrated plates by John Tenniel and was bound in red cloth with gilt debossed images of Alice and the Cheshire Cat.

Other standout books the sale were the twelve-volume "Complete Works of Abraham Lincoln" edited by the President's private secretary John G. Nicolay; a beautifully hand-illuminated Turkish Quran; and a signed first edition of Roald Dahl's short story collection "Someone Like You." Ephemera lots of note included a carefully compiled album of patriotic covers from both sides of the Civil War conflict; an extensive estate archive of personal correspondence dating back to the 1770s; and a selection of World War II propaganda posters.

National Book Auctions' next sale will take place on May 20, 2017 and will include a broad array of collectible and antique volumes and ephemera. Its full-service sister company, Worth Auctions, will hold a sale on May 7, 2017 featuring rare and desirable militaria from the estate of a prominent Civil War collector from Upstate New York plus a sizeable collection of large folio Currier & Ives lithographs and select other material from multiple consignors nationwide. For more information, visit www.nationalbookauctions.com and www.worthauctions.com.

210-Mormon copy.jpgNew York—On Thursday, April 27, Swann Galleries offered their tenth consecutive auction of Printed & Manuscript Americana to exceed $700,000. Much of the top material was unique or extremely rare, including diaries, letters and archives, many of which had never previously been seen at auction. 

Swann Galleries has gained a reputation as the leading source for quality material relating to the foundation of Mormonism. A first edition Book of Mormon, 1830—the only edition to list Joseph Smith as the "author and proprietor" rather than as the translator—led the sale at $52,500*. Other stand-out lots included a pair of legal documents, 1842, signed by Smith while he was the Mayor and Justice of the Peace in Nauvoo, Illinois, in a case against the postmaster of the town, which flew past its high estimate of $3,500 to $23,750, as well as a recognizance document from the following year, ordering a nurse to pay $100, which reached $15,000, above a high estimate of $1,800. Each of the seven offered lots related to Mormonism sold above their estimates.

The top five lots all went to private collectors.  A rare letter by Hernán Cortés to his property manager, instructing him to be hospitable to a visiting bishop, was purchased for $32,500; no other letters from the conquistador have appeared at auction in the last 30 years.

Further highlights included a Force printing by William J. Stone of the Declaration of Independence, 1833, a cornerstone of Americana collecting, at $21,250, and a large archive of Milwaukee sculptor John Severinus Conway that reached $12,500, above a high estimate of $3,000. A circa 1811 manuscript speech on the formation of New York's College of Physicians and Surgeons by Samuel Bard sold for $8,750,

Journals included the accounts of a diary missionary Edward W. Syles in Shanghai and San Francisco's Chinatown in the 1850s at $7,250, as well as the translated manuscript of a Japanese soldier’s last days in World War II ($3500). The bound diary of a wealthy Manhattan orphan in the mid-nineteenth century reached $2,250.

Among the records set was $1,375 for the iconic San Francisco Call-Chronicle-Examiner on the 1906 earthquake; the previous record of $840 was set in 2008. Additionally, the first complete set of Amos Doolittle's engravings of the Prodigal Son parable to be sold at auction in nearly 30 years sold for $6,500.

Institutions acquired important material, including an archive of a Mexican pulque bar that spanned nearly a century, which was purchased by the University of Notre Dame. A different institution purchased the first edition of Esther Levy's Jewish Cookery Book, 1871, the first Jewish cookbook published in the United States, for $11,250.

Specialist Rick Stattler noted, "The market remains strong for good, interesting material.  That this was our tenth consecutive sale to surpass $700,000 demonstrates a strong foundation in the market."

The next sale of Printed & Manuscript Americana at Swann Galleries will be held September 28, 2017. For more information or consign quality materials, contact Rick Stattler at rstattler@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 210 Joseph Smith, The Book of Mormon, first edition, Palmyra, 1830. Sold April 27, 2017 for $52,500.

DALLAS, Texas (May 1, 2017) - For over 40 years, photojournalist Gordon Converse travelled to more than 120 countries, shooting photos for the Christian Science Monitor. The award-winning photographer will have a number of prints available during Heritage Auctions’ Photographs Signature Auction in New York City on May 18. Prior to the auction Converse’s work which he shot exclusively with his Leica M camera - will be celebrated at the Christian Science Publishing Society in Boston on Tuesday May 16, 2017 during the world premiere of the documentary “Illumine All Mankind” by Bob Pokress, producer and director of the documentary.

“As Gordon said, 'The purpose of photojournalism at its best is to help mankind see...still photographs give us time to pause and to see...they provide a universal method of communication that breaks through all barriers of language.' “Illumine All Mankind” is a celebration of the work of one of the 20th century's great photojournalists,” said Pokress, who is also facilitating the consignment of the Converse prints for the Christian Science Monitor. “Having worked with numerous photojournalism archives over the years, Gordon's body of work stands out from that of all other photojournalists and has made bringing his work back to life through this documentary a distinct pleasure.”

Examples of Converse’s work from the archives of the Christian Science Monitor will be available for admirers and collectors during the Photographs Signature Auction include but are not limited to:

Fog burns off the old Inca city, Machu Picchu, Peru, 1968: est. $1,000-2,000

Spain (street scene), 1960s: est. $1,000-2,000

Portraits of Norman Rockwell (three photographs), 1970: est. $1,000-2,000

China - Time of Change, 1980: est. $1,000-2,000

Statue of Liberty, New York City, 1954: est. $1,000-2,000

Indian women at world's highest capitol, La Paz, Bolivia, 1967: est. $1,000-2,000

The screening of the Gordon Converse documentary at Christian Science Publishing Society in Boston on May 16, which will run from 7:00 p.m. - 9 p.m., will be followed by a casual Q&A with Gordon's daughter Linda Converse Bloom, with Alfredo Sosa, Monitor Director of Photography and with Mark Sappenfield, Editor of the Monitor, to discuss Gordon's award-winning body of work and his approach to photojournalism. Documentarian Bob Pokress will also be available to discuss the restoration of Gordon's photography and the making of this documentary.

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

Comic copy.jpgDALLAS (April 27, 2017) - The Mile High Pedigree copy of Suspense Comics #3 highlights a high-end selection of comics and comic art in Heritage Auctions’ inaugural Comics Platinum Night session May 18 in New York. The evening session kicks off a three-day, 1,300-lot event May 18-20 that will include spanning original Underground Comix art, original cover art and scarce, key books spanning every genre.

“Heritage has successfully held Platinum Night auctions in its U.S. coins and sports auctions and we decided the time is right to extend the practice to our comics offerings as well,” said Barry Sandoval, Director of Operations for Comics and Comic Art for Heritage Auctions. “Just 83 lots will comprise our first Platinum Night and we think collectors will relish the selection we’ve assembled for them.” The auction will take place at the Omni Berkshire Hotel, 21 East 52nd Street, with live online bidding and phone bidding also available.

Suspense #3, 9.2 CBCS, a white-hot Golden Age issue, driven by the Nazi bondage/torture cover by Alex Schomburg, could sell for as much as $200,000 in the evening session. High-grade copies of The Avengers #4, 9.8 CGC, is expected to end at $120,000 and a near mint copy of The Avengers #1, 9.4 CGC, is expected to spark spirited bidding and a $100,000 auction price due to its high grade and the first appearance of the Avengers (Thor, Iron Man, Hulk, Ant-Man and Wasp), as well as appearances by Loki, the Teen Brigade and the Fantastic Four. 

With her own movie coming this summer, the Amazing Amazon Wonder Woman never has been more popular and a copy of Wonder Woman #1, 7.5 CGC, could sell for as much as $100,000, surpassing price guide expectations. A scarce, high-grade copy of The Amazing Spider-Man #1, 9.2 CGC Massachusetts Pedigree, may bring $90,000 while the first appearance of Iron Man from Tales of Suspense #39, 9.4 CGC Bethlehem Pedigree, also could hammer for $90,000.

A Platinum Night selection of important original comic art features Robert Crumb’s iconic Fritz the Cat Cover Original Art (Ballantine, 1969) - a famous Underground Comix cover image also used to promote the character’s two animated films - is expected to sell for $150,000-$250,000. Another specialty art offering includes Frank Frazetta’s Battlestar Galactica Painting Original Art titled In Pharaoh’s Tomb, 1978, a fantastic oil published as an advertisement for the fan-favorite TV show, which could surpass $100,000.

Original comic and comic strip art ranges from Steve Ditko’s Amazing Spider-Man #23 Story Page 17 featuring a classic skirmish with the Green Goblin, which could sell for $100,000 to Alex Raymond’s Flash Gordon and Jungle Jim Sunday Comic Strip Original Art dated 2-26-39 (King Features Syndicate, 1939), which may bring $70,000.

Two special pieces of art by Jack “King” Kirby include Fantastic Four #11 Sub-Mariner Pin-Up Original Art, which could bring $50,000, and Thor #136 Cover Original Art, which could sell for $40,000.

Additional Platinum Night highlights include, but are not limited to:

Neal Adams’ Batman #222 Cover Beatles Original Art, Color Guide, and Printer's Proof Group of 3 (est. $30,000+)

Dave Gibbons’ Watchmen #2 Cover Original Art (est. $40,000+)

The bombastic Page 3 Original Art from X-Men #2 by Kirby and Paul Reinman (est. $50,000+)

The Incredible Hulk #1, 8.0 CGC, (est. $75,000+)

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

87-Cappiello copy.jpgNew York—On Thursday, May 25, Swann Galleries will hold an auction of Graphic Design, featuring a premier selection of posters, books and magazines by outstanding designers from around the world.

Early twentieth-century French posters lead the sale, with highlights ranging from A.M. Cassandre’s SS. “Côte d’Azur”, 1911, to Leonetto Cappiello’s Le Petit Dauphinois, 1933, an advertisement for one of the largest periodicals in the Alps at the time ($15,000 to $20,000 and $30,000 to $40,000, respectively). Also featured is Paul Colin’s complete portfolio Le Tumulte Noir, 1927, a tribute to Jazz-Age Paris and the craze for the Charleston, introduced by the actress Josephine Baker (who was also Colin’s lover). Two of the 42 original pochoir lithographs specifically depict Baker: one in a grass skirt, and one in her infamous banana skirt. The present copy, from the original edition of 500, includes the double cover and the rare insert bearing the French advisory “there is no advertising page in this album” ($25,000 to $35,000). Col van Heusen, 1928, by Charles Loupot, one of the artist’s most elegant Cubist designs, which has only appeared once previously at auction, and his verdant Voisin Automobiles, 1923, are each expected to bring between $20,000 and $30,000.

Outstanding works from the Vienna Secession begin with Richardsquelle, 1899, an alluring banner by Koloman Moser promoting mineral water, estimated at $12,000 to $18,000. Two scarce publications on the period will be available: the only comprehensive book on the Golden Age of Austrian posters, Österreichische Plakatkunst, circa 1914, with 24 color plates, and the complete 12-volume set of Die Fläche, the design magazine by the Wiener Werkstätte, 1903-04 ($6,000 to $9,000 and $12,000 to $18,000, respectively). In 1908, a Werkstätte exhibition organized by Gustav Klimt in conjunction with the Vienna’s School of Arts and Crafts and the Art School for Women and Girls was advertised by Bertold Löffler with the powerful poster Kunstschau Wien, valued at $30,000 to $40,000.

One year before his death, Egon Schiele designed a poster advertising Secession 49 / Asstellung, 1918, showing himself at the top of the table of exhibitors, with an empty seat opposite him representing Klimt, who died about a month before the opening ($15,000 to $20,000).

German posters demonstrate the dramatic difference in design trends before and after WWI. Ludwig Hohlwein’s delightful Besuchet den Tiergarten, 1912, advertising the opening of the new Munich Zoo in 1911 ($15,000 to $20,000) and Zoologischer Garten / Sommerfest, 1914, valued at $2,000 to $3,000, evidence the antebellum optimism of the country. Ten years later, an exhibition poster by Kurt Schwitters and Theo van Doesburg, Kleine Dada Soirée, 1922, advertising a tour to introduce other artists to Dadaism ($15,000 to $20,000), belies the devastation of war.

There is a strong selection of Soviet propaganda and Constructivist posters, with works by Mikhail Dlugach and Nikolai Dolgorukov, led by Gustav Klutsis’s dramatic photomontages The USSR is the Shock Brigade of the World’s Proletariat, 1931, and Long Live the Multimillion-Member Leninist Komsomol, 1932 ($10,000 to $15,000 and $8,000 to $12,000, respectively).

Mid-century American activism is on display, with wartime posters including dramatic images by Ben Shahn such as Break Reaction’s Grip / Register - Vote, circa 1946, and For All These Rights We’ve Just Begun to Fight / Register - Vote, 1946 ($2,000 to $3,000 and $1,500 to $2,000, respectively). A convincing work incentive poster from 1942 by an unknown designer that reads, simply, More More More More More Production, is expected to bring between $1,500 and $2,000. A run of images by Thomas W. Benton decrying the Vietnam War incorporate Bob Dylan’s lyrics, including Vital Issues / Bob Dylan, 1969, and Aspen Humanities Seminar / Bob Dylan, 1969, each valued at $700 to $1,000. Original gouache maquettes for 1970s posters responding to Cuba will be available, including End the U.S. Blockade Against Cuba, circa 1970s, by Peg Averill, and Karen Botten’s 1978 Cuba: Where Human Rights Are More Than A Privilege ($500 to $750 and $400 to $600, respectively).

A selection of 1966 posters promoting Andy Warhol’s creative output include a flyer for a screening of the film My Hustler ($7,000 to $10,000), as well as the exhibition Andy Warhol / Institute of Contemporary Art, Boston, valued at $5,000 to $7,500. Promotional materials designed by leading artists including Josef Albers, David Hockney, Jasper Johns and Frank Stella, will also be offered.

The auction will be held Thursday, May 25, beginning at 1:30 p.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Saturday, May 20, from 12 p.m. to 5 p.m.; Monday, May 22, through Wednesday, May 24, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Thursday, May 25 from 10 a.m. to noon.

An illustrated auction catalogue is available for $35 at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information and to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Nicholas D. Lowry at 212-254-4710, extension 57, or via e-mail at posters@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 87 Leonetto Cappiello, Le Petit Dauphinois, 1933. Estimate $30,000 to $40,000.

A diary written in 1945 by John F. Kennedy during his brief stint as a journalist after World War II sold for $718,750 according to Boston-based RR Auction. 

The diary was consigned by Deirdre Henderson, who began working for Senator Kennedy in 1959 as his research assistant in his run for the Presidency. 

“It was my hope that through the auction catalog the diary would come to the attention of a wider audience and find a home worthy of its merit,” said Deirdre Henderson. 

The diary is compromised of 61 loose-leaf pages, bound in a premium black leather cowhide binder. Twelve of the pages were handwritten by Kennedy and he typed forty-nine pages on his personal typewriter.

Within the detailed personal diary, a 28-year-old JFK reveals surprising views on liberalism versus conservatism and espouses his unedited beliefs regarding Roosevelt’s effect on capitalism; he witnesses and harshly critiques the formation of the United Nations; he muses on iconic leaders Chamberlain, Churchill, DeGaulle, FDR, and Eisenhower. Before the trip is over, young Jack experiences in real-time a desolated Berlin and along with Stalin, Truman, and Eisenhower, attends Potsdam, Germany’s summit.

This historic event included an unlikely gathering of a current president, Truman, and two future presidents, Ike and JFK. Potsdam was where Truman officially decided to drop the bomb on Japan and revealed the presence of the world-changing weapon to Stalin. 

Throughout the diary, JFK chronicles his own chilling premonitions of power-hungry Russia and the conflict that would be synonymous with his presidency: the cold war. 

By Summer’s end, Kennedy officially decided to run for congress, the first step on his sixteen-year journey to the White House. The final pages of this memoir record, in the future president’s own hand, his reservations on running, coupled with his renewed vigor to serve.

JFK’s assignment as an observer-reporter provided him the final push needed to embrace the next steps of his career and excel as a public servant.

“This exceptional diary sheds light on a side of John F. Kennedy seldom explored and confirms America’s enduring sense that he was one of the most qualified, intelligent, and insightful commanders-in-chief in American history,” said Bobby Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction. 

“The sale far exceeded our expectations and helps to establish us as one of the preeminent auction houses for Kennedy documents,” added Livingston. “We are honored to have had the chance to bring this little-known diary to the attention of a world-wide audience.” 

The winning bid came from Joseph Alsop, a Kennedy collector from Beverly Massachusetts.   

The live auction took place at RR Auction’s Boston Gallery on April 26, 2017 at 1PM Eastern. More details can be found online at www.rrauction.com.

Islam copy.jpgDALLAS, Texas (April 25, 2017) -  Three historically important lots from the dawn of The Nation of Islam will debut at Heritage Auctions this spring: A document archive covering the founding and early decades of the organization (est. $500,000), as well as 20th century political rights activist Elijah Muhammad’s Personally-Owned Kofia Hat (est. $20,000) and his Diamond 14 Gold Star and Crescent Ring (est. $2,000) will cross the block May 11 and May 13.

“This is the first and earliest archive ever offered pertaining to the Nation of Islam,” said Sandra Palomino, Director of Historical Manuscripts at Heritage Auctions. “The goals laid out by W. Fard Muhammad and the hopes expressed by the men and women asking to be accepted into the Nation must be examined within the context of what is happening in Detroit in the 1930s. There are riots in the black community as they struggle to break the constraints of segregation; and into this strife, Muhammad appears and offers them a pathway to improving their circumstances. Within this context, the founding of the Nation is really about the establishment and struggles of a civil rights movement.” 

The archive, offered in Heritage Auctions’ May 11 Manuscripts Auction, is consigned by the family of Burnsteen Sharrieff Muhammad, Fard Muhammed’s secretary and a founding member. Included are meeting notes, correspondence from followers, letters, lesson plans, and speech notes. Nothing has been published about the birth of the Nation of Islam (NOI) in the 1930s. Offered here are three linear feet of primary source materials critical to the understanding of the Nation of Islam and its later role in the Civil Rights movement.

After coming under investigation by state and federal agencies, Fard Muhammad disappeared from the NOI sometime in the mid-1930s. In his absence Elijah Muhammad assumed leadership, but he too would become subject of an FBI investigation. Elijah Muhammad went into hiding during the 1940s and for years, he led the NOI via letters to his wife and brother sending instructions to be implemented by his followers. The archive includes a substantial group of these letters, the only ones to remain in private hands. The majority are said to have been confiscated by the FBI.

Elijah Muhammad Artifacts

Elijah Muhammad led the NOI for four decades. Under his leadership the NOI’s membership skyrocketed in the years after World War II. Despite frequent clashes with Martin Luther King’s doctrine of nonviolent resistance, the NOI played an influential role in the Civil Rights movement. Malcolm X became one of its most important leaders, but was excommunicated in 1964 over disputes with Elijah Muhammad. Two years later, three Nation of Islam members assassinated Malcolm X in Manhattan. Although the Nation of Islam was always a controversial faction within the Civil Rights movement, outcry against them mounted to a fever pitch after Malcolm X’s death. 

Elijah Muhammad died in 1975, and his son Emmanuel Muhammad assumed leadership. While the movement has had some success in organizing protests and spreading overseas in the past three decades, it’s power and influence is much less that it was during Elijah Muhammad’s tenure.

Featured in Heritage Auctions’ May 13 Americana & Political Auction is Elijah Muhammad’s iconic and personally-owned Nation of Islam Jeweled Black Velvet Kofia and diamond encrusted gold ring. Consigned by a member of the family, the two items are inexplicably linked to the organization and serve as powerful symbols of the man who led the NOI during its most influential years.

This kofia was probably made in the early 1970's, and is based on the original kofia designed by Dr. Shakeela Hassan in the early 1950's. Dr. Hassan, a Pakistani immigrant, was befriended by the Muhammad family when she moved to Chicago to study medicine.  The kofia is consigned directly by the family of Muhammad. It passed to his eldest son Emmanuel Muhammad (1921-1998), then from Emmanuel to his daughter Fatimah Muhammad. In the early 1990's, Emmanuel and Fatimah put the kofia and his ring in a safe deposit box. The items remained in the safe deposit box until this offering. 

Also offered May 13 will be the Elijah Muhammad’s 14-karat Yellow Gold, Diamond and Enamel Ring bearing the Star and Crescent Symbol of the Nation of Islam. The ring, as well as the kofia, descended through Muhammad's family, and are consigned by his grandson for the benefit of Elijah’s granddaughter (Emannuel’s eldest daughter).  

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

34-Curtis copy.jpgNew York—On Thursday, April 20, Swann Galleries offered Images & Objects: Photographs & Photobooks, setting records for early and modern works alike. The sale performed well overall, with 71% of works offered finding buyers.

Swann Galleries consistently offers a varied selection of rare and iconic works by Edward S. Curtis, with nearly all of the offered lots selling above or within the estimate in this sale. Highlights included a striking portrait of Red Cloud, Oglala, 1905, which sold for $32,500*, a record for the work, above a high estimate of $9,000. The Scout, Apache, 1906, a dramatic orotone in the original frame depicting a Native American silhouetted on a horse, more than doubled its high estimate of $12,000 to sell for $27,500, a record for an orotone of the image; another orotone in its original frame, An Oasis in the Badlands, 1905, was purchased by a collector for $21,250, above a high estimate of $15,000.

Bastions of the art of photography performed well, with the highest price in the sale going to a group of 60 plates from Eadweard Muybridge’s seminal Animal Locomotion, 1887. Ansel Adams’s iconic Moonrise, Hernandez, New Mexico, 1941, printed circa 1976, went for $42,500. Five of the six works offered by New York-based vernacular photographer Weegee (née Arthur Fellig) found buyers, led by Coney Island, 1940, at $13,750.

The cover lot for the sale was an unusual version of Toni Frissell’s breathtaking A Midsummer Night’s Dream, 1957—the image was printed in reverse, with the notation “This is backwards” on the verso ($12,500).

Works from the last 50 years performed exceptionally well, with high prices going to Robert Frank’s Sick of Goodby’s, Mabou, 1978, and Zuma #9, 1978, by John Divola ($32,500 and $10,000, respectively). Both offered works by Peter Hujar far surpassed their high estimates: a trio of portraits of Robert Wilson, Ann Wilson and Sheryl Sutton, 1975, reached $27,500, above a high estimate of $12,000, while the striking 1985 Shack, Queens, more than doubled its high estimate of $6,000 to sell to a collector for $13,750. A suite of five photographs by Duane Michals, titled Narcissus, 1985, soared past its high estimate of $9,000 to sell after rapid bidding for $26,000, a record for the work.

Daile Kaplan, Director of Photographs & Photobooks at Swann Galleries, said of the sale, “Visual icons of the photography market, including Ansel Adams' Moonrise, Hernandez, New Mexico and Eadweard Muybridge's Animal Locomotion plates, and remarkable objects like Edward Curtis' extraordinary orotones sold competitively. The response to contemporary works by Peter Hujar, Adam Fuss and Duane Michals was exciting. The mid-range market for images and objects continues to attract new and mature buyers.”

The next sale of Photographs & Photobooks at Swann Galleries will be held October 19, 2017. For more information or consign quality materials, contact Daile Kaplan at dkaplan@swanngalleries.com

Image: Lot 34 Edward S. Curtis, Red Cloud, Oglala, platinum print, 1905. Sold April 20, 2017 for $32,500, a record for the work. (Pre-sale estimate $6,000 to $9,000.)

Screen Shot 2017-04-25 at 9.17.46 AM.pngA selection of English and Asian antiques and fine paintings ranging from the 18th through to the 20th century from Abbotswood, Gloucestershire, will be offered at auction at Donnington Priory on 24th May. The auction comprises over 260 lots, featuring fine furniture, ceramics and glass, works of art and sculpture, carpets, clocks, chandeliers, Chinese works of art and books. A strong group of paintings accompanies the selected contents with works by internationally recognised artists such as Sir Alfred James Munnings, Christopher Wood and Celso Lagar.

Abbotswood is an impressive house occupying an idyllic position overlooking the Swell valley. It sits amongst formal gardens laid out when Sir Edwyn Lutyens altered the house around 1900 and looks out over parkland down to the Swell running through its beautiful valley. The consignor of the collection purchased Abbotswood from the Ferguson family in 1970 and it is to his credit that the house and gardens have been maintained in immaculate condition. This sale is testament to the collector’s love of English antiques and fine art and Abbotswood provided the perfect environment for these notable works. 

Highlights of the sale include an oil-on-canvas, A Gypsy Queen, by Sir Alfred James Munnings, lot 125. The artist commented that, “Of all my painting experiences, none were so alluring and colourful as those visits spent amongst the gypsy hop-pickers in Hampshire each September. More glamour and excitement were packed in those six weeks than a painter could well contend with. I still have visions of brown faces, black hair, earrings, black hats and black skirts”. (Quoted in An Artist's Life, Sir Alfred Munnings, p.287). The present lot depicts a glamorous female with jet black hair and stunning pendant earrings and is estimated at £8,000-12,000.    

Abbotswood has been lovingly and tenderly maintained by its owner for over 40 years and has provided a beautiful setting for this impressive group of works. The sale is an exciting opportunity for clients to acquire a piece of the estate’s legacy. 

Image: Abbotswood, Gloucestershire 

 

April29_01_pics.jpgITHACA, NY--National Book Auctions, located in Ithaca, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog. 

This catalog features rare, antique and decorative books as well as select additions of ephemera. A quantity of author-signed books from a large private collection will be offered as well as a substantial array of early Christian printings in vellum and leather bindings.            

Antique and rare books in this catalog include numerous titles. Among the earliest examples are the 1580 printing of "Opera Tertulliani et Arnobii Quotquot ab Interitu Vindicari," Augustinus' "Opera Tomis Undecim Comprehensa," produced in eleven folio volumes in 1651, and the 1647 printing of "Eyxoaotion Sive Ritvale Graecorvm Complectens Ritvs," featuring folding engraved plates. Additional rare pieces include the 1866 first published edition of Lewis Carroll's timeless classic, "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland," the 1902 La Salle limited edition of "The Works of Frances Parkman," produced in twenty volumes, and the Lincoln Memorial University limited edition of "The Complete Works of Abraham Lincoln," published in 1894 in twelve leather-bound volumes.                     

Several pleasing collections will also be showcased. Highlighted is a substantial group of offerings from an estate library of author-signed books, including both fiction and historical writings. Notables from this collection include names such as Leslie Charteris, Roald Dahl, J. K. Rowling, P. G. Wodehouse, Louis L'Amour, and many others. Early theological texts dating from the 16th century forward will be offered, with many titles relating to Catholicism and most bound in vellum or full calf. Other vintage and antique tomes also include subject areas such as arctic and polar exploration, the American West, Native American Indians, Audubon, decorative antique, multi-volume sets, and more.    

Found throughout this catalog are interesting ephemera offerings. These lots include antique photographs, stereoviews, Americana, Civil War-related, original antique correspondence, billheads, rare prints of photogravure works by Yousuf Karsh, maps, antique magazines, issues of Derriere le Miroir, 1930's German cigarette trading card albums, postcards, and other interesting items.    

National Book Auctions is a public auction service specializing in books, ephemera, and art. National Book Auctions is a targeted service offering experience and expertise unique to marketing antique and modern books and ephemera for consignors and collectors alike. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of collectible, signed, and first edition books. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-269-0101 or email mail@nationalbookauctions.com.

188-Lawrence copy.jpgNew York—On Tuesday, May 16, Swann Galleries will hold an auction of 19th & 20th Century Literature, with fine and scarce first editions and cornerstone volumes for bibliophiles.

One of 170 complete copies of the privately printed Cranwell edition of Seven Pillars of Wisdom, A Triumph, 1926, by T.E. Lawrence (better known as Lawrence of Arabia) leads the sale. The book, bound in the original green and gilt leather and printed in red and black ink, includes 65 plates, many in color. Lawrence inscribed the present copy “Complete copy. I.XII.26 TES” and gave it to his dentist, Warwick James; it is estimated at $50,000 to $75,000.

Further highlights in this sale run the gamut from a rare limited first edition on handmade paper of Ulysses, 1922, by James Joyce, valued at $15,000 to $20,000, to a finely bound first edition of J.R.R. Tolkien’s seminal The Hobbit, 1937 ($8,000 to $12,000). Also available is T.S. Eliot’s Modernist masterpiece The Waste Land, 1922, a first state of the first edition, in the rare dust jacket, expected to fetch $8,000 to $12,000.

First editions of American classics span the last 150 years, with early highlights being the first American edition of Herman Melville’s magnum opus Moby-Dick; or, the Whale, 1851 ($12,000 to $18,000), and the two-volume first edition of Uncle Tom’s Cabin, 1852, by Harriet Beecher Stowe, estimated at $1,000 to $2,000.

A selection of first editions by Ernest Hemingway includes Death in the Afternoon, 1932, with the charming inscription “from one toreador to another” ($3,500 to $5,000); and the first trade edition, in the unrestored dust jacket, also inscribed, of A Farewell to Arms, 1929, valued at $5,000 to $7,500.

William Faulkner's first novel Soldiers' Pay, 1926, in its original dust jacket ($15,000 to $20,000) will be available, as will a first edition, first issue of John Steinbeck's The Pastures of Heaven, 1932, signed and inscribed by the author, estimated at $10,000 to $15,000.

Mark Twain is well represented in the sale, with rarities including a first edition of The Prince and the Pauper, 1882, in an exceptional Cosway binding, with a miniature watercolor portrait of the author on the cover, valued at $1,200 to $1,800. Also available is an uncommon copy in cloth of the salesman's dummy for the first American edition of The Adventures of Tom Sawyer, 1876, annotated with the names of subscribers from Marysville, California, as well as the first American edition of Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, 1885 ($3,000 to $4,000 and $2,000 to $3,000, respectively).

Additionally of note is a run of first editions by Robert Frost, among them a fine copy of the first American edition of A Boy's Will, 1915, in the elusive dust jacket, valued at $1,200 to $1,800. Other notables include first editions by Nathaniel Hawthorne and Robert Louis Stevenson.

The complete 12-volume set of the first edition of The Scourge; or Monthly Expositor of Imposture and Folly, 1811-16, one of the scarcest periodicals illustrated by George Cruikshank, makes a rare auction appearance. The present copy contains the elusive twelfth volume, as well as both versions—censored and uncensored—of the suppressed plate in Volume X, A Financial Survey of Cumberland, or Beggars Petition ($4,000 to $6,000). Cruikshank also contributed to the first edition in English of the Brothers Grimm’s German Popular Stories, 1923; this rare copy, which notably retains the original covers, is estimated to sell between $1,200 and $1,800.

Making its auction debut is the first American edition of The Brothers Karamazov, 1912, by Feodor Dostoyevsky, along with the first American edition of Crime and Punishment, 1886 ($5,000 to $7,500 and $3,000 to $4,000, respectively).

First editions by George Orwell include Homage to Catalonia, 1938, in the unrestored dust jacket, and Nineteen Eighty-Four, 1949 ($4,000 to $6,000 and $1,000 to $2,000, respectively).

Modern literature includes a run of James Bond books by Ian Fleming, an inscribed first edition of Stephen King’s classic Carrie, 1974 ($1,200 to $1,800), and a warmly inscribed presentation copy of the first edition of Flowers for Algernon, 1966, by Daniel Keyes, valued at $1,000 to $1,500. Further twentieth-century authors represented include Raymond Chandler, Dashiell Hammett and James Hilton.

The auction will be held Tuesday, May 16, beginning at 1:30 p.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Friday, May 12, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, May 13, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Monday, May 15, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Tuesday, May 16 from 10 a.m. to noon.

An illustrated auction catalogue is available for $35 at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information and to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact John D. Larson at 212-254-4710, extension 61, or via e-mail at jlarson@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 188 T.E. Lawrence, Seven Pillars of Wisdom, A Triumph, complete copy, inscribed, London, 1926. Estimate $50,000 to $75,000.

aviation copy.jpgDALLAS, Texas (April 19, 2017) - Two excellent portfolios/collections are highlighted in the Heritage Auctions Photographs Auction May 18 in New York City, including The Airplane as Art portfolio and a collection of photos from 20th-century photographer Berenice Abbott.

One of the most ambitious photography portfolio projects of the last 100 years, Bob Seidemann’s The Airplane as Art portfolio (est. $150,000-200,000), includes autographs from 75 of the photo subjects. The 302 photos depict numerous aviation pioneers - pilots, inventors, military heroes, etc. - and many have been signed in ink on the photo by the subjects. Other sets of these images can be found at the Getty Museum and The Boeing Company. Two sets have sold previously at auction in 2000 and 2007 for over $200,000 each. The autographed portraits are one (No.8) of an edition of 10 and the rest of the unsigned portrait and airplane views are one (also No. 8) of an edition of 20.  

“This auction is very special, since we will be offering the largest group of photographs from Berenice Abbott to come on the market since the Museum of the City of New York deaccessioned its duplicates in 2002. These ‘vintage’ prints are fresh to the market and come directly from a friend of Abbott’s,” said Nigel Russell, Heritage Auctions Director of Photography. “There are also smaller groups of photographs by photographers whose works have rarely, if ever, appeared at auction, such as Joseph Dankowski, Ira Cohen and Gordon N. Converse.”

The largest group of photographs from Berenice Abbott to come on the market since the Museum of the City of New York deaccessioned its duplicates in 2002 also is offered in this auction, including New York Stock Exchange II, 1934 (est. $3,000-5,000), Canyon: Broadway and Exchange Place, July 16, 1936 (est. $4,000-6,000) and Pennsylvania Station Interior, July 14, 1936 (est. $4,000-6,000). The prints come directly from a friend of Abbott’s and most are “vintage” prints. None was printed after the early 1970s and these will be sold without reserve.

There are smaller groups of photographs by photographers whose work has either never or very rarely has appeared. This includes Joseph Dankowski, the first photographer to receive a grant from the National Endowment of the Arts in photography; Ira Cohen who was a poet, publisher and photographer involved with the Beat-Era and the Psychedelic 60s and Gordon N. Converse, who was the chief photographer for the Christian Science Monitor for 40 years and traveled to more than 120 countries.

Other works included but not limited to:

A very rare vintage Edward Weston print Bananas, 1930, est. $50,000-60,000 - one of only three prints known

A 20th-century classic: W. Eugene Smith’s Walk to Paradise Garden, 1946, est. $25,000-35,000

Alfred Eisenstaedt’s Children at a Puppet Theatre, Paris, 1963, est. $25,000-35,000

Steve McCurry’s Afghan Girl, Pakistan, 1985, est. $12,000-18,000

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

247-Hockney copy.jpgNew York—On Thursday, May 11, Swann Galleries will hold an auction of Contemporary Art, offering original works and rare multiples by leading artists from the last 75 years.  

The sale is led by an important early sculptural work by Roy Lichtenstein titled Composition (Picture without a Frame), 1955, which will be included in the artist’s forthcoming catalogue raisonné. In 2005, The New York Times quoted Lichtenstein describing his 1950s paintings as "Taking the kind of stodgy pictures you see in history textbooks and redoing them in a modern-art way."  These early paintings are important thematic and stylistic precursors to the artist's iconic comic strip-inspired subjects from the early 1960s onward. The multimedia piece, which includes collage, metal screws and wooden slats, is valued between $30,000 and $50,000.

A selection of portraits by Andy Warhol features iconic colorblock screenprints of Geronimo, 1986, and Richard Nixon in Vote McGovern, 1972 (each $20,000 to $30,000).

Original works include stunners by well-known artists in their prime. Willem de Kooning’s pencil drawing Untitled (Seated and Reclining Women), circa 1965-70, is valued at $25,000 to $35,000. A unique mixed-media with color monotype by Robert Motherwell, Untitled (Imaginary Landscape) (EW.XVI), was completed in Surrealist artist Kurt Seligmann’s New York studio in 1941 ($20,000 to $30,000). An original gouache painting by Alexander Calder, titled Calvair Breton de Traguier, 1965, which features the primary colors and bold graphic shapes for which the artist is known, is valued at $20,000 to $30,000. A run of back and white ink works on paper by William Nelson Copley (“CPLY”) is each valued at $5,000 to $8,000. Also available are one-of-a-kind pieces by Jennifer Bartlett, Robert De Niro, Sr., Keith Haring and Paul Sharits.

Sculptural multiples by Jeff Koons, Julian Opie, Omar Rayo, George Rickey and Jesús Rafael Soto are joined by a unique untitled cedar work by Ursula von Rydingsvard, 1981 ($15,000 to $20,000). Petite Venus Bleue, 1956-57, by Yves Klein, is a bronze brooch with the artist’s signature International Klein Blue pigment suspended on an original gold leaf Perspex backdrop, estimated at $8,000 to $12,000. Also available is Christo’s Look magazine wrapped in transparent Polythylene and cord, titled Look Magazine Empaqueté, 1965, valued at $5,000 to $8,000.

Vik Muniz is represented in the sale by a chromogenic print from his Pictures of Color series. After Van Gogh, 2004, a limited edition photograph of a collage of Pantone swatches, is valued between $6,000 and $9,000. Other photographic works include the complete portfolio Uncle Tom’s Cabin, 2000, by David Levinthal ($3,000 to $5,000).

Print highlights include David Hockney’s The Artist and Model, 1974, and Cy Twombly’s lithograph with mixed media Natural History, Part I, Mushrooms: No. IV, 1974 ($20,000 to $30,000 and $8,000 to $12,000, respectively). Vibrant works by Josef Albers, Ellsworth Kelly, Tom Wesselmann and Zou Wou-Ki are complemented by subdued palettes by Richard Diebenkorn, Jackson Pollock, Robert Rauschenberg and Christopher Wool.

Notable portfolios will be offered, including the limited edition of William S. Burroughs’s The Seven Deadly Sins, 1991, with seven color screenprints and woodcuts printed from blocks shot by the artist with a 12-guage shotgun.

The auction will be held Thursday, May 11, beginning at 1:30 p.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Saturday, May 6, from noon to 5 p.m.; Monday, May 8 through Wednesday, May 10, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Thursday, May 11 from 10 a.m. to noon.

An illustrated auction catalogue is available for $35 at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information and to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Todd Weyman at 212-254-4710, extension 32, or via e-mail at tweyman@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 247 David Hockney, The Artist and Model, etching, 1974. Estimate $20,000 to $30,000.

00.Title-page.jpgLOS ANGELES—APRIL 2017—Profiles in History is proud to announce, the original typed working manuscript for The Big Book of Alcoholics Anonymous is going up for auction on June 8th. It is 161 typed pages and filled with hand written edits by the founders, some by William Griffith Wilson, aka, Bill W. It belonged to Lois Wilson, Bill’s widow. It is one of the best selling books of all time, over 30 million copies have been sold since 1939. It has been translated into 43 languages. The Library of Congress ranks it the number one non-fiction book that shaped America.

In “The Book That Started It All” a facsimile edition of this manuscript, published by Hazelden, an essay succinctly states the extraordinary importance of the present manuscript: “Amid the wealth of literature on Alcoholics Anonymous, you have in your hands the greatest treasure of all, the beginning of it all, the charter of the Fellowship.”

Best-selling AA historian and author, Dr. Ernest Kurtz, said “Not only is this Manuscript the most important nonfiction manuscript in all history, I consider it right up there with the Magna Carta because of the personal freedom it has provided so many millions of alcoholics!”

It is estimated to sell for $2,000,000 - $3,000,000.

The manuscript can be viewed at Questroyal Fine Art, LLC, 903 Park Avenue, Third Floor, New York, NY 10075.

ABOUT PROFILES IN HISTORY

Founded in 1985 by Joseph Maddalena, Profiles in History is the world’s largest auctioneer & dealer of original Hollywood Memorabilia, historical autographs, letters, documents, vintage signed photographs and manuscripts. Born into a family of antiques dealers in Rhode Island, Joseph “Joe” Maddalena learned early on how to turn his passion of collecting historical autographs into a career. Upon graduation from Pepperdine, Joe pursued his passion to become a full-time dealer of historical documents, and opened his first office in 1985. Profiles in History has held some of the most prestigious and successful auctions of Hollywood memorabilia and own virtually every Guinness Book record for prices of original screen-used memorabilia.  Highlights from their previous auctions include the “Cowardly Lion” costume from The Wizard of Oz ($805,000); Steve McQueen’s “Michael Delaney” racing suit from Le Mans  ($960,000); From the history-making Debbie Reynolds Auction in June 2011, Profiles in History sold the Marilyn Monroe “Subway” Dress from The Seven Year Itch for $5.52M and the Audrey Hepburn Ascot Dress from My Fair Lady for $4.44M. In February 2012, Profiles in History arranged the sale of a pair of Judy Garland screen-used Ruby Slippers from The Wizard of Oz  to the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences. In addition, Joe Maddalena was the star of Hollywood Treasure, which aired on Syfy.  Hollywood Treasure took viewers into the fascinating world of showbiz and pop culture memorabilia.

For more information visit www.profilesinhistory.com

 

Remington copy.jpgDALLAS, Texas (April 17, 2017) - A landmark illustration by artist Barbara Remington which were used for a trio of Ballantine Book covers for J. R. R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings series highlight the May 12 Heritage Auctions Illustration Arts Signature Auction in Dallas. The Lord of the Rings covers (est. $20,000-30,000) were designed so that laid side-by-side they create a panoramic scene. A hugely popular poster titled "Wilderness" was also produced using this iconic image.

"Categories such as Pulp, Pin-Up and Commercial Advertisement are seeing dramatic increases in demand and in value. Some of the most sought after artists such as Remington, Roger Hane and Mort Künstler who illustrated covers for Lord of the Rings, The Chronicles of Narnia, and some of the most sought after adventure magazines are offered in this auction,” said Ed Jaster, Senior Vice President of at Heritage Auctions. "The diversity of offerings in this auction once again shows the demand for Illustration Art."  

All seven Chronicles of Narnia book cover illustrations by Hane will be offered during the auction. Beginning with The Lion, The Witch, and The Wardrobe book cover, (est. $5,000-7,000) illustration which was the most popular novel of the seven written, by C.S. Lewis.

A preliminary illustration from the 1979 Disney sci-fi classic movie The Black Hole, (est. $10,000-15,000) painted by Robert McCall is also available.

Künstler, one of the most prolific adventure magazine illustrators often on the cover of Stag, For Men Only, and True Action is offering 30 works from his personal collection including Contraband Blonde, Stag magazine cover, April 1960, (est. $3,000-5,000), Renegade Sea Nymph and her Crew of Strange Castaways, True Action magazine cover, February 1963, (est. $3,000-5,000), Captured by the Chief, Stag magazine cover, February 1967, (est. $2,000-3,000) and Night of the Grizzlies, For Men Only magazine, March 1970, (est. $2,000-3,000) as well as many more excellent examples.

Other top lots include but are not limited to:

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

 

tex.jpegDALLAS (April 13,2017) - A historically important document signed by William Barret Travis, securing black walnut wood to help build a garrison just days before the Alamo was attacked by Mexican forces, sold for $137,500 in Heritage Auctions’ Texana & Western Americana auctionMarch 24 in Dallas. 

Three days after the date of the document, American lawyer and soldier William Barret Travis wrote a letter, possibly the most famous document in Texas history, calling on Texans in particular and Americans in general to come and help defend the Alamo, vowing never to surrender or retreat and adding the words "Victory or Death" before his signature. 

The auction’s top lot honors included two rare maps: A.R. Roessler’s 1874 Latest Map of the State of Texas, considered the best contemporary records of agricultural and mineral wealth, which sold for $35,000 following interest from five bidders, and J. Eppinger and F.C. Baker’s 1851 Map of Texas Compiled from Surveys Recorded in the General Land Office, which sold for $32,500.

Additional highlights include, but are not limited to: 

d3278719-8fe0-4010-bfe4-27d33b5c070e.jpgAmong the standout lots at National Book Auctions' April 8, 2017 sale was the complete seven-volume Holy Bible printed in London for Thomas Macklin by Thomas Bensley in 1800. The large-scale volumes were bound in full leather with gilt tooling and were profusely illustrated with engravings by several of the most eminent artists of the day including Angelica Kauffman, William Hamilton, and Henry Fuseli. The first volume included a subscription list that listed King George III, Queen Charlotte, and their progeny. The set sold for $1,312.50.

Other lots of note were thirteen volumes of "Histoire Generale des Voyages" edited by Abbé Prévost; a handsome 1818 edition of the Federalist Papers by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison, and John Jay; and a volume of The Norristown Gazette commemorating the death of George Washington with the Senate Address to John Adams, Adams' response, and details of the funeral procession printed within mourning borders.

National Book Auctions' next sale will take place on April 29, 2017 and will include a broad array of collectible, rare, and antique volumes and ephemera. Its sister company, Worth Auctions, will hold a sale on April 23, 2017, which will feature the third session of material from the estate of a major Civil War collector, including original Confederate Bowie knives, portrait paintings, and uniforms. For more information, visit www.nationalbookauctions.com and www.worthauctions.com.

Lot_131.jpgLas Vegas, NV, April 12, 2017-- Morphy Auctions, the finest auction destination for fresh to the market collections, is pleased to announce this world-class sale to be held on Friday, May 26th at the company’s Las Vegas, Nevada gallery starting at noon EST.   A full spectrum of quality merchandise will be offered across the most desirable collecting categories.  All items in this sale are available for preview now in the company’s Las Vegas facility. 

American Indian cultural items feature prominently in this auction, with many of these handmade treasures and artifacts demonstrating extraordinary quality and design.  Lot #67, a c. 1865-1875 rare third phase pictorial Chief's blanket variant, is woven with natural ivory and brown wool, and is colored with indigo blue, red cochineal, and green vegetable dyes. Measuring 85” x 64”, its design features unusual pictorial elements including stars and birds.  It is estimated at $60,000-90,000.  Lot #111, a rare c. 1860 Prairie tobacco bag detailed with contour floral motifs beaded on hide, cut-outs, and early paint, should hold bidders interest with its $20,000-30,000 estimate.  Lot #256, an early 20th century 124-1/2” high non-traditional native cedar totem pole features carved faces and is topped with an eagle with spread wings. It is estimated at $10,000-20,000 and includes a base to keep it securely upright.  And lot #155, a c. late 19th century Western Apache large coiled and lidded basket, made from devil's claw, red yucca, and willow fibers, is truly a work of art from every angle.  This pictorial polychrome olla is decorated with woven stylized human and equine figures among chevrons; its lid has a large morning star center and small triangles around the rim.  This stunning rarity is estimated at $40,000-80,000. 

Collectors are certain to go to war over this sale’s fantastic selections of interesting antique hand weapons.  Lot #109, a beautifully made c. 1880 pipe tomahawk with a steel head, its original leather gasket, and an unusually long original haft with file branding is estimated at $10,000-15,000.  Lot #110, a c. 1840-50 Osage Missouri War axe tomahawk features a long, round haft and triangular, thin blade, typical to its age and origins.  This outstanding example was featured in the 2010 book The Missouri War Axe: War Tomahawk of the Plains and Prairies and is estimated at $15,000-20,000.  Lot #157, a very rare c. 1860-1870 Yanktonai Sioux knife blade war club features two large blades and a haft made of chestnut that is decorated with hot file branding and brass tacks. There are approximately 20 known knife blade war clubs; all attributed to the Yanktonai Sioux of eastern South Dakota. This extraordinary this example was featured in the 2009 book The Mark Francis Collection of American Indian Art and is estimated at $15,000-25,000.  And lot #66, a c. 1860 Eastern plains or Western Great Lakes classic gun stock club is estimated at $45,000-50,000.  This rarity features a triangular base pierced for attachment of a wrist cord and a recessed grip. Its other cutting edge details include an elaborated engraved, carved, and accented shaft and an exaggerated steel blade - pierced twice and inlaid with brass the words "Little Hill” - set into the crook.

This event features an extensive offering of antique advertising materials relating to America’s fascination with the “wild west.”  Lot #146, a rare Old Forester Whiskey advertisement is estimated at $10,000-15,000.  This printer's proof with reverse lettering is professionally mounted and framed and was produced by Chas. W. Shonk Co. of Chicago.  And lot #50, a c. 1908-09 poster for the Winchester .401 caliber self-loading rifle is right on target with its $4,000-5,000 estimate.  This vibrant example was originally executed by Philip R. Goodwin for Winchester.  

Two outstanding Indian themed antique advertising examples are lot #100, a mid-19th century, 90” tall wooden cigar store Indian, estimated at $40,000-80,000 and lot #7, a c. 1885, 77” tall flat board cigar store Indian tobacco curb sign, estimated at $6,000-12,000.  The full-bodied Indian is hand carved, holds a bundle of "Best Quality Cigars,” and is looking off into the distance with one hand shading his eyes.  The flat board Indian sign was made for narrow doorways and easy storage and came from Baltimore. It is marked “E.H. carved” on the bend of the elbow.  Similar early flat board cigar store signs are pictured and described in Cigar Store Figures in American Folk Art by A. W. Pendergast and W. Porter Ware and Artists in Wood by Frederick Fried.  

Exciting Buffalo Bill themed collectibles also take the spotlight in this sale.  Cabinet cards, posters, and paintings featuring this famous showman are all on offer. Lot #99, an extremely rare Buffalo Bill's Wild West White Eagle advertising poster, is estimated at $8,000-15,000.  It is framed behind glass and is illustrated with Buffalo Bill “guiding and guarding;” its colors remain magnificent and vibrant.  And lot #131, a matted and framed original show poster for Buffalo Bill's Wild West. Congress, Rough Riders of the World. Miss Annie Oakley, The Peerless Lady Wing-Shot in very nice condition is estimated at $3,000-4,000.  This full color example was printed by A. Hoen & Co. from Baltimore and measures 20” x 29”.

This sale rounds out with a refreshing blend of antique back bar bottles, calendars, artwork, sculptures, and saddles.   Lot #51, a framed Union Metallic Cartridge Co. 1900 single calendar page of plains buffalo is estimated at $10,000-15,000.  Lot #185, a clear, faceted glass aniseed back bar bottle decorated with an image of a lovely woman is estimated at $2,000-4,000.  And lot #132, Joyce Lee’s original oil on board painting, Practice Loop, comes full circle at $5,000-8,000.

According to Dan Morphy, Morphy Auctions’ President, "This auction offers some of the finest Western and Indian themed merchandise to come to auction in memory. We are very pleased to display as well as sell these outstanding examples from our Las Vegas location. The quality and craftsmanship demonstrated on the antique Indian cultural items is simply breathtaking.  The large, lidded olla basket is astonishing in its decoration, handiwork, and scale.  You really have to see it to appreciate the endless hours that went into its creation! We welcome you to visit our gallery in Las Vegas to view these rarities in person, or of course check them out online anytime at www.morphyauctions.com.”

Image: Buffalo Bill's "Wild West Miss Annie Oakley" painting, Est. 3,000-4,000. 

Met (old) Faust opening night 1953-54 Pierre Monteux Sedge LeB;ang photo copy.jpgNew York-Christie’s announces The Metropolitan Opera Guild Collection, a dedicated auction of rare musical manuscripts and memorabilia, to take place in New York on June 15, 2017, with two exquisite pieces of jewelry to be sold in the Magnificent Jewels auction on June 20, 2017. Funds from the sale will benefit the Opera Guild and the Metropolitan Opera. Highlights will be previewed during a global tour with exhibitions in London and Hong Kong in April and May. The full collection will be on preview in New York June 10-14.

The collection includes approximately 90 lots and represents a selection of autograph material from some of the most important composers of the Western classical tradition spanning from the Baroque era to the 20th-century. The majority of manuscripts come from the carefully assembled gift of Edwin Franko Goldman (1878-1956), renowned American composer and trumpeter with the Metropolitan Opera. The sale is led by the sole surviving autograph musical manuscript by Schubert for his Piano Sonata in A flat Major (estimate: $350,000-500,000). Additional highlights include annotated manuscripts and letters by the trinity of Bach, Mozart and Beethoven. Illuminating the sale are objets d’art with provenance grounded in opera and classical music including Enrico Caruso’s Cartier gold eyeglass case with glasses and Arturo Toscanini’s Gubelin open-faced pocket watch.

Sven Becker, Head of Books & Manuscripts, Christie’s New York, remarks: “Christie’s is honored to be entrusted with this special collection offering a concentration of fine musical autograph material. Collections such as this come to the market very infrequently; even more rarely do they bear the name of such a well-regarded American institution.”

“We are pleased to be working with Christie’s to present this auction at the time of two important milestones in 2016/7: the 60th anniversary of the death of Edwin Franko Goldman and the 50th anniversary of the Met Opera at Lincoln Center,” says Richard J. Miller Jr., President of the Metropolitan Opera Guild. “Funds generated from this sale will ensure that the Guild and the Metropolitan Opera are poised to continue fulfilling their respective missions for years to come.”

Cataloguing and complete details of the sale will be available in May 2017.

Global Tour Dates and Locations:
London | Highlights Exhibition | April 19-27
Hong Kong | Highlights Exhibition | May 26-29
New York | Sale Preview | June 10-14

Image: Opening night of Gonoud’s Faust in 1953. Photo by Sedge LeBlang/ Metropolitan Opera Archives.

 

7-Hemingway-Dietrich-Letter copy.jpgNew York—On Thursday, May 4, Swann Galleries will hold their biannual auction of Autographs, featuring personal snippets of the lives of important artists, musicians, politicians, scientists and writers.

A highlight of the sale is a love letter from Ernest Hemingway to Marlene Dietrich, in which he asks her to visit him at Finca Vigía, Cuba, and tells her about his work on The Old Man and the Sea. On August 12, 1953, he wrote, “Please know that I love you always and I forget you sometimes as I forget my heart beats. But it beats always.” The letter, written on four sheets of stationery, comes from Dietrich’s family; it valued at $20,000 to $30,000. From the same consignment come several other letters from the author that open “My dearest Marlene,” sent in the 1950s from around the world. In a 1950 letter from Venice, Hemingway provides a list of his beliefs and notes that horoscopes are not included on the list ($12,000 to $18,000). Dietrich also received tokens from Richard Burton, Jean Cocteau and Noël Coward, which are featured in the sale; other photographs are signed to her daughter Maria by Clark Gable, Cary Grant and Mae West.

A strong showing of Revolutionary War correspondence includes Autograph Letters Signed by Timothy Pickering, James van Rensselaer, and other major figures. Early presidents are well represented, with several examples from John Adams and Thomas Jefferson each. A Partly-printed Document Signed by Adams as President confirms a ship’s papers in four languages on June 13, 1798, and several years later, President Jefferson signed a partly-printed vellum document, appointing William M. Daws Inspector of the Revenue for the Port of Thomaston, countersigned by Secretary of State James Madison, Washington, February 8, 1809 (each $4,000 to $6,000). Further early presidents represented in the sale include John Quincy Adams and Abraham Lincoln.

Twentieth-century Presidents are not to be missed: a photograph of John F. Kennedy and Dwight D. Eisenhower by Elliot Erwitt during their historic meeting on December 6, 1960, signed by both, is expected to sell between $10,000 and $15,000. A complete sheet of 1928 20¢ stamps, collected and signed by philatelist president Franklin D. Roosevelt is valued at $1,000 to $1,500, while his Records of the Town of Hyde Park, Duchess County of the same year is estimated to sell between $2,000 and $3,000.

A section of autographs by artists includes Ludwig Bemelmans, Alexander Calder, Piet Mondrian and Maurice Sendak.  The Mechanics of Form Organization in Painting, 1926, is an Autograph Manuscript for an essay by American Regionalist painter Thomas Hart Benton, dedicated to his pupils at the Art Students League, one of whom was Jackson Pollock. The 39 pages feature diagrams and sketches by the artist, in addition to the handwritten text for the article ($20,000 to $30,000). Claude Monet is represented in the sale by an Autograph Letter Signed to Desmond Fitzgerald in French, with a list of prices for his paintings on exhibit in Paris, Giverny, 26 November 1889, valued at $4,000 to $6,000.

Among scientists and inventors are letters from Louis Agassiz, Marie Curie and Sigmund Freud, as well as a signed and inscribed photograph of Thomas Edison with a phonograph, which he invented ($1,000 to $1,500). Further autographs by the inventor include Letters Signed, as well as checks and clipped signatures. A graphite portrait of Albert Einstein by S.N. Swamy, 1950, signed by both, is valued at $7,000 to $10,000. Several additional signed portraits of Einstein—original drawings as well as etchings and photographs—are being offered, as well as letters and ephemera.

An Autograph Letter Signed in French by Alexis de Tocqueville to the Charles Gosselin Library, detailing the terms of the publication of his Democracy in America, 1837, is expected to sell for $10,000 to $15,000 (though de Tocqueville only received 3,000 Francs for his work).

Sir Arthur Conan Doyle is well-represented in the sale, with personal items including a circa 1926 Autograph Manuscript Signed outlining his conception of spiritualism, and a Typed Letter Signed June 7, 1930, arranging a séance ($3,500 to $5,000 and $700 to $1,000, respectively).

The sale provides myriad tangible connections to the past, from Agatha Christie’s personal circa 1948 notebook from Baghdad, containing more than 150 Autograph Manuscript pages of notes and drafts for several of her early novels and plays, to the bars to the theme from Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky’s Suite No. 3, jotted on March 21, 1888, in London, a day before performing the piece at St. James’s Hall ($4,000 to $6,000 and $7,000 to $10,000, respectively). The oldest autograph in the sale is that of the Medieval Czech priest Jan Hus, whose signature “Huß” appears in the margin of a vellum fragment from a manuscript Breviary, circa 1400, estimated between $4,000 and $6,000.

The auction will be held Thursday, May 4, beginning at 1 p.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Monday, May 1 through Wednesday, May 3 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Thursday, May 4 from 10 a.m. to noon, and by appointment.

An illustrated auction catalogue is available for $35 at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information and to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Marco Tomaschett at 212-254-4710, extension 12, or via e-mail at mtomaschett@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 7 Ernest Hemingway, Autograph Letter Signed to Marlene Dietrich, discussing The Old Man and the Sea and expressing love, Cuba, August 1952. Estimate $20,000 to $30,000.

AntiquarianAuctions.com is an online auction site dedicated to the sale of rare and out-of print books, maps & prints, documents, letters, ephemera and vintage photography. All pricing is done in US$. No buyer’s premium is charged. 

Lot 1 

Harris (C.J.H.) & Ingpen (Brian) Mailships of the Union-Castle Line 

Published: Cape Town, 1994 Estimate: $1,750/2,000 

A Special Edition Limited to 100 copies, this is copy number 1 and is presented to Fernwood Press, signed by the author and artist. With a painting in oils by Peter Bilas of the Kildonan Castle approaching Durban specially commissioned for this work and reproduced on page 44. The painted area measures 900 x 500 mm and is in an attractive gilded frame (1050 x740 mm). 

Peter Bilas was born in Austria but has spent much of his life in South Africa. His interest in the sea and his consummate talent as a marine artist encouraged him to abandon a successful career in computers to concentrate on painting. He exhibits regularly and has won considerable acclaim at the renowned Mystic Gallery in the United States of America as well as elswhere. Among his best known works are four scences on large canvas, of the Battle of Trafalgar. 

Lot 2 

Berry (William) Africa divided according to the Extent of Its Principall Parts 

Published: London, 1680 

Estimate: $3,000/4,000 

The very large and decorative title cartouche, copied from Jailot, includes a lion, an ostrich, an elephant, a crocodile as well as classical and native figures. William Berry changed the coat of arms to that of the Royal Arms and included a dedication to the then recently restored King Charles II. There is also a cartouche that includes five distance scales.

William Berry was a bookseller, geographer and engraver, who was active between about 1670 and 1703. His most enduring partnership was with map-maker Robert Morden and, together, they dealt in topographical works, prints, maps, charts and globes. In the title of the map, Berry added detail for his English audience. 

Lot 3 

Harris (Willaim Cornwallis) Portraits of the Game and Wild Animals of Southern Africa
Published: London, 1840 

Estimate: $12,500/15,000 

Published in five parts at £2. 2s. each part, on large (Columbier) paper, with tail-pieces, or at £1. 1s. each part of ordinary (Imperial) paper without tail- pieces. The book was finally published in volume form in 1843 at £10. 10s. (possibly in half morocco) and £5. 5s. respectively. 

One of the most important and valuable of the large folio works on South African fauna. In addition to the beautiful coloured engravings (sic) which render this work almost the most highly prized of the books relating to South African animals, every plate is accompanied by an exhaustive chapter upon the characteristics of the animal represented, as well as by a short sketch of its personal appearance. 

Lot 8 

Skotnes (Pippa) Editor: Sound from the Thinking Strings: A Visual, Literary, Archaeological and Historical 

Interpretation of the Final Years of /Xam LIFE 

Published: Cape Town, 1991 

Estimate: $4,000/5,000 

Private edition with 3 original colour etchings and seventeen original black and white etchings by Pippa Skotnes, each signed and numbered by the artist, quarter black leather with paper-covered sides, uncut edges, contained in a matching leather and cloth slip case, a fine copy. Number 35 of 50 copies signed by all four contributors. 

All the etchings were printed from the original copper plates, on Zerkall Buetten paper, by the artist with the assistance of Frith Langerman, Pascal Bompard and Christine Dixie. 

‘Sound from the thinking strings’ is a visual, literary, archaeological and historical interpretation of the final years of |xam life. Published by Axeage Private Press and edited by Pippa Skotnes, it includes translations by Stephen Watson, essays by John Parkington and 

Nigel Penn, original etchings by Pippa Skotnes and a foreword by Stephen Jay Gould. Sound from the thinking strings was the inaugural publication of Axeage Private Press and was launched with an exhibition at the Iziko South African Museum that included various related objects, manuscripts, photographs and the records of the Breakwater Prison. The edition is limited to 50 copies, some of which are included in the collections of the Iziko South African National Gallery, public libraries and several European and American collections, including Yale’s Centre for the Book and the Smithsonian’s African art collection. The book was widely reviewed and was the recipient of the University of Cape Town Book Award in 1992. 

The publication was later also exhibited as part of the Standard Bank Young Artist Award and travelled with the exhibition to all the major centres of the country. It was also the subject of a major court case which was widely publicised in the press in which the National Library sued Pippa Skotnes for free copies of the book under the Legal Deposit Act, maintaining that a book could not be an artwork. 

Lot 134 

Cape Piscatorial Society, Piscator, Vol 1 no 1 March 1947 - vol1 XXXII no. 104 Summer 1979 

Published: Cape Town, 1947 -1979 

Estimate: $900 /1,100 

In March 1947 the first issue of Piscator, the Society's journal appeared. A. C. Harrison was its editor and, in a tribute to AC in December 1977 when the 100th edition of Piscator was published, the then CPS President, the late Dr. Frank Bradlow, wrote: "There can be few people who have met "AC" whose lives have not been enriched; his direct courteous manner, his dry sense of humour, his encyclopaedic knowledge of nature and fishing, and his human and humane wisdom are but a few of the qualities which make those who know him realise they have been in the company of a very unusual individual; one of those rare human beings whose personality makes an indelible impression on one's memory 

Lot 203 

[Wenceslas (Hollar), Logan (David) Engravers] Origines Juridiciales, or Historical Memorials of English Laws Published: London, 1666
Estimate: $700/1,000 

A large and internally fine copy of this scarce first edition: many copies were destroyed during the Great Fire of London, according to Pepys. He wrote "15 April 1667...bought Dugdale's History of the Inns of Court, of which there was but a few saved out of the fire...so away home... [17 April] ...to my chamber and there spent the night in reading my new book, Origines Juridicales, which pleases me" (Samuel Pepys, Diary, 15 and 17 April 1667).

The foremost early treatise devoted to the history of the legal profession (particularly to the Inns of Court) still of value, termed "a pioneering work . . and influential" by Dr. Baker and "the chief authority" by Holdsworth: Dugdale's landmark treatise provides a wealth of information about the sources of both English law and English legal institutions, including the Inns of Court for which it is a main authority. 

Lot 208

Bauer (Elvira) Trau Keinem Fuchs Auf Grüner 

Heid Und Keinem Jud Bei Seinem Eid 

Published: Nurnberg, 1936 

Estimate: $600/700 

One of the most virulently anti-Semitic children's books ever published. This is the first of three anti-Semitic children’s books published by Julius Streicher’s Stürmer Publishing House. They are among the nastier productions of the Third Reich. Around 100,000 copies were printed, and the book was used in many schools. The author, Elvira Bauer, was an 18-year-old art student. The title comes from a phrase by Martin Luther, whose anti-Jewish remarks the Nazis were happy to use. 

Written in Sutterlin the old German script developed in the 16th century. The Nizkor Project: Propaganda and Children during the Hitler Years by Mary Mills: The image of the Jew as something less than human, unnatural and immoral recurs throughout the Nazi propaganda picture storybooks for young children. Around the age of six, children were given primers, whose content focused upon camp life, marching, martial drums, boys growing up to be soldiers, etc. Even at this young age, it is obvious that as one principal of a German academic high school wrote: "Education in relation to weapons... is no special branch of general education; rather it is, in point of fact, the very core of our entire education." Along with these primers, children were given a supplement entitled Trau keinem Fuchs auf grüner Heid und keinem Jud bei seinem Eid (Don't Trust A Fox in A Green Meadow Or the Word of A Jew). 

AntiquarianAuctions.com is an online auction site dedicated to the sale of rare and out-of print books, maps & prints, documents, letters, ephemera and vintage photography. 

Dealers and collectors worldwide have been selling and bidding on the site since 2010.
Only established booksellers who are members of major national trade associations such as ABA, ABAA, PBFA or SABDA or are of good standing in the trade are permitted to sell on the site. 

Auctions are held every five weeks and run on the model of a timed auction for one week. 

All pricing is done in US$. No buyer’s premium is charged. 

Next auction: Auction #58: 25 May - 1 June 2017 

Contact:
Antiquarian Auctions: Paul Mills P.O. Box 186 7848 Constantia, Cape Town South Africa E-mail: support@antiquarianauctions.com Tel: +27 21 794 0600 

 

BK165 Ladybird Kipper Kiln copy.jpgTennants’ sale of Books, Maps, Prints and Manuscripts on the 28th April is set to include Part I of a collection comprising over 150 original illustrations made for Ladybird books by artist and illustrator John Berry (1920-2009). A window into a vanished world, these nostalgia-filled pictures present the optimistic ideals of the 1960s and 1970s.

Ladybird books entertained and educated generations of children. Established as an imprint in 1915 with an aim to provide ‘pure and healthy’ literature for children, Ladybirds’ distinctive small hardback books combined simple yet engaging information vividly brought to life with colourful illustrations. 

John Berry was one of Ladybird’s foremost and longest serving artists; he illustrated over 35 books for Ladybird between 1961 and 1978, including the popular ‘People at Work’ series and the ‘Hannibal the Hamster’ series. Berry was born and raised in west London, studying at Hammersmith College of Art. From there he won a scholarship to study at the Royal Academy, but unfortunately he was not able to take up his place due to the onset of war. Berry served as an official war artist attached to the Eighth Army in the Western Desert, and some of his pictures were exhibited during wartime at the National Gallery in London, and are now in the Imperial War Museum. After the War, Berry worked on advertising campaigns and was also a prolific portrait painter, before starting his work for Ladybird in the late 1950s. 

Berry’s illustrations were exhibited alongside the work of fellow Ladybird illustrator Martin Aitchison at the Simon Finch Gallery, London, in 2004, and the following year there was a show of Berry’s work at the NEC in Birmingham. Original Ladybird illustrations are much in demand - particularly since the relaunch of the brand as humorous ‘Ladybirds for Grown-ups’.

The illustrations will be sold in group lots comprising 2 - 5 illustrations, estimated at between £200 and £500 per lot. 

Part II of the collection will be sold in Tennants Book, Maps, Prints and Manuscripts Sale on 2nd August. A fully illustrated catalogue for the sale of Books, Maps, Prints and Manuscripts will be available on our website, www.tennants.co.uk, leading up to the sale, alternatively, please contact the saleroom for further details.

Image: ‘Kippers in Kiln’ - Gouache & Watercolour on Paper from People at Work: The Fisherman. Sold together with two other illustrations from the same book (Estimate - £250-400).

Screen Shot 2017-04-11 at 8.58.00 AM.pngAn important 11-part Panorama of San Francisco from California St. Hill taken in 1877 by the pioneering British photographer, Eadweard Muybridge, is among the highlights of Bonhams Photographs sale in New York on Tuesday April 25. It is estimated at US$40,000-60,000.

The images were taken from the central tower of the Mark Hopkins' residence, at the corner of California and Mason Streets, on Nob Hill. It took Muybridge around five hours to create the photographs, beginning in the late morning and moving the camera in a clockwise direct to keep the sun behind him. He made the final print in the mid-afternoon. The original price for the panorama was US$8 unmounted or US$10 with a bound album.

The sale also features two works by the Brazilian sculptor-turned-photographer, Vik Muniz, known for recreating famous imagery from art history and pop culture. Among other sources, he has drawn inspiration from the mosaics in the Basilica di San Vitale in Ravenna Italy as seen in Still Life with Lemons, Oranges, and a Rose, after Francisco de Zurbarán, from Pictures of Magazines. Estimated at US$18,000-25,000, the print dates from 2004, and is signed and numbered 5 from an edition of 6. Teacher (Joseph Beuys), from Pictures in Chocolate, 1999 is a tribute to the influential German performance and visual artist, Joseph Beuys. Artist's proof number one of three from an edition of three, it is signed by the artist and estimated at US$30,000-40,000. 

Robert Mapplethorpe's Self-Portrait with Horns from 1985, is one of the controversial photographer's most famous images, conveying a knowing combination of innocence and devilment. He signed and dated work is estimated at US$35,000-55,000.

Other highlights include:

Two signed images by Ansel Adams. The Grand Tetons and the Snake River, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming, and Clearing Winter Storm, Yosemite National Park both date from the 1940s, and are estimated at US$25,000-35,000 each.

Welsh Miners by Robert Frank from 1953. Estimated at US$25,000-35,000, the print comes from a series of photographs illustrating the working day of a Welsh miner published as a photo essay in US Camera 1955. This image was not included in that publication, but another print of it appeared in Frank's retrospective exhibition at MOMA in 1962.

Kennedy Assassination, Times Square, New York City, November 22 1963 by Richard Avedon. The famous fashion photographer walked round Times Square on the day of President Kennedy's assassination capturing the somber mood of ordinary Americans stunned by the news. Printed in 2002, the image is signed, dated and numbered 2 out of 7. 

Commenting on the sale, Bonhams Director of Prints and Photographs, Judith Eurich, said: "This is a wonderfully eclectic selection of high quality work from the dawn of the photographic era to the modern day. I am particularly excited by Muybridge's Panorama of San Francisco from California St. Hill. Not only does this provide an invaluable record of the city in the mid to late 19th century, but the photographs themselves are stunning in the daring of their concept and the quality of their execution." 

PHOTOGRAPHS
Bonhams New York, 580 Madison Avenue, New York 10022
Tuesday 25 April at 13.00

Sale Previews
Saturday 22-Sunday 23 April 12.00-17.00
Monday 24 April 10.00-17.00
Tuesday 25 April 10.00-12.00
Specialist: Judith Eurich, Director, Prints and Photographs

 

102-Hammons copy.jpgNew York—The crowd was standing-room only at Swann Galleries’ spring auction of African-American Fine Art on Thursday, April 6. The sale totaled $2.5M, with five of the top lots breaking previous auction records, all of which were set by Swann since the department’s inception ten years ago. Onlookers cheered as six lots exceeded $100,000, with David Hammons’s Untitled (Double Body Print), 1976, reaching $389,000*.

Hammons was an important member of the L.A. Assemblage artists, who used found material to create sculptural collages in the wake of the Watts Riots in 1965. He was represented in the sale by two unique multimedia works: in addition to the previously mentioned double body print, his slightly later Untitled (Body Print) was purchased for $161,000. A haunting work by Timothy Washington, another member of the group, titled Raw Truth, 1970, incorporates such diverse media as a deconstructed baseball mitt and a zipper; it was purchased by a collector for $22,500, a record for the artist.

All five works by graphic abstractionist Alvin D. Loving, Jr. found homes, with nearly all selling above their estimates.  A monumental untitled diptych of two hexagonal canvases broke the artist’s previous auction record, selling to a phone bidder for $161,000. The previous record of $156,000 was set by Swann Galleries in October, 2008.

A run of works by Hughie Lee-Smith spanned the artist’s career, beginning with his 1954 Untitled (Cityscape) ($57,500). A midcareer canvas titled Couterpoise, 1988, exceeded its $25,000 high estimate to sell for $45,000, while a late surrealist painting, Silhouette, 1995, sold after breakneck bidding for $106,250.

Morning Light, 1974, a luminous yellow “poured painting” by Frank Bowling, reached $161,000, a record for the artist, above a high estimate of $90,000. A similar work by Sam Gilliam, Mess of Greens, 1968, features a beveled-edge canvas and was purchased for $37,500.

A previously unrecorded canvas by Walter Williams was also the largest work by the artist ever to come to auction. Untitled (Boy on Porch), circa 1965, is from Williams’s Southern Landscape series and nearly doubled its high estimate to sell for $93,750, a record for the artist.

The sale offered media beyond painting as well. A transfixing painted copper mask by Sargent Johnson, Untitled (Negro Mother), 1935-36, landed the artist a new record at $100,000, while Leslie Garland Bolling’s carved poplar Beautiful Womanhood reached $24,700, also a record for the artist. Several additional artists achieved new records, including William Majors, Eugene Martin and Priscilla “P’lla” Mills, whose work made its auction debut.

James VanDerZee’s magnum opus, the portfolio Eighteen Photographs, 1905-38, tied its previous auction record of $87,500, set by Swann in September 2016. Carrie Mae Weems’s striking triptych of gelatin silver prints, Chocolate Colored Man, 1989-90, was purchased by a collector for $68,750, above a high estimate of $50,000.

Nigel Freeman, founder and director of the African-American Fine Art department at Swann Galleries, said “I am thrilled with this sale’s strong results. We saw great activity with bidding often exceeding the high estimate, and several record prices. We continue to build on our strengths with both modern and post-war artists, surpassing our previous records with artworks from the 1930s through the ‘70s.” Swann Galleries is the only major auction house with a department dedicated to African-American Fine Art, and has been instrumental in building a market for oft-overlooked artists.

            The next sale of African-American Fine Art at Swann Galleries will be held in October 2017. For more information, contact Nigel Freeman at nfreeman@swanngalleries.com.

8-Schongauer copy.jpgNew York— On Tuesday, May 2, Swann Galleries will offer Old Master Through Modern Prints, with a prodigious selection of works completed before the nineteenth century.  

Swann remains the premier American venue for Old Master prints, opening the morning session of the sale with a unique offering of fine works from Renaissance visionaries. The top lot of the sale is an astoundingly detailed engraving, A Censer, circa 1485, by Martin Schongauer. Scholars believe that Schongauer made this intricate work for the sole purpose of showing off his technical virtuosity. Only two other impressions have been offered at auction in the last 75 years, and many of the 28 known impressions are in institutional collections. In excellent condition with no sign of wear, the present impression is valued at $120,000 to $180,000. Schongauer is also represented in the sale by the circa 1475 engraving The Madonna and Child with Apple, expected to sell between $70,000 and $100,000.

The Visitation is a circa 1450 engraving by Master E.S., a still-unidentified artist believed to have been active in southwestern Germany. Master E.S. was likely a goldsmith, and his works on paper are some of the earliest known Western engravings. Fewer than 20 impressions of any of the mysterious master’s approximately 320 known engravings have appeared at auction in the last 30 years. The only other known impression of this work in North America is in the collection of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York ($70,000 to $100,000).

Iconic engravings by Albrecht Dürer are led by Knight, Death and the Devil, 1513 ($50,000 to $75,000). Other important works by the master include The Sea Monster, before 1500; The Four Horsemen, a woodcut, 1498; and Melancolia I, 1514, each valued at $40,000 to $60,000. The Ravisher, or a Young Woman Attacked by Death, circa 1495, is believed to be Dürer’s second attempt at producing an engraving for the blossoming European print market ($7,000 to $10,000).

An exceptional array of etchings by Rembrandt van Rijn features scenes both religious and vernacular. A rare early impression of Landscape with a Square Tower, 1650, leads the section with an estimate of $50,000 to $80,000. Also available is The Omval, 1645 ($40,000 to $60,000), and Abraham Casting out Hagar and Ishmael, 1637, valued at $30,000 to $50,000.

Iconic works by Canaletto, Giovanni Piranesi and Francisco José de Goya complete the selection of Old Masters. The afternoon session of the sale will pick up in the nineteenth century with works by artists from both sides of the Atlantic. Highlights include The Doorway, 1879-80, from James A.M. Whistler’s Venetian tour, which shows a woman doing laundry in a palazzo doorway onto a canal ($40,000 to $60,000).

From early twentieth-century America come works that reflect a rapidly modernizing way of life. Martin Lewis is well represented in the sale, with highlights including Winter on a White Street, 1934, and Wet Night, Route 6, 1933 ($20,000 to $30,000 and, $30,000 to $50,000, respectively). Also available are scenes by Edward Hopper, whose Evening Wind, etching, 1921 is estimated at $80,000 to $120,000, as well as works by Georges Bellows and Rockwell Kent.

The Modern section glows with works by Marcel Duchamp, René Magritte, Henri Matisse, Emil Nolde, Wassily Kandinsky and Fernand Léger. Scarce highlights include Otto Mueller’s Der Mord II (Liebespaar II), circa 1919, valued at $15,000 to $20,000. Scions Georges Braque and Pablo Picasso are also represented en masse. Picasso’s Figure composée II, 1949, is expected to sell between $30,000 and $50,000, while Braque’s Pal (Bouteille de Bass et Verre sur une Table), 1911, is valued at $15,000 to $20,000.

The auction will be held Tuesday, May 2, beginning at 10:30 a.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Thursday, April 27 and Friday, April 28, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, April 29 from noon to 5 p.m.; and Monday, May 1 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

An illustrated auction catalogue is available for $40 at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information and to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Todd Weyman at 212-254-4710, extension 32, or via e-mail at tweyman@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 8 Martin Schongauer, A Censer, engraving, circa 1485. Estimate $120,000 to $180,000.

54844131 copy.jpgNew York—Christie’s is pleased to announce the two-day sale of Prints & Multiples taking place over two sessions on April 19-20. This sale includes nearly 200 lots spanning the 20th to 21st centuries featuring modern works by Marc Chagall, Henri Matisse, Joan Miró, and Pablo Picasso—and contemporary editions by Chuck Close, Keith Haring, David Hockney, Jasper Johns, Robert Motherwell, Bruce Nauman, and Andy Warhol, among others.

The auction is led by two complete series of ten screenprints by Andy Warhol (1928-1987), Myths, executed in 1981 (estimate: $450,000-550,000); and Cowboys and Indians, executed in 1986 (estimate: $300,000-500,000). Another highlight is Robert Rauschenberg (1925-2008), Accident, executed in 1963 (estimate: $40,000-60,000), considered to be one of the most important prints in his oeuvre. Rauschenberg pulled only a handful of impressions before the lithographic stone broke in the course of printing. Rather than start again, he welcomed the rupture, visible as a long diagonal crack that bifurcates the stone, resulting in a sweeping diagonal that tears apart a field of gestural ink strokes.

Other Post-war and Contemporary editions include a selection of prints by Bruce Nauman (B. 1941) from The Collection of Earl and Camilla McGrath, iconic editions by David Hockney (B. 1937), including three lots from his Water Made of Lines series, and an important early print by Jasper Johns (B. 1930), False Start II, executed in 1962 (estimate: $100,000-150,000).

Highlighting the Modern section are classic works by Pablo Picasso (1881-1973), led by his Nature morte au verre sous la lampe, a large-scale and highly complex linocut executed in 1962 (estimate: $200,000-300,000). Other featured works by Picasso include the early etching Le Repas Frugal, 1904 (estimate: $150,000-250,000), and his later Portrait de Jacqueline, linocut in colors, executed in 1959 (estimate: $100,000-150,000).

Prints

19-20 April 2017

20 Rockefeller Center, New York, NY, 10020

  • Auction
    19 Apr, 2pm (Lots 1 - 70)
    20 Apr, 2pm (Lots 71 - 181)
  • Viewing
    New York, Rockefeller Center
    14 Apr, 10am - 5pm
    15 Apr, 10am - 5pm
    17 Apr, 10am - 5pm
    18 Apr, 10am - 5pm

Image: PABLO PICASSO (1881-1973), Nature morte au verre sous la lampe, linocut in colors, 1962, Estimate: $200,000-300,000. 

 

GW letter.jpegDALLAS, Texas (April 4, 2017) -  An important, leopard skin saddle pad owned by George Washington highlights Heritage Auctions’ May 13 Americana and Political auction, which will include a separate catalog titled “Washington and the Founding Fathers.”

“This special auction was inspired by the great success of our September 2016 ‘Lincoln and His Times’ auction,” Americana Auctions Director Tom Slater said. “The eclectic mix of items includes important offerings from categories such as period display pieces, autographic material, paper ephemera, fine art and more. Our goal was to present an auction containing items which appeal to a diverse range of specialized collectors, as well as to those who simply love objects which evoke the earliest days of American history.”

Two of the most important items come from the collection of the Society of the Sons of the Revolution, an organization founded in the 19th century for descendants of Revolutionary War veterans.

Washington’s distinctive leopard skin saddle pad (est. $20,000) originally belonged to British General Edward Braddock. Washington scouted for the general on his ill-fated 1755 expedition against Fort Duquesne in the French and Indian War. Braddock was killed, and his famed leopard skin saddle pad, pistols and sash were given to Washington. 

Also consigned is a large silk banner supporting “Washington’s Policy” (est. $100,000) which was carried in a 1789 parade honoring the recently-installed president when he visited Boston. Washington’s inauguration heralded a period of stability and economic growth, and he enjoyed strong support from the various artisan trade guilds. Each guild had a delegation marching in the parade, and this banner led the contingent of glaziers, or window pane specialists, and plumbers. The Sons of the Revolution have been custodians of both relics since the 1920s.

Another featured item is a Nov. 22, 1803 letter, penned by Thomas Jefferson to Georgia Governor John Milledge (est. $150,000). The recent Louisiana Purchase had opened up many possibilities for developing commerce and settlement between the coastal states and the port of New Orleans. However, entrenched Native American populations posed an obstacle to this anticipated economic development. Jefferson addresses immediate steps regarding the Cherokee and Creek peoples in Georgia, but most significantly expresses the vision that these groups would eventually be relocated west of the Mississippi in the newly acquired territory. This plan ultimately would culminate in the infamous “Trail of Tears” some three decades later, when large numbers of Cherokee Indians were forced to give up long-held property and relocate to inhospitable land in Oklahoma.

No auction focusing on George Washington would be complete without examples of the popular brass clothing buttons worn to celebrate his 1789 Inauguration ($5,000). The sale includes several outstanding examples, including particularly choice buttons of classic designs and a possibly unique variant struck in silver (est. $10,000).

Important early broadsides include a 1774 Massachusetts issue (est. $10,000) all but declaring hostilities with England and a rare early report on the events at Lexington and Concord.

Significant autographic offerings include an appointment document signed by Washington and by Jefferson as Secretary of State, an extremely rare document by one of the scarcest signers of the Declaration of Independence George Taylor (est. $36,000), and a 1776 document signed by Continental Congress President John Hancock appointing Bunker Hill hero Benjamin Haskell as an officer in the Continental Army (est. $6,000).

Three-dimensional display items include such varied objects as fine selection of pottery pieces honoring Washington, John Adams, Thomas Jefferson and James Monroe (est. $2,000); a fine circa 1790 bronze bust of Washington; a pair of hand-painted Paris porcelain vases depicting George and Martha Washington; a tablespoon bearing the mark of Revolutionary War hero and master silversmith Paul Revere (est. $12,000); and an 1805-dated oil portrait by William Dunlap of John Adams.

Among the most unique items in the auction is a circa 1800 pendant containing intertwined hair locks from George and Martha Washington (est. $40,000), with provenance back to the wife of Washington’s private secretary, Tobias Lear.

The entire Americana & Political Auction will be available for viewing and bidding online around April 25 at HA.com, under the heading of the Political and Americana Auction #6172. Questions may be addressed to Tom Slater at TomS@HA.com or 214-409-1441.

341-Cortes copy.jpgNew York— On Thursday, April 27, Swann Galleries will offer Printed & Manuscript Americana, offering historical material from North and South America from the past five centuries.

The top lot is a rare 1538 letter by the conquistador Hernán Cortés to the Majordomo Diego de Guinea, instructing him to provide hospitality to a visiting bishop, valued at $50,000 to $75,000. Only one other letter by Cortés has appeared at auction since 1984.

The sale features a fantastic array of early Latin Americana, including the first edition of the lavishly illustrated early nineteenth-century Brazilian travel book Malerische Reise in Brasilien by Johann Moritz Rugendas, and a signed manuscript profession of faith by Jesuit missionary Eusebio Kino in 1684 ($15,000 to $25,000 and $20,000 to $30,000, respectively). One of the first Mexican novels, La Portentosa Vida de la Muerte, 1792, by Joaquín Bolaños, contains the earliest known use of skeletons in Mexican literature—these engravings would prove fundamental to Mexican Día de los Muertos iconography. It is valued at $1,500 to $2,500.

A hallmark of these biannual sales at Swann is outstanding material related to early New York history. Featured in this sale is the 1848-49 diary of Edith H. Brevoort, a wealthy Manhattan orphan who describes, among other things, visiting the wilderness of Northern Manhattan (currently around 70th Street) in vibrant detail ($1,000 to $1,500). Also available is an unrecorded election circular for the New York Constitutional Convention that reads “We hourly expect a British army in this colony to enslave us.” The printed handbill, with contemporary manuscript notes, is dated June 15, 1776, and is expected to sell between $15,000 and $25,000.

Further Revolutionary highlights include an engraving of the Declaration of Independence by William J. Stone, circa 1833, valued between $12,000 and $18,000, and the first report in The London Chronicle of the Boston Tea Party, 1774, estimated at $1,500 to $2,500.

A special offering is the second Latin edition of Theodore de Bry’s Admiranda Narratio Fida Tamen, the first volume of his famous Great Voyages, circa 1608. The text includes a translation of a promotional text published to lure settlers to the Colony of Roanoke, before their disappearance was discovered, as well as important early maps of the colony and surrounding areas ($25,000 to $35,000).

Rarities include the complete run of the Cherokee Messenger, Oklahoma's first periodical, from 1845-46, which includes important Cherokee translations of the Bible. Only one other complete set has appeared at auction since 1913 ($5,000 to $7,500). For the first time in nearly 30 years, the complete set of hand-colored engravings by Amos Doolittle depicting the parable of The Prodigal Son, 1814, will be offered at auction, expected to sell for $4,000 to $6,000.

Also available is the 1851-56 diary of Edward W. Syle, an American missionary in Shanghai, who upon his return to the States was asked to work in San Francisco’s burgeoning Chinatown. Syle discusses Chinese culture and dress on both continents, and offers observations of Chinese settlements outside of San Francisco. This rare contemporary ethnographical log is valued at $3,000 to $4,000.

The sale will feature a premier selection of nineteenth-century Hawaiian publications, including the first directory of Honolulu, 1853, and the first complete set of the newsletter for the Hawaiian Mission Children’s Society, The Maile Quarterly, 1865-68, to come to auction in more than a century ($7,000 to $10,000 and $1,500 to $2,500, respectively).

Americana auctions at Swann Galleries often include a robust selection of material relating to the formation of the Mormon faith. In the April sale, these will be led by a first edition of the Book of Mormon, 1830 ($40,000 to $60,000). A selection of legal documents signed by Joseph Smith sheds light on the LDS Church founder’s more earthly activities.

Swann Galleries is the world’s largest auctioneer of Works on Paper, and has been dealing in Americana since its inception. This year, the house celebrated the diamond anniversary of its first sale, an auction of books and literary properties, held March 27, 1942.

The auction will be held Thursday, April 27, beginning at 1:30 p.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Saturday, April 22 from noon to 5 p.m.; Monday, April 24 through Wednesday, April 26 from noon to 5 p.m.; and Thursday, April 27 from 10 a.m. to noon.

An illustrated auction catalogue will be available for $35 at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information and to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Rick Stattler at 212-254-4710, extension 27, or via e-mail at rstattler@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 341 Hernán Cortés, letter signed, to his property manager, ordering hospitality for a visiting bishop, December 1538. Estimate $50,000 to $75,000.

3_spiegel2.pngNew York - Christie’s is honored to have been entrusted with Visionaries: Works from the Emily and Jerry Spiegel Collection. The Spiegels were internationally recognized as vanguard collectors of Post-War and Contemporary Art, who devoted the last thirty years of their lives to the patronage of and philanthropy to the arts. The Spiegels’ legendary collection of painting, sculpture, and photography comprises over 100 works, and will represent the first 26 lots of the Post-War and Contemporary Evening Sale in New York on May 17. Additional works will be included throughout the Day sales and in a dedicated auction of photography, which will take place in New York this October. Together, the collection is expected to realize in excess of $100 million. Highlights will be on view at Christie’s London April 6-11.

Alex Rotter, Chairman, Post-War and Contemporary Art, remarked “The Collection of Emily and Jerry Spiegel is one of the great examples of visionary collecting in Post-War America. The Spiegels bought Wool, Sherman, Koons, Polke and Kiefer when very few collectors had the guts to do so, and acquired works that were considered incredibly radical and fierce at the time. As a testament to their foresight, these works are just as poignant today - only now they are among the most sought after examples of contemporary art in private hands. However, the Spiegels didn’t restrict their collecting to new artists. They successfully combined threads of Pop, Minimalism and photography with cutting edge contemporary to form a collection that conveyed a deep representation of post-war art.”

From humble origins working on his uncle’s Long Island farm, Jerry Spiegel rose to become one of Long Island’s most enterprising real estate developers. Sharing Mr. Spiegel’s passion for visionary thinking was his beloved wife, Emily—a singular spirit renowned for her vivacity, intelligence, and dedication to art.

Emily and Jerry Spiegel’s daughter, Pamela Sanders, a noted collector in her own right, remarked: “My mother’s art journey was extraordinary and became legendary; her deep passion for the works she collected and the artists she befriended culminated in a highly cohesive collection of American and European fine art. Paintings and photography found a home on her walls, and together they tell a story that transcends a moment in time. Her legacy was one of connoisseurship, purity and refinement. The joy my mother experienced in the art world everyday of her life, and her curiosity about culture, prevailed until her last days and that is how I will always remember her.”

When the Spiegels began collecting in the 1980’s, they did so with a vengeance. They lived and breathed the art that they saw and studied, and befriended many of the artists that they collected.  In addition to being early proponents of artists such as Polke, Richter, Wool and Kiefer, the Spiegels championed an ambitiously diverse group of artists ranging from Jeff Koons and Andy Warhol to Francis Picabia, and from Man Ray to Cindy Sherman. The Spiegel Collection reflects an extraordinary commitment to the seminal gestures by the artist’s they collected.

As early proponents of artists such as Kiefer, Polke, Richter and Wool, the Spiegels were able to amass an extraordinary grouping of Post-War and Contemporary painting, sculpture, and photography. Anselm Kiefer’s Malen = Verbrennan, 1974 was their first major purchase.

In addition to their Modern and Contemporary holdings, the collectors built an important collection of Photographs with prime examples by Edward Steichen, Man Ray, Paul Outerbridge, and Paul Strand and Diane Arbus.

Emily and Jerry Spiegel sought to share their deep love for art and culture with the community, and became tireless backers of museums and cultural institutions in New York, Long Island, and beyond. They were particularly ardent supporters of the Museum of Modern Art, where Mrs. Spiegel served as a trustee and member of the Painting and Sculpture Committee. In 2001, the collectors gifted Warhol’s Silver Double Elvis (1963) in honor of friend Kirk Varnedoe. Through the years, the Spiegels and their eponymous foundation underwrote a wide range of exhibitions for the museum, and donated a number of important works that now factor prominently into MoMA’s permanent collection.

Today, Pamela Sanders perpetuates the Sanders’ legacy in the arts. In 2010 she oversaw the donation of Emily and Jerry Spiegel’s sizable library of fine art books, several of which were given directly to the Spiegels by artists, to the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University. “My parents’ vision, aesthetic focus, and generosity to artists and institutions alike,” Sanders said, “have served as powerful examples of both the importance of expertise and the need for collectors to give back to the art world.

The Collection of Emily and Jerry Spiegel is the inspiring creation of two remarkably visionary collectors—a joyful collaboration in art and spirit.

The sale is led by a landmark painting by Christopher Wool. Painted in 1988, Wool’s Untitled is a brilliant, early iteration of the critically-acclaimed word-based paintings that remain the most gripping, highly-coveted objects of the artist’s career. The insistent refrain “PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE” personifies the explosive utterings of the soulful James Brown song of the same name. The word “PLEASE” remains one of Wool’s most enigmatic personal phrases. It appears in an early paper version in 1987, and again two years later, in a nearly identical painting of 1989 with matching dimensions (owned by The Broad, Los Angeles).

In 1989, the curators of the Whitney Biennial selected two of Wool’s paintings to represent him. They chose the present work and Apocalypse Now. Both paintings were installed in the Whitney’s Madison Avenue location with another up-and-coming art wunderkind—Jeff Koons—whose Pink Panther was placed directly opposite the present work. At the time, New York Times critic Roberta Smith singled out Wool’s word paintings and illustrated his work in her review, writing: “Christopher Wool’s punchy word-images...have a refreshing visual toughness” (R. Smith, “Review/Art: More Women and Unknowns in the Whitney Biennial,” The New York Times, 28 April 1989, p. C32).

Also highlighting the selection is Sigmar Polke’s Frau mit Butterbrot, 1964. An early iconic masterpiece, the present canvas dates from the year of Polke’s first Rasterbilder, the ubiquitous raster-dot paintings that mimicked the halftone printing process of newspapers and magazines. Frau mit Butterbrot is a rare, formative work that demonstrates the scathing critique of mass media culture that Polke and his fellow “Capitalist Realist” painters, Gerhard Richter, Manfred Kuttnerand Konrad Lueg proposed in their radical exhibits of the early 60s. Its biting critique of bourgeois norms and the meticulous, time-consuming nature of its large-scale execution make Frau mit Butterbrot one of the most significant paintings of Polke’s early career. Both charming vixen and proper hausfrau, Polke’s cunning, perfectly-coiffed subject is the wholesome German counterpart to Lichtenstein’s comic-book heroines and Warhol’s starlets. Created at a critical, early juncture, Frau mit Butterbrot slyly demonstrates the significant themes that would sustain the artist for the duration of his prolific career.

Francis Picabia’s Adam et Ève, 1941, highlights the Modern works acquired by the Spiegels, and was recently featured in the Museum of Modern Art’s 2016-2017 retrospective of the artist’s expansive career. This striking canvas belongs to a series of paintings that the artist began in the early 1930s. The appropriation of mass media had been a central part of the artist’s oeuvre since World War I. Long before Rauschenberg, Warhol, Lichtenstein and Koons embraced appropriation, Francis Picabia wryly played with the concepts of artistic authorship and individual skill that were to become among the central doctrines of modern painting. His defiantly anti-modernist style demonstrates his lifelong and unremitting predilection for overturning conventions of the avant-garde and pursuing new and radical approaches to art and art making, which paved the way for future generations of artists.  

Image: SIGMAR POLKE, Frau mit Butterbrot, Dispersion on canvas, 1964

ITHACA, NY—National Book Auctions, located in Ithaca, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog.  

This catalog features rare, antique and decorative books as well as select additions of ephemera. A quantity of author-signed books from a large private collection will be offered as well as a substantial array of Easton Press fancy leather bindings.          

Antique and rare books in this catalog include numerous titles. Among the earliest examples are the 1567 printing of Paradin and Simeon's "Symbola Heroica M Claudii Paradini," David and Galle's "Christelijcken Waerseggher," produced in 1603, and the 1618 printing of David and Galle's "Pancarpium Marianum Septemplici Titulorum Serie Distinctum," published with full-page engraved plates. Additional rare pieces include a Macklin Bible published in 1800 in seven folio volumes with engraved plates, the 1864 first edition of Kirmani and Miles' "History of the Reign of Tipu Saltan," the 1818 first American edition of Johnson's "Dictionary of the English Language," published in two volumes, and many other desirable titles.                     

Several pleasing collections will also be showcased. Highlighted is a substantial collection of Easton Press volumes, sumptuously bound in the signature full-leather Easton style. Among these are numerous groupings of titles from their "Library of the Presidents" series. We will also present the first offerings from a sizable estate library of author-signed books. Highlights from this grouping include names such as Stephen King, Ken Follett, Bill Mauldin, Mario Puzo, Bernard Cornwell, Seamus Heaney, and many others. Additional modern firsts and limited editions include examples such as a first American edition of Nabokov's "Lolita" in the original jacket. Other vintage and antique tomes also include subject areas such as travel & exploration, the American West, Native American Indians, decorative antique, multi-volume sets, theology, and more.    

Found throughout this catalog are interesting ephemera offerings. These lots include antique photographs (tintypes, etc.), rare prints of photogravure works by Yousuf Karsh, maps, antique magazines, postcards, and other items.   

National Book Auctions is a public auction service specializing in books, ephemera, and art. National Book Auctions is a targeted service offering experience and expertise unique to marketing antique and modern books and ephemera for consignors and collectors alike. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of collectible, signed, and first edition books. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-269-0101 or email mail@nationalbookauctions.com.

 

 

75-CDV-album-Harriet-Tubman copy.jpgNew York—On Thursday, March 30, Swann Galleries’ annual auction of Printed & Manuscript African Americana exceeded $1M for the first time in the department’s 20+ year history. The success was largely due to interest surrounding a carte-de-visite album from the 1860s that contained a previously unknown photograph of Harriet Tubman.

The album topped the sale, selling for $161,000, above a pre-sale high estimate of $30,000. Specialist Wyatt Houston Day discovered the photograph of Tubman in the album, compiled by Quaker abolitionist Emily Howland in the 1860s. The album contains 48 photographs, including 44 cartes-de-visite of noted abolitionists, politicians and friends of Howland.

The sale also featured “the strongest selection of Civil Rights material we’ve ever offered,” according to Mr. Day. An archive of documents relating to the formation of the Montgomery Improvement Association, including checks endorsed by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., realized $18,750.

Half of the top lots were institutional purchases, including a working draft for Dr. Martin Luther King’s famous Letter from Birmingham Jail, 1963 ($40,000) and a West African cast bronze Kuduo ritual burial jar, circa eighteenth- to nineteenth century ($10,624).

The sale broke several long-standing records, including $7,800 for an inscribed first edition of Zora Neale Hurston’s Their Eyes Were Watching God, 1937, which since 1992 had stood at $1,000. Material relating to Frederick Douglass saw new records, including an 1880 Autograph Letter Signed to George Alfred Townsend, in which Douglass writes, “You are wrong in saying I bought my liberty, a few friends in England bought me and made me a present of myself,” which reached $100,000, more than doubling the previous record for a letter by the famed abolitionist. An inscribed first edition of The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, 1845, exceeded all expectations by selling for $37,500, above a high estimate of $4,000.

Another record price went to Benjamin Banneker's Almanac for 1795 at $55,000, the second highest price ever paid for an American almanac at auction.

Swann Galleries is the oldest continually operating specialist auction house in New York, and the world’s largest auctioneer of Works on Paper. This month, the house celebrated the diamond anniversary of its first sale, an auction of books and literary properties, held March 27, 1942. The Printed & Manuscript African Americana department at Swann Galleries, the only one of its kind, has been holding sales since 1996.

The next sale of Printed & Manuscript African Americana at Swann Galleries will be held in Spring 2018. For more information, or to consign works to future auctions, contact Swann Book Department Administrator David Rivera at drivera@swanngalleries.com or (212) 254-4710 ext. 13.

Image: Lot 75 Carte-de-visite album of 48 photographs, including two photos of Harriet Tubman, one previously unrecorded, circa 1860s. Sold March 30, 2017 for $161,000. (Pre-sale estimate: $20,000 to $30,000.)

 

Invisibble.jpegDALLAS, Texas (March 30, 2017) - The classics never go out of style.

Such was the case at Heritage Auctions’ Vintage Movie Posters Auction March 25-26 in Dallas, when several posters sparked a frenzy of competitive bids, driving their ultimate sale prices well beyond their pre-auction estimates.

The top lot in the event was a poster from The Invisible Man (Universal, 1933), and the final price soared all the way to $274,850 - more than four times its pre-auction low estimate. Universal Studios did not often produce an Advance or Teaser one sheet, but when it did, the results were sensational. This is an exceptional copy of what is considered by some to be among the greatest horror posters of all time.

Another poster that brought a six-figure return was this Casablanca (Warner Brothers, R-1953) 4-Fogli, which went for $107,550. The poster shows Ingrid Bergman in the legendary film in which she co-starred with Humphrey Bogart and Paul Henreid. Italian artist Luigi Martinati’s design shows Bergman in front of Casablanca, in French Morocco. Bergman brought elegance to the Michael Curtiz picture that helped it become almost universally accepted as one of the greatest films ever made. This example, which has a Very Fine grade and is mounted on linen, is considered one of the rarest and best posters ever made for the legendary film.

Several other posters from the iconic film enjoyed enormously successful returns, including:

Casablanca (United Artists, R-1962) Italian 4-Fogli: $89,625

Casablanca (Warner Brothers, 1946): $89,625

Casablanca (United Artists, R-1962): $50,190

Casablanca (Warner Brothers, 1942): $38,240

Collectors clamored for images other iconic films, as well.

Numerous bidders pursued this Wizard of Oz (MGM, 1939) half sheet until it realized $71,700. This poster commemorates one of the most beloved movies of all time, a musical comedy/drama that has entertained viewers of all ages for more than seven decades. Judy Garland’s turn as “Dorothy” remains one of the most well-known roles in movie history, and the film has remained enormously popular, despite the fact that it was a financial disappointment. Noted for its use of Technicolor, it was nominated for six Academy Awards, losing the Best Picture award to Gone with the Wind but winning Best Original Song for Over the Rainbow and Best Original Score (by Herbert Stothart).

This lobby card from The Bride of Frankenstein (Universal, 1935), which brought in $51,385, heralded the follow-up to the 1931 horror classic Frankenstein and offered evidence that the sequel is not always inferior to the original. Four years after the first installment, Universal coaxed director James Whale to return, along with actors Boris Karloff and Colin Clive, to continue the story. Elsa Lanchester was the studio’s second choice, but ultimately landed the title role.

Other top lots included, but were not limited to:

A Bordertown (Warner Brothers, 1935) Italian 4-Fogli: $33,460

An Italian 4-Fogli from It’s A Wonderful Life (RKO, 1948): $28,680

A One Sheet from Gilda (Columbia, 1946): $22,705

A One Sheet from The Day the Earth Stood Still (20th Century Fox, 1951): $21,510

17-Bradford-Cover copy.jpgNew York—On Thursday, April 20, Swann Galleries will offer Images & Objects: Photographs & Photobooks, with selections exploring the many functions and purposes of the media since its inception.

The top lot of the sale is The Arctic Regions, 1873, a sumptuously bound narrative of American artist William Bradford’s seven expeditions to the Arctic, illustrated with 141 mounted albumen photographs. Scenes include massive ice floes looming over his ship, Panther, nearly abstract views of icebergs and portraits of indigenous people (“Eskimeaux”); the volume is expected to fetch $100,000 to $150,000.

Eadweard Muybridge, another early master to use the nascent media for scientific purposes, will be represented in the sale by 60 plates from his magnum opus, Animal Locomotion, 1887. Subjects include women in motion, various exotic animals and a self-portrait by the artist ($40,000 to $60,000).

Works that reveal the enduring fascination with the American West include a run of orotones by Edward S. Curtis, led by An Oasis in the Badlands, 1905, with an estimate of $10,000 to $15,000. Ansel Adams is represented in the sale by his iconic 1941 silver print, Moonrise, Hernandez, New Mexico and the extremely rare deluxe edition of Yosemite and the Range of Light, 1979 ($30,000 to $45,000 and $10,000 to $15,000, respectively), among others.

As New York’s oldest specialized auction house, Swann Galleries’ Photographs & Photobooks sales consistently offer a premier selection of works exploring the dramatic growth of the city in the first half of the twentieth century. Iconic views include Berenice Abbott’s City Arabesque, 1938 ($6,000 to $9,000), and a run of Lewis W. Hine’s images from the construction of the Empire State Building. A selection of works by beloved New York street photographer Weegee (Arthur Fellig) offers glimpses into the lives of bygone New Yorkers with Easter Sunday in Harlem, 1940, and Coney Island, 1940 ($2,000 to $3,000 and $7,000 to $10,000, respectively). The breathtaking silver print New York, 1931, by Alfred Stieglitz, taken from his office window, is valued at $25,000 to $35,000.

Camera Work Number 36, 1903, with 16 photogravures by Stieglitz, headlines the selection of photobooks with an estimate of $18,000 to $22,000. Bringing the form into the world of the avant-garde is Jack Smith's The Beautiful Book, 1960-62, estimated at $14,000 to $18,000. The self-titled documentary portfolio by Danny Lyon features 30 silver prints, including iconic images from his series Conversations with the Dead and Bikeriders ($30,000 to $40,000), while Édouard Boubat’s complete self-titled portfolio of 15 original silver prints is valued to $14,000 to $18,000.

Robert Frank’s Sick of Goodby’s, Mabou, silver print, 1978, a gift to his friend, the artist Sylvain Cousineau, is featured in the sale. The influential photograph is estimated at $30,000 to $45,000, and was published in Frank’s The Lines of My Hand, a signed first edition of which is also featured in the sale ($3,000 to $4,500).

Further highlights include Lee Miller's circa 1929-32 unique solarized portrait of critic and editor George Jean Nathan ($10,000 to $15,000), alongside Irving Penn's 1947 portrait of Nathan with his colleague and collaborator, the great H.L. Mencken, valued at $7,000 to $10,000.

Contemporary works in the sale date to as recently as 2007, with Abelardo Morell’s Upright Camera Obscura Image of Piazetta San Marco, Looking Southeast in Office, Venice ($3,000 to $4,500).  Untitled (Human Skull), 2002, a unique and oversize daguerreotype Adam Fuss, is expected to sell between $15,000 and $25,000.

The auction will be held Thursday, April 20, beginning at 1:30 p.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Saturday, April 15 from noon to 5 p.m.; Monday, April 17 through Wednesday, April 19 from noon to 5 p.m.; and Thursday, April 20 from 10 a.m. to noon. Also available by appointment.

An illustrated auction catalogue will be available for $35 from Swann Galleries, Inc., 104 East 25th Street, New York, NY 10010, or online at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information and to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Daile Kaplan at 212-254-4710, extension 21, or via e-mail at dkaplan@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 17 William Bradford, The Arctic Regions, with 141 albumen prints, London, 1873. Estimate $100,000 to $150,000.

20.jpgCRANSTON, R.I. - A screenprint in color, accented with diamond dust of screen legend Greta Garbo as Mata Hari by Andy Warhol, titled The Star and from Warhol’s “Myths” portfolio, sold for $52,000 at a two-session Spring Antiques and Fine Arts Auction held Saturday, March 25th by Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers, online and in the firm’s gallery at 63 Fourth Avenue in Cranston.

The screenprint was signed in pencil by Warhol and numbered “4 of 200” on the verso. It also came with the original certificate of authenticity from Gallery 121 in New York City and sold for nearly two times its estimate to take top lot honors. “With interest worldwide, the Warhol print had a strong result for today’s market,” said Kevin Bruneau, company president and auctioneer.

In addition to original artworks and prints, the auction also featured fine antiques, decorative arts, vintage toys and old comic books. “It was a very strong sale with great results all around,” said Travis Landry, Bruneau & Co. specialist and auctioneer. “I was especially impressed with the Martinez painting which, according to records, is a new record price for a work by the artist.”

He was referring to the Mexican painter Miguel Martinez (b. 1951) and the fine pastel and oil on paper titled Woman from Velarde, New Mexico that brought $8,125. The 30 inch by 40 inch work (sight, less frame) depicted the divine and winsome face of a young Hispanic woman over a background of rolling farmlands. It was signed and dated (“95”) in the lower right hand corner.

Approximately 100 people packed themselves into the Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers gallery, while a staggering 7,845 others registered to bid online, using LiveAuctioneers.com, Invaluable.com and Bidlive.Bruneauandco.com. Over 150 telephone and absentee bids were also recorded. The Warhol piece attracted 11 phone bids and two absentee bids. Overall, 470 lots came up for bid.

Following are additional highlights from the auction. All prices quoted include a 25 percent buyer’s premium.

The day started with a morning “Discoverit” sale, offering over 150 lots to an in-house crowd only - no absentee or phone bidding. A highlight was a bronze sculpture of a samurai that sold for $450. The first portion of the catalog featured 100 works of art, many from an outstanding Westport, Mass., collection. The Warhol and Martinez pieces both came out of that collection.

Noteworthy artworks from the cataloged sale at noon included a limited lithograph by Pablo Picasso, pencil signed and numbered (91/200) in the margin and dated (“21.4.60”) in the plate ($4,065); an oil on canvas marine rendering by Walter Franklin Lansil (Mass./Maine, 1846-1925), titled Boston Harbor, signed and dated “1879” ($3,437); and a well-executed oil painting by Wesley Webber (Mass./Calif., 1841-1914), showing a milkmaid and cows in a field ($2,250).

Overall, the second portion of the cataloged session consisted of over 225 diverse lots. These included a Pairpoint Puffy reverse painted hummingbird and rose table lamp, made around 1920. The lamp illuminated the room for $2,812. Also, a Czechoslovakian Art Deco carved alabaster and patinated metal figural table lamp, made circa 1920 with a globe form shade, went for $750.

A mid-20th century George Nelson for Herman Miller modular sofa set - one section having a laminated table attached to the base and acting as a corner side table, the other placed next to the side table to firm an “L”-shaped sofa - brought $2,375. Also, an 18th century sturdy American Chippendale mahogany tall chest with the overall original finish, 60 inches tall, reached $1,625.

An English 20th century Royal Crown Derby dinner service for eight in the Red Aves pattern, in very good condition and appearing never to have been used, changed hands for $2,125. Tops in the Asian category was a fine pair of early 20th century Chinese Export porcelain famille jaune (ground yellow in color) palace vases, 36 ½ inches tall, showing warriors on horseback ($3,250).

Also from Asia, a large Chinese pictorial rug, made circa 1930 and depicting a temple in the lower right and colorfully decorated, 139 ½ inches by 108 inches, coasted to $1,500; and a large Japanese Meiji period (19th century) embroidered and woven tapestry, decorated with a bevy of dragons and other mythical creatures against the clouds, 81 inches by 55 inches, reached $812.

Back to vases: An Art Deco Rookwood pottery vase, made circa 1946 and designed by Jens Jensen, decorated with five grazing deer in a steel blue and gray high glaze, 7 ¼ inches tall, knocked down for $812; while a Roseville Art Deco vase in the Laurel pattern (form #675-9), in the green color variation and with the original Roseville foil sticker, changed hands for $688.

A collection of five CBCS-graded Superman and Batman comic books, paired with a grouping of Silver, Bronze and Golden Age comics, all from the 20th century, went for $750; a collection of eight CBCS-graded Tales of Suspense comic books, paired with a grouping of Avengers-related comics, realized $531; and a copy of Marvel Comics’ Amazing Spider-Man #50 (July 1976), with the first appearance of Kingpin and having an overall grade of 4.5, rose to $406.

Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers’ next sales will be on Saturday, May 6th, featuring a single-owner collection of fine Asian arts; and Saturday, June 3rd, being billed as a Summer Estates Auction.

To learn more about Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers and the May 6th and June 3rd auctions, visit www.bruneauandco.com. To contact Bruneau & Co. via e-mail, use info@bruneauandco.com

Image: Original screenprint depiction of screen legend Greta Garbo as Mata Hari by the iconic pop artist Andy Warhol ($52,000).

Bob-Dylan-Handwritten-Lyrics-52851b_lg.jpegLOS ANGELES, March 27, 2017 - Original handwritten lyrics by musician and Nobel Laureate Bob Dylan will be auctioned by Nate D. Sanders Auctions on March 30, 2017.  

The lyrics were written for an unpublished song about Wisconsin. Dylan had a special connection with Wisconsin. He went to camp there as a child and briefly lived in Madison in 1960 after dropping out of the University of Minnesota in May that same year. Dylan was determined to make a name for himself in Madison, which was one of the hotspots for folk music at the time. He played at various clubs, but didn’t make a major impression. 

Dylan moved to New York City in January 1961 and signed a recording contract with Columbia Records in October. He penned these original handwritten lyrics in November 1961 and gave them to Peter Crago, a fellow New York musician and roommate. 

The lyrics are an ode to the Badger state. The lyrics come with a certificate of authenticity from music dealer Roger Epperson. Bidding for the lyrics begins at $30,000.

Additional information on the lyrics can be found at 
http://natedsanders.com/Original__Handwritten_Lyrics_by_Bob_Dylan_From_Nov-LOT46136.aspx

About Nate D. Sanders Auctions

An industry leader in documents and autographs, Nate D. Sanders Auctions has conducted auctions in Los Angeles since 1990 and now holds major auctions on a monthly basis. Owner Nate Sanders is recognized for his knowledge of sports, historical and Hollywood memorabilia. To learn more visit natedsanders.com

ITHACA, NY--Worth Auctions, located in Dryden, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog.    

This catalog features the second session of rare and desirable arms and militaria from the estate of a prominent Civil War collector. Central to the Civil War collection is a veritable arsenal of over 150 antique firearms and swords, over 60 of which are offered in this sale. Noteworthy weapons include a rare Confederate Fayetteville musket; an Clauberg presentation sword ornately embellished with garnets, silver, and gold; and a Colt First Model dragoon revolver showing original color.          

Numerous presidentially-signed items will also be showcased, such as a passport signed by James Monroe; a land grant signed by John Quincy Adams; and a mounted riflemen commission signed by James K. Polk. Other interesting documents include a vellum indenture sworn before King George III; a decorative "Squirrel Hunter's Discharge" presented to a member of the volunteer militia that defended Cincinnati from Confederate invasion; and an early American Colonial deed relating to a tract in New York City.                  

Fine art offerings in this session include a masterful oil on canvas portrait of an Erie County gentleman attributed to Moses Billings; a cameo on bone by D.J. Watkins; and a scarce hand-colored woodcut print of the Naval battle at Memphis. Other remarkable items from this state are a French bronze medallion of Abraham Lincoln; an early H.L. Leonard raised pillar fishing reel made of German silver and ebonite; and an eighteen-karat gold Elgin pocket watch. Also of note are a Tiffany Studios trinket box; a field surgical kit; and two McClellan saddles.      

Worth Auctions is a public auction service specializing in estate work and collections.  The company conducts fully cataloged auctions with global bidding activity over three platforms. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of items, from pencils to airplanes. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-330-0358 or email mail@worthauctions.com.

 

Img2766 copy.jpgBOSTON, MA -  As we near the 100th anniversary of John F. Kennedy's birth, Boston-based RR Auction is proud to announce the manuscript: Prelude to Leadership - JFK's Summer Diary of 1945 will be featured in an upcoming live auction on April 26, 2017. 

This 61-page diary, written as a Hearst newspaper war correspondent, captures a moment in time perhaps never before fully appreciated, and only now, 71 years later, officially being offered at auction.

The diary is compromised of 61 loose-leaf pages, bound in a premium black leather cowhide binder. Twelve of the pages were handwritten by Kennedy and he typed forty-nine pages on his personal typewriter.

The diary was consigned by Deirdre Henderson, who began working for Senator Kennedy in 1959 as his research assistant in his run for the Presidency.  She worked closely with him and his academic advisory group on position papers for his campaign, and the President-elect asked her to stay on during the transition period. Deirdre was on the White House staff before moving on to the State Department. 

“It was a privilege to work as research assistant to Senator John F. Kennedy in his run for the Presidency. He gave me his 1945 diary so I could better understand his views,” said Deirdre Henderson. 

He was not yet thirty, and—unbeknownst to himself and the world—the courageous PT-109 veteran was forging his path to greatness. Germany had just surrendered, and over a brief two months during the summer of 1945, he served as a witness to history, traveling World War II-torn Europe: England, Ireland, France, finally Germany. There, shoulder to shoulder with presidents, prime ministers, and generals, he experienced firsthand the end of WWII and the ominous creeping of the iron curtain.

In the wake of his elder brother’s valiant death soaring over the British Channel, the Harvard graduate left his twenty-something scholarly dreams behind, and picked up the mantle of his storied family dynasty.

Within the detailed personal diary, a 28-year-old JFK reveals surprising views on liberalism versus conservatism and espouses his unedited beliefs regarding Roosevelt’s effect on capitalism; he witnesses and harshly critiques the formation of the United Nations; he muses on iconic leaders Chamberlain, Churchill, DeGaulle, FDR, and Eisenhower. Before the trip is over, young Jack experiences in real-time a desolated Berlin and along with Stalin, Truman, and Eisenhower, attends Potsdam, Germany’s summit. 

This historic event included an unlikely gathering of a current president, Truman, and two future presidents, Ike and JFK. Potsdam was where Truman officially decided to drop the bomb on Japan and revealed the presence of the world-changing weapon to Stalin. 

Throughout the diary, JFK chronicles his own chilling premonitions of power-hungry Russia and the conflict that would be synonymous with his presidency: the cold war. Kennedy even visits the ravaged bunker where Hitler died and attests to a long-rumored conspiracy that the Fuhrer’s body was never found; lacking hindsight and knowledge of Nazi horrors now known, he ends the European portion of the diary with the startling assessment that Hitler possessed “the stuff that legends were made of.”

By Summer’s end, Jack officially decided to run for congress, the first step on his sixteen-year journey to the White House. The final pages of this memoir record, in the future president’s own hand, his reservations on running, coupled with his renewed vigor to serve.

JFK’s assignment as an observer-reporter provided him the final push needed to embrace the next steps of his career and excel as a public servant.

“This exceptional diary sheds light on a side of John F. Kennedy seldom explored and confirms America’s enduring sense that he was one of the most qualified, intelligent, and insightful commanders-in-chief in American history,” said Bobby Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction.

The live auction will take place at RR Auction’s Boston Gallery on April 26, 2017 at 1PM Eastern. More details can be found online at www.rrauction.com.

Image: Courtesy of RR Auctions.

63dee8bb-7876-441b-a3b5-3f13774379ed.jpgNew York, NY: Bidsquare's inaugural themed auction Passport to the World features a curated collaboration of travel-inspired art, antiques and collectibles from the finest New York dealers. The themed auction is open for bidding, live on Bidsquare until March 30. Featured New York galleries include Barbara Israel Garden Antiques, Elizabeth Street GalleryCombray Gallery and Burden among others.

Take a trip while you browse the auction, all from the convenience of your device. First, decide where you're headed by spinning this vintage globe or consulting engraved or hand colored fabric maps from Rare Paper.

Next, pack up your suitcase! Travel in style, or back in time with vintage Louis Vuitton suitcases and trunks from A Second Chance. The boutique has been supplying the Upper East Side with divine, luxury goods from their Lexington Avenue location since 1993.

Choose your mode of transportation: planes, trains or automobile? Or maybe by boat? Hop on your flight and you're headed there. A Conceptual Aircraft, French, c. 1900 is a uniquely hand-crafted model airplane, extremely impressive in scale measuring 9 feet long. It may have been built by early aviation pioneer Louis Bleriot, or by his collaborator Gabriel Voisin, with whom he created many variations of experimental airplanes and flying machines, from 1903-06.

You've arrived. Take in the scenery and check out the sights, gardens, canals and architecture. Admire the terra-cotta jars and sculptures from Barbara Israel Garden Antiques and take in the views around you. Barbara Israel Garden Antiques works closely with landscape architects, designers, and private clients to find the ideal object for individual gardens.

Bid now on the curated collaboration of travel-inspired art, antiques and collectibles. For purchases made for themed auctions, there is no buyer’s premium. Additional information and the full digital catalog for the sale is online now at www.bidsquare.com.

For Dealers and Galleries

If you are a dealer or gallery and are interested in participating in the next themed auction, please contact Bidsquare here.

About Bidsquare

Bidsquare is a curated platform where collectors can discover, bid and buy authenticated fine art and antiques from over 130 trusted and vetted auction houses and galleries. Bidsquare is the destination for individuals and collectors seeking exceptional, one-of-a-kind pieces, with new, unique property added every day. Visit http://www.bidsquare.com to view sales. 

Image: 1789 Engraved Map of Ukraine with the Black Sea port of Ochakov from Rare Paper, asking bid $50

76-Corcos copy.jpgNew York—On Tuesday, March 21, Swann Galleries held their spring auction of Illustration art to a packed room. The biannual sale offers original works of art intended for publication; it finished with an 82% sell-through rate, and many works exceeded their high estimates.

The top lot of the sale was the original watercolor for the cover of the first French edition of the third Babar book, Le Roi Babar, 1933, by Jean de Brunhoff. It was purchased by a collector for $40,000*. A watercolor by de Brunhoff’s son Laurent, who carried on the Babar series after his father’s death, was also sold; Babar dans l’Île aux Oiseau, 1969, reached $7,000.

Skeletons and Hiding Figures, circa early 1980s, achieved the highest hammer price for a work by Edward Gorey in the last 12 years; with the buyer’s premium, it sold for $18,750. With 12 original works, the auction offered the largest selection of works by Edward Gorey in a single sale. Further highlights included a watercolor, pen and ink drawing of Mr. Earbrass, 1970s, purchased by a collector for $11,875.

The sale featured five works by Charles Addams that came from the Charles & Tee Addams Foundation and had never previously appeared at auction. The run was led by a 1957 gouache and watercolor cover for The New Yorker, titled Scuba Galleon, and a cartoon for the same publication titled Z Line Subway, into which Addams had snuck three characters from his popular show, The Addams Family (each $16,250). Another highlight from the selection was Addams Family Barge, a 1984 advertisement for Mobil Oil that featured the entire freaky family, including the Pugsley’s pet octopus Artistotle and Thing, as Addams had originally conceived him ($14,300).

Two original Peanuts comic strips by Charles Schulz each surpassed their high estimates. A rare early depiction of Snoopy in Here comes the big Polar Bear stalking across the snow!, 1957, was purchased by an institution for $12,500. Snoopy in his more familiar form also starred in the 1974 pen and ink strip Mister Sensitive, which reached $11,875.

A mesmerizing undated egg tempera painting by Lucille Corcos titled Weekend Chores broke the artist’s previous auction record to sell for $10,000. Another record went to John C. Damron for his 1946 oil painting Pet Store, which flew past its high estimate of $1,200 to sell for $5,460.

As is customary for Illustration Art sales at Swann Galleries, there was a robust section of covers and cartoons for The New Yorker. All but one of the 25 offered lots found buyers, surpassing the high estimate for the section by over $10,000. Available works spanned the lifetime of the publication, the earliest being Summer and Winter Activities, a gouache cover by Theodore Haupt published in 1933, which broke its previous auction record to sell for $1,300.

Christine von der Linn, Director of Illustration Art, said of the sale, "Our commitment to offering fresh-to-market material paid off in a sale that was heavily attended and flooded with phone and Internet bidding throughout. Kids, creatures, and cartoons shone as the clear fan favorites in the sale. Perhaps in a time of unusually high political discontent, the pure joy of illustration art also serves as a comfort and panacea."

The next sale of Illustration Art at Swann Galleries will be held in Fall 2017. For more information, contact Christine von der Linn at cv@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 76 Lucille Corcos, Weekend Chores, egg tempera on masonite. Sold March 21, 2017 for $10,000, a record for the artist. (Pre-sale estimate $5,000 to $7,000.)

Bullitt full.jpegDALLAS, Texas (March 21, 2017) -  The personally-owned collection of movie star Steve McQueen brought $280,618 across 30 lots in Heritage Auctions’ spring Entertainment & Music Memorabilia auction March 18 in Dallas. The $1 million sale offered private collections by Bruce Willis and Farah Fawcett, as well as a stellar collection of never-before-seen concert posters. 

“Strong bidding across the spectrum drove this auction past expectations,” said Margaret Barrett, Director of Entertainment Memorabilia at Heritage Auctions.

The auction offered 18 annotated shooting scripts from some of McQueen’s greatest movies. His leather-bound, annotated script for the 1968 film Bullitt and his script for Le Mans each sold for $55,000. The script for the 1963 classic The Great Escape - which detailed McQueen’s own requests for the classic motorcycle jump scene - sold for $50,000.

The auction offered a special selection of personal rarities from Marilyn Monroe, including an original marker from Marilyn Monroe’s grave, which sold for $35,000; a circa 1953 Marilyn Monroe signed black and white photograph, which ended at $13,750; and a circa 1954 dollar bill autographed by both Monroe and Joe DiMaggio, which brought $5,750.

A one-owner collection of rarely-seen music concert posters sold for a combined $255,843 led by a poster for a 1964 performance by Roy Orbison. The window card, showing a classic image of Orbison wearing horn-rimmed glasses, saw interest from five bidders who pushed the sale price to $16,250. A Batman/Young Rascals concert poster from 1966 sold for $13,750 and a colorful, 1956 poster advertising performances by Little Richard, Big Joe Turner and Etta James closed at $12,500.

Two rare pieces of memorabilia relating to Otis Redding surpassed estimates as a RIAA Gold Record sales award for his smash hit (Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay sold for $12,500 and a scarce, 1965 record promotional poster sold for $11,250.

Additional highlights include, but are not limited to:

The mauve silk chiffon dress worn by Elizabeth Taylor in the film Cleopatra sold for $10,000.

Hollywood memorabilia personally-consigned by stage and screen actor Bruce Willis featured his French movie poster from Forbidden Planet, which sold for $7,500, and his Hollywood Walk of Fame Award from 2006, sold for $5,000.

Memorabilia from The Beatles saw four signatures from a 1963 autograph album sell for $10,625 and a signed copy of the group’s LP Help! saw $7,500.  

Items from the collection of David Gest Memorabilia Archive includes a Michael Jackson signed color photograph from 1998 and busts of Louis Armstrong and W.C. Handy, which both sold for $4,750.

Lot-293-Steinlen copy.jpgNew York—On Thursday, March 16, Swann Galleries offered Vintage Posters, featuring dynamic selections of graphic art from the end of the nineteenth century through the middle of the twentieth century. The sale represented the myriad functions of the poster as a means of communication and advertising, with sections devoted to Soviet propaganda and beachside vacations alike.

The top lot of the sale was the iconic Tournée du Chat Noir by Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen. The 1896 large-format poster was purchased after a neck-and-neck race by two phone bidders for $30,000*, a record for the work. Art Nouveau pieces performed well overall, most notably a run of works by Alphonse Mucha led by the rare complete 1902 portfolio Documents Décoratifs, purchased by a collector for $22,500. Further highlights by the master included a four-panel folding screen featuring women as the allegories of Times of the Day, 1899, and the deluxe edition of Salon des Cent, 1896 ($13,750 and $16,900, respectively). Nicholas D. Lowry, director of Vintage Posters,  noted “a refreshing resurgence of interest in works by Jules Chéret,” with highlights being Musée Grévin / Théâtre Les Fantoches de John Hewelt, 1900, with and without text ($3,750 and $1,188, respectively).

The sale featured an enormous run of ski and winter posters, with nearly three quarters of the 91 offered lots finding buyers. The breathtaking St. Moritz, 1924, by Carl Moos, topped the section with $11,250, followed by the action-packed Chamonix Mt. Blanc, 1930, by Roger Broders at $9,100. Four of the top ten ski posters advertised American resorts with sweeping scenes showing a single skier. Dwight Clark Shepler’s Sun Valley / Ketchum, Idaho, circa 1940, reached $8,750, while his 1940 Sun Valley / “Round House” on Baldy Mountain sold for $5,500. All but one of the posters featuring the Idaho resort town found buyers: Mr. Lowry was pleased, saying, “As usual, ski posters performed very well, and there was in particular a renewed enthusiasm for Sun Valley.”

In addition to directing the Vintage Posters department at Swann Galleries, Mr. Lowry is also house’s President and Principal Auctioneer, as well as the third generation of his family to run the company since its inception 75 years ago. Swann Galleries is the oldest continually operating specialist auction house in New York, and the world’s largest auctioneer of Works on Paper. This month, the house celebrates the diamond anniversary of its first sale, an auction of books and literary properties, held March 27, 1942.

The next sale of Vintage Posters at Swann Galleries will be Graphic Design on May 25, 2017. For more information, or to consign works to future auctions, contact Nicholas D. Lowry at posters@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 293 Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen, Tournée du Chat Noir, 1896. Sold March 16, 2017 for $30,000.

StevenSpielberginSharkJaws.pngCLEARWATER, Fla. - The most important piece of Jaws history to hit the market since the blockbuster film’s 1975 release will be sold on March 18 when Blackwell Auctions of Clearwater, Florida, offers the personal Jaws movie scrapbook of the late actor Alfred Wilde. Known for his small but memorable role as Harry Wiseman (a k a “Bad Hat Harry”) in Jaws, and “Select Man #1” in Jaws 2, Wilde carefully documented his time on both movie sets by amassing a unique collection of memorabilia - a virtual time capsule of Jaws’ actors and crew.

This fresh-to-the-market collection includes nearly three dozen pages of photographs and autographs - including handwritten sentiments by Steven Spielberg, Roy Scheider, Richard Dreyfuss and Robert Shaw (and signatures of nearly the entire cast and crew), as well as Peter Benchley, the author of Jaws, who visited the set.

Also included are an original shooting call page, original script pages, tickets from the movie’s premiere in Martha’s Vineyard and more. None of the 100 original candid snapshots has ever been published or broadcast.

Click here to view Google Photos album of the entire scrapbook: https://goo.gl/photos/9qEayDvG4KEidnEJA

Of the many noteworthy aspects of this collection, these stand out:

1 - Steven Spielberg wrote a personal note to Wilde, signed it “Steve Spielberg” and, under his name, in parentheses, wrote “Director of JAWS.”

“It’s like looking at Steven Spielberg’s rookie card,” said Blackwell Auctions’ co-owner and auctioneer Edwin Bailey. “He identified himself as the director because back then, very few people would have had a clue who ‘Steve Spielberg’ was.”

2 - Unlike many movie memorabilia items, which may change hands many times, this collection has never been offered for sale or displayed publicly. 

3 - Establishing an opening bid was a challenge, as only one “comp” could be found: In 2014, a Los Angeles-based auction sold an unnamed movie technician’s photo album and four lifejackets used by Spielberg and three Jaws actors. There were no autographs. That collection sold for $50,000.

Blackwell Auctions has set the opening bid for Alfred Wilde’s scrapbook at $25,000, with a pre-auction estimate of $50,000-$75,000.

“There isn’t a movie memorabilia collector out there who wouldn’t want to own something like this,” Bailey said. “It’s an item that utterly transcends a signed poster or a screen-used prop. The scrapbook represents the very spirit of Jaws, a cinematic masterpiece that made Steven Spielberg a household name.”

Internet live or absentee bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers. For more information, please call or text Edwin Bailey of Blackwell Auctions at 727-644-0457. Email info@blackwellauctions.com. 

Image: Steven Speilberg in Shark Jaws - Candid photos including Steven Spielberg posing in the gaping shark jaws. Courtesy of Blackwell Auctions. 

343-Malcolm-X copy.jpgNew York— On Thursday, March 30, Swann Galleries will hold an auction of Printed & Manuscript African Americana, featuring powerful ephemera both painful and uplifting from oft-overlooked chapters of American history.

The earliest material in this annual sale relates to slavery and abolition, including an annotated early nineteenth-century bible belonging to an enslaved family ($800 to $1,200), and several letters concerning George Washington’s slaves on Mount Vernon (each $10,000 to $15,000). A copper slave badge made by Charleston silversmith John Joseph Lafar, 1824, is estimated at $8,000 to $12,000, while a vellum certificate of emancipation for a Maryland woman named Margaret Tillison, 1831, is valued at $600 to $900. Also available is the scarce 1795 edition of Bannaker’s Almanac, expected to sell between $30,000 and $40,000. There is a run of first-hand accounts of slavery written by people who had been freed, including the first edition of Solomon Northup’s Twelve Years a Slave, published in Auburn, New York in 1853 ($1,000 to $1,500).

A highlight of the sale is a previously unrecorded photograph of abolitionist hero Harriet Tubman, part of a carte-de-visite album compiled in the 1860s. The album features 48 photographs of contemporary political and abolitionist figures, one being the only known photograph of the first African American elected to Congress, John Willis Menard ($20,000 to $30,000).

Frederick Douglass is also represented in the sale with rare offerings, including a typed copy of the last speech he made before an audience, titled A Defense of the Negro Race, 1895, just four months before his death ($3,500 to $5,000). In an emotional 1885 Autograph Letter Signed to Civil War journalist George Alfred Townsend, Douglass wrote, “You are wrong in saying I bought my liberty, a few friends in England bought me and made me a present of myself;” the two-page letter is estimated at $40,000 to $60,000.

Making its auction debut is the printed culmination of The Proceedings of National Negro Conference, 1909, which became the NAACP the following year. The scarce book included two pieces by W.E.B. Du Bois: Politics and Industry and Evolution of the Race Problem; and one by Ida B. Wells, titled Lynching, Our National Crime ($2,500 to $3,500).

The strongest selection of Civil Rights material Swann has ever offered is led by typed manuscripts for Malcolm X’s Los Angeles Herald Dispatch column, God’s Angry Men, 1957, heavily edited and signed in the activist’s own hand ($200,000 to $300,000). Also available is a rare working draft of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter from Birmingham Jail, 1963, in which he addresses seven religious leaders in defense of his methods of peaceful and passive resistance. King wrote the letter on scraps of paper that had been smuggled to him in prison, and then typed and returned for him to edit. The draft, which already includes the iconic line, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere,” is estimated at $10,000 to $15,000.

Further examples of King’s work can be found in an archive of more than 500 documents relating to the foundation of the Montgomery Improvement Association, in the wake of Rosa Parks’s momentous defiance. The material includes the original by-laws and constitution of the organization, checks signed by King, and details on expenses relating to a fleet of station wagons and a voting machine. The archive, held in two contemporary binders, is valued at $20,000 to $30,000.

Also in the sale is material related to the Black Panthers and the Nation of Islam, as well as various protest signs used in marches throughout the 1960s and ‘70s. Outstanding items include two iconic placards used in strikes: I Am A Man!, 1970, and Honor King: End Racism!, 1968, are valued at $10,000 to $15,000 and $20,000 to $30,000, respectively.

Materials commemorating the achievements of African Americans in the arts include a silver sequined cape presented to James Brown by Michael Jackson at the 2003 BET Awards, along with a pair of Brown’s platform shoes ($25,000 to $35,000 and $1,500 to $2,500, respectively). An archive of material related to The Ink Spots, including photographs signed by Ella Fitzgerald and Peal Bailey and maintained by band member Charlie Fuqua, is valued at $4,000 to $6,000.

The auction will be held Thursday, March 30, beginning at 10:30 a.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Saturday, March 25 from noon to 5 p.m.; and Monday, March 27 through Wednesday, March 29 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

An illustrated auction catalogue is available for $35 at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information or to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Wyatt Houston Day at 212-254-4710, extension 300 or wyatthday@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 343 Malcolm X, typed manuscripts for the Los Angeles Herald Dispatch column God's Angry Men, edited and signed, 1957. Estimate $200,000 to $300,000.

Screen Shot 2017-03-13 at 10.27.15 AM.pngLONDON, 13 March 2017-This Spring, Sotheby’s will offer at auction a masterpiece of Spanish printmaking recently discovered in a library in France. La Tauromaquia, the complete set of thirty-three prints by Goya celebrating the artist’s unique understanding of the art of bullfighting, comes to sale from the collection of a French ducal family, having remained undisturbed for decades in a nineteenth-century ledger. Estimated at £300,000-500,000, the prints are virtually flawless examples of the first and only contemporary edition that was printed for Goya from large copperplates etched and aquatinted by him in 1815-1816. Having made the journey from the court of Madrid around the time of their publication, to the château de Montigny in France in 1831 where they remained -eventually forgotten by succeeding generations of the original owner -these exceptional works by an inspired master printmaker will headline Sotheby’s sale of Prints & Multiples in London on 4 April 2017. 

Séverine Nackers, Head of Prints, Sotheby’s Europe, said: “To find a complete set of Goya’s bullfighting prints with such historically significant provenance is a once-in-a-lifetime discovery. With La Tauromaquia currently holding the auction record for a series of prints by Goya, we’re expecting an enthusiastic response from collectors.”

The prints were discovered when new heirs inspecting the family property pulled a large nondescript volume from the back of a library shelf, full of splendid bindings. On first inspection, the nineteenth-century ledger revealed 90 lithographs bearing the signature H. Bellangé pasted onto its pages, showing brightly watercoloured prints of uniformed French military personnel. A glance beyond the two blank facing pages that followed, in what appeared to be a ‘scrapbook’ volume of prints, revealed a surprising discovery --another series of prints, this time in monochrome, a warm, dark umber ink on freshly textured, handmade paper. They were immediately recognisable as masterpieces by the hand of Goya, from the quality of the materials and the fresh and perfect condition of their technique. These prints have evidently lain undisturbed within the album, ever since each one was carefully tipped, with touches of glue to the four corners, sideways on the pages, an operation that appears to have been carried out in the 1840s, following the death of the original owner in 1837.The ledger, with printed columns and headings, was perhaps chosen because its format fitted the uncut sheets so well.

The original owner of this set of Goya’s Tauromaquia was Anne Adrien Pierre de Montmorency Laval (1768-1837), whose inheritance of the family title of marquis de Laval led him to attend the court at Versailles. He joined the French army, but fled to England as an émigré during the French Revolution. Back in France after 1800, he came to prominence following the defeat of Napoleon and the return of the Bourbon monarchy. The reign of Louis XVIII coincided with the return to Spain of Ferdinand VII: both Bourbon kings were re-established on their thrones in May 1814, and in August, Anne Adrien, now known as prince de Montmorency Laval, was appointed ambassador to the Court of Madrid, where he would have arrived while Goya was still working on his heroic paintings of the Second and Third of May 1808, commemorating the Spanish resistance during Napoleon’s occupation and intended for the royal palace. The situation was initially complicated by Napoleon’s return to Paris from Elba, but the French ambassador decided to remain in Madrid during this difficult period, and in February 1816 he was richly rewarded by Ferdinand VII who conferred on him the title of duque de San Fernando Luis with the rank of Spanish grandee, and the Order of the Golden Fleece.

Though cleared of collaboration with the Bonaparte régime, Goya was forced to abandon all hope of publishing his etchings of the horrors of the recent war. He embarked instead on a new and publicly acceptable project to illustrate the origins, development and contemporary state of the art of bullfighting-in effect, ‘popular’ subject matter. The set of thirty-three prints was advertised for sale in October and December 1816, by which time the French ambassador had been resident in Madrid for two years. The new duque de San Fernando Luis may have purchased this fine, early set of the bullfight prints or received them as a gift from the crown. He remained in place in Spain until 1823 and went on to other ambassadorial posts in Rome and Austria, and at the Court of St James in London. His career ended with the revolution of July 1830, and his refusal to swear allegiance to Louis-Philippe d’Orléans who succeeded as king of France. In 1831 he acquired the château de Montigny, where he built a major extension for the display and enjoyment of the many acquisitions made in the course of his diplomatic career. On his death in 1837, all his properties were inherited by his daughter and her husband, Athanase de Lévis, marquis de Mirepoix, who assumed the family titles including that of second duque de San Fernando Luis. It is his name and Paris address that are inscribed in the register, probably in connection with the mounting of the Bellangé and Goya prints in the volume which was placed in the library at Montigny.

[ITHACA, NY] National Book Auctions, located in Ithaca, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog.  

This catalog features rare, antique and decorative books as well as select additions of artwork and ephemera. We will offer another session of books and ephemera from a large estate Civil War collection being sold through National Book Auctions and Worth Auctions over the coming months.          

Antique and rare books in this catalog include numerous titles. Among the earliest examples are a paired binding of works by Lycosthenes and Wolffhart, "Apophthegmata ex Probatis Graecae Latinae'que Linguae Scriptoribus" and "Parabolarum siue Smiiltudinum," produced in 1602, the 1693 printing of Temple's "Observations upon the United Provinces of the Netherlands," and the 1762 first edition of Rousseau's "Emile ou de l'Education," Additional rare pieces include Cibot and Guignes' "Lettre de Pekin sur le Genie de la Langue Chinoise," comparing Egyptian hieroglyphics to Chinese characters, published in 1773 with plates, the 1610 printing of David's "Duodecim Specula Deum," and Basnage's "Annales des Provinces Unies," printed in two folio volumes in 1726.                      

Several pleasing collections will also be showcased. Highlighted is a substantial collection of volumes relating to the use of emblems, dating from the 17th century and led by examples such as Reinzer's "Meteorologia Philosophico-Politica," published in 1709, and the 1631 printing of Hugo and Bolswert's "Pia Desideria Lib III ad Urbanum VIII." Civil War-related works include the 1864 printing of "The Fort Pillow Massacre," and Cooper's "In and out of Rebel Prisons." Vintage and antique tomes also include subject areas such as travel & exploration, the American West, the American Revolution, Native American Indians, music & art, history of New York City & State, and medicine.   

Found throughout this catalog are interesting art and ephemera offerings. Ephemera includes a fine selection of Civil War-related items such as a signed carte-de-visite of General Philip H. Sheridan, an original 1864 ferrotype Lincoln campaign pin, Confederate state loan certificates with coupons and original signatures, and much more. Additional ephemera and art lots include original works, photographs, stereoviews, original Life magazine issues (including the first issue from 1936 with the Margaret Bourke-White front cover), rare prints of photogravure works by Yousuf Karsh, original issues of "Derriere le Miroir" with the original lithographs retained, maps, antique magazines, and other items.   

National Book Auctions is a public auction service specializing in books, ephemera, and art. National Book Auctions is a targeted service offering experience and expertise unique to marketing antique and modern books and ephemera for consignors and collectors alike. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of collectible, signed, and first edition books. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-269-0101 or email mail@nationalbookauctions.com.

 

 

124-Oraciones copy.jpgNew York— On Thursday, March 9, Swann Galleries offered a morning auction of Early Printed, Medical, Scientific & Travel Books, with examples from each section of the sale represented in the top 20 lots.

A leaf of the Gutenberg Bible, 1455, topped the sale. The remnant of the first book ever printed was hinged in a 1921 folio of A Noble Fragment; being, A Leaf of the Gutenberg Bible by A. Edward Newton. The leaf contains the text of Ecclesiasticus 16:14-18-29; it was purchased by a collector for $52,500*. Tobias Abeloff, the Senior Specialist for Early Printed Books at Swann, noted “While individual leaves from the Gutenberg Bible come to auction with some regularity, they are still sought after, considering the unlikelihood of a complete or even fragmentary copy coming on the market."

Nearly all of the offered bibles sold, including the first edition of the Geneva Bible, the most popular bible in Elizabethan England, which was printed in 1560; it sold for $22,500. The first English-language edition of Hans Holbein’s The Images of the Old Testament, 1549, with 94 woodcut illustrations by the artist, sold for $11,875.

Premier examples of English printing included a run of first editions by David Hume, led by Philosophical Essays Concerning Human Understanding, 1748, which brought $4,500, and the 1751 An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals, which was purchased for $4,000, double its high estimate.

From the Medical and Scientific sections of the sale came an archive of 21 letters from Harvey Cushing to Agnes Willard Bartlett, the great-niece of Elisha Bartlett, which was purchased for $13,750. Expositio super Antidotario Mesue, 1488, by Christophorus Georgius de Honestis, the second edition of a late 14th-century commentary on the Antidotarium ascribed to the Baghdad court physician Mesuë the Younger, tripled its high estimate to sell for $15,000.

The sale featured a strong selection of travel books, led by Jan Nieuhoff et al’s narratives of the Dutch East India Company’s missions to China, titled An Embassy from the East-India Company of the United Provinces, to the Grand Tartar Cham, Emperour of China, 1671, which sold for $7,500.

Each of the eight offered manuscripts found buyers, with the highlight being a collection of 15 illustrated prayers by Charles V of Spain, titled Oraciones de los SS. Mysterios Gloriosos y Dolorosos de la Santissima Virgen Maria, 1676, which was purchased for $9,375.

The next sale of Early Printed Books at Swann Galleries will be held in Fall 2017. For more information, contact Tobias Abeloff at tabeloff@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 124 Oraciones de los SS. Mysterios Gloriosos, manuscript in Spanish on vellum, with 15 engravings of gospel scenes, Brussels, 1676. Sold March 9, 2017 for $9,375. (Pre-sale estimate: $3,000 to $5,000)

McM.jpegNEW YORK (March 9, 2017) — Collectors pounced on a pair of historic typewriters author Larry McMurtry used to write Lonesome Dove for $37,500 Wednesday, March 8, 2017 at a $1.8+ million public auction of rare books held by Heritage Auctions. The novel was a genre-defining opus and reinvigorated the western literature scene.

The Swiss-made Hermes 3000 is one of the world's finest typewriter models and the instrument of choice for thousands of writers. It was introduced in 1958 and was noted for its simplicity and ease of maintenance. The pair on offer is dated between 1963 and 1970 with pale green bodies and keys. Each has its original case and exhibits only light scuffs and handling marks. McMurtry stationed one at his home in Archer City, Texas, and the other in Washington, D.C., while writing Lonesome Dove. McMurtry still uses a Hermes 3000, writing five pages every day to avoid "the empty well."

Lonesome Dove follows a pair of Texas Rangers in a 1,500-mile cattle drive in the Old West. The 843-page epic was an instant success, earning McMurtry the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. CBS adapted the story into a miniseries starring Robert Duvall three years later. More than 28 million people watched the miniseries, which won seven Emmys. 

The auction rounded out with Neal Cassady's THE JOAN ANDERSON LETTER to Jack Kerouac selling for $206,250; Kerouac's original typescript for The Dharma Bums selling for $137,500; and Thomas Jefferson's own copy of The Laws of the United States of America, which sold for $156,250.

RANKLIN, Mass. - A pair of drawings on white paper by the renowned Russian-born French artist Marc Chagall (1887-1985) combined for over $25,000 in an online-only fine art auction held February 22nd by The Woodshed Gallery, based in Franklin. The sale featured nearly 200 prints and drawings by Old and Modern Masters representing four centuries of artwork on paper.

The Chagalls were the top two selling lots of the auction. Village Berger Descending (aka Dream of the Dance), a sanguine figural drawing on white Arches paper, sold for $16,250, while another drawing, titled Violinist and Family, unframed and on white paper, finished at $9,600. Both were done in the poetic and figurative style that made Chagall one of the most popular modern artists.

Both drawings were previously owned by the Ashkenazy Gallery in Los Angeles. A flood in 1990 resulted in a large portion of the gallery’s inventory to be compensated by its insurer and subsequently sold on the secondary market. The drawings were never appraised by a third party but the gallery was paid for the damaged inventory. Neither Chagall suffered any flood damage.

Nearly 700 registered bidders participated in the auction via the platforms LiveAuctioneers.com and Invaluable.com. Bidding traffic was also driven through The Woodshed Gallery website, at www.woodshedgallery.com. “The Chagalls marked an increase in the quality of our offerings and in our ability to attract better consignments,” said Bruce Wood of The Woodshed Gallery. 

Following are additional highlights from the auction. All prices quoted include a 25 percent buyer’s premium.

An ink drawing on toned paper by Man Ray (Am., 1890-1976, born Emmanuel Radnitzky), titled Female Nude on a Bridge, signed and dated 1917, gaveled for $1,800; while a much later Man Ray work, an ink drawing on tan paper with abstract watercolor underpainting titled Female Figure, signed and dated 1951, brought $9,375. Both had identical estimates of $8,000-$12,000.

A blue ink drawing with water wash on heavy art paper, signed by Jean Cocteau (Fr., 1889-1963), and titled Mermaids, with just a few light handling marks its only flaw, went for $720. Also, an ink drawing on heavy-weight tan art paper by Fernand Leger (Fr., 1881-1955), titled Group of Women, signed (“F.L.”) and dated (1951), went to a determined bidder for $1,875.

A pair of male nude sculptures, unsigned but by a follower of Auguste Rodin, each one 11 ¼ inches tall, sold as one lot for $1,750. They might not have brought nearly as much without the connection to Rodin (Fr., 1840-1917), widely regarded as the progenitor of modern sculpture. His iconic work The Thinker remains one of the most recognizable works of art ever produced.

An ink on white bond paper drawing by the one and only Dr.Seuss (Am., born Theodor Seuss Geisel, 1904-1991), depicting a scene from his classic children’s book Green Eggs and Ham, signed by the artist, realized $480. The same amount was the winning bid for a drawing by Dr. Seuss of the classic book character The Cat in the Hat, signed, with “Best wishes, Dr. Seuss.”

A signed drawing by Hans Erni (Swiss, 1909-2015), titled Minotaur, newly matted and housed in a 33 inch by 23 inch frame, in good condition, rose to $500; while a mixed media work by Cy Twombly (1928-2011), titled Abstract Floral, signed, hit $2,250. Also, a personal note of thanks written in blue ink on buff paper by President John F. Kennedy, unframed, topped out at $375.

The Woodshed’s next big online-only auction is scheduled for Wednesday, March 29th. Already consigned are an original drawing by Vincent Van Gogh, with a minimum bid of $20,000; several interesting pieces by South American artists; two circa 1930s French posters from Noveltex; a Rodolfo Morales collage; and three portraits by Chicago’s very own Lee Godie.

The Woodshed Gallery is a family-owned art gallery specializing in oil painting restoration, art auctions and custom picture framing. The firm holds online and live auctions and is always accepting quality artworks for future auctions. To inquire about consigning a single piece or a collection, call Bruce Wood at (508) 533-6277; or, e-mail him at bruce@woodshedgallery.com

To learn more about The Woodshed Gallery and the online-only auction on March 29th, please visit www.woodshedgallery.com. Updates are posted often.

551-Chagall copy.jpgNew York— On Thursday, March 2, Swann Galleries’ sale of 19th & 20th Century Prints & Drawings exceeded $3M and broke ten auction records. The house, which is celebrating it diamond anniversary this year, has enjoyed several record-breaking sales already in their spring 2017 season.

The rare deluxe edition of Marc Chagall’s 1948 portfolio Four Tales from the Arabian Nights, of which only 11 were printed, topped the sale. The set belonged to the publisher of Pantheon Books, Kurt Wolff. The vibrant color lithographs include the 13th plate denoting the deluxe edition; still in the original case, the set sold to a collector for $269,000*.

Early twentieth-century American prints saw competitive bidding and high prices. Edward Hopper’s rare 1921 etching Evening Wind sold for $149,000, nearly doubling its high estimate of $80,000. The American master was also represented in the sale by the 1921 etching Night Shadows, which went for $33,800. A premiere selection of prints by Hopper’s mentor Martin Lewis was led by the extremely rare aquatint Which Way?, 1932, which was purchased for $42,500, a record for the work. Further highlights by Lewis included the 1929 drypoint Bay Windows and 1916’s etching The Orator, Madison Square, each of which went for $27,500. 

Another highlight of the sale was Männlicher Akt (Selbstbildnis I), 1912, Egon Schiele’s first attempt at a printed self-portrait; the work brought $30,000. A 1914 drypoint by the artist, Kümmernis, was purchased for $15,000.

Orologi Molli, a watercolor by Salvador Dalí featuring one of his famous melting clocks, surpassed its high estimate to sell for $112,500. Another original, a pen and ink drawing by Paul Klee of prancing bulls, titled Drama in der Kuhwelt, 1915, reached $25,000. 

All four offered works by Mary Cassatt found buyers, including the rare circa-1902 drypoint Crocheting Lessons, which sold for $27,500. Another Cassatt, the color drypoint and soft-ground etching The Coiffure, circa 1891, broke its previous auction record to sell for $81,250.

Etchings made by James A.M. Whistler during a 1879-80 trip to Venice performed well, including the luminous Upright Venice, at $70,000. Two further prints from the same period each broke their previous auction records: The Garden reached $70,000, while San Biagio sold for $62,500.

The complete set of 14 lithographs in Henri Toulouse-Lautrec’s Mélodies de Désiré Dihau, 1895, was sold for $30,000, a record for the work. The set was previously in the collection of Eric Carlson.

Todd Weyman, Director of Prints & Drawings, said of the sale, “This has been one of our strongest sales to date in terms of bidder registration. We are pleased with the continued growth in our dynamic market.”

The next sale of Prints & Drawings at Swann Galleries will be Old Master Through Modern Prints on May 2, 2017. For more information, contact Todd Weyman at tweyman@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 551 Marc Chagall, Four Tales from the Arabian Nights, complete deluxe portfolio with 13 color lithographs, 1948. Sold March 2, 2017 for $269,000. (Pre-sale estimate: $250,000 to $350,000)

 

Dingwall Library.jpgThe Library of the Late Hubert Dingwall, featuring rare and historic books collected by Hubert Dingwall over 70 years, will be the first collection to go under the hammer at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions’ new London premises which will open in Pall Mall this April.  The Library includes over 1,500 books and ranges in estimate from £100 - £15,000.  The auction takes place on Thursday, 27 April 2017 with a preview brunch on Sunday, 23 April, timed to coincide with the anniversary of the death of two literary legends: Miguel de Cervantes and William Shakespeare. 

Hubert Dingwall’s (1912 - 2001) passion for serious book collecting started when he was in his early 20s, soon after he graduated from Oxford.  From the early 1930s he enjoyed trawling the many booksellers’ barrows in the Charing Cross Road for bargains, although later he established a close relationship with the revered bookseller Maggs Bros. Ltd, whose professionalism he always admired. 

Through his sister Winifred, he met Patricia (Patsy) Harrison on holiday in Donegal; they married in 1946.  The couple lived first in Finchley, north London, and then, from 1951, in Wimbledon. Here, they had books in every room, except the kitchen and bathroom, and the house also boasted two large cellar rooms that were soon fitted up with library-style shelves, lighting and background heating to accommodate Hubert’s ever-growing collection.

Hubert Dingwall commented, “I well remember the first book I bought once the bug had bitten me: It was in 1935, a vellum-bound copy of the Second Part of Don Quixote printed in Spanish in Antwerp in 1697. It cost me 1s 6d! This was, of course, far from being contemporaneous with Cervantes, who died in 1616, but at least it was the right century. You will realise how green a collector I was ... that I felt confident I should come across the First Part in next to no time”. 

Hubert Dingwall’s continued interest in Cervantes and the tale of the illustrious and victorious knight Don Quixote is the subject of one of the key highlights of the auction. Cervantes Saavedra (Miguel de) El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quixote de la Mancha, 1780 is the first Spanish Royal Academy edition, 4 vol. and is estimated at £10,000 - £15,000 (pictured). The four volumes are handsomely bound in Spanish paneled calf probably by the contemporary Madrid binder Antonio de Sancha. 

The collection also contains an important section of 'emblemata', books pictorially depicting morals, axioms and fables, including a copy of Horatius Flaccus Emblemata (pictured) printed in 1612 and translated by the Dutch poet Jan van der Veen (1578-1659). The book features 103 engraved plates of emblems and is estimated at £350 - £450. Spiegel van den Ouden ende Nieuwen Tijdt, 1633 or Mirror of the Old and the New Times is by the Dutch poet, humourist and politician, Jacob Cats (1577-1660). This emblem book is one of his most famous and is presented as 4 parts in one with 79 engraved emblems (est. £500 - £700). Cats also acted as a political envoy and in 1627 came to England on a mission with Charles I, who later made him a knight. His home, situated near The Hague, is now the official residence of the Dutch Prime Minister named ‘Catshuis.’ 

The Emblamata Amatoria, 1682 by Vaenius or Otto van Veen (c.1556-1629) comprises 44 full-page engraved emblems and is expected to realise between £600 - £800 (pictured). Vaenius was primarily active in Antwerp from c. 1594-1598 and a teacher of Rubens. He was renowned for featuring putti that enacted the mottoes and quotations from lyricists, philosophers and ancient writers on the power of love. 

Charles Dickens is represented by a deluxe and illustrated edition of A Christmas Carol, 1915. Illustrated by Arthur Rackham this version is one of 500 signed deluxe editions and features many of Rackham’s best known illustrations. The work is estimated at £800 - £1,200. 

The 20th century is represented by a volume of Aesop’s fables published in 1932 by the Gregynog Press - a philanthropic venture started by two sisters in the early 1900s. The book is illustrated with engravings on wood by engraver and illustrator Agnes Miller Parker (1895-1980). Titled, The Fables of Esope, 1932, the bound book is one of 25 specially bound copies (est. £2,000 - £3,000). 

“I have remained to a great extent an accumulator. I think this is because I derive pleasure from so many different aspects of books. It is my hope that [I] give those of you who have not been bitten by the bibliomania bug an inkling of what interest is inherent in books above and beyond the reading matter they contain”. Hubert Dingwall. 

The auction will take place in St James’s, London. Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions and the prestigious, long standing dealers Mallett will open new premises in Pall Mall creating a bespoke dual purpose auction and retail space. Situated over two floors, the building is not only in the heart of London’s celebrated Club land, but is flanked by the National Gallery and St James’s Palace and joins several well-established galleries. 

Auction location: 16-17 Pall Mall, St James’s, London SW1Y 5LU 

Image: L-R: Rackham (Arthur).-Dickens (Charles) A Christmas Carol, 1915, One of 500 signed deluxe copies, est.£800-1,200, Hubert Dingwall, Gregynog Press.-Aesop. The Fables of Esope, 1932, One of 25 specially bound copies, est. £2,000-3,000

 

Screen Shot 2017-03-06 at 8.49.28 AM.pngMARCH 2017 - Collectors will have the opportunity to acquire their own piece of political and cultural history in April, when over 130 drawings by the foremost caricaturist and cartoonist of our age, Gerald Scarfe (b. 1936), will be offered for sale at Sotheby’s in London.

Continuing a tradition of uncompromising satire dating back to Hogarth and Gillray, Scarfe has pushed the boundaries of caricature for more than five decades, delivering provocative portraits of the foremost politicians and statesmen of our age, from Winston Churchill to Theresa May. Together, they tell the history of over half a century of political intrigue and seismic change.

Scarfe’s no-holds-barred approach in his contributions for Private Eye and The New Yorker, and as The Sunday Times’ political cartoonist for more than 50 years, has secured him a place on the list of the most 40 important newspaper journalists of the modern era. 

While many of the drawings included in the auction have been published, a number of works included in the sale are unseen, revealing the most private views of the artist.

Gerald Scarfe said: “I feel it’s the duty of an artist to re-interpret the world and to freshen our stale vision, making us see what we hadn’t realised was there. What I’m trying to do is simply to bring out their essential characteristics. I find a particular delight in taking the caricature as far as I can.

I have always drawn, ever since I could hold a pencil. As a young child I was a chronic asthmatic and spent long periods bedridden either at home or in hospital and I drew. Drawing became my way of communicating. It became my way of exorcising my fears, and that still applies today.

My drawings are of course very personal acts made in the privacy of my own home, but when they leave my hands they escape into hundreds of thousands of copies and may be seen by millions of people. I don’t think about that when I make the drawing - it’s just between my imagination and that piece of paper - but if a drawing is particularly ferocious or overtly sexual and someone looks at it in my presence I have to admit to sometimes feeling shy; I feel so personally about it it’s almost like undressing in public. To me these are not only drawings, they are memories, and mark particular moments in my life.”

The royal family and countless celebrities have not escaped Scarfe’s pen, with portraits of the Queen, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, David Beckham and Mick Jagger accompanying over 70 political caricatures in this sale.

The star lot is a historic drawing of Winston Churchill showing the elderly statesman’s final appearance in the House of Commons in 1964. Scarfe had been commissioned by The Times to record the occasion, but his image was deemed too controversial to publish. In the artist’s own words ‘ ...T h e Times refused to print my drawing, saying that Churchill’s wife, Clementine, would be upset when the paper dropped through the letter-box in the morning.’ Less than six months later Churchill was dead, and the image appeared on Private Eye’s cover. Until recently, the drawing has been on exhibition at Portcullis House, House of Commons.

There are also examples of Gerald Scarfe’s film work for Disney’s Hercules, for which he was the external design consultant, and for Pink Floyd the Wall - a project that Scarfe happened upon by chance when members of the band saw his work on television and decided “We’ve got to work with this guy, he’s f***ing mad”. Their long-term, highly-acclaimed collaboration on stage shows, album and subsequent film continues to the present day. 

Finally, the sale also reveals Scarfe’s theatre work. A serendipitous meeting with director Sir Peter Hall led to an invitation for him to work on a musical, two West End farces and a production of The Magic Flute for Los Angeles opera. Works showing illustrations for The Nutcracker, Fantastic Mr Fox and The Magic Flute are all included in the sale.

Dr Philip W. Errington, Sotheby’s Specialist in Books and Manuscripts said: “Over the past months, spent working alongside Gerald preparing for this sale, I’ve been struck by his consummate skill and artistry. Sometimes he treats his subjects with gentle amusement, at other times he presents a full-blown, biting critique. These drawingspack a significant punch. The works selected range from Disney to Pink Floyd, from Thatcher to May, Reagan to Obama, and Yes Minister to The Magic Flute. There is truly an eclectic mix, spanning his entire half-century career. The sharp, steel-nib of our greatest living caricaturist demonstrates time and time again his pedigree with Hogarth, Cruikshank and Gillray.”

Kestenbaum & Company will be featuring Isidor Kaufmann’s painting entitled “A Young Jewish Bride” (lot 1) in their upcoming auction of Fine Judaica to be held on Thursday, March 16th. The subject of a Jewish woman is one that was seldom created by Kaufmann, making this particular artwork most desirable. The painting has been exhibited over the years at both The Israel Museum and at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art. It was acquired decades ago directly from Philipp Kaufmann, son of the artist, and has now been consigned to Kestenbaum for auction by descendants of the original owner. 

Estimated at $200,000-300,000, the painting is accompanied by a detailed letter of provenance written by Philipp Kaufmann (London, 1964). Another Isidor Kaufmann painting, “Hasid at Prayer” is offered as lot 2. This fine portrait has never before appeared at auction, nor has it ever been publicly exhibited. The pre-auction estimate is $60,000-80,000.

Further Fine Art offerings in the auction include works by such noted artists as Samuel Hirszenberg, Mane-Katz, Lajos Kolozsvary, Artur Markowicz, Leopold Pilichowski, Ze’ev Raban, Issachar Ber Ryback, Hermann Struck and Roman Vishniac.

The Printed Books section of the sale commences with a selection of American Judaica:

  • A rare, complete set of Isaac Leeser’s Discourses on the Jewish Religion, collected sermons of this pioneer of American Orthodoxy, Philadelphia, 1856-67 Estimate: $10,000-15,000 (Lot 35)
  • Seder HaTephiloth, the first Hebrew prayer-book printed in America, New York, 1826. Estimate: $6,000-9,000 (Lot 31)
  • A Historical Souvenir Journal for Yeshiva College Building Fund, Madison Square Garden, NY, 1926. Estimate: $600-900 (Lot 42)

Important Hebrew Printed Book highlights include:

  • A complete, wide-margined copy of Solomon ibn Gabirol’s Mivchar HaPeninim, Soncino, 1484. Estimate: $50,000-60,000 (Lot 139)
  • Schneur Zalman of Liadi’s Sepher Likutei Amarim [“Tanya”], Shklov, 1806. Estimate: $15,000-18,000 (Lot 76)
  • The first edition of Isaiah ben Abraham Halevi Horowitz’s Shnei Luchoth HaBrith, Amsterdam, 1648-49. Estimate: $10,000-15,000 (Lot 134)
  • The first edition of the Kabbalistic Sepher Yetzirah, Mantua, 1562. Estimate: $18,000-22,000 (Lot 153)
  • The very first Hebrew prayer-book printed in Switzerland, Seder Tefilloth MiKol HaShanah KeMinhag Kehiloth Ashkenazim, Basle, 1579. Estimate: $15,000-25,000 (Lot 168)

Further noteworthy Printed Books in other languages:

  • An uncut and unopened copy of the Polyglot Psalter, the second book printed in Arabic and the only book printed in Genoa, Italy, in the first quarter of the 16th century. Estimate: $12,000-18,000 (Lot 64)
  • Isaac Cardoso’s Las Excelencias de los Hebreos, the first edition of this masterpiece of Jewish apologetics, Amsterdam, 1679. Estimate: $6,000-9,000 (Lot 75)
  • The first edition of Joseph Gikatilla’s Portae Lucia, the work that opened the portal of Kabbalah to Christian Hebraists, Augsburg, 1516. Estimate: $4,000-6,000 (Lot 154)
  • The first Hebrew edition of the Koran, Leipzig, 1857. Estimate: $2,000-3,000 (Lot 142)

Prominent among Holocaust-related lots:

  • An original Safe Conduct Pass issued and signed by Japanese diplomat Chiune Sugihara and Dutch diplomat Jan Zwartendijk bearing visas for a Jew to escape from Lithuania during World War II, Kaunas, 1940. Estimate: $10,000-15,000 (Lot 118)
  • A Swedish Protective Passport issued to a Hungarian Jew by Raoul Wallenberg, Budapest, 1944. Estimate $6,000-9,000 (Lot 123)
  • Four scarce Bank of England counterfeit Sterling bills forged by Jewish concentration camp prisoners, under Operation Bernhard, Germany, 1943. Estimate: $4,000-6,000 (Lot 119)

Autograph Letters Highlights:

  • An extraordinary and voluminous world-wide study on anti-Semitism, created by the Holocaust survivor and prominent Argentinean reparation lawyer, José Moskovits. Included are circa 1,000 autograph letters signed by noted religious authorities, politicians, academics, artists, corporate leaders, writers, journalists and other notables from around the globe who answered Mr. Moskovits’ survey concerning anti-Semitism, 1974-78. Estimate: $20,000-25,000 (Lot 226)
  • A collection of c. 63 autograph letters signed by the Lubavitcher Rebbe, R. Yosef Yitzchak Schneerson and his sons-in-law, Brooklyn, NY 1943-51. Estimate: $20,000-25,000 (Lot 261)
  • A collection of 19 fascinating autograph letters signed relating to the bitter divisions which arose within the ultra-Orthodox world surrounding the marriage of Rabbi Amram Blau, leader of the Neturei Karta sect, and Ruth Ben-David, the divorced, French covert to Judaism, 1965-66. Estimate: 8,000-12,000 (Lot 234)
  • An autograph letter by R. Mordechai Banet, a responsa concerning milk sold to a Gentile on Passover, Nikolsburg, 1794. Estimate: $8,000-10,000 (Lot 228)
  • A letter signed by R. Yechezkel Shraga Halberstam of Shinova (The Shinaver Rav), 1896. Estimate: $10,000-15,000 (Lot 244)
  • A group of 11 autograph letters signed by Marc Chagall, all written in Yiddish to David Giladi, Vence, 1970’s. Estimate: $4,000-6,000 (Lot 235)
  • A presentation copy of Torath HaNazir warmly inscribed and signed by the author, R. Yitzchak Hutner, Kovno, 1932. Estimate $1,000-1,500 (Lot 136)
  • A Western Union Telegram containing a New Years greeting sent by Prime Minister Menachem Begin to Rabbi Moshe Feinstein, 1981. Estimate: $3,000-5,000 (Lot 63)

Manuscripts of interest include:

  • Regulations of the Frankfurt Bikur Cholim Society, Hebrew manuscript on vellum, with more than 250 autograph signatures of several generations of society members, Frankfurt, 1760. Estimate: $8,000-12,000 (Lot 240)
  • An illuminated marriage contract on vellum from Split, Croatia, 1836. Estimate: $4,000-6,000 (Lot 251)
  • An illuminated marriage contract from Calcutta, 1892, linking three exotic communities: India, Burma and Java (Indonesia). Estimate: $4,000-6,000 (Lot 252)
  • A finely composed 18th century Ethiopic Psalter, written in Ge’ez on vellum, and housed in an early leather carrying-case. Estimate: $1,000-2,000 (Lot 239)

Rounding out the auction are Holy Land Maps mostly from the Collection of Nathan Lewin, Esq., including:

  • Ptolemy’s Tabula Terre Sanctae, Lyon, 1535. Estimate: $5,000-7,000 (Lot 268)
  • Joann Simonis’s renowned “Grapevine Map” of the Holy Land, a hand-colored copy, Halle, 1741. Estimate: 6,000-9,000 (Lot 144)
  • Heinrich Buenting’s celebrated “Clover Leaf Map”, Magdeburg, 1581. Estimate: $4,000-6,000 (Lot 271)

The auction will take place on Thursday, March 16th at 3:00 pm in our gallery located at 242 West 30th Street in New York City. The exhibition will be held from Monday, March 13th through Wednesday, March 15th. For further information, to request images, or for any other queries please contact Ms. Jackie Insel: (Tel) 212.366.1197 or at jackie@kestenbaum.net

efb95a3ecb12d1d9488348b9dc6db1696d3c3c9a.jpegBOSTON, MA - (March 1, 17)  A fragment from Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s manuscript for the third movement, ‘Allegro,’ of his Serenade in D Major will be auctioned by Boston-based RR Auction. 

The one-page handwritten musical manuscript, on both sides, is unsigned, no date but circa 1773. 

Also known as ‘Antretter,’ the manuscript contains thirteen precisely penned measures in an eight-staff system, scored for an orchestra of two oboes, two horns, strings, and solo violin. 

The music contained herein constitutes an ebullient rondo designed to show off the virtuosity of the solo violinist, and was likely played by Mozart himself. 

The sheet bears pagination number “34” and foliation number “79” in pencil, both possibly in the hand of Leopold Mozart. Catalogued as K185, Mozart’s manuscript for the score of this serenade was originally 58 leaves, of which the present leaf was 34.

The complete manuscript was offered at auction in 1975 by J. A. Stargardt and subsequently split up; the location of many of its leaves are today unknown, although some are preserved at the Mozart Foundation in Salzburg.

It is believed that the 17-year-old Mozart composed this serenade in August 1773 as a congratulatory piece to celebrate the graduation of a family friend, Thadda Simon Antretter, from the University of Salzburg with a degree in logic. He invokes the pompous effects of academic ceremonies infused with jubilation to drive the music, concluding with a marvelous finale ending in a gigue. It is an important symphonic movement in sonata form characteristic of Mozart’s great works, weaving together brilliant modulations and refined phrases which he, as always, brings to a perfect resolution. Mozart, employed as a concert violinist in Salzburg at the time he composed the ‘Antretter Serenade,’ included three flowing violin solos which demonstrate his mastery of the instrument. 

“From the hand of the young prodigy Wolfgang Amadeus, this is an exceedingly desirable piece and represents a cornerstone of any collection,” said Robert Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction.

Also featured; a rare Nicolo Paganini letter from April 26, 1831, during his first Paris tour, a significant moment in Paganini's legendary career.

The Fine Autographs and Artifacts Auction from RR Auction began on February 17 and will conclude on March 8. More details can be found online at www.rrauction.com

spider copy.jpgDALLAS, Texas (March 1, 2017) -  Iconic and rare comic books and original art sold for $6,332,633 at Heritage Auctions Feb. 23-25, with the first appearance of Spider-Man and art by Frank Frazetta and Robert Crumb selling for $155,350 each.

“The auction exceeded our estimates by more than $1.2 million,” said Barry Sandoval, Director of Comics Operations at Heritage Auctions. “The market is red hot.”

A high-grade copy of Amazing Fantasy #15 (Marvel, 1962), CGC VF+ 8.5, sold for $155,350 during the first day of the sale. It was followed by Frank Frazetta’s oil painting Thor’s Flight, published on the cover of the paperback edition of Thongor in the City of Magicians by Lin Carter, which also sold for $155,350. Likewise a four-page complete story of original art by Underground Comix master Robert Crumb, closed at $155,350.                                  

Batman fans had much to choose from as the first edition of Batman, CGC VG- 3.5, sold for $143,400 and a copy of Detective Comics #35, CGC VF- 7.5, sold for $119,500.

Several important collections performed well, as the Ethan Roberts Estate Collection of comics and comic art sold for a combined $1.2 million, as artist Alex Raymond’s original art for a Flash Gordon comic strip dated Oct. 27, 1935 sold for $131,450. The collection featured two important examples of original cover art by genre masters Bernie Wrightson, as his cover art for Swamp Thing #6 sold for $58,555 and the original cover art for The Amazing Spider-Man #259 sold for $33,460.

A small selection from the landmark collection of American cartoonist Richard Felton Outcault - considered by historians as the father of the American comic strip - realized more than $100,000 led by a Buster Brown Sunday comic strip original art dated Oct. 29, 1916, which sold for $35,850.

 Additional highlights include, but are not limited to:

From the Roberts Estate Collection, Alex Raymond Flash Gordon with Jungle Jim Topper Sunday Comic Strip Original Art dated Nov. 12, 1939: realized $95,600.

Ken Bald (attributed) Captain America Comics #68 Cover Original Art (Timely, 1948): realized $77,675.

Bill Watterson Calvin and Hobbes Daily Comic Strip Original Art dated April, 28, 1986 (Universal Press Syndicate, 1986): realized $71,700.

Hit Comics #5, Mile High Pedigree (Quality, 1940), CGC NM+ 9.6,: realized $59,750.

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos. Reproduction rights routinely granted to media for photo credit.

For breaking stories follow us: HA.com/Facebook and HA.com/Twitter. For prior press releases: HA.com/PR. Link to this release on your blog or website.

258-Addams copy.jpgNew York— On Tuesday, March 21, Swann Galleries will hold an auction of Illustration Art, featuring original works of art intended for publication.

A run of original illustrations for the popular Babar series includes the top lot of the sale—the ink and watercolor design for the cover for the third book, Le Roi Babar, 1933, by Jean de Brunhoff, is estimated to sell between $20,000 and $30,000. Further beloved children’s characters include an illustration for Ludwig Bemelmans’s 1956 Madeline and the Bad Hat, titled “He said - ‘Let’s play a game of tag’ and let a cat out of the bag,” valued at $7,000 to $10,000. The sale will also offer works by Maurice Sendak, as well as several storyboard illustrations from Walt Disney Studios, including Ben Ali Gator and Hyacinth Hippo waltzing the Dance of the Hours for the 1940 classic Fantasia, estimated at $800 to $1,200.

Also available are several original drawings by Dr. Seuss (aka Theodore Geisel), led by A Gentle Sport, Forsooth, a charming ink, watercolor and wash dragon first published in Judge Magazine’s April 1929 issue, and a 1930s cartoon for Life magazine titled The Skier and the Walrus (each $8,000 to $12,000).

The largest selection of works by Edward Gorey ever to come to market showcases 12 works by the beloved master of the macabre. The cover for a circa-1950 unrealized work titled The Worsted Monster is valued between $8,000 and $12,000. Additionally, there are costume and set designs, as well as numerous sketches and published illustrations for book covers, which include Chance, a Novel by Joseph Conrad and Cobweb Castle ($3,500 to $5,000 and $6,000 to $9,000, respectively).

Two Peanuts strips by Charles M. Schulz include an early work, titled Here comes the big Polar Bear stalking across the snow!, 1957, featuring Snoopy and Charlie Brown, as well as Mister Sensitive, 1974, depicting Snoopy and Lucy (each $6,000 to $9,000).

One staple of Swann Galleries’ Illustration Art auctions is a robust section of cartoons and covers for The New Yorker. This spring’s selection includes original works by Peter Arno, Charles Barsotti, Ilonka Karasz, Saul Steinberg, Tom Toro and Gahan Wilson, from as early as 1933 to as recently as 2016. Charles Addams is represented by Z Line Subway, a 1979 cartoon into which he snuck Uncle Fester, Wednesday and Grandmama from The Addams Family ($6,000 to $9,000).

In addition to the previously mentioned work by Charles Addams, the sale boasts new-to-market works consigned by the Tee & Charles Addams Foundation, including a cartoon depicting the entire Addams Family ($6,000 to $9,000), and a 1957 cover for The New Yorker titled Scuba Galleon, estimated at $8,000 to $12,000.

Early magazine covers by Erté include Sports d’Hiver, which graced the Harper’s Bazaar February 1933 issue, valued here at $8,000 to $12,000. Erté is also represented by several of his original set designs and costumes. There are additional early covers by McLelland Barclay, Umberto Brunelleschi and Georges Lepape.

A raucous selection of pulp is led by Harold von Schmidt’s oil painting to accompany a 1935 story in Cosmopolitan, captioned “But my husband—” Cleone gasped. “He’d kill you!” ($10,000 to $15,000). Further selections include Earl Moran’s pastel A Sweet Job, circa 1940, estimated at $6,000 to $9,000, and the oil on canvas Over My Dead Body, 1932, by Remington Schuyler, which was the cover illustration for West magazine ($3,000 to $4,000).

There is a strong run of original works by Al Hirschfeld featuring three iconic pen and ink caricatures depicting Holly Golightly (Audrey Hepburn) from Breakfast at Tiffany’s, commissioned in 1997 and each valued at $7,000 to $10,000. Hirschfeld is additionally represented by Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands, a gouache painting that was used as the cover for The American Mercury magazine in 1946 ($3,000 to $4,000).

From the nineteenth century come two floral ornaments by Aubrey Beardsley for Le Morte d’Arthur, 1893-94, are led by Spiky Leaves on a Stem ($6,000 to $9,000). A rare pen and ink drawing by the master, Squatting Devil Fishing, for the title page of The Bon-Mots of Sydney Smith and Richard Brinsley Sheridan, 1893, is estimated at $4,000 to $6,000.

The auction will be held Tuesday, March 21, beginning at 1:30 p.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Friday, March 17 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, March 18 from noon to 5 p.m.; Monday, March 20 through Tuesday, March 21, from 10 a.m. to noon.

An illustrated auction catalogue is available for $35 at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information or to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Illustration Art Specialist Christine von der Linn at 212-254-4710, extension 20 or cv@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 258 Charles Addams, Scuba Galleon, watercolor and gouache, cover illustration for The New Yorker, September 1957. Estimate $8,000 to $12,000.

10309a82-88c0-4762-9261-aafa92e17b63.jpg[ITHACA, NY] Worth Auctions, located in Dryden, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog.  

Worth Auctions is pleased to present an extensive and carefully selected group of fine and decorative prints, paintings, and drawings.          

Central to this specialist art sale is a fine array of antique natural history prints by such masters as Audubon, Wolf, Thornton, Smit, Ettingshausen, Redoute, Catesby, and Gould. These include scores of classic ornithological and botanical images as well as compelling renderings of rarer subjects like tigers and buffalo.                     

Modern and contemporary pieces will also be featured, including an early Jim Dine masterpiece; several pastel portraits by Howard L. Munns; and distinctive paintings by First Nation artists Gerda Christofferson, James Allen, and James Marshall Speck that are ex-collection of a major Canadian museum.

Automotive enthusiasts will take great interest in the unique vintage concept drawings by noted designers like Alex Tremulis, Richard Arbib, and William A. Moore, as well as the series of pochoir prints of early race cars by Gamy-Montaut.   

Likewise, sporting fans will enjoy Marco Ceri's oil on copper scenes of Edwardian golfers and polo players.

Also worthy of special mention are a quintet of hand-colored aquatints after Karl Bodmer depicting American Indians; a series of lithographs by David Roberts showing monuments of the Near East; a majestic color lithograph of the Grand Canyon after Thomas Moran; a pair of Western etchings by Edward Borein; and an excellent example of Eugene Delacroix's famous 1865 etching "Juive d'Alger."   

Worth Auctions is a public auction service specializing in estate work and collections.  The company conducts fully cataloged auctions with global bidding activity over three platforms. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of items, from pencils to airplanes. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-330-0358 or email mail@worthauctions.com.

 

 

14487f58-80b2-4b8f-ba86-59e69a0a02d9.jpg[ITHACA, NY] National Book Auctions, located in Ithaca, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog.  

This catalog features rare, antique and decorative books as well as select additions of ephemera. We will offer a second session of books from a large estate library concentrated in Civil War history.  Modern first editions will also be sold, along with an array of early American histories.          

Antique and rare books in this catalog include numerous titles.  Among the earliest examples are the 1676 first English edition of "The Art of Speaking," the 1701 printing of Heynes' "Treatise of Trigonometry," containing folding plates and charts, and Mahon's "Principles of Electricity," produced in 1779.  Additional rare pieces include the 1831 printing of "A Narrative of Military Actions of Colonel Marinus Willett," the decorative 1897 first edition of Mark Twain's "Following the Equator," and the American history staple, "The Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant," produced in two volumes in 1892.                     

Several pleasing collections will also be showcased.  Highlighted is a substantial array of Civil War history volumes from a large private estate library.  We are offering this collection in multiple session and this group includes desirable writings such as the 1863 printing of "The Regulations for the Army of the Confederate States," "Cavalry Tactics," printed in 1864 with folding plates and tactical diagrams, and the two-volume 1862 printing of Gross' "System of Surgery."  An array of important modern first and early printings includes works by Ernest Hemingway, James Joyce and others. Vintage and antique tomes from estate collections also include titles from subject areas such as travel & exploration, history of the American West, colonial and border wars, the American Revolution, Native American Indians, Irish history, slavery, philosophy, music & art, history of New York City & State, and medicine, to name a few.   

Found throughout this catalog are interesting group offerings and ephemera lots. Ephemera offered includes Civil War-related items, antique photographs, maps, antique magazines, rare prints of photogravure works by Yousuf Karsh, and other items.    

National Book Auctions is a public auction service specializing in books, ephemera, and art. National Book Auctions is a targeted service offering experience and expertise unique to marketing antique and modern books and ephemera for consignors and collectors alike. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of collectible, signed, and first edition books. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-269-0101 or email mail@nationalbookauctions.com.

 

 

Screen Shot 2017-02-28 at 10.27.07 AM.pngDALLAS, Texas (Feb. 28, 2017) - Perhaps one of the most impressive of all of the great Universal Studios horror posters, a terrifying, 1933 one sheet teaser poster for The Invisible Man could sell for as much as $80,000 in Heritage Auctions’ Vintage Posters Auction March 25-26 in Dallas.

“Even the most advanced collectors have never seen this poster in person,” said Grey Smith, Director of Vintage Posters at Heritage Auctions. “(Artist) Karoly Grosz does a hauntingly wonderful job capturing the insanity that slowly takes hold of the film’s mad scientist. In only a few instances did, the studio produce a teaser for their horror greats but when they did they were often outstanding.”

Additional posters from Universal Studios’ greatest monsters include a title lobby card for The Bride of Frankenstein (est. $30,000) and a lobby card for the 1935 film Werewolf of London (est. $10,000). 

A rare and stunning Italian four-fogli from the 1953 re-release of Casablanca (est. $30,000) - considered by many collectors to be one of the most beautiful ever made for the film - depicts an elegant, wind-swept Ingrid Bergman set against the backdrop in French Morocco. Likewise, a poster for Columbia’s 1946 film Gilda (est. $20,000) sets heroine Rita Hayworth center stage on this classic film noir Style B one sheet.

Very rare, half sheet posters from classic films such as a Style A depicting five major cast members and two important scenes from the 1939 MGM classic The Wizard of Oz (est. $30,000) is on offer, as is the elusive Style B for The Maltese Falcon, which shows a double-fisted, gun-slinging Humphrey Bogart and the sultry Mary Astor (est. $8,000).

Large-size international paper for La Dolce Vita (est. $18,000); Warner Brothers’ 1935 poster for Bordertown ($12,000) with art by Luigi Martinati; and the 1928 film The Passion of Joan of Arc (est. $12,000) would be at home in the most advanced collections.

Posters from silent films include rarities from 1926’s The Black Pirate, starring Douglas Fairbanks (est. $10,000), and the never before seen large-format poster from The Perils of Pauline from 1914 (est. $10,000).

Additional highlights include, but are not limited to:

The Day the Earth Stood Still (20th Century Fox, 1951): est. $10,000 

This Gun For Hire (Paramount, 1942): est. $10,000.

The Raven (Universal, 1935) Window Card: est. $8,000.

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (RKO, 1937) One Sheet Style B: est. $8,000.

spillane.jpegNEW YORK - The Original Typescript for Mickey Spillane’s I, the Jury (New York: E.P. Dutton & Company, 1947) is expected to headline a large and important collection of items relating to the 20th-century American novelist and actor at Heritage Auctions’ 2017 Rare Books Auction March 8 in New York.

Known best for his detective novels featuring the “Mike Hammer” character, Spillane sold more than 225 million copies of his books internationally; he wrote 46 novels - 13 of which were finished by mystery writer Max Allan Collins after Spillane’s death in 2006 - and 14 short stories. His acting credits included an appearance in the Mike Hammer role, as well as the 1954 movie Ring of Fear in which he played himself.

The typescript for I, the Jury, which carries a pre-auction estimate of $50,000, is Spillane’s copy with pencil marks and editing notations throughout in graphite and red pencil. The first 190 pages have three holes punched on the left margin with reinforcement labels around the holes.

Another Spillane script, the Original Typescript Manuscript and Long Galley of The Big Kill (est. $15,000), was published in New York in 1951, also by E.P. Dutton & Company. The manuscript was for what turned out to be one of four books Spillane published in a single year, preceded by My Gun is Quick, Vengeance is Mine! and One Lonely Night.

Tony Varady’s Original Painting for I, the Jury (est. $7,500), circa 1947, matted to 8-by-10 inches in a frame that measures 15-by-18.75 inches, is accompanied by the first Signet edition hardback and paperback copies of I, the Jury and comes from Spillane’s estate.

Collectors will have a chance to bid on Mickey Spillane’s Royal Manual Typewriter (est. $5,000), circa 1930, is old enough that it is believed possible that he used it when working as a comic book writer for Funnies, Inc. Spillane used a typewriter for his entire career, never making the transition to a computer.

A Group of Spillane’s World War II Relics (est. $3,000), circa 1941-45, includes an array of the author’s possessions from his time as a fighter pilot, including his dog tags, military records, photographs, buttons and pins, patches and three Bibles - one of which is signed by Spillane.

A collection of Mickey Spillane WWII Original Photographs and Army Air Force Uniforms (est. $2,000) includes roughly 100 original images of Spillane with comrades, women and several kinds of aircraft. Of particular interest are the pictures of the author with a woman believed by some to be the inspiration of the character “Velda,” the secretary in the Mike Hammer novels. The lot also includes his 1943 Greenwood Army Air Field yearbook and two tan, wool, summer-weight officer service dress tunics, trousers and two tan cotton shirts.

Other top lots include but are not limited to:

The Original Typescript Manuscript of the Second Chapter for I, the Jury Sequel: Est. $5,000

A copy of I, the Jury that Spillane inscribed to his parents: Est. $5,000

A Sterling Silver WWII Army Air Force Pilot’s Wing Bracelet: Est. $1,500

A 2011 South Carolina Senate Resolution 821 Renaming a Portion of U.S. Highway 17 the “Mickey Spillane Waterfront 17 Highway” with the accompanying sign: Est. $1,500

A Colt Government Model Semi-Automatic Pistol: Est. $1,000

 

record copy.jpgDALLAS, Texas - A 45 rpm copy of the second single released in the United Kingdom by all four members of the Beatles is expected to earn top lot honors at Heritage Auctions’ Entertainment & Music Memorabilia Signature Auction March 18 in Dallas. 

The record includes recordings of Ask Me Why and Please Please Me (est. $40,000). John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr all signed the Ask Me Why B-side of the record; McCartney and Harrison also signed the reverse side, which features an A-side recording of Please Please Me. Given to its original owner at the Cavern Club in Liverpool, the single was released Jan. 11, 1963, 13 days before a signing session at the NEMS record shop, where the signatures likely were acquired.

photo of the Fab Four signed by all four members of the band (est. $18,000) also is expected to draw heavy interest at the auction. The 8-by-10 glossy black-and-white picture, taken in early 1965 in the Bahamas, is signed with a felt-tip pen and includes a certificate of authenticity from Heritage Auctions and Tracks LTD.

An original pressing of the Help! Album Signed by John Lennon, Paul McCartney and George Harrison of the Beatles (Capitol MAS 2386, 1965), (est. $12,000) will be available to collectors in the auction. The Gatefold Mono LP was the band’s eighth album for Capitol and the soundtrack for the band’s second major motion picture. It contains seven Beatles songs from the film with six instrumental pieces interspersed.

Savvy collectors and Beatles fans alike are expected to clamor for an extremely rare piece of memorabilia: a Postcard Signed by John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Substitute Drummer Jimmie Nicol (est. $10,000). In addition to the band members’ signatures, this 3.5-by-5.5-inch postcard includes the inscription: “To Judy / Best Wishes / Jimmie Nicol” that was written by Nicol, who was filling in on the band’s Australian tour for regular drummer Ringo Starr, who was ill with tonsillitis and stayed home during much of the tour. According to the accompanying letter of provenance, the signatures were acquired by a 24-year-old steward who remembers serving Lennon two boiled eggs for breakfast aboard the plane to Sydney.

Other Beatles-related items include, but are not limited to:

group of images used to market Mötley Crüe’s 1987 “Girls, Girls, Girls” World Tour (est. $16,000) includes three pieces showing hand-painted airbrush work applied to a matte board and mounted on one-inch Styrofoam; two of the images are of a “stripper girl” and the third depicts a “rebel rocker” who strongly resembles Crüe bassist Nikki Sixx. Each piece is autographed by the artist (“Tyler”) in the lower right corner and was used for tour merchandise for one of the most successful heavy metal bands of all time.

Signatures from Davie Jones (David Bowie) and the King Bees / The Animals on a 1964 Album Page (est. $7,000) commemorate Bowie’s short-lived second band, the King Bees, which produced one single - Liza Jane / Louie Louie Go home - in June 1964. Jones left the band shortly thereafter, eventually changed his name to David Bowie, and became an iconic singer, songwriter and actor who was revered for his innovative creativity. The back of the album page features the signatures of the members of The Animals: Eric Burdon, Alan Price, Chas Chandler, Hilton Valentine and John Steel.

Pair of Sunglasses Michael Jackson Wore On Stage ($6,500) during a Victory Tour performance Sept. 8, 1984 in Denver were given by the late “King of Pop” to the Los Angeles Daily News, and subsequently to a fan in a newspaper contest. This pair of black, metal-rimmed aviator shares are identical to those Jackson wore at the 1984 Grammy Awards and are almost universally identified with his look during that era. Also included are a non-original black satin bag and a black hard case, as well as a portion of the Los Angeles Daily News from Nov. 23, 1984, featuring Jackson and the contest.

A collection of memorabilia from the estate of entertainer/producer/television personality David Gest also is expected to draw attention from numerous collectors. Among the top Gest items are:

Reel-to-Reel Prince Demo Tape with a Tracklist Handwritten by the Artist, circa 1976/77, (est. $6,000) was recorded at Sound 80 Recording Studio in Prince’s hometown of Minneapolis prior to the recording of his landmark debut LP. The tape included three tracks: Just As Long As We’re TogetherMy Love Is Forever and Jelly Jam. The first two tracks were rerecorded on Prince’s first album, with Jelly Jam being modified and added as a coda to Just As Long As We’re Together.

Other top lots include, but are not limited to:

1528-003.jpgYORK, Pa. - Looking back on the year 1967, some might say that it was, paradoxically, a time of peace, love and war. Lyndon B. Johnson was president, 475,000 US troops were fighting in Vietnam, the Beatles unveiled their immortal Sgt. Pepper’s LP, and the Chiefs and Packers squared off at the first Super Bowl. Today, collectors clamor for mementos related to those historical people and events, and fortunately they’re able to find them because of another highlight of 1967. It was during that year, half a century ago, that visionary political ephemera collector Ted Hake founded his pop-culture collectibles business. Dubbed “Hake’s Americana,” the company has since become a globally renowned auction house whose sales embrace over 200 popular collecting categories.

To celebrate its 2017 golden jubilee year, Hake’s Americana will conduct three major online auctions, the first slated for March 14-16. As a nod to Hake’s roots, Auction #220 will feature 500+ lots of important political memorabilia. Two of the top items are a framed 36-star Grant and Colfax campaign parade flag from 1868, estimate $5,000-$10,000; and an exceedingly rare 1896 William McKinley poster publicizing a “Republican Barbecue at Greenfield, Ind.” One of only two examples known to Hake’s, the huge (26.5 x 39.5in) tri-color poster lists among its enticements “Ten Oxen, Twenty Sheep, 500 Chickens and 20,000 Free Buns!” along with brass bands and fireworks. Estimate: $2,000-$5,000.

A diverse selection of certified and authenticated autographs runs the celebrity gamut from historical to sports and entertainment figures. There’s a 1901 Thomas Edison-signed stock certificate, $1,000-$2,000; a signed and inscribed 8 by 10-inch photo of Humphrey Bogart, $1,000-$2,000; a framed Disney Song of the South color print signed by Walt Disney, $1,000-$5,000; and a glossy photo on cardboard of Beatle John Lennon in a stylish cane rocker. Inscribed and signed by Lennon with the addition of “XXX,” it is expected to make $2,000-$5,000.

A remarkable 1884 studio photo of the integrated Bellaire Globes baseball team includes among its members the Negro League pioneer Sol White. It is the earliest known photographic depiction of White, who was not only a pro baseball infielder, but later a manager and influential executive in the Negro Leagues. He also authored the important Sol White’s Official Base Ball Guide, a seminal manuscript chronicling the formative years of black baseball. Estimate: $10,000-$20,000

The centerpiece of the sale is Norman Mingo’s (1896-1980) spectacular original, signed artwork for the cover of Mad Magazine’s September 1968 issue. The mixed-media painting spoofs the days of flower power with its depiction of Alfred E. Neuman as a spiritual guru held aloft by the Beatles, Mia Farrow and the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. 

“When Mad magazine first started, it was satirical and goofy, but in the early to mid-1960s, its focus turned increasingly toward parodies of current events. That’s when pop culture became its fodder,” said Hake’s Americana President Alex Winter. “Mad art, especially anything by Norman Mingo, has been very strong, but his paintings for front covers will always attract a premium price because they simply aren’t available. This painting is a rare find that collectors of Mad art are going to want.” Estimate: $35,000-$50,000

More than 1,000 comic books from Platinum Age to Modern period will be offered, with the vast majority certified by CGC or CBCS. The sale boasts key issues from all eras, including coveted first issues, first appearances of characters, pedigree comics and numerous books that represent the highest-graded examples of their type. A premier entry is DC’s More Fun Comics #72, from October 1941. The cover’s action-filled World War II imagery depicts superhero Dr. Fate fighting off Nazi soldiers on a U-24 submarine, as a torpedo explodes in the background. Graded 9.6 NM+, the highest of all known examples, it is estimated at $10,000-$20,000.

Another comic book for the advanced collector is Top-Notch Comics #2, from January 1940. It, too, has a wartime theme on its lavishly illustrated, brightly hued cover showing a Nazi bomber plane going down in flames. The only known copy in 9.6 NM+ condition, and with no others known in a higher condition, it carries a pre-sale estimate of $5,000-$10,000.

A category that has gone from strength to strength with each successive Hake’s auction is posters, whether they advertise concerts or movies, solicit military enlistments, or entice prospective travelers with scenes of idyllic vacation spots. Auction #220 has a fantastic assortment to offer, starting with pop-music classics. 

The only known example of a 1958 Jerry Lee Lewis Rock & Roll Jamboree poster, with a photo-image of “The Killer” standing at his piano, is expected to sell for a minimum of $2,000-$5,000; while a 1965 poster promoting Little Richard’s Allentown (Pa.) Fairgrounds concert carries a similar estimate. A psychedelic pink/yellow/black stiff paper poster touting the Jimi Hendrix Experience’s May 10, 1968 gig at Bill Graham’s Fillmore East depicts all three members of the legendary band. It is a desirable first printing and therefore should easily command $2,000-$5,000 at auction.

With its extraordinary scene of a daredevil named M. Pernelet seated amongst dozens of crocodiles, hand-feeding them chunks of meat, a 1903 Circus Busch poster is from a succession of graphic, if not startling, advertisements the company published over several decades to promote its unusual entertainers. “This poster is so rare, you won’t even see it in even the most advanced collections,” said Winter. Estimate: $1,000-$5,000

Hake’s Americana Auction #220 has opened for bidding by phone, mail or online at www.hakes.com. The first session will close on March 14, 2017, while the second session will conclude on March 16. March 15 is an interim day in which bidders can peruse the catalog and prepare for further bidding. To request a free printed catalog or for information on any item in the sale, call toll-free: (866) 404-9800 or (717) 434-1600. Email: hakes@hakes.com. Visit the auction catalog online at www.hakes.com.

Image: Norman Mingo (1896-1980) original cover art for Mad magazine #121 (Sept. 1968) featuring Alfred E. Neuman being held aloft by the Beatles, Mia Farrow and the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, 23.75 x 31.75 inches, est. $35,000-$50,000. Courtesy of Hake’s Americana.

 

orwell.pngAn important, inscribed, first edition presentation copy of George Orwell’s 1936 novel Keep the Aspidistra Flying, is to be offered at Bonhams Fine Books and Manuscripts Sale in London on Wednesday 1 March.

Keep the Aspidistra Flying was largely written while Orwell was employed as an assistant at Booklovers Corner, a secondhand bookshop in Hampstead. He took up the position in October 1934, having spent the preceding nine months living at his parents’ house in Southwold, Suffolk, pining for metropolitan life and the company of fellow writers. The job was secured for him by his aunt, Nellie Limouzin, who was a friend of the owners, Francis and Myfanwy Westrope, through their shared involvement in the Esperanto Movement. The copy for sale is dedicated to Francis Westrope, the inscription reading, "To, F.G. Westrope, with very best wishes, from, 'George Orwell'". (The quotation marks round “George Orwell” are a reminder of his literary identity, his real name being Eric Blair).

Orwell worked in the bookshop during the afternoons in return for board and lodging. The mornings he devoted to writing; the evenings to socialising. His view of the Booklovers Corner’s clientele was not always flattering. As he wrote in Bookshop Memoirs, “….in a town like London there are always plenty of not quite certifiable lunatics walking the streets, and they tend to gravitate towards bookshops".  Some of this attitude finds its way into Keep the Aspidistra Flying, in which the protagonist, Gordon Comstock, also works in a bookshop while trying to pursue a literary career.

Orwell was undoubtedly grateful to the Westropes, but he owed them more than the chance to write in peace. Francis had been a founding member of the international Labour Party (ILP), an offshoot of the established Labour Party, which espoused left-wing egalitarianism and non-Communist Marxism. Orwell soon joined the ILP, becoming a prominent member, and its beliefs influenced his writing for the rest of his life.   

Orwell was, however, less enthusiastic about the Esperanto Movement. Unlike those who supported it as a plank of the proletarian revolution, he saw the imposition of a shared common language as a step on the road to totalitarianism. Some of this disquiet may have found its way into Newspeak, the means by which the rulers of Oceania in Nineteen Eighty-Four attempt to exercise control over the population.

Bonhams Head of Fine Books and Manuscripts Matthew Haley said, “Anyone who has ever worked in a bookshop would recognise the eccentric customers that Orwell discovered while working for the Westropes. His experiences in their shop inspired Keep the Aspidistra Flying, the novel which formed an important bridge between his earlier novels like Burmese Days, and the masterworks of Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four.”

Fine Books and Manuscripts

Bonhams, Knightsbridge, London, SW7

1 March 2017, 1.00 pm

Specialist: Matthew Haley, Bonhams Head of Fine Books and Manuscripts

Lot-39-Moos copy.jpgNew York—On Thursday, March 16, Swann Galleries will hold an auction of Vintage Posters, featuring the house’s strongest selection of ski posters to date.

Many fine early examples of ski and winter resort posters for France, Germany and Switzerland include the dramatic St. Moritz, 1924, by Carl Moos, expected to fetch $12,000 to $18,000, and Elsa Moeschlin’s jaunty Arosa / XIII. Grosses Skirennen der Schweiz, 1918 ($4,000 to $6,000). There are also exceptional American images, including Dwight Clark Shepler’s Sun Valley / Ketchum, Idaho, circa 1940, and the exceedingly rare Sun Valley Lodge / Union Pacific Railroad, circa 1940 ($8,000 to $12,000 and $1,200 to $1,8000, respectively), of which the only other known copy is in the collection of the Boston Public Library. There is an assortment of strong art deco ski posters, as well as iconic works by the masters Erich Hermès, Ludwig Hohlwein, Franz Lenhart, Sascha Maurer and Mario Puppo.

A run of Art Nouveau work by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec includes Jane Avril, 1893 ($50,000 to $75,000) and P. Sescau / Photographe, 1894, estimated between $30,000 and $40,000. Also available is the rare deluxe edition on vellum of Alphonse Mucha’s Salon des Cent, 1896, valued at $20,000 to $30,000. The cover lot for the sale, Le Frou Frou by the artist Weiluc, was used in 1900 for a naughty humor magazine of the same name, and is here expected to sell between $12,000 and $18,000. Other artists represented in this section include Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen with the iconic Tournée du Chat Noir, 1896 ($12,000 to $18,000), as well as Paul Berthon, Jules Chéret, Privat-Livemont and Édouard Vuillard.

A strong selection of Work Incentive posters is led by Teamworkers Are in Demand / You Win When All Win, 1927, and Winners Never Pass the Buck! / Face the Music and Go Ahead, 1927, each valued at $4,000 to $6,000. There are also propaganda posters from World War I and II from both sides of the front, as well as Soviet posters as early as 1920. Jim Crow and Civil Rights posters include Symeon Shimin’s poignant Jim Crow Is His Enemy - America’s Enemy - My Enemy, circa 1948 ($4,000 to $6,000).

Literary posters feature a selection of Scribner’s advertisements by Howard Chandler Christy, James Montgomery Flagg and Robert J. Wildhack, whose design for Scribner’s March, 1907, is estimated at $1,500 to $2,000. Also available is a rare version in green of Aubrey Beardley’s The Yellow Book, 1894 ($1,000 to $1,500), and several fine examples of The Chap Book by William H. Bradley.

Circus, magic show and theatrical advertisements abound, showcasing such amusements as Airplane Rides / Inman Bros. Flying Circus, circa 1929, which boasted a “long high ride” for $1, but here is expected to fetch $4,000 to $6,000.

Domestic and international travel posters feature favorites by master Roger Broders, including Lac D’Annecy, 1930, and Dunkerque, circa 1930 ($3,000 to $4,000 and $8,000 to $12,000, respectively). Several posters depicting bathing beauties by Jean-Gabriel Domergue are also available, led by L’Été á Monte - Carlo, 37, estimated at $2,000 to $3,000. There are also stunning works by Adolphe Mouron Cassandre and Jupp Wiertz, and American images by Joseph Binder, Leslie Ragan and Don Perceval.

The sale will include a selection of early movie posters, led by the 1917 release of Adventures of Buffalo Bill, which is estimated at $8,000 to $12,000.

The auction will be held Thursday, March 16, beginning at 10:30 a.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Saturday, March 11 from noon to 5 p.m. and Monday, March 13 through Wednesday, March 15 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

A printed auction catalogue is available for $35 via www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information or to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Swann President and Director of Vintage Posters, Nicholas D. Lowry at 212-254-4710, extension 57 or posters@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 39 Carl Moos, St. Moritz, 1924. Estimate $12,000 to $18,000.

Martin_Luther_King_the_Trumpet_of_Conscience_Corrected_Gallery_Sheets_52811c_lg.jpegLOS ANGELES, February 21, 2017 - Galley proofs for Dr. Martin Luther King’s last book, “The Trumpet of Conscience,” which featured a collection of his speeches will be auctioned by  by Nate D. Sanders Auctions on February 23, 2017.

The galley proofs features five speeches Dr. King delivered in November and December 1967 for the Canadian Broadcasting System (CBC). The speeches were ''Impasse in Race Relations,” “Conscience and the Vietnam War,” ''Youth and Social Action,” ''Nonviolence and Social Change'' and ''A Christmas Sermon on Peace.''

The galley proofs contains drafts all 28 slides, except for slide 4, which features Coretta Scott King’s introduction. The slides have corrections including typos and formatting errors.

New York-based Harper & Row released “The Trumpet of Conscience” in 1968 after Dr. King’s assassination.

Bidding for the galley proofs begins at $7,500.

Additional information on the galley proofs can be found at http://natedsanders.com/Galley_Proofs_for_Martin_Luther_King_Jr__s_Last_Bo-LOT45910.aspx

About Nate D. Sanders Auctions

An industry leader in documents and autographs, Nate D. Sanders Auctions has conducted auctions in Los Angeles since 1990 and now holds major auctions on a monthly basis. Owner Nate Sanders is recognized for his knowledge of sports, historical and Hollywood memorabilia. To learn more visit natedsanders.com

Screen Shot 2017-02-16 at 3.50.16 PM.pngMichaan’s is pleased to announce the sale of a prominent San Francisco Library consisting of over 14,000 hardcover books that have been accumulated over a period of fifty years by one family and kept in their Pacific Heights Estate since the 1920’s.

The collection is strong in history with great emphasis on American Presidential and Constitutional history but also a strong gathering of British and French including major collections of Napoleon, Abraham Lincoln, World War I and II.  A lovingly assembled collection of all aspects of Irish History including many 19th Century Works.  

There are over 50 sets of high quality leather-bound books.  As well as over 100 sets of cloth and lesser beauty.  

The family stopped buying books circa 1965 and one seldom sees so many vintage titles that have been aged and preserved so well.

In addition there are large quantities of books on Catholicism, Communism, Russian and California History with a strong emphasis on the history of the missions.

Do not miss the opportunity to preview and inspect this massive private collection - only once or twice in a generation does one see an accumulation of this size and content.

Image: The Savoy Cocktail Book, Original Edition, circa 1930 with Brilliant Art Deco Cover. Estimate: $200 / 300

NEW YORK — The first of Bonhams' Kennedy offerings, is a section titled the "Kennedy Years" in the Fine Books & Manuscripts sale in New York 10:30 am on March 9. From several consigners, items up for sale tell the story of JFK's days as a young senator arriving in Washington D.C. with his beautiful young bride, his rise to seize the Democratic ticket, and his presidential campaign and presidency. 

Leading the sale is the original plaster maquette from the bust of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, modeled by renowned sculptor Felix De Weldon, most known for his Marines Corps Memorial, in the mid to late 1963, estimated at $150,000-200,000. After the president was assassinated on November 22, 1963, Jackie worked closely with the sculptor to ensure the truest depiction of the fallen president. Most notably she re-shaped the mouth so the bust portrayed him smiling. Completed in 1964, the bronze cast of this bust stood nobly in the cabinet room in the North East corner of the White House, before Jackie moved it in 1979 to the new John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston.

Prominently featured in the sale, are groups of photos shot by Orlando Suero from Three Lions pictures, which offer a rare glimpse into JFK and Jackie's first year of marriage in 1954, a junior senator from Massachusetts and a political history student at Georgetown University. From a five-day shoot with the couple in and around their first home in Georgetown, the first group shows Jackie in class and around the campus of Georgetown (estimate $3,000-5,000). The second presents JFK relaxing at home discussing a senate bill with Jackie and playing a friendly game of football with brother Robert while his wife and sister-in-law watch (estimate $4,000-6,000).

Additional highlights include items from Jackie's personal assistant, Mary Gallagher, who served JFK when he was a young senator before working for his wife. Gallagher met Jackie in her bedroom at 9:30 am each morning, and liaised between her, designers, artists, and the president, whom she reported Jackie's personal expenses. Jackie's famed relationship with Paris-born designer Oleg Cassini comes to life in a collection of notes to be delivered to her exclusive couturier, estimated at $3,000-5,000, including her hand drawn sketches of dresses on White House stationary. Up for sale, jewelry and a goodbye note from Jackie at the end of Gallagher's employment reads "please accept this with memories of so many happy days", estimated at $3,000-5,000. 

The friendship of JFK and British Ambassador David Ormsby Gore is conveyed through personal possessions at Bonhams London sale of Glyn Cywarch on March 29.

Bonhams London is to sell the contents of Glyn Cywarch, the Welsh seat of Jasset Ormsby Gore, the 7th Lord Harlech. The Contents of Glyn Cywarch - the property of Lord Harlech sale will take place at Bonhams, New Bond Street, London on 29 March 2017. Some of the most fascinating objects tell the story of the close friendship between Lord Harlech's grandfather, David Ormsby Gore (5th Lord Harlech), and President Kennedy.

In 1961, David Ormsby Gore was appointed by the British Prime Minister, Harold Macmillan, as the UK's Ambassador to the United States. He served until 1965, the year after he assumed the title on the death of his father. David Ormsby Gore played a key role as adviser to Kennedy during the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962 and was once referred to by the President as one of the two brightest men he ever knew. Ormsby Gore and his wife Sissy formed a particularly close personal bond with President Kennedy and his wife Jackie.

Up for sale, gifts from the Kennedys to the Harlechs include:

• A copy of JFK's copy of The Poetical Works of Shelley from Jackie Kennedy to David Ormsby Gore on his birthday accompanied by a handwritten note from Jackie, estimated at £1,000-2,000.

• A copy of Inaugural Addresses of the Presidents of the United States... to John F. Kennedy 1961 given to Ormsby Gore in 1963 by Jackie Kennedy a few weeks after the President's assassination with inscription in her handwriting, estimated at £3,000-5,000.

• An American Sterling Silver Cigar Box given by Jackie Kennedy in 1965 to Lord and Lady Harlech engraved and inscribed to David and Sissy (Harlech), estimated at £800-1,200. 

Auction Guide