August 2018 Archives

Sanders-D Duck.jpegLos Angeles - A signed hand-drawn Walt Disney sketch of Donald Duck was auctioned tonight by Nate D. Sanders Auctions for $11,949.

In the early 1930’s, Disney created Donald Duck to be Mickey Mouse’s companion. Disney signed his name at the bottom of his pencil drawing of the beloved duck character. The sketch measures 5.5 by 8.5 inches. 

Nate D. Sanders auction manager Michael Kirk remarked, “It's rare to find a Donald Duck illustration hand drawn and signed by Walt Disney himself. Disney famously delegated almost all animation work to his team of talented animators, making this piece very unique and collectible."  

Additional information on the Sketch can be found at 
https://natedsanders.com/Walt_Disney_Hand_Drawn_Sketch_of_Donald_Duck__Sign-LOT50054.aspx

About Nate D. Sanders Auctions

An industry leader in documents and autographs, Nate D. Sanders Auctions has conducted auctions in Los Angeles since 1990 and now holds major auctions on a monthly basis. Owner Nate Sanders is recognized for his knowledge of sports, historical and Hollywood memorabilia. To learn more visit natedsanders.com

The Library of Congress today announced the winners of its “A Book That Shaped Me”: Summer Writing Contest, a program that asks rising fifth- and sixth-graders to reflect on a book that has made a personal impact in their lives.

More than 300 young readers submitted essays to participating public libraries in the Mid-Atlantic region in this seventh year of the contest. Launched in 2012 with the DC Public Library, “A Book That Shaped Me” expanded with the help of public libraries in Washington, D.C., Maryland, Virginia, Delaware, Pennsylvania and West Virginia. The local libraries offered the contest as part of their summer-reading programs.

Thirty finalists total, from the states that received entries, were chosen in an initial round of judging. The finalists each will receive a $50 gift-card prize.

Judging was conducted by members of the American Association of School Librarians (AASL), a division of the American Library Association (ALA). The AASL works to ensure all elementary- and secondary-school librarians participate as collaborative partners in the teaching and learning process.

The grand-prize judging round, which selected state and grand-prize winners from the pool of state finalists, was conducted by a panel assembled by the Library of Congress that included educators, children’s authors and Library of Congress staff.

Each state winner will receive another $50 gift-card prize. The first-, second- and third-place grand-prize winners will be awarded additional gift-card prizes in the amounts of $200, $150 and $100 respectively.

Grand-prize winners will read their essays during the “A Book That Shaped Me” awards presentation at the Library of Congress National Book Festival. The contest presentation will take place at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C., on Saturday, Sept. 1, 2018 at 11:50 a.m. at the Children’s Green Stage and will be emceed by Eun Yang, NBC4 Washington television anchor. 

Grand Prize & State Winners

1st Place Grand Prize & Pennsylvania State Winner
Tyler Williams, Spring City Free Library - Chester County Library System, who wrote about the Harry Potter series by J.K. Rowling.

2nd Place Grand Prize Winner & Virginia State Winner
Aria Patnaik, Reston Regional Library - Fairfax County Public Library, who wrote about “One for the Murphys” by Lynda Mullay Hunt.

3rd Place Grand Prize & Washington, D.C. Winner
Zuri Kenyatte, Anacostia Neighborhood Library - DC Public Library, who wrote about “Lucky Broken Girl” by Ruth Behar.

Delaware State Winner
Sarah Jane McMann, Hockessin Library - New Castle County Libraries, who wrote about “Harry Potter and The Chamber of Secrets” by J.K. Rowling.

Maryland State Winner
Alyssa Yu, Germantown Library - Montgomery County Public Libraries, who wrote about “Amina’s Voice” by Hena Kahn.

State Finalists (winners indicated by asterisks)

District of Columbia Finalists
Safya Biswal, Chevy Chase Neighborhood Library - DC Public Library
Raphael Fox, Tenley-Friendship Neighborhood Library - DC Public Library
*Zuri Kenyatte, Anacostia Neighborhood Library - DC Public Library
Ben Smith, Chevy Chase Neighborhood Library - DC Public Library
Brooke Talbott, Shaw (Watha T. Daniel) Neighborhood Library - DC Public Library
Miles Walters, Chevy Chase Neighborhood Library - DC Public Library

Maryland Finalists
Brea Ampaw, Montgomery County Public Libraries
Ellyce Butuyan, Connie Morella (Bethesda) Library - Montgomery County Public Libraries
Grace Hollenbach, White Oak Library - Montgomery County Public Libraries
Julliette Mamalian, Potomac Library - Montgomery County Public Libraries
Joseph K. Mathew, Germantown Library - Montgomery County Public Libraries
*Alyssa Yu, Germantown Library - Montgomery County Public Libraries

Virginia Finalists
Bella DeFilippi, Central Library - Arlington Public Library
Deven Hagen, Arlington Public Library
Eleanor G. Hoopengardner, Central Library - Arlington Public Library
Julienne Lim, Montclair Community Library - Prince William County Public Library
*Aria Patnaik, Reston Regional Library - Fairfax County Public Library
Landon Pollard, Bedford Central Library - Bedford Public Library

Delaware Finalists
Maggie Clarke-Fields, Brandywine Hundred Library - New Castle County
Reese Corbett, Dover Public Library
Tianyu Mao, Hockessin Library - New Castle County Libraries
*Sarah Jane McMann, Hockessin Library - New Castle County Libraries
Amrita Rai, Kirkwood Library - New Castle County Libraries
Michelle Ratanraj, Hockessin Library - New Castle County Libraries

Pennsylvania Finalists
Sienna Camlin, Perkasie Branch Library - Bucks County Free Library
Michaela Clement-St. Louis
Brayden Samuelsen, Oley Valley Community Library - Berks County Public Library
Hannah Strawhecker, Avon Grove Library - Chester County Library
Annabelle Troup, Quakertown Library - Bucks County Free Library
*Tyler Williams, Spring City Free Library - Chester County Library

The detailed list of current and previous winners, along with more information about the "A Book That Shaped Me" program, is available at loc.gov/bookfest/kids-teachers/booksthatshape/. For further details, contact booksshapecontest@loc.gov.

The 18th National Book Festival will be held Saturday, Sept. 1 from 9 a.m. to 7:30 p.m. (doors open at 8:30 a.m.) at the Washington Convention Center. The event is free and open to everyone.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States - and extensive materials from around the world -both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

Betty Crocker copy.jpgWashington, D.C. - Visitors have the rare chance to flip through and purchase a piece of history at the 43rd annual Washington Antiquarian Book Fair: September 28­-29, 2018 at Holiday Inn Rosslyn. 

WABF is the D.C. region’s only curated festival of rare and collectible books, manuscripts, autographs, maps, drawings and other fine ephemera. 

Among this year’s highlights:

­

  • 1st edition of Bram Stoker’s Dracula (1897): bound in publisher’s original cloth
  • ­ Limited­ edition copy of Betty Crocker’s Picture Cook Book: signed by the author
  • ­ 1st edition of Thunderball (1961): Ian Fleming’s first novel featuring notorious James Bond villain Ernst Stavro Blofeld
  • ­ 1st printing of Thomas Pynchon’s 1973 novel, Gravity’s Rainbow 

You needn’t be a veteran collector - or a gazillionaire - to enjoy WABF. More than 60 exhibitors will offer items for all budgets and interests. 

WABF director Beth Campbell says the personal nature of WABF is something worth celebrating, especially “with the advent of doing business online.” She calls WABF “an active museum, a forum to access diverse knowledge gathered in one place.”

WABF is “about connectedness and discovery,” Campbell says. “The exhibitors are connected to their collections, each other and the fairgoers. The fairgoers are connected to a particular genre, author or time. We all discover more when we connect and converse with one another.”

Special features at the 43rd annual WABF include personalized impromptu haikus from “wordsmith minimalists” Haiku Gals, and the chance to make bookmarks and bind pamphlets with renowned bookbinder and conservator Jill Deiss of Cat Tail Run Hand Bookbinding.

What: 43rd Annual Washington Antiquarian Book Fair (www.wabf.com) 

When: Friday, September 28, 2017: 5pm - 9pm; Saturday, September 29, 2017: 10am - 5pm

Where: Holiday Inn Rosslyn: 1900 Fort Myer Dr., Arlington, VA, 22209

Tickets: Fri. + Sat.: $15. Sat. only: $10 ($5 for students & librarians w/valid ID). Children 12 & under free. Purchase tickets at wabf.com or at the door. 

Find Us: Twitter: @theWABF (#WABF18) / Facebook: facebook.com/thewabf 

Contact: Beth Campbell: bcampbell@wabf.com / (202) 363­4999

20180829094534.jpgMontreal - The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts (MMFA) is presenting, for the first time, remarkable Books of Hours conserved in seven Quebec collections. The result of extensive research, the exhibition Resplendent Illuminations is a unique opportunity to admire some fifty works primarily from illuminated manuscripts - in this priceless legacy of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance in Europe. 

Books of Hours were works of private devotion that first appeared in the thirteenth century. They were the most popular prayer books made for the laity and were used as primers for learning to read. Often given as wedding gifts, they were “bestsellers” until the sixteenth century. Over time, they evolved in a variety of ways both textually and iconographically, adapting to the regional differences in devotions, languages and artistic styles of European Christianity.

The 59 artefacts presented here for the first time belong to the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, McGill University, the arts library of the Université du Québec à Montréal, the Séminaire de Saint-Sulpice, the Archives of the Jesuits in Canada, to Concordia University and the Musée de l’Amérique francophone in Quebec City. 

Three curators present new findings

“My hope is that the public can appreciate the singular beauty of these artefacts, which come from across medieval and Renaissance Europe and enrich our collective heritage. Perhaps they will be spurred to delve deeper into the past by leafing through the new Catalogue raisonné des livres d’Heures conservés au Québec,” said Brenda Dunn-Lardeau, associate professor, department of literary studies, UQAM, who edited the scholarly work. 

“One of the remarkable aspects of this exhibition is that we have assembled entirely from publicly accessible collections in Quebec such a breathtaking range of Books of Hours, some independent leaves but most of them still bound, with exquisitely beautiful illuminations.  These works bring vividly to life both the evolving internal religious experiences and their outward expressions over the course of four centuries. Our evocative installation is intended to permit the visitor to appreciate each work intimately,” added Hilliard T. Goldfarb, Senior Curator - Collections, and Curator of Old Masters, MMFA.

“The most surprising discovery in this exhibition is how many Books of Hours have been in Quebec for more than two hundred years. Unlike most collections of Books of Hours in North America, which have been assembled in the late 19th and 20th centuries, here there are books that are truly part of Quebec's religious and cultural heritage. The other remarkable feature of this exhibition is the successful identification of artists and schools that link these manuscripts to others held around the world,” concluded Richard Virr, chief curator (retired), Rare Books and Special Collections, McGill University. 

Priceless treasures from the Middle Ages to the Renaissance

The works on display show the exquisite elegance of some Gothic and Renaissance illuminations from France, the Southern Netherlands, Italy and Southern Germany, as well as other contemporaneous expressions of popular piety. These small images, carved into wood or hastily painted, were probably produced for clients of more modest means and feature decorations similar to decorative folk art. Seven books come from the early days of printing, an innovation that made it possible to reach a much wider readership than did manuscripts. These books illustrate the development of woodcuts and metal cuts that gradually replaced the art of illumination.

Little-known contribution by women

Contrary to popular belief, women were more than just pious readers of Books of Hours. As the works in the exhibition eloquently demonstrate, women contributed their expertise at various stages of production. Thus, in the Rhodes Hours, the patron is painted kneeling right in the middle of the Annunciation, combining the sacred and the profane. The Heures de Nostre Dame of Pierre Gringore, published in 1525, were dedicated to Renée de Bourbon, Duchess of Lorraine, who commissioned the French translation. Lastly, a pocket-sized manuscript Book of Hours, was illuminated around 1500 to 1510 by Cornelia van Wulfscherchke, a Carmelite nun in Bruges.

An outstanding heritage conserved in Quebec

In comparison with other collections of early books in North America, what is special about the Books of Hours held in Quebec is the fact that they were first and foremost devotional works of New France. This is evidenced in the Jesuit Relations as of 1653 and in requests made by the Hospitalières (nursing sisters in Quebec) between 1664 and 1668 to their benefactors in France. In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, these devotional books found a new vocation, becoming collectible artefacts. Whether complete or fragmentary, Books of Hours came into Quebec by way of inheritances or purchases in Europe.

Over time, a number of Books of Hours entered public institutions following private donations and also thanks to purchasing policies that encouraged public education. Thus, in the 1920s and 1930s Gerhard R. Lomer, one of McGill University’s earliest librarians, launched an original project, creating a small Museum of Books inside the university library open to the general public. In his purchasing trips, especially to London, Lomer was helped by F. Cleveland Morgan, the great patron who also acquired works for the Art Association, later to become the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts. The detached folios in Quebec collections are among the most representative specimens of the early history of both manuscripts and printed books down through the centuries.

Credits and curatorial 

The exhibition is organized by the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts, in collaboration avec Université du Québec à Montréal and McGill University. Its curators are Brenda Dunn-Lardeau, associate professor, department of literary studies, UQAM, Hilliard T. Goldfarb, Senior Curator - Collections and Curator of Old masters, MMFA, and Richard Virr, chief curator (retired), Rare Books and Special Collections, McGill University.

Publication

The exhibition is accompanied by the Catalogue raisonné des livres d’Heures conservés au Québec, published by Presses de l’Université du Québec and edited by Brenda Dunn-Lardeau. The Books of Hours, manuscripts for the most part, are remarkable for their textual and iconographic diversity. The catalogue presents this priceless European heritage from 1225 to 1583 and conserved in North America. Special attention was paid to their complex history and to identifying the artists who created them, since these miniatures elevate Books of Hours to the ranks of unique, high-quality works of art. 

Available at the Museum Boutique and Bookstore. In French.

Softcover $48, ISBN: 978-2-7605-4975-3; hardcover, $55, ISBN: 978-2-7605-4978-4.

Activities in connection with the exhibition 

September 27, 2 to 5 p.m.

Workshop-masterclass: 

Le nombre d’or et la recherche des harmoniques du sens caché du texte with Jean-Luc Leguay

Michal and Renata Hornstein Pavilion for Peace, Studio 11, 2075 Bishop St.

 One of the last master illuminators, Jean-Luc Leguay spent 10 years under the tutelage of an Italian Franciscan. For this workshop, participants will need to bring a set square, compass, paper and pencil to apply the teachings, which are based on the study of geometry, and prepare a parchment for illumination. Space is limited. 

September 28, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

Symposium: Discovering Books of Hours held in Quebec Collections

Maxwell Cummings Auditorium, 1379-A Sherbrooke Street West

The aim of this symposium is to present diverse facets of Books of Hours - pigments, decorated manuscripts and prints, original bindings and unique elements of particular works (e.g. sheet music inserts) - to gain an appreciation of the production and aesthetics underlying Books of Hours from the thirteenth to the sixteenth century in Europe. The experts at the symposium, organized by the MMFA, in collaboration with the Groupe multidisciplinaire de Montréal sur les livres anciens (XVe-XVIIIe siècles), include Geneviève Bazinet (University of Ottawa), Sarah Cameron-Pesant (Université de Montréal), Brenda Dunn-Lardeau (UQAM), Madeleine Jeay (McMaster University), Helena Kogen (Université du Québec à Montréal), Sylvie Poirier (Université de Sherbrooke), Geneviève Samson (Library and Archives Canada and Richard Virr (McGill University).

Information and reservations: mbam.qc.ca/calendrier

Acknowledgements 

The Museum acknowledges the vital contribution of Air Canada to the presentation of this exhibition and extends its thanks to Quebec’s Ministère de la Culture et des Communications and the Conseil des arts de Montréal for their ongoing support. Research for the preparation of the exhibition was made possible with financial support from the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada.

Images (from left to right): Workshop of the Master of the Échevinage of Rouen, The Annunciation to the Shepherds, Hours of Pellegrin de Remicourt and Madeleine Symier, about 1470-1475, Rouen. Université du Québec à Montréal, arts library, special collections, Montreal School of Fine Arts Bequest, 1969. Photo Gilles Saint-Pierre. | Simon Bening (1483-1561), Saint Sebald of Nuremberg, about 1515-1525, Flanders, Southern Netherlands, manuscript leaf from a Book of Hours, a prayer book or a breviary. MMFA, Horsley and Annie Townsend Bequest. | A late follower of Robert Boyvin, The Adoration of the Magi, about 1500 (1495-1505), Rouen, leaf from a manuscript Book of Hours in Latin for the use of Rouen. McGill University Library, Rare Books and Special Collections, Catherine Rhodes Tudor-Hart Bequest, 1972. Photo Gregory Houston.

166 .jpgChicago -- Potter and Potter's signature summer magic auction caught the attention of collectors worldwide and delivered exceptional results. After a long day of spirited bidding, 29 lots realized between $1,000-1,999; 29 lots made between $2,000-$9,999; and six lots broke the five-figure mark. Prices noted include the company's 20% buyer's premium. 

Rarities associated with legendary people or places in the magic community took the top spots in this sale. Lot #282, a 1916 three sheet color litho featuring Howard Thurston as Thurston the Great rose to $22,800. This spectacularly illustrated poster featured Thurston, assisted by imps, levitating an assistant, with Kellar’s endorsement quoted in the lower margin. Lot #455, Bob Swadling’s Magic Kettle more than doubled its low estimate and changed hands at $21,600. This mechanically complex vessel was used by Paul Daniels on British TV in 1979. This kettle is one of the items that was sold to help defray the costs of Sebastian Midtvaage's care. And lot #166, Chicago Magic Roundtable 1946 scrapbook - featuring the autographs of about 500 magicians as well as brochures, business cards, signed photographs, letters, promotional materials, and clippings from the club - made an astonishing $19,200 on its original $2,000-3,000 estimate. This treasure-trove generated 43 bids, the most of any lot in this sale. 

The results of this auction confirm Potter & Potter’s solid reputation as the first choice for buying and selling fine magic-related archives and collections. Lot #209, a Servais LeRoy & Co. illusion instruction archive from 1912 almost doubled its low estimate to make $11,400. This collection included typed and manuscript instructions and advertisements for illusions, gimmicks, pocket, and parlor tricks sold and manufactured by this short-lived but important London-based magic company. Buyers were also focused on lot #255, a collection of more than 200 photographs of magicians from the 1940's through the 1990's including Doug Henning, Ali Bongo, Paul Daniels, Lance Burton, Jack Gwynne, Blackstone Jr, and others. This comprehensive grouping was estimated at $400-800 and sold for $3,000. And lot #173, a Loring Campbell scrapbook, owned and kept by the lyceum and Chautauqua magician, turned the page for $720 on its $50-100 estimate. 

Ephemera related to the great Dutch magician Okito (1875-1963) clearly captured the imagination of bidders at this event. Okito was the stage name of Tobias Bamberg, a sixth-generation magician who performed his Asian themed act entirely in pantomime. Lot #221, a 1929 photo postcard of a costumed Okito signed and inscribed to his best customer and friend Victor Barbour, sold for $2,400 - four times its high estimate!  A number of letters from Okito to Barbour also delivered strong results in this sale. Of note is lot #222, a letter from Okito to Barbour dated April 29, 1920 addressing a variety of personal and professional topics, and lot #233, three Okito letters to Barbour spanning the 1918-1924 time frame. Each of these lots was estimated at $400-600 and sold for $2,160. 

This event's offering of over 150 rare and important magic books, with titles from the 1600's onward, was truly breathtaking. Surprise best sellers in this category include lot #70, Professor Hoffmann’s signed copy of Robert-Houdin and Jean Eugène’s Les Tricheries Des Grecs Devoilees, published by J. Hetzel in Paris in 1863.  Estimated at $300-500, it made $2,750. And lot #120, a manuscript copy of Tetragramaton, published by the author Tony Andruzzi (Tom Palmer) in Chicago in the 1970’s sold for $4,080 on its $1,200-1,800 estimate.  This absolutely exquisite book doubled as a piece of art, and was detailed with pebbled black hardcovers, brass studs, a color lenticular illustration of a wizard, border decorations, and original illustrations.

This spotlight sale rounded out with top-tier offerings of magic related ephemera, stage worn costumes, apparatus, artwork, and other rarities. Lot #366, a c. 1940’s deco style Devil’s mailbox made by the F.G. Thayer & Co. burned through its $250-300 estimate to realize $3,600.  Lot #328, an early 20th century French wind up bisque-headed child conjuror performed well, making $4,250 on her $300-500 estimate.  Lot #187, a 1924 typed, signed letter from Ottokar Fischer to Dr. Samuel Cox Hooker on dramatic, three color letterhead made $2,640 - more than ten times its high estimate! And wrapping things up here, lot #177 - two 1920’s-era costume robes from the Carter Illusion Show - brought $1,440 on their $250-350 estimate. 

According to Gabe Fajuri, President at Potter & Potter Auctions, “It's gratifying to see strong demand for the rare and unusual magic memorabilia we featured in this sale. As is often the case, the unique or truly scarce and attractive items we offer performed exceptionally well. This bodes well for the future - both short-term and long-term - as we have some spectacular and historically significant magic memorabilia on deck for the coming year." 

Potter & Potter, founded in 2007, is a Chicago area auction house specializing in paper Americana, vintage advertising, rare books, playing cards, gambling memorabilia, posters, fine prints, vintage toys, and magicana - antiques and collectibles related to magic and magicians. The company's next sale, its annual Coin-Op & Advertising Auction, will be held on September 29, 2018.  For more information, please see www.potterauctions.com.  Follow us on Facebook (potterandpotterauctions), Twitter (PnPAuctions), and Instagram (potterauctions). 

Image: Chicago Magic Roundtable 1946 Scrapbook, sold for $19,200.

Dallas, TX - A rare Polk & Dallas: Highly Significant Large 1844 Campaign Flag Banner sold for $81,250 and a Pocket Watch Owned by One of the Passengers on the R.M.S. Titanic drew $57,500, to lead Heritage Auctions’ Americana & Political auction Aug. 25-26 in Dallas, Texas. Sales from the event totaled $1,459,448.

“This auction featured items that really captured the fascination of collectors of all levels,” Heritage Auctions Americana Auctions Director Tom Slater said. “The 1844 campaign flag and the watch from the Titanic are lots that tell important stories, and will be key pieces in their new owners’ collections.”

Polk campaign items, especially display pieces, are rare, and the Polk & Dallas flag is one of the largest political flags ever made, measuring 49-1/2 by 30-1/2 inches, or 57 by 38 inches with the frame. This flag is one of perhaps six known. It formerly resided in the legendary U.I. “Chick” Harris Collection, and achieved the highest price of any object when that collection was sold in a series of eight auctions nearly 20 years ago. Intended for horizontal display, it still has the original fabric loops for suspension across the top, and fine stitching around the perimeter.

The pocket watch was salvaged from Sinai Kantor, a Russian immigrant who was one of victims when the Titanic collided with an iceberg April 15, 1912. Kantor’s belongings, including the watch, were returned to his widow, Miriam, who was spared when “women and children first” protocol earned her a seat on the final lifeboat to reach the rescue ship R.M.S. Carpathia.

Numerous bidders pursued Revolutionary War: “Liberty Triumphant or the Downfall of Oppression” Prohibitively Rare Copper Engraved Cartoon Celebrating the Boston Tea Party until it brought $37,500. The rare political cartoon was published after Dec. 23, 1773 and before April 1774, mere months after the Sons of Liberty, disguised as Mohawk Indians, took to Boston Harbor and destroyed more than 92,000 pounds of tea. Just six copies of the copper engraved cartoon are known to exist in institutional holdings.

One of the premier political banners surviving from the era, Henry Clay: A Spectacular Hand-Painted Banner from the 1844 Campaign drew multiple bids before closing at $35,000, nearly double its pre-auction estimate. Reflecting the Nativist and Protectionist viewpoint of many of Clay’s supporters, the banner features a portrait of Clay over text that reads: “AMERICA THOU ART OUR COUNTRY AND THEE WILL WE SUPPORT / We are labourers and would not that our children’s bread should be cast to the dogs of foreign nations.”

William F. “Buffalo Bill” Cody’s Wild West Show: “He-Nu-Kaw” Richly Colored Lithographed Poster Depicting “The Handsomest Indian Maiden in the World” led a group of 84 lots related to the legendary American scout, bison hunter and showman when multiple bidders drove its final price to $32,500 - more than six times its pre-auction estimate. A rare and early poster issued around 1878 to promote Cody’s New York stage play, this example is one of only a handful known to remain in existence, according to former longtime Buffalo Bill Historical Center curator Paul Fees. Printed by Cleveland, Ohio-based lithographers W.J. Morgan & Co., this example comes from the collection of the late, renowned collector Edward C. Gillette of Kansas City. Gillette amassed one of the finest collections of items related to Buffalo Bill, many of which appeared in the Aug. 25 Heritage Auctions sale.

Other top lots included but were not limited to:

·       George Washington: Portrait Dated 1791 After Gilbert Stuart: $27,500

·       Dwight D. Eisenhower & John F. Kennedy: Official White House Presidential Flag: $27,500

·       Mexican-American War: South Carolina Palmetto Regiment Gold Medal with Ribbon: $27,500

·       Cox & Roosevelt: The “Holy Grail” Jugate Button for These 1920 Running Mates: $22,500

·       Lyndon B. Johnson: Signed Iconic Air Force One Swearing-In Photograph: $21,250

55036a_lg.jpegLos Angeles - A signed hand-drawn Walt Disney sketch of Donald Duck will be auctioned by Nate D. Sanders Auctions on August 30, 2018.

In the early 1930’s, Disney created Donald Duck to be Mickey Mouse’s companion. Disney signed his name at the bottom of his pencil drawing of the beloved duck character. The sketch measures 5.5 by 8.5 inches.

Nate D. Sanders auction manager Michael Kirk remarked, “It's rare to find a Donald Duck illustration hand drawn and signed by Walt Disney himself. Disney famously delegated almost all animation work to his team of talented animators, making this piece very unique and collectible."  

Bidding for the drawing begins at $7,900.

Additional information on the manuscript can be found at 
https://natedsanders.com/Walt_Disney_Hand_Drawn_Sketch_of_Donald_Duck__Sign-LOT50054.aspx

 

blobid6_1535450110996.pngA reflective and tender letter written by Nelson Mandela from his prison cell on Robben Island to the daughter of his friend and fellow anti-apartheid activist, Michael Harmel is to be offered at Bonhams South African Sale in London on 14 September.  It is estimated at £50,000-100,000.

The letter, which has never been published, is addressed to Barbara Lamb and sends condolences on the death of her father Michel Harmel, news of which had only recently reached Mandela. At the time - October 1974 - the future South African President (Prisoner 466/64) was ten years into a life sentence, following his conviction for sabotage at the Rivonia Trial in 1964. 

Mandela first met Harmel at a Communist Party meeting in the 1940s, and he writes movingly about his initial failure as a young college graduate to appreciate the older man’s gifts: “I was convinced that he did not deserve the honour of being placed amongst the elite. It was some years later that I came to accept his simplicity as a virtue on which one could model his own life...". 

Over time their friendship grew. Harmel’s wife Ray - a seamstress and ardent supporter of the anti-apartheid movement - made Winnie Mandela’s wedding dress at Nelson’s request and the famous post-wedding photograph of the newly married couple was taken at the Harmel’s house. 

Elsewhere in the letter Mandela reflects, “He was one of those men who fully understood the meaning of their life as part of mankind generally & as individuals. His peep into the future very often coincided with one's most intimate hopes & dreams. May he rest in peace for 'his work on earth is done'.”

The conditions under which Mandela lived when the letter was written were brutal. Although by 1974 he had progressed from a Grade D to a Grade A prisoner, and was able to maintain more contact with the outside world, he was still sleeping every night on a stone floor, breaking stones in the yard every day during the week, and was confined to his cell 23 hours a day at the weekends.

Despite the hardships and the sad circumstances that prompted him to write, Mandela maintains a sense of perspective and humour. Looking forward to his freedom he promises to take his European ‘sisters’ - close friends who had supported him in the days of struggle - to a feast and then to invite them to join in Umngqungpo, the Xhosa dance performed by elder women to celebrate girls who are coming of age.

The letter closes with a characteristically thoughtful interweaving of the personal and the philosophical. “It has been said that faith is like an oak tree, it grows steadily but, once established, it endures for centuries. Ever ridden a horse in your life, or seen a horse race? Hope is the horse on which you ride & travel to your destination, to reach the winning post. My only fortune in life is to have friends who taught me these things, amongst whom was your beloved Pa. Fondest regards & sincere good wishes to all. Sincerely, Nelson".

Bonhams Director of the South African Sale Giles Peppiatt said, “When Nelson Mandela wrote this letter he had endured 10 years of appalling treatment with no prospect of release, yet he retained his humanity, his sense of humour and his faith in the future. He writes with almost conversational grace and ease. It is a wonderful letter.”  

AllthatGlitters.jpgLos Angeles—Courtiers feasting at elaborately set tables, knights in gleaming armor, a richly clad monarch presiding over elegant festivities—these are the images often associated with the medieval and Renaissance courts of Europe. For rulers and members of the nobility at the center of these privileged spaces, the visual arts—illuminated manuscripts, paintings, drawings, enamels, and textiles—were central aspects of their political and cultural identities. All that Glitters: Life at the Renaissance Court, on view from August 28 to December 2, 2018 at the J. Paul Getty Museum, focuses on court culture during the transition between “late medieval” and “Renaissance” (or “early modern”) Europe.

“During this critical period, the court was often a place of leisure, entertainment, and display, where members of the aristocracy engaged in tournaments, hunting, feasting, and games such as chess,” explains Timothy Potts, director of the J. Paul Getty Museum. “The settings for these pursuits were designed to impress—sumptuous and spectacular displays of art and pageantry that reaffirmed their status and prestige. The manuscripts that recorded such courtly pastimes were themselves valued as luxury goods and much sought after by the nobility.”

The objects featured in All that Glitters include a selection of luxury textiles and clothing, a drawing, a hand-colored print, and glass that complement the wide variety of lavishly illuminated manuscripts that found an enthusiastic audience in the palaces and châteaux of late medieval and Renaissance Europe.

In aristocratic households all over continental Europe, even expressions of religious faith took a luxurious material form. Court artists produced small illuminated prayer books that could be worn as fashionable accessories, decorated with elegant fabrics, precious metals, and glittering jewels that adorned the residences of Europe’s elite.

The adherence to chivalric code and the way it governed both belief and behavior at the Renaissance courts was established in the Middle Ages but emerged with renewed vigor during the late medieval period. A number of dazzling and complex objects including manuscripts and stained glass explore the display of heraldry at court, where rank and systems of social hierarchy were incredibly important. Objects produced for kings, queens, and courtiers enshrined ideals of chivalry, especially in the form of jousting that continued to guide official conduct into the sixteenth century.

“The incredible material luxury of the objects in the exhibition shows how ostentatious life at court could be, but when you dig a little deeper, the same objects can also be evidence of how courtiers were expected to behave and how they built their social hierarchies and identities,” says Larisa Grollemond, assistant curator of manuscripts and curator of the exhibition.

The exhibition concludes with a display of illuminated manuscript leaves from the court of King Louis XIV at Versailles, where the splendor of European court life reached its apex in the seventeenth-century. The display of heraldry, personal emblems, fine textiles, and luxury books continued to affirm social standing and good taste. Ultimately, the very trappings of magnificence that once cemented the king’s authority would also be what helped spark a revolution.

Related programming includes a performance of music from the period by the group Cappella Pratensis and An American Court: A Conversation with Former White House Curator William Allman, a discussion that will reveal the history of the White House collection and how various presidents have used art to help define their administrations and deliver cultural messages. Additional information can be found at getty.edu/360.

Image: A Tournament Contest, Augsburg (probably), Germany (Place created), about 1560-1570. Tempera colors and gold and silver paint on paper bound between original pasteboard covered with original brown calf. Leaf: 43 × 28.9 cm (16 15/16 × 11 3/8 in.). Ms. Ludwig XV 14, fol. 27v

Alexander Vetro -Suzdal Evening-.jpgIt appears that revolutionary ideas in society and revolutionary ideas in art develop simultaneously, “observes OLesya Koenig, co-owner with her husband Jerry Koenig of the From Russia with Art gallery. “Political ideas emanating from the 1917 Russian Revolution quickly found their way into art movements such as Constructivism and Suprematism, producing startling new original works of enduring quality, while maintaining realism in art -an important vision of everyday life.

From Russia with Art will be featuring a curated collection of works on paper by leading artists from this important time period at the upcoming Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair, (BABF), Sept. 8 & 9 at the Brooklyn Expo Center in Greenpoint. The Cambridge, Mass art gallery will have on display and for sale, etchings and prints from such major artists as Stanislav Nikireev, Alexander Vetrov, and Vladimir Vorobyov, in the BABF’s new fair-within-a-fair section, “The Brooklyn Print & Photo Fair.  “Some of Russia’s best artists have focused their creative energy mastering printmaking, particularly etching - and the results are breathtaking, but hard to find in this country,” says Ms. Koenig.  From Russia With Art is helping to change that.  

Stanislav Nikiereev (1932-2007), known as the “People’s Artist of Russia,”  was one of the most remarkable Masters of modern Russian Fine Arts. Experts consider his incredibly detailed works as a unique phenomenon in current landscape art and etching technique, to be compared only with the legacy of old Masters, such as Albrecht Durer, Rembrandt van Rijn and especially Pieter Brueghel the Elder.  

Etchings, aquatints and dry points (an engraving or print made with a dry point needle), rarely seen in the United States, by “Honored Artists of Russia” - Aleander Vetrov, an outstanding colored-etching craftsman; Vladimir Vorobyov and Irina Makoveeva; will also be presented as part of the BABF exhibition. Vetrov, Vorobyov and Makoveeva have had exhibitions in America and Europe. From Russia with Art will also feature rarely seen original works on paper (pastels, mixed media, drawings) by an important Italian-American modernist August Mosca (1909-2002,) created by the artist in the 1940s-1970s,  as well as the rich color oil paintings by St. Petersburg artist, Grigory Samson, who explored a variety of styles throughout his life from Cubism to Surrealism.  

One hundred years ago, Russian art brought a revolutionary vision to the world and was eagerly grasped and appreciated by American and European artists working throughout the world.  It was a major contribution and endures today.  As Olesya Koenig says, “Art is organically interwoven into the fabric of life, whether in times of political change and uncertainty, or more stable eras in which we can contemplate how, so often, art shows the way.

Fair hours are:  Sat., September 8th, noon-7pm; Sun. September 9th, 11am-4pm; Admission:  Weekend pass:  $15 for adults; Sunday admission $10. Contact:  info@brooklynbookfair.com, 781-862-4039

TS Eliot - The Cocktail Party.jpgNorthhampton, MA—Flamingo Eventz and the Southern New England Antiquarian Booksellers have joined forces to present the 14th Annual Pioneer Valley Book & Ephemera Fair on Sunday, October 14, 10am - 4pm at Smith Vocational School, 80 Locust St (Rt. 9), Northampton, MA. Exhibitors from across the Northeast will fill the school’s cafeteria, stage, corridors, and lobby with collectible, rare, antique, modern, fine, scholarly and used books, manuscripts, prints, maps, autographs, photographs, postcards and every other sort of printed ephemera.

Exhibitor Specialties include: Advertising Covers, African American, Americana, Architecture, Art, Art Deco, Auctions, Autographs, Aviation, Baseball, Books, Bibles, Black History, Black Power, Calendars, Calling Cards, Christmas, Circus, Civil War, Cook Books, Charts, Children’s Books, Cocktails, Design, Dogs, Die Cuts, Documents, Engineering, Engraving, Ephemera, Erotica, Esoterica, Fantasy, Fashion, Fishing, Floridiana, Folklore, Folk Music, Foreign Language, Furniture, Games, Gardens & Horticulture, Graphics, Historic Documents, Horses, Hunting, Illustrated Books, Interior Design, Japan, Judaica, Letters, Logbooks, Manuscripts, Maps, Maritime, Medicine, Middle East, Military, Modernism, Music, Native American, Natural History, Nautical, Naval, New York City, New York State, New Jersey, Novelties, Olympic Games, Pacifica, Photographs, Photography, Pochoir, Polar, Pop-Ups & Moveable Books, Poetry, Postcards, Posters, Presentation Copies, Presidential Archives, Press Books, Prints, Pulitzer Prize Winners, Psychedelica, Puppetry, Puzzles, Railroad, Reference, Revolutionary War, Russia, Scholarly, Science, Science Fiction, Sports, Sporting, Technical, Theatre, Theology, Trade Cards, Trade Catalogues, Travel & Exploration, Travel Brochures, Typography, U.S. Coastal History, Vanity Fair Prints, Valentines, Voyages, Watercolors, Whaling, Wine, Yachting. These, and many other specialties, will be found at this event. Be sure to check our website, FlamingoEventz.com, for a full Exhibitor List and complete details.

The Pioneer Valley is a primary foliage destination in the fall, with many scenic hikes and drives, and you can pick your own apples and stock up on cider, pumpkins and chrysanthemums while visiting. Northampton and nearby Pioneer Valley towns provide a great variety of restaurants and entertainment. The Five Colleges, Smith College, University of Massachusetts, Amherst College, Hampshire College, and Mount Holyoke College offer library and museum exhibits and cultural events, but if it is Parents Weekend, hotels may fill quickly, so book early. Old Deerfield is nearby, Yankee Candle, too.

The school is on Route 9, near Cooley-Dickinson Hospital; there’s plenty of free parking. The event is catered by Black Sheep Deli from Amherst. Admission is $6, $1 off with a card or advertisement; $3 ages 12-21; under 12 free with paid Adult. Click flamingoeventz.com and pioneervalleybooks.com for more information as many local SNEAB members always exhibit. All are cordially invited.

Dates/Hours: Sunday October 14, 2018; 10am-4pm.

Location: The Smith Vocational School, 80 Locust Street (Rt. 9), Northampton, MA 01060.

Admission: Adults: $6, Students & Young Collectors 12-21: $3, under 12 free w/Paid Adult.

Directions: I-91 Exit 18, left on Pleasant Street, left on Rt. 9, Elm St, follow Rt. 9, it becomes Locust St.

Miscellaneous: Plenty of free parking and Refreshments will be available at an on-site café during show hours.

Nakki_Photobooth_1 copy.jpgBefore the i-phone and “selfies”, there was the photobooth—the forerunner of instant photography. Baby Boomers will  remember sitting in the photobooth , primping, making faces, squeezing in friends. But, surprisingly, it is Millennial who are rediscovering the fun of the Photobooth. Invented by Siberian émigré, Anatol Josepho and first introduced in 1925, the photobooth is enjoying renewed popularity. Today, they’re a “must” for wedding receptions and would you believe - even made an appearance at the Academy Awards and the Emmys!  

At the upcoming Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair, Sept. 8 & 9 at the Brooklyn Expo Center in Greenpoint, the fascination of the photobooth will be explored in both a one-of-a-kind exhibit and talk by film and dark room photographer Nakki Goranin. The author of the American Photobooth, published by W.W. Norton and Co., and a long-time collector of fascinating photobooth images, Ms. Goranin will present her talk ,” The Photobooth: A Short History and Conversation about a Photographic Revolution,” on Saturday, Sept. 8th at 4:00 pm.  At the same time, show goers won’t want to miss the photobooth exhibit she has created especially for this Fair. It features a dozen blow-ups of her own work, including both photobooth and tintype art. 

Ms. Goranin, whose interest in photography started in childhood, spends hours at the computer, taking small vintage photos, not much larger than a quarter, enlarging them, playing with the tones and transforming  them. What was a vernacular shot becomes fine art. “What is so wonderful about the photobooth was the changing world it represented, and the fact that it made photography available to everyone,” notes Ms. Goranin.  

As many as 7,500 people a day would line up to have their photos taken for 25 cents in Josepho’s Photomaton Studio on Broadway in the 1920s. The 1953 film The Band Wagon saw Fred Astaire dancing into and out of a Photomatic booth.   Four years later, Esquire magazine lugged an art deco photobooth into Richard Avedon’s NYC studio for a stunning photo essay that included images of Marilyn Monroe, Audrey Hepburn, Truman Capote and Ethel Merman. Andy Warhol became fascinated with photobooth images in the 1960s, envisioning the color and sense of movement the artist could achieve by combining a variety of poses from the booth. 

“I think about the people in the Photobooth,” adds Ms. Goranin, “who they were on that day,  the time in which they lived. My favorite photobooth images are the most tender ones -- couples shyly kissing for the first time; images in which you can see genuine affection between people, as well as portraits that show humor, such as a blowup of three ‘wise guys’ - young men puffing on their cigars. I love each photo. I fall in love with the people in them. I strive to convey this feeling to the viewer.”

Ms. Goranin’s exhibit will also feature tintypes - a wet-plate process whereby a photograph is taken as a positive and applied on a thin tin plate.  An outstanding example is a photographic panorama of the Chicago Exhibition of 1893, which Ms. Goranin created from two separate images she purchased twenty years apart -- two of the few tintypes to survive from the Exhibition. Admission to the talk is free with online registration and purchase of a Fair ticket.

Image: This vintage Photobooth image from Nakki Goranin’s exhibit at the Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair came from the Midwest and was probably made in the era of the great farming migration and the dust bowl days.  Most likely they were farmboys in town for a Saturday adventure, getting their photo taken in a Photobooth for a quarter. Ms. Goranin, author of American Photobooth, will also offer a special talk on The Photobooth and its Revival of Memories at the fair on Saturday, September 8th, at 4 pm. 

New York - LiveAuctioneers, the world’s leading online marketplace for exceptional fine art, antiques and vintage collectibles, has released its Mid-Year 2018 Report confirming record results and a year-over-year pattern of growth unrivaled in the industry.

“In the first six months of 2018, LiveAuctioneers delivered winning bidders on more than 300,000 items and processed billions of dollars in winning bids and underbids,” said LiveAuctioneers CEO, Phil Michaelson. “We dramatically outperformed the competition, and our accelerating growth and Internet best practices continue to drive the highest-quality consignments to auction houses that are on the LiveAuctioneers platform. It has been a source of great pride for our team to be the lowest-cost provider of premium services and yet drive the best results in the industry.”

The first half of the year comparisons on a year-over-year basis include:

  • An increase of 37% more bids
  • An industry-leading average sell-through rate of 24.7%
  • An increase of more than 50,000 new bidders, on average, every month
  • Web and mobile traffic of over 23 million visits, up 34%
  • Over 133,000 consignments directed, an increase of more than 27%
  • Record online-auction results for Lucio Fontana art ($210,000), blockchain art ($140,000), Atsuko Tanaka art ($88,000), Finn Juhl furniture ($60,000) and more 

LiveAuctioneers has continued to invest in new solutions for growing its auction house partners’ sales and increasing the flow of their respective consignments. Customer-driven innovations like Custom Auction Software, Auction Previews, Timed Auctions, and payment by cryptocurrency are converting traditional ecommerce shoppers to live-auction winners through LiveAuctioneers. “We out-execute the competition, and auction houses on our platform are enjoying an increase of up to 40% in the number of items sold as compared to the first half of 2017,” Michaelson said. LiveAuctioneers’ free auction price results database, with over 21 million listings, is now faster to search and continues to be the leading resource for appraisers and consignors seeking auctioneers with whom to place consignments.

“Many other exciting improvements are in the pipeline for later this year,” Michaelson said. “The incredible results LiveAuctioneers achieved in the first half of 2018 are just the beginning. Our goal is to empower auction-house partners with tools and marketing products that take their sales to the next level. Our business model ensures alignment. We focus all of our energy on enabling partners to grow their respective businesses. If we do that effectively, our success takes care of itself.”

Click to view LiveAuctioneers’ 2018 mid-year results.

UG9ydHJhaXRfRWRtb25kRGVCZWxhbXkuSlBH.jpegNew York—This fall, as part of the ongoing dialogue over AI and art, Christie’s will become the first major auction house to offer a work of art created by an algorithm, which will be included in the Prints & Multiples auction in New York October 23-25. The work is titled Portrait of Edmond de Belamy (estimate: $7,000-10,000), created by artificial intelligence and conceived by the Paris-based collective Obvious.

The portrait depicts a gentleman, possibly French and — to judge by his dark frockcoat and plain white collar — a man of the church. The work appears unfinished: the facial features are somewhat indistinct and there are blank areas of canvas. The portrait, however, is not the product of a human mind. It is one of a group of 11 unique portraits of the fictional Belamy family conceived by Obvious, a Paris-based collective consisting of Hugo Caselles-Dupré, Pierre Fautrel and Gauthier Vernier.

Hugo Caselles-Dupré, representative of Obvious, describes the process: “This new technology allows us to experiment on the notion of creativity for a machine, and the parallel with the role of the artist in the creation process. The approach invites the observer to consider and evaluate the similarities and distinctions between the mechanics within the human brain, such as the creative process, and the ones of an algorithm. We wish to emphasize the parallel between the input parameters used for training an algorithm, and the expertise and influences that craft the style of an artist. Most of all, we want the viewer to focus on the creative process: an algorithm usually functions by replicating human behavior, but it learns by using a path of its own.”

Richard Lloyd, International Head of Prints & Multiples, comments: “Christie’s continually stays attuned to changes in the art market and how technology can impact the creation and consumption of art. AI has already been incorporated as a tool by contemporary artists and as this technology further develops, we are excited to participate in these continued conversations. To best engage in the dialogue, we are offering a public platform to exhibit an artwork that has entirely been realized by an algorithm.”

In July 2018, Christie’s London staged a symposium on the profound implications of blockchain for artists and collectors. The inaugural technology conference will be an annual event, and AI will very likely be one of the next topics explored. This October, when the Portrait of Edmond de Belamy goes under the hammer in the Prints & Multiples sale it will signal the arrival of AI art on the world auction stage. Proceeds from the sale of this lot will be used to further the collective’s research into training its algorithm and to finance the computation power needed to produce this type of artwork.

About the process:

Obvious is engaged in exploring the interface between art and artificial intelligence, using a method known as a ‘generative adversarial network’ or the acronym GAN. This series is referred to as “La Famille de Belamy,” was named as a tribute to the inventor of GANs, Ian Goodfellow (“Goodfellow” is roughly translated to “Bel ami” in French). Created by an algorithm composed of two parts, The Generator and the Discriminator, the system was fed a data set of 15,000 portraits. The Generator made new images based on the set and the Discriminator reviewed all outputs until it deemed the result imperceptible whether done from a human-hand or attributed to the algorithm. The work included in the October sale is Edmond de Belamy, the ‘youngest’ documented member of the family or the ‘newest’ born creation of the algorithm. For additional information visit the Christie’s online feature: Is artificial intelligence set to become art’s next medium?

Image: Generative Adversarial Network print, on canvas, 2018, 70x70 cm (60x60 cm unframed) signed with GAN model loss function in ink by the publisher, from a series of eleven unique images, published by Obvious Art, Paris, with original gilded wood frame. Estimate: $7,000-10,000

7ebdd6be-2a80-4c5c-8bad-429d6aeca74a.jpgThe second weekend of June 2019 promises to be unmissable for book lovers as a major new fair will open every day between Thursday 6 and Sunday 9 June. For the first time the flagship summer book fairs of the ABA and PBFA will coincide with the annual London Map Fair and Etc Fairs' Bloomsbury Book Fair. 

 

For many years the fairs have been days or even weeks apart. 2019 will mark a return to traditional June dates which will not clash with Bank or School Holidays. Collectors, dealers and curators from around the world will not have to make tough decisions about which fairs to attend.

Book, map and print lovers can start this special weekend with an extravaganza of books at the PBFA London Antiquarian Book Fair. Opening at noon on Thursday June 6, and running through Friday June 7, the IBIS hotel in Lille Road will welcome over 100 dealers from all around the world.  This guarantees a wide range of material to suite every interest and pocket.

Opening on Friday June 7 and running through to Sunday June 9: Firsts - London’s Rare Book Fair, the ABA’s annual flagship event and one of the most prestigious rare books fairs in the world, will be staged in beautiful Battersea Park and will welcome over 170 international exhibitors.

Opening at noon on Saturday June 8: The London Map Fair. Held annually at the Royal Geographical Society, SW7, with over 40 leading international exhibitors, this is the largest as well as the oldest specialist antique map fair in the world. 

The Bloomsbury Book Fair, organised by Etc Fairs will be held on Sunday June 9 from 10am - 3.30pm. With over 120 dealers from the UK, Europe and further afield, the summer fair is a key event in their fairs calendar, always drawing an excellently diverse selection of buyers and booksellers.

Image: Photo credit Iona Wolff

 

Heritage Map copy.jpgDallas, TX - America’s rarest, rabble-rousing poke-in-the-eye to British Parliament - a seldom-seen political cartoon celebrating the 1773 Boston Tea Party - is expected to sell for more than $20,000 after surfacing in Heritage Auctions’ Aug. 25 Americana auction. It was published mere months after the Sons of Liberty, disguised as Mohawk Indians, took to Boston Harbor and destroyed more than 92,000 pounds of tea. Just six copies of the copper engraved cartoon are known in institutional holdings.

Titled: “Liberty Triumphant or the Downfall of Oppression,” the illustration shows the response of New Englanders to the British Tea Tax, enacted in 1773, drawn over a map of the northern and middle colonies. Probably published in Philadelphia or New York, the cartoon is attributed to Henry Dawkins, an engraver who was arrested in 1776 on suspicion of counterfeiting continental and provincial currency, which resulted in a $1,500 fine. 

“Revolutionary era cartoons are in exceedingly high demand, and this is an extremely rare print,” Heritage Auctions Americana Director Tom Slater said. “This is a very important cartoon that addresses one of the most successful acts of civil protest in the history of our country. We are aware of just six other copies, all of which are in institutional holdings, making the demand for this one even higher among serious collectors.”

The Boston-based Sons of Liberty, a secret society formed to protect the rights of the colonists and to fight taxation by the British government, targeted the Tea Act of 1773, which allowed the British India Company to sidestep some tax liability while selling tea from China in American colonies, thereby effectively undercutting local tea merchants. Protestors, some of whom were disguised as Native Americans, destroyed an entire shipment of tea on December 16, 1773, forcing the closing of Boston Harbor.

Published after December 23, 1773 and before April 1774, the image is decidedly busy, filled with captions and quote balloons from nearly all of the 30 characters. The left side of the cartoon shows British politicians and merchants with the devil, and American colonists - seven of whom are dressed as Native Americans representing those at the Boston Tea Party - on the right. 

Captions at the bottom of the cartoon serve as a key to explain the people and symbolic figures portrayed in it. Most of those on the left are representatives of the East India Company; those in the lower right are colonial merchants who opposed the Tea Party but deemed it better to acquiesce, since the deed was done. On the far right side of the cartoon is a British ship like those the protesters wanted to redirect back to England, prevented from discharging its cargo of tea.

The December 16, 1773 Boston Tea Party was the most dramatic act of civil disobedience to the Tea Act passed the previous spring. Mass protests in Boston, New York, Philadelphia and Charleston effectively prevented the unloading of cargo, leading to the passage of the “Intolerable Acts” and the forced closing of Boston harbor.

In an effort to aid in the recovery of materials missing as a result of the Carnegie Library theft, the ABAA requests the assistance of the public in bringing its attention to the list of items believed stolen. A downloadable pdf of same can be found here:

<https://www.abaa.org/blog/post/carnegie-library-theft>

Should any member of the public identify having purchased or otherwise having knowledge of the disposition or current location of any items from the Carnegie Library—whether on this list or not—please contact one of the following detectives from Allegheny County District Attorney’s Office:

· Det. Fran Laquatra 

  (412) 388-5305 

  flaquatra@alleghenycountyda.us

· Det. Perann Tansmore                   

  (412) 388-5307                           

  ptansmore@alleghenycountyda.us         `

· Det. Lyle Graber                           

  (412) 388-5316                           

  lgraber@alleghenycountyda.us

Please note, the detectives do not have reason to believe that anyone who may have purchased any of these items was necessarily aware that the material had been reported stolen.

The ABAA appreciates your attention and assistance with respect to this grave matter. Please check our post from March for further details, including additional information on collection markings: https://www.abaa.org/blog/post/pittsburgh-area-thefts.

Sincerely,

Vic Zoschak

President, ABAA

Brad Johnson

Chair, ABAA Security Committee

Susan Benne

Executive Director, ABAA

 

The Phantom in Skanor by De Geer.jpgIt’s the largest known collection of artwork and photography produced by the leading Swedish and Scandinavian artists of the 1960s and 70s counterculture. The Swedish Underground Exhibition, one of the finest examples of the shift in post-war art in Sweden, is coming to the Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair, Sept. 8 & 9 at the Brooklyn Expo Center in Greenpoint. The exhibition will be on view both days of the Fair during show hours in the Center’s exhibit room.   

Organized and curated by Johan Kugelberg, founder of Boo-Hooray, the organization he formed to formalize his archival collections of hip hop, punk and counter culture art,  the exhibition features major artistic voices of the time. At the center of the movement is Carl Johan De Geer, the Swedish artist and photographer, who began taking photographs in the 1960s that captured the grit of everyday Swedish life. De Geer’s photographs serve as a visual record of the era’s societal and cultural upheaval in otherwise conservative Sweden.

Like many artists of the time, De Geer became associated with Galleri Karlsson, considered the epicenter of the countercultural movement. The gallery exhibited artists such as De Geer and his wife, Mari-Louise De Geer, an accomplished artist in her own right;  Lars Hillersberg, Lena Svedberg, and Oyvind Fahlstrom - all of whom are represented in the upcoming exhibition.

In the late 60’s, De Geer, along with Svedberg, Hillersberg, and two other Swedish artists were associated with the leading Swedish underground publication of the Time, Puss magazine, contributing to its satire-driven, progressive content. The work of Lars Hillersberg, often employed humor and caricature in his political cartoons. Oyvind Fahlstrome served as New York correspondent, covering the city’s underground art scene.

Lena Svedberg (1946-1972) is cited as the greatest political artist associated with Puss. A compulsive draftsman, she avoided gallery shows, making her work difficult to sell.  De Geer’s documentary, “ I Remember Lena Svedberg is a masterful tribute to the artist, who committed suicide at age 16. The Swedish Underground Exhibit contains several original Svedberg artworks, as well as reproductions in prints and publications such as Puss.

Johan Kugelberg, who teaches and hosts symposiums at Yale and Cornell Universities, as well as Rare Book School at the University of Virginia, will conduct a tour of the exhibit and give a talk, humorously titled, “Why is The Swedish Underground Important:  I Don’t Speak Swedish,” on Sunday September 9th at  2pm. The tour and talk is free with pre-registration on the Fair’s website - www.brooklynbookfair.com.  

Show hours are: Saturday noon-7pm; Sunday 11am-4pm.   Admission:  Weekend pass $15 for adults; Sunday admission $10. An opening “Bagels & Books,” preview is scheduled for Saturday, 10am on.  The preview benefits scholarships at the University of Virginia’s Rare Book School. Tickets are $30 and available online at a discounted price at brooklynbookfair.com

Image: Like many artists of the time, De Geer, a talented painter, photographer, illustrator and filmmaker, became associated with Galleri Karlsson, considered the epicenter of the countercultural movement. The Swedish Underground Exhibition opens Sept. 8 & 9 at the Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair. It is largest known collection of counterculture artwork and photography produced by  leading Swedish and Scandinavian artists of the 1960s and 70s. The 100-exhibitor Fair is held at the Brooklyn Expo Center in Greenpoint.

BIABF-cloth bindings_Courtesy Brattle Book Shop copy.jpgBoston - The annual fall gathering for booklovers, the Boston International Antiquarian Book Fair returns to the Hynes Convention Center in Boston’s beautiful Back Bay for its 42nd year, November 16-18, 2018. Featuring the collections and rare treasures of 130 booksellers from the U.S., England, Canada, Netherlands, France, Germany, Russia, Denmark, and Argentina, the Boston Book Fair gives visitors the opportunity to see, learn about, and purchase the finest in rare and valuable books, illuminated manuscripts, autographs, graphics, maps, atlases, photographs, fine and decorative prints, and much more.

One of the oldest and most respected antiquarian book shows in the country, the event offers a top selection of items available on the international literary market. Attendees have the unique chance to get a close look at rare and historic museum-quality items, offered by some of the most prestigious participants in the trade.  Whether just browsing or buying, the Fair offers something for every taste and budget—books on art, politics, travel, gastronomy, and science to sport, natural history, literature, music, and children’s books—all appealing to a range of bibliophiles and browsers.

“We’re seeing a marked increase in dealers participating in this year’s event, including many dealers who are participating for the first time, “ said show producer Betty Fulton. “We’re very excited to see the array of items they will be bringing with them to Boston.”

For attendees wanting to start a collection without breaking the bank, there will be dealers offering “Discovery” items priced at $100 or less, including a selection of children's books and decorative cloth bindings.  The Fair is an opportunity to learn tips on how to start a collection, and talk to dealers who are experts in their specialties.

Special events at the Fair will include The Ticknor Society’s annual Collectors’ Roundtable, free appraisals, and other talks and demonstrations to be announced early this fall.  Visit www.bostonbookfair for updated event listings.

Tickets are $20 for Friday night’s exclusive Opening Night preview event, an opportunity for the public to get a first look at items for sale at the Fair; admission is free on Saturday and Sunday.

Friday, November 16              5:00-9:00pm             Tickets: $20.00 - Opening Night (valid all weekend)   

Saturday, November 17          12:00-7:00pm          Free Admission 

Sunday, November 18             12:00-5:00pm         Free Admission

Hynes Convention Center
900 Boylston Street
Boston, MA
www.mccahome.com

The Boston International Antiquarian Book Fair is sponsored by the New England Chapter of the Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association of America. A portion of the ticket sales will benefit the Boston Public Library and the American Antiquarian Society. Tickets are for sale at www.bostonbookfair.com and at the show’s box office during Friday evening show hours. For more information, please visit www.bostonbookfair.com or call 617-266-6540.

TUFSR0FSRVQtQk9VUktF4oCTV0hJVEUtKDE5MDTigJMxOTcxKS0tRm9ydC1QZWNrLURhbSwtTW9udGFuYSwtMTkzNi5qcGc=.jpegNew York -  Christie's announces the sale of An American Journey: The Diann G and Thomas A Mann Collection of Photographic Masterworks. On public view in Los Angeles, San Francisco and New York - the sale will take place at Christie’s Rockefeller Center the evening of October 4, followed by a morning session on October 5. The collection includes rare examples of works by major figures of the Photo-Secession—Edward Steichen, Gertrude Kasebier, Clarence White, and the quintessential patron and practitioner of American art photography, Alfred Stieglitz—along with numerous masterworks in early American Modernism by Edward Weston and Paul Strand.

Alfred Stieglitz was immensely influential in establishing and tirelessly promoting photography as an art form in the United States. He edited and published magazines, promoted photographers through exhibitions at his galleries, and produced his own rich body of creative photographic work. The photogravure printing process was his well-known favored method, and he promoted the technique as an original means of photographic printmaking. The Mann Collection contains his three most iconic works from the Photo-Secessionist period, printed as oversized photogravures; each example is signed and mounted including: The Terminal, New York, 1892; The Hand of Man, 1902; The Steerage, 1907.

The Mann collection also features works by socially conscious photographers associated with the Farm Security Administration which documented America during the Great Depression era, including Dorothea Lange, Margaret Bourke-White, Arthur Rothstein and Walker Evans. Additionally, of particular note are two outstanding 19th century works, including El Capitan, Yosemite, 1878-1881 by Carleton Watkins, and a superb example of White House Ruins in Canyon de Chelley by Timothy O'Sullivan, from 1873. 

An American Journey forms a comprehensive visual record of a rich period of production before World War I, through the explosive and radical period between the two great wars, and into the heady post-War period. Assembled by an assiduous couple who were moved by the power of photography, and recognized how severely photographic masterworks were undervalued. The Manns were true connoisseurs before photography collecting took off and had been fully accepted as a legitimate art form.

Image: Margaret Bourke-White (1904-1971), Fort Peck Dam, Montana, 1936. Gelatin silver print. Estimate: $100,000-150,000

Dayton, Ohio - Recognizing the power of literature to promote peace and reconciliation, the Dayton Literary Peace Prize Foundation today announced the finalists for the 2018 Dayton Literary Peace Prize in fiction and nonfiction.

Inspired by the 1995 Dayton Peace Accords that ended the war in Bosnia, The Dayton Literary Peace Prize is the only international literary peace prize awarded in the United States. The Prize celebrates the power of literature to promote peace, justice, and global understanding. This year's winners will be honored at a gala ceremony in Dayton on October 28th.

Writer John Irving, whose novels champion outsiders and often explore the bigotry, intolerance, and hatred directed at sexual minorities, will receive the 2018 The Ambassador Richard C. Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award, named in honor of the noted U.S. diplomat who helped negotiate the Dayton Peace Accords.

The full list of finalists can be found below and at www.daytonliterarypeaceprize.org.

"Many of this year's finalists explore the concept of 'home' at a time when more and more people find themselves forced to leave theirs, whether because of war, poverty, political turmoil, or dreams of new opportunities," said Sharon Rab, Chair of the Dayton Literary Peace Prize Foundation. "These books help the reader cultivate their ability to understand and empathize with people from very different backgrounds than their own - an ability that is becoming increasingly vital in today's turbulent world." 

The 2018 Dayton Literary Peace Prize fiction finalists are

  • Exit West by Mohsin Hamid (Riverhead): An astonishingly timely love story that brilliantly imagines the forces that transform ordinary people into refugees and the impossible choices that follow.
  • Go, Went, Gone by Jenny Erpenbeck (New Directions): A scathing indictment of Western policy toward the European refugee crisis, but also a touching portrait of a Berlin man who finds he has more in common with his city’s African refugees than he realizes.
  • Pachinko by Min Jin Lee (Grand Central): Exiled from a homeland they never knew, four generations of a poor Korean immigrant family fight to control their destinies. 
  • Salt Houses by Hala Alyan (Houghton, Mifflin, Harcourt): A heartbreaking story that follows three generations of a Palestinian family and asks us to confront that most devastating of all truths: you can’t go home again.
  • Sing, Unburied, Sing by Jesmyn Ward (Scribner): A family makes the trip from their Gulf Coast town to the Mississippi State Penitentiary, testing the strength of their emotional bonds and the pull of a collective history.
  • Spaceman of Bohemia by Jaroslav Kalfař (Little, Brown): Raised in the Czech countryside by his doting grandparents, Jakub Procházka has risen from small-time scientist to become the country's first astronaut. A dangerous solo mission to Venus offers him the chance at heroism he's always dreamed of -- and a way to atone for his father's sins as a Communist informer.   

The 2018 Dayton Literary Peace Prize nonfiction finalists are

  • Enduring Vietnam by James Wright (St. Martin’s Press): A recounting of the experiences of the young Americans who fought in Vietnam and of the families who mourned those who did not return.
  • Ghost of the Innocent Man by Benjamin Rachlin (Little, Brown): This gripping account of one man's long road to freedom provides a picture of wrongful conviction and of the opportunity for meaningful reform, forever altering how we understand our criminal justice system.
  • Lolas’ House by M. Erdina Galang (Northwestern U. Press): The stories of sixteen Filipino “comfort women” are told in unprecedented detail in what is not only testimony and documentation, but a book of witness, of survival, and of the female body. 
  • Reading with Patrick by Michelle Kuo (Random House): In this stirring memoir, Kuo, the child of Taiwanese immigrants, shares the story of her complicated but rewarding mentorship of Patrick Browning, a teenaged student from one of the poorest counties in the U.S., and his remarkable literary and personal awakening.
  • The Newcomers by Helen Thorpe (Scribner): Helen Thorpe’s intensive, year-long reporting puts a human face on the U.S. refugee population through an intimate look at the lives of 22 teenagers enrolled in a beginner-level English Language Acquisition class at South High School in Denver, Colorado. 
  • We Were Eight Years in Power by Ta-Nehisi Coates (One World PRH): “Biting cultural and political analysis... reflects on race, Barack Obama’s presidency and its jarring aftermath, and [Coates’s] own evolution as a writer in eight stunningly incisive essays.” Kirkus Reviews (starred review) 

A winner and runner-up in fiction and nonfiction will be announced on September 18. Winners receive a $10,000 honorarium and runners-up receive $2,500. Finalists will be reviewed by a judging panel of prominent writers including Lesley Nneka Arimah (What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky), Robin Hemley (Reply All: Stories, Nola: A Memoir of Faith, Art, and Madness, Invented Eden: The Elusive, Disputed History of the Tasaday), Susan Southard (Nagasaki: Life After Nuclear War), and Alan Taylor (William Cooper’s Town, The Internal Enemy).

To be eligible for the 2018 awards, English-language books had to be published or translated into English in 2017 and address the theme of peace on a variety of levels, such as between individuals, among families and communities, or between nations, religions, or ethnic groups.

 

Pathe.jpgNew York - Poster Auctions International, Inc., has unveiled its all-new Poster Price Guide, an expanded and revamped version of its poster-dedicated database, consolidating a full pricing history of over 40,000 of the rarest vintage posters sold in 75 proprietary auctions over the past 33 years. It’s a must-have reference tool for poster collectors and dealers worldwide.

The new Poster Price Guide includes a new, mobile-responsive database, larger images and links to auction listings, with all relevant details (to include references, sizes and printer and historical details). Poster Auctions International, Inc., has also redone the user interface, allowing for easier browsing and searching. Even the technologically challenged will find it very simple to navigate.

Access is competitively priced, at just $4.99 per week, $14.99 per month or $149.99 for a year. “It’s an essential tool for collectors, auctioneers, and scholars,” company president Jack Rennert said. “Since you have a full history - every poster, estimated price and final sale - you can learn about sales trends for individual posters, artists or the artistic movements, such as Art Nouveau.”

Since the late 1980s, Poster Auctions International, Inc., has held 3-4 auctions a year. Poster aficionados, enthusiasts, collectors, galleries, and leading art museums around the world value it as one of their most trusted venues for successful consignments, unique buying opportunities, an unequaled experience in the field, and an impeccable source for top quality in original poster art.

Poster Auctions International, Inc.’s gallery, located at 26 West 17th Street in New York City, hosts rotating exhibitions of original poster art. Additionally, it offers for sale a wide catalogue of “Contemporary Classics” poster originals from the 1960s to the 1980s, with specialties in local New York topics, plus late 20th-century Polish, Japanese, and Israeli designers and more.

The gallery is also a veritable bookstore of research and coffee-table volumes on poster art, as well as an extensive research archive, open to the public by appointment. Poster Auctions International, Inc., regrets that it can sell, and accept for consignment, only poster originals.

Jack Rennert is regarded as one of the world’s foremost authorities on rare vintage posters. He’s authored (either solo or in collaboration,) two dozen books on poster art, including catalogue raisonnés for Leonetto Cappiello and Alphonse Mucha; studies on bicycle and circus posters; and Buffalo Bill’s Wild West. His book Posters of the Belle Epoque has sold over 30,000 copies.

Rennert is currently at work on the definitive catalogue of Edward Penfield’s graphic art. He was a consultant at Time-Life Books for the poster section of the Collectibles Encyclopedia and has organized poster exhibitions around the country, including the Lincoln Center Museum for the Performing Arts, Radio City Music Hall, the French Embassy and banks and corporate buildings. 

To learn more about Poster Auctions International, Inc., visit www.posterauctions.com. To schedule a gallery appointment, call (212) 787-4000, or e-mail to info@postersplease.com.

Image: Pathe (1932), a vinyl-record poster by the French illustrator A.M. Cassandre (Alphonse Mouron, 1901-1968), sold for $96,000 at Poster Auctions International, Inc., on March 12, 2017.

MoserNoFatherMLM71811_73495v_0002-hpr(1).jpg“It’s alive, It’s alive! cried the crazed scientist, Dr. Frankenstein, looking up from his operating table and exulting at the success of his scientific experiment.  And, in fact, the hated and lonely, yet fabulous creation of the mad scientist is alive and thriving in 2018 - two hundred years later!

Mary Godwin Shelley’s iconic novel, Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus,” written when she was just 21 years old -  a remarkable literary feat for a young woman just finding her way in the world-- is 200 years old this year.   It’s an anniversary that is soon to be the subject of a major exhibition this Fall at the Morgan Library & Museum in New York City, appropriately titled, “It’s Alive:  Frankenstein at 200.”

A special preview of this exhibition, will be featured at the upcoming Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair, September 8 & 9 at the Brooklyn Expo Center in Greenpoint - a not-to-be-missed event for all those who continue to be fascinated  and drawn to this world classic novel.  The exhibition’s curators,  the Morgan Library’s John Bidwell, and New York Public Library’s Elizabeth Denlinger, are scheduled to present a talk on Sat. Sept 8th at 5pm that previews the Morgan exhibition and looks at the enduring legacy of Mary Shelley’s novel.  It is a wonderful opportunity to sample some of the excitement of the upcoming exhibition a month before its actual opening at the Morgan Library.

Mary’s own life echoed some of the estrangement of the monster she created.  The wife of Percy Bysshe Shelley, one of England’s most renowned 19th century poets, Mary was the daughter of philosopher and political writer, William Godwin, and early feminist writer, Mary Wollstonecraft, who died shortly after Mary’s birth in 1797.  Mary was raised  in London by her father and stepmother.  It was a difficult childhood, not much enlightened by love nor formal education.  Mary escaped her challenging home life by reading and daydreaming.

At age 17, she entered into a relationship with Shelley, a devoted student of  Mary’s father.  Although still married to his first wife, he and the teenaged Mary fled England to travel throughout Europe for the next two years.   Perpetually poor, they ended up in Switzerland with a group of similarly poor friends, including Lord Byron, who had rented a house at Lake Geneva.  The friends entertained themselves one rainy summer day by reading a book of ghost stories.

“Let’s write our own ghost story,” Byron suggested.  This was the impetus for Mary to begin work on what would become her most famous novel, the incomparable “Frankenstein, or the Modern Prometheus.” Thus,  the legend of this frightening, yet very human monster was born.  The book, published anonymously in 1818,  proved to be a huge success  and is read world-wide to this day. 

The struggle between a monster and its creator has been reincarnated in the theatre, other books, comic books and especially in film (the iconic Boris Karloff movie of 1931; Gene Wilder’s spoof, Young Frankenstein;” Kenneth Branagh’s film adaptation in 1994; and the modern thriller, “I, Frankenstein” in 2015).

Aside from the classic story that appeals to both children and adults, the enduring relevance of Frankenstein lies in its basic human emotions.  Immediately recognizable as part of the human condition, is the monster’s need to be loved.   “You made me,” says the monster reasonably.  “All I ever wanted was your love.  Or at least acceptance.  But I am so ugly that everyone flees in disgust.  I’m lonely, an outcast, hated.  So I take my revenge.  I have learned, in the absence of love, to hate.”  Perhaps Frankenstein’s ultimate message today remains exactly what it was 200 years ago:  give love, not unkindness.

Hours for the Brooklyn Antiquarian Fair are:   Sat., September 8th, noon-7pm; Sun. September 9th, 11am-4pm; Admission:  Weekend pass:  $15 for adults; Sunday admission $10.   The Frankenstein talk is free with  online registration and tickets to the fair at www.brooklynbookfair.com.  

Image: Barry Moser, “No Father Has Watched My Infant Days” illustration in Mary Woolstonecraft Shelley, Frankenstein, West Hatfield, Mass.:  Pennyroyal Press, 1983. Morgan Library & Museum.  Photography by Janny Chiu 2017 @ 1984 Pennyroyal Press. 

Frazetta venus.jpgDallas, TX - Frenetic bidding drove the final price for Frank Frazetta’s Escape on Venus Painting Original Art (1972) to $660,000 to claim top-lot honors in Heritage Auctions' Comics & Comic Art Auction Aug. 2-4 in Dallas, Texas, which brought in a total of $6,670,739.

The price realized by Escape on Venus was the third-highest ever through Heritage Auctions for a Frazetta painting. Death Dealer 6 Painting Original Art (1990) brought a record $1,792,500 in May 2018, and Frank Frazetta At The Earth's Core Paperback Cover Painting Original Art (1974), sold for $1,075,500 in August 2016.

Used as the cover image for the 1974 re-issue of the Edgar Rice Burroughs novel of the same name, Escape on Venus was created in 1972 and released as a print later in the decade.

“The result for this painting continues a trend of Frazetta paintings that have enjoyed enormous success in our auctions,” Heritage Auctions Senior Vice President Ed Jaster said. “Frank Frazetta was known for painting strong, sensuous women in fantastic environments. Escape on Venus is a prime example of his ability to paint in a way that directs the focus of those viewing his paintings to a specific place. In this painting, the trees and plants around the borders of the painting are done in subtle, muted tones, sending the focus back to the tiger and the woman in the center of the image.”

The Incredible Hulk #1 (Marvel, 1962) CGC VF/NM 9.0 Off-white to white pages also drew bids from nearly 30 collectors, before ultimately selling for $264,000. Ranked second on Overstreet’s list of the Top 50 Silver Age Comics, this issue is the only one in which the Hulk appears grey, and carries a grade higher than all but two copies ever offered by Heritage Auctions.

The cover of Gene Colan and Bill Everett Iron Man and Sub-Mariner #1 Cover Original Art (Marvel, 1968) proclaims it to be a “Special Once-In-A-Lifetime” issue, and the $240,000 - a figure nearly 2-1/2 times the pre-auction estimate - showed evidence that the statement was more than mere hyperbolic hype designed to sell the issue. The title characters teamed up in this issue after each had paired up with others: Namor the Sub-Mariner with the Hulk in Tales to Astonish, and Iron Man with Captain America in Tales of Suspense.

John Romita Sr. Amazing Spider-Man #55 Cover Doctor Octopus Original Art (Marvel, 1967) was another extremely popular lot, drawing bids from 18 collectors before realizing $105,000. This stunning cover shows an extreme close-up image of supervillain Doctor Octopus, who is engaged in a battle with Spider-Man, who can be seen in the reflection of Doc Ock’s glasses over a banner trumpeting “DOC OCK WINS!”

Jack Kirby and Chic Stone Tales of Suspense #60 Splash Page 1 Captain America Original Art (Marvel, 1964) was among the most coveted items in the auction, inspiring bids from 31 collectors before closing at $96,000, nearly double the pre-auction estimate. Just the second solo Captain America story since the 1950s, the issue features an extraordinary image of Captain America beneath a starburst balloon announcing “THE ARMY OF ASSASSINS STRIKES!” The issue is written by Stan Lee, with art by Jack Kirby, and is inked by Chic Stone and lettered by Art Simek.

The 1958 cult-classic film The Blob! was inspired by scenes like the one on the cover of Wally Wood Weird Science #22 Cover Original Art (EC, 1953), which yielded $90,000. Promising “Incredible Science-Fiction Stories,” the original art by Wally Wood features Wood’s “Old English” font signature in the lower left corner. The image, measuring 13-1/2 by 19-1/2 inches, is done in ink over graphite on EC Bristol board.

Other top lots included, but were not limited to:

·         Jack Kirby and Paul Reinman X-Men #1 Story Page 5 Original Art (Marvel, 1963): $72,000

·         Detective Comics #35 Larson Pedigree (DC, 1940) CGC Conserved NM- 9.2 White pages: $66,000

·         Bernie Wrightson Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley's Frankenstein Unused Illustration Original Art (c. 1975): $60,000

·         Barry Smith Conan the Barbarian #5 Cover Original Art (Marvel, 1971): $60,000

The auction also featured a collection of 23 Star Wars action figures, which sold for a total of $201,180. The collection included, but was not limited to:

·         Bib Fortuna (Red Cape) Loose Action Figure /TW Prototype (Kenner, 1983) Condition: AFA 85 NM+: $31,200

·         Luke Skywalker 12 Back-C w/Yellow Hair Action Figure (Kenner, 1978) AFA 95 MT: $28,800

·         Ben (Obi-Wan) Kenobi First Shot Prototype Action Figure with Yellow Saber (Kenner, 1977) AFA 70 EX+: $20,400

·         Princess Leia Organa 12 Back-B Action Figure (Kenner, 1978) AFA 95 MT: $19,200

·         Luke Skywalker w/Telescoping Lightsaber 12 Back-C Action Figure (Kenner, 1978) AFA 85 NM+: $15,600

16 Kajioka.pngThe Center for Book Arts is pleased to announce its Fall Exhibitions. The Main Exhibition, titled Inside/ Out: Self, Family, Memory, Loss, Displacement, Catastrophe, is organized by Carole Naggar, poet, artist, curator, educator, and photography historian. 

Self-published photobooks first made their appearance in Europe right after World War II. At that time photographers mainly published in magazines, and the form of the photobook was still somewhat exotic, used infrequently by photographers. Today, self-published photobooks are also well represented in collections such as the New York MoMA’s library, The Indie Photo Library at the Beinecke (Yale), which inspired the creation of other independent photobook archives, like The Asia-Pacific Photobook Archive, as well as private collections.

This exhibition features thirty-four self-published photobooks, varying in sizes and aspect, usually printed in small editions. Their form varies from the classic, traditionally printed book to the zine, the folio, the leporello book, the panoramic shape, the I-phone… Also including selected photographs, Inside/Out shows a range of media from gelatin prints to C-prints, collotype, inkjet and Xerox.

The photographers and artists in this exhibition see the self-published photobook as a place of independence, a place where they can experiment freely with form, but, more importantly, as a testing ground for reflection, self-examination, meditation and ideas that the main market does little to accommodate. The quick turnaround from concept to creation also allows them to react to national and international news, making the books not only an aesthetic endeavor but also a political one.

The chosen books illustrate very personal subjects such as family, memory, loss and identity as well as larger topics such as immigration, displacement and exile and catastrophic events such as World War II, the AIDS epidemic, September 11 and Fukushima. A few are historical and most contemporary. They originate from twenty countries: Argentina, Azerbadjian, Denmark, Estonia, France, Germany, Great Britain, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Great Britain, Mexico, The Netherlands,The Philippines, Russia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, the United States and Vietnam.

It had been predicted that the rise of the Internet would mean the end of the book on paper. However, it had an opposite effect, creating “digital fatigue” because ephemeral images are everywhere. Readers still crave a hands-on experience and the concrete sensations associated with reading and looking.

While some deplore the rise of self-publishing because it tramples the gates and gatekeepers who once decided what should be published, the trend gave artists new freedom. Self-published photobooks provide the experience of looking at work the way the artist envisioned it. Most self-published photobooks are issued in limited editions, hand-numbered or signed, which makes them works of arts themselves. They become places for debating ideas, articulating insights and experience, and testing out new forms. And many are objects of beauty.

Artists include: Olivia Arthur, Barbara Bash, Doug Beube, Julia Borissova, Machiel Botman, Chien Chi Chang, Cristina De Middel, Giovanni del Brenna, Michel Delsol, Eamonn Doyle, Carolyn Drake, Tina Enghoff, Veronica Fieiras, Claire Fouquet and Patty Smith, Lee Friedlander, Ralph Gibson, Hiroshi Hamaya, Simone Hoang, Ilkin Huseynov, Fumiko Imano, Miho Kajioka, Kent Klich, Anouk Kruithof, Susan Meiselas, Editha Mesina, Kazuma Obara, Pablo Ortiz Monasterio, Sophie Ristelhueber, Alec Soth, Jordan Sullivan, Peter Van Agtmael, Todd Walker, Mo Yi, and Ksenia Yurkova

Roundtable Discussion: Friday, October 19, 2018, 6:30 pm

The roundtable will include Barbara Bash, Michel Delsol, Editha Mesina and Patty Smith. and will be moderated by Carole Naggar.

For inquiries please contact the Center at eahern@centerforbookarts.org.

When: October 5 - December 15, 2018

Where: 28 W 27th St., 3rd Floor, NY, NY

Subway: N/R to 28th St, or F to 23rd St

Exhibition URL: https://centerforbookarts.org/events/category/exhibitions/upcoming-exhibitions/

Gallery Hours: M-F, 11a-6p; Sat, 10a-5p

Admission: Free

ALSO ON VIEW: FALL 2018 FEATURED ARTIST PROJECTS

 In addition to Inside/Out, The Center presents Cultivating Book and Land by Sally Alatolo and Celestial Bodies by Monica Ong, both organized by Alexander Campos, Executive Director & Curator for The Center for Book Arts. All three shows are on view through December 15.

Cultivating Book and Land by Master Faculty Fellow Sally Alatolo is a project that originated in the rehabilitation of an orchard and woodlands in rural SW Michigan. Alatolo is eager to bridge her interests in language and its dissemination with the discourses of rural economies.

Monica Ong is a visual artist and poet whose hybrid image-poems juxtapose diagram and diary, bearing witness to silenced histories of the body. Her Featured Artist Project is presented as a series of art installations. The poems are as much visual journeys as they are lyrical haunts of medicine and memory.                                                               

Visit our website for up-to-date details on all events and programs:  www.centerforbookarts.org

Image: Miho Kajioka, And Where Did the Peacocks Go?, 2018, Courtesy of the Artist

l2017146_119v_low.jpgLos Angeles - The J. Paul Getty Museum recently announced the acquisition of the Rothschild Pentateuch, a manuscript of the first five books of the Hebrew Bible, known as the Torah. Its acquisition, coupled with works already in the Museum’s manuscripts collection, allows the Getty to represent the medieval art of illumination in sacred texts from the three Abrahamic religions—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Art of Three Faiths: A Torah, a Bible, and a Qur’an, on view August 7, 2018 through February 3, 2019, showcases three spectacular examples of each of these three: a Christian Bible and a Qur’an will be shown alongside the newly acquired Torah.  

“This landmark acquisition fulfills one of the Museum’s longstanding goals of adding to our collection a Hebrew manuscript that can stand comparison in quality and importance to our finest illuminated manuscripts of other languages and faiths,” explains Timothy Potts, director of the J. Paul Getty Museum. “It has taken 35 years, but the Rothschild Pentateuch fills this gap more brilliantly than we could ever have imagined. An amazingly rare and beautiful object, richly illuminated with all manner of real and imaginary animals, it also broadens greatly the narratives we are able to tell about life, culture and religion in the Middle Ages. The acquisition will be a highlight of an upcoming exhibition that brings together - for the first time at the Getty - the sacred texts of the three Abrahamic religions, something that I am sure will deepen the experience of these works for many of our visitors, and be a rich subject of study for scholars.”

Judaism, Christianity, and Islam trace their belief in the singular God to a common patriarch, the figure of Abraham. The practitioners of all three religions have been called “people of the book” for their shared belief in the importance of the divine word, rendered in medieval manuscripts in glowing gold and luminous colors on parchment. 

The Torah is the central sacred text of Judaism. In the strictest sense, the word refers to the Pentateuch, which contains the books of Moses: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. Illuminated copies of the Hebrew Bible in codex form, rather than Torah scrolls, began to appear in the mid-thirteenth century. In northern Europe, these manuscripts served the needs of members of the Ashkenazi Jewish community who had settled in the area along the Rhine River. Lavishly illustrated Hebrew manuscripts are exceedingly rare, since Jewish artisans were forbidden by law to join painting guilds. Hebrew manuscripts were often written by itinerant Jewish scribes and illuminated by local, sometimes Christian, artists. Illumination of the Hebrew Bible centers on the calligraphic forms of the letters, such as initials, word panels, or decorative frames around blocks of text.

“The three objects on display are exceptionally beautiful artworks that we hope will spark meaningful dialogue among various audiences,” said Elizabeth Morrison, senior curator of Manuscripts at the Getty Museum. “Museums offer more than simply an aesthetic experience. Through exhibitions such as this one, they foster a deeper understanding of history that helps us to reflect on our own shared experiences.”

Among the earliest bound and illuminated codices from the Mediterranean world are copies of the Christian Bible written in Greek, Latin, Syriac, Ge’ez, Armenian, and other languages. The first part of the Christian Bible consists of texts from the Hebrew Bible, referred to since the second century by Christian writers as the Old Testament. Medieval Christians understood it not only as a historical document but also as a body of prophecy that specifically foretold the coming of Christ. The New Testament comprises accounts of Christ’s life, the Gospels, letters to churches or individuals from his disciples, such as apostles Peter and Paul, and a text about the end of time known as Apocalypse or Revelation. Illuminated Bibles—handwritten and printed alike—are among the most enduring forms of Christian book art produced during the Middle Ages.

The words that the angel Jibril (Gabriel) recited to the prophet Muhammad ibn Abdullah, about 560-632, formed the sacred text of the Qur’an. The opening line, “In the name of Allah, most gracious, most merciful,” a central tenet of Islam that expresses submission to the will of Allah, is repeated in almost every surah or chapter. Muslims transmitted scripture through oral tradition for the first few centuries, and later recorded it through beautiful and ornate calligraphy. Artists incorporated Quranic verses into books, textiles, coins, ceramics, and architecture, demonstrating reverence for the written word. Throughout the Middle Ages, the Islamic word spanned a vast territory, from the Iberian Peninsula to northern and coastal Africa, across the Mediterranean basin, and as far as Central and Eastern Asia.

Art of Three Faiths: A Torah, a Bible, and a Qur’an is curated by Kristen Collins, Bryan Keene, and Elizabeth Morrison, of the department of Manuscripts at the J. Paul Getty Museum. The exhibition will be on view August 7, 2018 through February 3, 2019. 

Image: Decorated Text Page (Book of Exodus) from the Rothschild Pentateuch, France and/or Germany, 1296. Leaf: 10 7/8 x 8 1/4 in. (27.5 x 21 cm). Ms. 116 (2018.43), fol. 119v

 

511-Sutro-Baths copy.jpgNew York—A mammoth auction of Vintage Posters on August 1 set at least six auction records, including a new high price for Sutro Baths. The text-free variant of the 1896 poster, promoting a former San Francisco landmark, brought $23,400. The exhibition for Swann Galleries’ annual summer auction was overflowing, taking both exhibition floors at the house’s Flatiron district premises.

Alphonse Mucha’s Times of the Day was the top lot of the auction, selling to an institution for $40,000. Other Mucha works received significant attention from collectors: Bières de la Meuse, 1897, sold for $17,500 over an $8-12,000 presale estimate, and Salon des Cent, 1896, brought $10,000. The sale set a record price for Peter Behren’s Der Kuss, 1898, a color woodcut published by Pan magazine, at $5,000. Other Art Nouveau highlights included Marcello Dudovich’s 1908 design for the Italian department store Mele ($6,500).

The auction offered an unusually broad selection of food and drink posters, with sections devoted to Leonetto Cappiello and Luciano Achille Mauzan. The former's Carnaval / Vinho do Porto, 1911, brought $18,750. Manuel Orazi’s Ligue Vinicole de France, 1901, an elegant image positioning wine as the wholesome answer to the modern world’s ills, brought a record $10,625. Ludwig Hohlwein’s Kathreiner Weine, 1913, was purchased by an institution for $4,750. As a firm counterargument to the virtues of a perfectly aged bottle of wine, a group of 20 small-format posters issued by the American Temperance Society sold for $2,125.

Wartime propaganda, for which these sales are known, included both marketplace mainstays and surprises. Among top lots were perhaps the two most iconic posters in the world: James Montgomery Flagg’s I Want You brought $10,000, while the anonymously designed Keep Calm and Carry On, a 1939 image from Great Britain’s propaganda efforts in WWII, sold for $12,500. Soviet Constructivist images performed well, with posters by Gustav Klutsis and Nikolai Andreevich Dolgorukov among the top lots ($9,375 and $6,750, respectively). Two posters designed by Arthur Szyk in the 1940s for the war effort, encouraging American soldiers to “Fool the Axis - Use Prophylaxis,” sold for $4,750 and $4,000, new auction records over estimates of just $800 to $1,200 apiece. 

Nicholas Lowry, Swann Galleries’ President and Director of Vintage Posters, noted that “the results were representative of the kind of poster passion that has driven the success of these auctions over the last two decades. As is usual in our August sales, WWI and WWII propaganda and Art Nouveau performed well, but unexpected highlights also indicate a buoyant market for psychedelic, protest, artist and exhibition posters.”

The next auction of Vintage Posters at Swann Galleries, Rare & Important Travel Posters, is scheduled for October 25, 2018. Swann Galleries holds at least five poster auctions each year and is currently accepting quality consignments for auctions in 2019.

Image: Lot 511, Sutro Baths, designer unknown, 1896. Sold for $23,400.

Furthermore grants in publishing, a program of the J. M. Kaplan Fund, is pleased to announce the Short List for the 2018 Alice Award. This year, the sixth year of the Alice, $25,000 will be given for the Alice Award and $5,000 to each of the shortlisted books. 

Debi Cornwall: Welcome to Camp America, Inside Guantánamo Bay

Radius Books

Santa Fe, New Mexico 

“O’er the Wide and Tractless Sea:” Original Art of the Yankee Whale Hunt

New Bedford Whaling Museum

New Bedford, Massachusetts

Visual Voyages: Images of Latin American Nature from Columbus to Darwin

Yale University Press

London, United Kingdom; New Haven, Connecticut

Furthermore received over 100 submissions for the 2018 Alice, including books that have received funding from Furthermore and are automatically considered for the Award. The Alice 2018 shortlisted books are geographically diverse and all three have been recognized for focusing attention on subjects that are culturally significant in their various fields and not considered of broad general interest by mainstream publishers.  The books meet the criteria of the Alice as being “well-made illustrated books, that afford a special sense of intimacy.”

In addition to taking us inside Guantanámo Bay and raising questions for the reader to ponder through photographs and text, the design of Debi Cornwall:  Welcome to Camp America has an exposed binding and individual sheets that are not stitched into the binding.  The book, published by Radius Books a non-profit publisher located in Santa Fe, New Mexico, accompanied an exhibition that opened at the Steven Kasher Gallery in New York City and was then exhibited at the Fotofest Biennial, Houston, Texas and the Philadelphia Photo Art Center in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. 

The subject of American whaling is outlined with text, drawings, paintings, journal pages, posters, and other ephemera in a beautifully designed book written by Michael P. Dyer and entitled: “O’er the Wide and Tractless Sea:” Original Art of the Yankee Whale Hunt.  The book was published by the New Bedford Whaling Museum, New Bedford, Massachusetts. 

Visual Voyages: Images of Latin American Nature from Columbus to Darwin, published by Yale University Press in New Haven, Connecticut and London, United Kingdom, positions Latin America as a source of artistic and scientific study and connects this history with what was happening in Europe during the same time period. Visual Voyages was published in collaboration with the Huntington Library, San Marino, California to accompany the exhibition with the same title. 

ALICE JURY:

R.O. Blechman, Illustrator

Paula Cooper, Director, Paula Cooper Gallery

David Godine, Publisher

Sharon Helgason Gallagher, President & Publisher, Artbook/D.A.P.

Ian Wardropper, Director, the Frick Collection

Chair: Jock Reynolds, Former Director, Yale University Art Gallery  

THE ALICE AWARD

The $25,000 Alice award, inaugurated in 2013 and administered by Furthermore grants in publishing, is given to a book that represents excellence in all aspects of the work—from idea to design to quality of production. This is the sixth Alice Award and $160,000 will have been contributed to institutions in support of illustrated publications when the Alice is presented in October. The book receiving the Alice will be announced on the Furthermore website (furthermore.org) on Monday, 8 October at 12:00 noon. 

Every book receiving a grant from Furthermore is eligible for the Alice.  Books not receiving funding from Furthermore may be submitted for consideration for the Alice if they are a 501(c)3 organization and have acted as a partner in the book’s production.  The submission process opens on 1 January and closes on 1 April.  Books published in the calendar year prior and up to the submission deadline will be considered. 

The Alice Award will be presented on Monday, 29 October 2018 at the Strand Book Store.  

ALICE M. KAPLAN:

The Alice honors Alice M. Kaplan, who was the co-founder of the J. M. Kaplan Fund. Mrs. Kaplan energetically encouraged the Kaplan Fund to support music, dance, libraries, and the visual arts. Joan K. Davidson, Ms. Kaplan's daughter, who is the founder and president of Furthermore and president emeritus of the Kaplan Fund, said, "My mother loved and collected the handsome illustrated book as itself a work of art, and since that kind of book depends upon the efforts of many creators—writer, designer, editor, and publisher—it is a commitment to that joint effort that the Alice will acknowledge and celebrate.”

Furthermore, founded in 1995, is a unique form of philanthropic support for nonfiction publishing that has given grants to nearly 1,200 publication projects—for writing, research, illustrations, editing, indexing, printing and binding, and more—totaling over $5 million. In establishing the Alice, Furthermore celebrates the program’s history of honoring outstanding book publishing and furthering its goal to provide significant support for the continuing creation of timeless and beautiful books. Furthermore is a program of the J. M. Kaplan Fund which was founded in 1945 by Jacob M. Kaplan.

556  .jpgChicago - Potter and Potter Auctions' midsummer event was a bibliophile's dream, drawing attention and buyers from every corner of the globe! When the hammer fell for the last time, 25 lots realized between $1,000-1,999; 15 lots made between $2,000-$9,999; and three lots scored $12,000 or more! Prices noted include the company's 20% buyer's premium. 

The three top lots in this auction all represented periods of great transition in world history. Lot #556, Emil Orlik's Aus Japan from 1904, was estimated at $10,000-15,000 and realized $18,000. Orlik was one of the first Western artists welcomed to Japan in 1900; he traveled to this traditionally secretive country to learn its print making techniques. His documentation of everyday Japanese life remains an important body of work today.  Lot #369, an engraving of the United States Declaration of Independence realized $16,800. This example was from volume I of Peter Force’s 1837-1853 series of books, American Archives. It is suspected that only 500 copies of the Force declaration were printed, making this Potter & Potter offering quite revolutionary in its own way. And lot #383, a 1917 US Army recruitment poster titled Destroy This Mad Brute/Enlist illustrated by H.R. Hopps, marched its way to $12,000. Its visceral call to enlist, which prominently features a monster primate, Lady Liberty, blood, and a cudgel in its design, blatantly expressed many American's deep-held fears of a German invasion.

This sale presented an a to z selection of important and rare books, with about 350 lots on offer. Lot #234, Edward Tracy Turnerell's two volume Russia on the Borders of Asia. Kazan, The Ancient Capital of the Tartar Khans trekked to $2,880 on its $200-400 estimate.  This first edition set was published in 1854 by London's Richard Bentley. Lot #38, a first edition of Kahlil Gibran's Jesus The Son of Man made $2,160 - more than seven times its low estimate! This example was inscribed by the author and published in 1928 by Alfred A. Knopf, New York.  And lot #26, a first edition of Philip K. Dick's 1962 The Man in the High Castle traded hands at $660. 

Fine, novel, and humorous photographs provided another focal point to this comprehensive sale. Everything worked out in the end with lot #469, a c. 1940s Louis Armstrong signed “Swiss Kriss” laxatives print advertising photo. Estimated at $400-800, it sold for $1,320. Lot #464, an inscribed and signed 1920-era publicity photo of boxer Jack Johnson pulled no punches, generating a whopping 19 bid and realizing $3,120.  And lot #424, a pair of 1908 photo albums of Cincinnati building construction projects from the Ailing Construction Co. climbed to $1,320. 

Museum-quality ephemera spanning three centuries also captured the imagination of collectors at this sale. Lot #411, a 1860-era Missouri Civil War recruitment broadside, battled its way to $1,440.  This bold letterpress recruitment poster offered handsome bounties to veterans and recruits alike to serve in Col. Sigel’s third volunteer infantry regiment. Lot #457, a 1928 Babe Ruth “Vote for Al Smith” real photo postcard made $900 on its $200-300 estimate.  This glossy original treasure pictured Ruth in bowler hat and cigar, with a flyer pinned to his lapel endorsing Al Smith for president.  And lot #567, a Tate Gallery Exhibition Booklet from 1971 with Andy Warhol’s “Marilyn Monroe" on the front and signed by the artist realized $2,640.

This memorable sale came full circle with carefully curated selections of posters, illustrations, artwork, and other temptations. It was a clothes encounter with lot #31, a group of three pre-production costume design drawings for the character Dick Diver from the 1962 film Tender is the Night.  They were illustrated by Academy Award winning costume designer Marjorie Best and realized $1,440.  Lot #444, a binder of 1920-era German notgeld, or regional currency, rang up $1,440.  This collection included over 450 different uncirculated monies.  And lot #384, a 1918 poster featuring a kneeling Boy Scout and a flag draped Lady Liberty sold for $900 - more than double its high estimate.  It was illustrated by Joseph Leyendecker and promoted the purchase of USA Bonds through the Third Liberty Loan Campaign.  

According to Gabe Fajuri, President at Potter & Potter Auctions, "Our book and manuscript sales continue offering diverse material, and the results of this auction show strong interest across all categories. The results show that demand for quality material is strong, and we are already looking forward to a full calendar of similar auctions in 2019." 

Potter & Potter, founded in 2007, is a Chicago area auction house specializing in paper Americana, vintage advertising, rare books, playing cards, gambling memorabilia, posters, fine prints, vintage toys, and magicana - antiques and collectibles related to magic and magicians. The company's next sale, its annual Summer Magic Auction, will be held on August 28, 2018.  For more information, please see www.potterauctions.com.  

Image: Aus Japan. Sold for $18,000 .

Sunday 26th August 2018 marks the 250th Anniversary of Captain James Cook’s departure on the first of his famous three voyages to the Pacific. He set sail on HMS Endeavour from Plymouth Harbour in 1768 having been commissioned by King George III.

Peter Harrington, the UK’s largest rare bookseller, has a complete set of James Cook’s 3 voyages, including a copy of The Life of Captain Cook by Andrew Kippis, for sale (£37,500), as well as rare books on each of the voyages and other books by and about Captain James Cook.

As Pom Harrington the owner of Peter Harrington says “The British explorer, navigator, cartographer and naval officer Captain Cook made three incredible voyages to the Pacific in which he surveyed and named new places, and features, and these voyages made great contributions to many fields of knowledge. These books would form the cornerstone of any book collection on the Pacific and many people would love to own these rare books about Cook’s fascinating historical adventures.”

Complete set of the three voyages by Captain James Cook with The Life of Captain Cook by Andrew Kippis (1773-1785) - £37,500

Q29sbGVjdGlvbiBvZiBib29rcy5wbmc=.png4 works in 10 volumes: This set includes first editions of the first two voyages made by Cook, the preferred second edition of his third voyage and a first edition of Kippis's biography of Captain Cook. The 10 volumes are attractively bound with wonderful illustrations. The extra-large maps and illustrations from the third voyage are contained in a separate atlas folio volume. 

 Highlights of Captain Cook’s Three Voyages:

  • During Cook's first voyage he observed the 1769 transit of Venus from Tahiti, discovered the Society Islands, made the first circumnavigation and charts of New Zealand and he led the first European expedition to the eastern coast of Australia which he charted and claimed for Britain on 22nd August 1770, naming it New South Wales;
  • In 1772 he was sent on his second voyage to search for Terra Australis or the great southern land mass which was supposed to lie between New Zealand and South America. In 1773 he made the first recorded crossing of the Antarctic Circle and proved no ‘Terra Australis’ existed. On route to New Zealand he discovered a host of islands including Easter Island, Tahiti, Vanuatu and New Caledonia and he also mapped South Georgia before returning to London in 1775;
  • In 1776 he left on his third voyage and in 1778 became the first European to visit Hawaii and went on to explore the west coast of North America passing through the Bering Strait before returning to Hawaii. Back in Hawaii quarrels broke out between the Europeans and local people which led to Cook’s death in February 1779.

Cook’s First Voyage

An Account of the Voyages undertaken…for Making Discoveries in the Southern Hemisphere...compiled by John Hawkesworth (1773) - £9,750

This is a handsome first edition, 3 volume set, of the official account of Cook's first voyage, together with accounts of previous expeditions under Byron, Carteret and Wallis, compiled by John Hawkesworth.

Hawkesworth was a respected London author and was commissioned by the Admiralty to edit the journals of the sea captains. Although this book was a huge success and became a best-seller, it was less successful for Hawkesworth who was attacked by the captains for tampering with the texts of their journals, by prudish readers for reprinting descriptions of the sexual freedoms of the South Sea islanders, and by devout churchmen for the immoral introduction. Hawkesworth was devastated by the criticism, and it was thought to be the main cause of his death. 

Cook’s Second Voyage

A Voyage Towards the South Pole, and Round the World, James Cook (1777) - £5,000

A first edition of Cook’s second and historically most important voyage, and the only one to be included in Printing and the Mind of Man as one of the printed books that made the greatest impact on humanity. In his circumnavigation of the globe in this voyage, Cook conclusively disproved the existence of a great southern continent, or ‘Terra Australis’, which was believed by some to connect Australia with a larger southern landmass. This account was written by Cook himself and it is noted for its very high-quality illustrations.

Cook’s Third Voyage

A Journal of Captain Cook's Last Voyage to the Pacific Ocean (1783) - £18,750

A remarkably well-preserved first edition of this rare book which is the first American account of Cook's third voyage, which preceded publication of the official (London) account by more than a year. This was the first American book about the Northwest coast of America and probably the first American book on Hawaii. It was written by the Connecticut-born John Ledyard who served under Cook.

The books are on display at Peter Harrington in Fulham Road, Chelsea. Peter Harrington offers an unconditional guarantee of every item’s authenticity and completeness as described. For more information see: www.peterharrington.co.uk

Les Enluminures will present a special exhibition and catalogue at Les Enluminures New York from October 17 to 23, 2018. It consists of four books that are remarkable survivals of what people read in the Middle Ages - the finest of medieval Bibles (the greatest text of Western civilization), one of the oldest Books of Hours (the most famous medieval manuscripts of all), biography (the unique legend of an Anglo-Saxon princess), and the history of Troy (the oldest chivalric story in European history). 

These are all manuscripts unknown on the market for at least eighty years. One of the four was last described in print in 1588; the others were last catalogued for sale in 1909, 1932 and 1938 respectively. All are richly illustrated, with a total of 133 miniatures between them, as well as hundreds of borders and illuminated animals and grotesques. Some of the finest artists of the period were responsible for the miniatures, and at least two of them likely issue directly from the greatest of European courts. 

A lavishly illustrated publication accompanies the exhibition. Prize-winning author (“Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts”) Christopher de Hamel wrote the Introduction and Catalogue. Founder and President of Les Enluminures, Sandra Hindman is responsible for the Preface. 

Les Enluminures is an internationally recognized leader in the field of Medieval and Renaissance manuscripts, miniatures, and finger rings. Dr. Sandra Hindman, an expert on medieval and Renaissance manuscript illumination and Professor Emerita at Northwestern University, founded Les Enluminures in Paris in 1991 in association with her Chicago-based business. The New York City location opened in May 2012. Keegan Goepfert (M.A., Courtauld) became Vice-President of the company in 2012. For over twenty-seven years, Les Enluminures has forged and maintained relationships with the world’s most prestigious public and private collections. International clients include the Musée du Louvre, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C., the J. Paul Getty Museum, among many others. The gallery has exhibited in most major art fairs in the United States and Europe, and we organize three to four exhibitions in our gallery spaces annually. 

October 17- 23, 2018 

23 E. 73rd St., 7th floor New York, NY 10021 

Opening: Wednesday October 17, 6-9 pm 

Open Daily 10am-6pm 

 

Lincoln shirt fragment.jpegWestport, CT - Important, historical items signed by Albert Einstein, Abraham Lincoln and Marilyn Monroe are just part of the incredible selection of autographed documents, books, manuscripts and relics set to come up for bid in University Archives’ next online-only auction, slated for Wednesday, August 22nd, at 10:30 am Eastern time. In all, 298 lots will be offered.

Other names in the auction include such diverse luminaries as Napoleon Bonaparte, Catherine the Great, Ty Cobb, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Woody Guthrie, Ernest Hemingway, Bruce Lee, J. D. Salinger, Joseph Stalin and Orville Wright. The full catalog with all lots can be viewed online now, at www.University Archives.com. Internet bidding will be provided by Invaluable.com.

“The historical market is showing great signs of strength, in many cases outpacing our strong economy,” said John Reznikoff, the president of University Archives. “It’s not often that we see such select items in the current seller’s market. We are particularly proud of the size and breadth of this sale but mostly the quality. Also worthy of noting is that the majority of items in this sale are offered for the first time or the first time in decades. Many of the items that have appeared before are offered at levels below their original sales price, offering some terrific opportunities.”

There are several Einstein lots in the sale, including a single page typed, signed scientific letter (in English) on Kepler and Quantum Law, the precursors to his special and general theory of relativity, dated Nov. 3, 1942 (est. $10,000-$12,000); and a rare and astounding life-size wax mold of Einstein’s head, commissioned by him personally and created by Katherine Stubergh (the wax sculptress of the stars), with human hair and signed by him (est. $15,000-$20,000).

Lincoln also makes multiple appearances in the auction. Lots include a one-page letter written and signed by Lincoln in 1863, a few months after issuing the Emancipation Proclamation, with association to freed slaves who fought with Gen. Ulysses S. Grant (est. $50,000-$60,000); and an actual fragment of Lincoln’s blood-stained shirt from the night of his assassination, with superb provenance, plus a copy of the book Obsequies of Abraham Lincoln (est. $25,000-$30,000).

Marilyn Monroe remains an enduring source of fascination to collectors. Several items signed by the screen goddess will come up for bid, to include the finest known photo signed by Monroe when she officially transformed from Norma Jean Baker to Marilyn Monroe. Taken circa 1947 and showing the starlet in a swimsuit pose, the 8 inch by 10 inch black and white photo is signed and inscribed with, “My very best wishes, Marilyn Monroe”. It should bring $20,000-$24,000.

From the same era, J. D. Salinger is another figure with lasting appeal for collectors. The famously reclusive author of The Catcher in the Rye is represented in the sale by a single-page letter, written and signed (“Love, Jerry”) entirely in Salinger’s hand, and addressed to Joyce Miller, a longtime friend, confidante and possible lover (no one is really sure). The letter, from May 1950, is jubilant, playful and suggestive. The envelope is included (est. $9,000-$10,000). 

The five lots dedicated to George Washington include an autograph manuscript, dated June 20, 1771, unsigned but penned by Washington on a single page as a survey and plot drawing that mark off reportedly violent Indian lands in the Ohio Valley (est. $20,000-$25,000); and a letter written and signed by Washington in January 1785, in which he introduces an Italian nobleman (the Count Castiglioni) to Governor William Moultrie of South Carolina (est. $14,000-$16,000).

A one-page letter written in French by Napoleon Bonaparte (1769-1821), signed by him, should command $2,000-$2,400. The letter, dated May 22, 1807 and written from what is now Poland, is regarding the surrender of Gdansk and the capture of the H.M.S. Dauntless. Also, a document from summer 1786 in which the Russian Empress Catherine II (Catherine the Great) promotes a Dutch engineer to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel, has a pre-auction estimate of $3,000-$3,500.

A single-page letter written circa 1922 and signed by the author F. Scott Fitzgerald, to journalist Marguerite Marshall, in response to her interview of him following the publication of his novel, The Beautiful and the Damned, should garner $5,000-$6,000. Also, a two-page typed letter, signed by literary giant Ernest Hemingway, to the writer Peter Viertel, dated Aug. 8, 1948, where he discourses on writing, fishing, hunting, marriage and religion, is estimated at $4,000-$4,500.

A rare reproduction photo print signed by former Russian leader Joseph Stalin, one of only three known and accompanied by great association and provenance, should hit $15,000-$20,000. The photo, boldly signed by Stalin in Cyrillic (“J Stalin”), is from 1930 and shows two other men. Also, a single-page letter handwritten and signed by Clarence Anglin, an escapee from Alcatraz prison, to his mother, dated Feb. 19, 1950, with provenance, has an estimate of $2,500-$3,000.

It doesn’t get any more diverse than Bruce Lee and Ty Cobb. An 11-page letter hand-penned and signed by Cobb, dated “8/29/59”, in which he makes predictions as to which teams will reach that year’s World Series, with envelope, should fetch $4,000-$5,000; while Bruce Lee’s iconic wood-handled rubber tube jump rope that the martial arts legend used for footwork training, is expected to breeze to $3,500-$4,000. The jump rope was gifted to Lee by a friend.

Woody Guthrie’s two-page handwritten lyrics for a song he never recorded, titled Why, penned at the Brooklyn State Hospital in May 1956, where he was being treated for Huntington’s Disease, signed three times by the singer, should go for $5,000,$6,000; and an original piece of aviation pioneer Orville Wright’s plane, with a photo of the famous Wright Brothers’ first flight and a check signed by Orville, all in a matted display presentation, should make $3,000-$4,000.

As with all University Archives online auctions, this one is packed with important, scarce and collectible signed documents and other items relating to some of the most famous names in all of history. The firm has become world-renowned as a go-to source for rare material of this nature.

University Archives was founded in 1979, as a division of University Stamp Company, by John Reznikoff, who started collecting stamps and coins in 1968, while in the third grade. Industry-wide, Reznikoff is considered the leading authenticity expert for manuscripts and documents. He consults with law enforcement, dealers, auction houses and both major authentication companies.

For more information about University Archives and the Wednesday, June 20th online auction, please visit www.universityarchives.com.

Image: Actual fragment of Abraham Lincoln’s blood-stained shirt from the night of his assassination, with provenance, plus a copy of the book Obsequies of Abraham Lincoln (est. $25,000-$30,000).

4c4e37782d826b1215e62545091369fec7e91b95.jpegBoston - Charles De Gaulle's handwritten Bastille Day speech will be auctioned by Boston-based RR Auciton. 

The one-page manuscript in French by Charles de Gaulle, signed within the heading, "Gen. de Gaulle," one page, July 14, 1941. A speech headed (translated): "Communique of Gen. de Gaulle to the Troops, 14.7.1941." In full (translated): "To the soldiers, to the sailors, to the airmen, to the people of France. July 14 is for us the anniversary of faith and national hope. Faith because never, despite the tears of France, we have no longer firmly believed in her and in her destiny. Hope because we see on the horizon all the data of Victory. Soldiers, sailors, airmen, Frenchmen, my dear companions, be firm, pure and faithful; because at the end of our troubles, there is the greatest glory in the world: that of men who have not yielded." In fine condition. 

General de Gaulle gave this rousing message during a Bastille Day ceremony at Marchand Stadium in Brazzaville, Republic of the Congo (then the capital of French Equatorial Africa), during which he awarded three soldiers with the Cross of Liberation. 

During this period, de Gaulle was leading the Free France movement, a government-in-exile that continued to fight against the Axis powers after the fall of France. A superb wartime message from the exiled French leader.

“It’s a superb wartime message from the exiled French leader,” said Bobby Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction. 

Highlights among the more than 80 World War II related lots include: 

Charles de Gaulle letter "from warlord to warlord," de Gaulle writes to FDR: "General de Gaulle, he has only one goal, to defeat the enemy wherever he is.”

George S. Patton matte-finish photo in uniform, along with a typed letter. The superb pairing of two WWII-era items signed by Patton to General R. B. Lord, Chief of Staff of S.O.S 'Service of Supply' and Communications, Headquartered in Paris.

Original hand-painted wooden sign removed from the headquarters of the 600th Bomb Squadron (398th Bombardment Group, Eighth Air Force) in Nuthampstead, Hertfordshire, England.

Remarkable grouping of World War II military apparel belonging to Staff Sergeant William C. King, a B-24 aerial gunner with the 576th Bomb Squadron in Wendling, England.

Iconic World War II-era Irvin Royal Air Force fleece-lined leather flight jacket, the standard issue flying jacket used by British air crews during wartime.

The Fine Autographs and Artifacts auction featuring World War II from RR Auction will conclude on Aug 8.  More details can be found online at www.rrauction.com.  

 

Screen Shot 2018-08-02 at 9.18.11 AM.pngDr. Jörn Günther Rare Books returns to TEFAF New York (27-31 October 2018, stand 336) with an exquisite selection of museum quality, medieval and Renaissance illuminated manuscripts, miniatures, and early printed books. At the core of this year’s exhibition are extremely rare, unique manuscripts of important literary works that have become beloved classics over the centuries. Readers all over the world continue to read, interpret and appreciate works by Ovid, Boccaccio, and Livy, making these beautifully painted books all the more significant for present-day collectors. 

The line-up of classics begins with a singular and extremely rare compilation of five of Ovid’s Heroides, in French translation by Octovien de Saint-Gelais, made for Anne of Brittany, queen consort of France. The letters by abandoned women to their faithless lovers, including the stories of Ariadne, Dido, and Oenone, are part of Ovid’s early work. The subject matter, the heroines of antiquity telling events from their - female - perspective, might have encouraged Saint-Gelais to offer these translations to the Queen, whose own life was just as dramatically at the mercy of men as Ovid’s female letter-writers. Heiress of Brittany, Anne was forced to marry Charles VIII and agree that, if widowed, she would remarry only his successor. The Ovid translations are bound in one volume, together with three French poems that were presumably written for an exclusive audience, possibly explaining the extreme rarity of this compilation. The manuscript includes eight full-page compositions with outstanding illumination by the Master of the Chronique scandaleuse. One of the full-page miniatures shows Anne of Brittany herself, portrayed with her identified court ladies. This extraordinary manuscript has only recently come on the market and will be presented at TEFAF New York for the first time with an asking price of 1,200,000 euro. 

Another timeless classic is Giovanni Boccaccio’s collection of stories about the fortunes and calamities of the rich and famous, translated into French as Des cas des nobles hommes et femmes. The text starts with the biblical Adam, continues with mythological and historical figures from Antiquity, and concludes with several of Boccaccio’s own 14th-century Florentine contemporaries. This manuscript is a notable addition to the Parisian luxury books associated with an artist who is commonly referred to as Maître François. Its miniatures mark the openings of the nine books of Boccaccio’s work, which offers a moral commentary on overcoming misfortune by adhering to virtue. At the French princely courts, the destinies of famous men and women of all ages were read as popular, inspiring models. This beautiful manuscript is on the market at an asking price of 650,000 euro.

Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books will also bring to New York an extraordinary copy of Livy’s History of Rome, translated into French as Les décades. Its text is a copy of the first translation of any major classical author into French, originally commissioned by the French King John II the Good. The manuscript is outstanding not only in historical importance, but also in size. The sheer dimensions of this 15th-century manuscript make it a showstopper highlight of the exhibition. Measuring 450 x 318 mm and with 87 large miniatures, this manuscript is the most profusely illustrated of all known copies of Livy. The extremely fine 16th-century binding à la fanfare is equally spectacular. 

The engaging illustrations are a medieval feast for the eyes in a profusion of colour, evoking a world of chivalric splendour with knights in armour, kings, and maidens, battle scenes, jousts, and banquets. Extraordinarily, on the last leaf of the book, the makers of this manuscript are not only named, but are also pictured, including a self-portrait of the artist, a portrait of the scribe, and a portrait of their patron. This outstanding work is on the market at an asking price of 1,650,000 euro.

Image: Boccaccio, Des cas des nobles hommes et femmes. France, Paris, c. 1470. Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books AG. EUR 650,000

 

Highway Map - Seattle World's Fair 1962.jpgBoxborough, MA — Flamingo Eventz is pleased to announce the return of the popular Boxborough Paper Town - The Vintage Paper, Books & Advertising Collectibles Show. This is the original Boxborough Paper Show where you’ll find all things Paper - from classic Ephemera to Books, Board Games, Postcards, Advertising, Classic Vinyl, and more! A long time favorite of both dealers and customers, we continue to make changes and improvements to ensure continued growth and success. We’re bigger, better, more diverse, and with lots of new dealers…this is the paper show to attend for the rare, unusual and hard-to-find treasure!

Scheduled for Saturday September 15, 2018 at the Boxborough Regency Hotel & Conference Center in Boxborough, MA, Exhibitors from across the Northeast will gather to present an outstanding array of fine, rare & unusual old ephemera, books, maps, postcards, autographs, prints, posters, advertising, and much, much more. Plus, we have appraisals by well-known appraiser John Bruno, star of the PBS series Market Warriors, and guest appraisers from 12-2pm. Interested parties - both dealers & customers - should contact Flamingo Eventz at 603.509.2639 / info@flamingoeventz.com.

Exhibitor Specialties include: Advertising Covers, African American, Americana, Architecture, Art, Art Deco, Auctions, Autographs, Aviation, Baseball, Books, Bibles, Black History, Black Power, Calendars, Calling Cards, Christmas, Circus, Civil War, Cook Books, Charts, Children’s Books, Cocktails, Design, Dogs, Die Cuts, Documents, Engineering, Engraving, Ephemera, Erotica, Esoterica, Fantasy, Fashion, Fishing, Floridiana, Folklore, Folk Music, Foreign Language, Furniture, Games, Gardens & Horticulture, Graphics, Historic Documents, Horses, Hunting, Illustrated Books, Interior Design, Japan, Judaica, Letters, Logbooks, Manuscripts, Maps, Maritime, Medicine, Middle East, Military, Modernism, Music, Native American, Natural History, Nautical, Naval, New York City, New York State, New Jersey, Novelties, Olympic Games, Pacifica, Photographs, Photography, Pochoir, Polar, Pop-Ups & Moveable Books, Poetry, Postcards, Posters, Presentation Copies, Presidential Archives, Press Books, Prints, Pulitzer Prize Winners, Psychedelica, Puppetry, Puzzles, Railroad, Reference, Revolutionary War, Russia, Scholarly, Science, Science Fiction, Sports, Sporting, Technical, Theatre, Theology, Trade Cards, Trade Catalogues, Travel & Exploration, Travel Brochures, Typography, U.S. Coastal History, Vanity Fair Prints, Valentines, Voyages, Watercolors, Whaling, Wine, Yachting. These, and many other specialties, will be found at this event. Be sure to check our website, FlamingoEventz.com, for complete details and easily downloaded Discount Coupons.

Date/Hours: Saturday, September 15, 2018, 9am-3pm

Location: The Boxborough Holiday Inn, 242 Adams Place, Boxborough, MA 01709. Directly off I-495, exit 28.

Admission: Adults: $7 ($1 Discount with Ad or Website Coupon), Young Collectors 12-21: $4, plenty of free parking.

Appraisals: By John Bruno, Star of Market Warriors, and guest appraisers 12-2pm at $5/Item.

Directions: I-495 Exit 28, East on Massachusetts Ave (Rt. 111), right on Adams Place to Hotel. Check our website: flamingoeventz.com for easily downloaded maps.

Miscellaneous: Food & refreshment available at the Hotel restaurant during show hours.

Information: For Dealer or Customer information, please call or click 603.509.2639 / info@flamingoeventz.com

The 46th Annual Rochester Antiquarian Book Fair, the oldest continually running regional antiquarian book fair in the U.S., will take place on Saturday, September 8 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Main Street Armory, 900 East Main Street, Rochester, New York.

Presented by the Rochester Area Booksellers Association (RABA), the event features dealers from across the nation. Beyond the rare and antiquarian books, collectors can expect to find good secondhand titles of wide breadth and interest, including scholarly texts, as well as prints, maps, photographica and collectible ephemera embracing an equally broad range of subject categories.

The fair represents a unique opportunity for book and print enthusiasts to converse with numerous professionals in the field all in one place, some of whom do not maintain ‘brick and mortar’ shops. The diversity of vendors ensures that there is something for everyone, from affordable curiosities to valuable treasures.

The Main Street Armory, a spacious building with a historical feel that complements this event well, has hosted the event for the last several years. Ample parking is available in the vicinity, and concessions will be available during the fair.

Admission to the Book Fair is $5, or free to students who present a current student ID. This year advance admission tickets are available online through RABA’s website: (www.rochesterbooksellers.com). You can also buy tickets through their event page on Facebook at www.facebook.com/rochesterantiquarianbookfair. Advertisements in local publications can be redeemed the day of the Fair for discount admission.

For more information, visit www.rochesterbooksellers.com or call Jonathan Smalter (of Yesterday’s Muse Books) at 585-265-9295.

16.jpgChicago — Potter & Potter Auctions is pleased to announce their 467 lot Summer Magic Auction to be held on Saturday, August 25th, 2018 starting at 10am at the company's gallery, located at 3759 N. Ravenswood Ave., Chicago, IL 60613. The sale includes 13 lots from the Bob Swadling collection that will be sold to help cover the healthcare costs of Sebastian Midtvaage, a young magician recovering from brain cancer. All items from this upcoming sale will be on display and available for public preview on Thursday, August 23rd and Friday, August 24th from 10:00am to 5:00pm in the Potter & Potter facility. 

This event's offering of books related to all things magic spans an astonishing five centuries, with titles from the 1600's onward.  Lot #9, a near fine, first edition of Isaak de Caus' New and Rare Inventions of Water-Works from 1659 is estimated at $10,000-15,000. This important volume features 26 copper engraved plates, woodcut text illustrations, and the engraved bookplate and ownership signature of Sir John Cope. Its contents promise to "Shew the earliest waies to raise water higher than the spring. By which invention the perpetual motion is proposed many hard labours performed and varieties of motions and sounds produced."  Lot 16, a fine, crisp copy of Thomas Richardson's c. 1830 The Whole Art of Legerdemain; or, The Conjurer Unmasked includes a gloriously hand-colored engraved folding frontispiece depicting a conjuror flanked by a demon and a coiled snake.  It is estimated at $2,500-3,500.  And not escaping the spotlight is lot 98, a copy of Harry Houdini's 1920 Miracle Mongers and Their Methods.  This example, published by E.P. Dutton & Co. in New York, is inscribed and signed by Houdini, “To Edward J. Rice/The man Germain hypnotized?/Good Luck/Houdini/”My Brain is the key that sets me free”/Oct 28/25”.  It is estimated at $1,200-1,600.

Books specifically about witchcraft also cast their spell over this magic sale.  Two absolute rarities include lot 28, Reginald Scot's The Discoverie of Witchcraft from 1665 and lot 27, William Pinchbeck's Witchcraft: or, the Art of Fortune-Telling Unveiled from 1805.  They are estimated at $6,000-9,000 and $5,000-7,000 respectively.  Pinchbeck's work is reputed to be only the third conjuring book published in the United States.

This sale presents robust selections of modern and vintage magic apparatus, with some examples carrying impressive provenance.  Lot 455, Bob Swadling’s Magic Kettle, is estimated at $10,000-15,000.  This mechanically complex vessel enables the magician to pour four different beverages at the request of the audience. It was designed and constructed by Bob Swadling and used by Paul Daniels on British TV in 1979. Daniels performed for decades on British TV and was one of the nation’s best-recognized stars of the time. This kettle is one of the items that will be sold to help defray the costs of Sebastian Midtvaage's cancer treatments.  Lot 425, a pair of John McKinven custom made maple passe-passe lidded vases, is estimated at $2,500-3,500. Each of these finely tuned vases operates as an independent giant Morison pill box and measures approximately twice the height of a standard McKinven-made pill box.  

Vintage highlights include lot 330, an all original, late nineteenth century French conjuring set with eighteen turned boxwood props, and lot 341, a c. 1925 Conradi card and watch pistol. The conjuring set includes eleven instruction sheets folded in a narrow side compartment; the pistol is realistically rendered with a Bakelite-like grip and an engraved stock. These visually stunning and fully functional antique are estimated at $1,600-2,400 and $1,00-1,500 respectively.  

Potter & Potter has established itself as the worldwide leader in representing the best magic-related archives at auction.  Recent successes include a two-volume spiritualism scrapbook signed, kept, and annotated by Harry Houdini; it was estimated at $30,000-40,000 and realized $66,000 in April, 2018.  Following in this tradition, this sale also offers several choice, one-in-a-lifetime archival offerings. Lot 209, a Servais LeRoy & Co. illusion instruction archive from 1912, is estimated at $4,000-6,000. This collection includes typed and manuscript instructions and advertisements for illusions, gimmicks, pocket, and parlor tricks sold and manufactured by this short-lived but important London-based magic company.  Lot 166, a Chicago Magic Roundtable 1946 cloth covered scrapbook containing signatures and club related ephemera, is estimated at $2,000-3,000. This volume features the autographs of about 500 magicians as well as brochures, business cards, signed photographs, letters, promotional materials, and clippings.  The Roundtable was informal luncheon club that met at the same restaurant day after day, year after year; attendees were invited to socialize, dine, and perform for each other and guests.  And it’s easy to picture collectors getting excited over lot 255, a collection of more than 200 photographs of magicians from the 1940's through the 1990's. These images - some signed - include portraits, studio poses, and action shots of top tier talent including Doug Henning, Ali Bongo, Paul Daniels, Lance Burton, Jack Gwynne, Blackstone Jr, and many others. This comprehensive grouping is estimated at $400-800.  

Prints, drawings, and posters are another eye-catching collectible category in this sale. These visual treats are also perfect for adding a distinctive, decorative highlight to an important personal or professional interior space. Lot 282, a 1916 three sheet, linen backed color litho featuring Howard Thurston as Thurston the Great is estimated at $15,000-25,000.  This rarity features Thurston, assisted by imps, levitating an assistant, with Kellar’s endorsement quoted in the lower margin.   Lot 315, a hand-colored, cartoon-style aquatint by James Gillray titled The Theatrical Bubble is estimated at $400-600.  It dates from 1810 and depicts Sheridan as Punchinello blowing soap bubbles. And lot 321, a portfolio of hundreds of mid-nineteenth to early 20th century conjuring prints and illustrations from the collection of Bob Read is estimated at $300-500.  These items were collection from publications including Le Pêle-Mêle; Pasouino; La Vie Parisienne; La Caricature; Lo Spirito Folletto; Gil Blas; and others.  

This sale rounds out with world-class offerings of autographs, props, cards, automata, and other magical-themed treasures.  Lot 198, a letter on personal stationery from Harry Houdini to Ellis Stanyon dated Dec. 21, 1923 is estimated at $1,000-1,500.  It reads, “Just a line to wish you Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year. Regards/Sincerely yours,/Houdini”.  Lot 431, four sealed decks of cards commemorating Dai Vernon’s 88th birthday, housed in the original custom display case decorated with Vernon’s silhouette, is estimated at $200-300.  The cards were produced by Congress Playing Cards in June, 1982; two packs reproduce the famous Hal Phyfe photo of Vernon.  Lot 258, two c.1930's era film reels featuring The Great Raymond and Litzka is estimated at $200-400.  The first film shows the couple in various candid everyday scenarios and the second one is a theatrical film trailer for upcoming live performances by Raymond.  And finally, tongues will be a-wag over lot 439, a 2003 ventriloquist’s cane with provenance to the Watertown, Massachusetts Magic Art Studio. It features a plaster dummy head with oversized green glass pupil eyes. The eyes and mouth can be moved in very lifelike ways through invisibly placed hand controls.    

According to Gabe Fajuri, President at Potter & Potter Auctions, "It's hard to pick a highlight in this auction. Though we have had many magic auctions in our decade-long history, each new offering includes items I consider true prizes. In this sale, the LeRoy archive and associated material strikes me as truly historic and important, and a few of the books are genuine rarities. For show-stoppers, the Thurston three-sheets certainly fit the bill." 

Image: The Whole Art of Legerdemain; or, The Conjurer Unmasked. Estimate $2,500-3,500.

Auction Guide