July 2018 Archives

New York - The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture in Harlem acquired several important manuscripts related to the landmark work The Autobiography of Malcolm X - manuscripts that will now be available to the public for the first time.

The internationally-renowned New York Public Library research center acquired the items at auction, including:

  • The full 241-page manuscript of The Autobiography of Malcolm X with handwritten corrections and notes from both Malcolm X and collaborator Alex Haley.
  • A previously unpublished chapter from the book, believed to be omitted from publication after Malcolm X’s assassination. The 25-page typewritten chapter - titled “The Negro” - is thought to be one of three unpublished chapters in existence. It is as yet unclear why the chapters were removed.
  • A series of literal and literary “fragments,” or short notes and drafts by Malcolm X written or typed on small pieces of paper.

All three important acquisitions related to the Nation of Islam minister and civil rights leader will soon be accessible at the Schomburg Center - marking the first time that members of the public will be able to see them. The items were previously held by a private collector, who acquired them at the sale of Alex Haley’s estate in 1992.

“These materials are extremely significant, as they can provide researchers with extensive new insights into the writing process and thoughts of one of the most important and influential figures and books of the 20th Century,” said Schomburg Center Director Kevin Young. “The Autobiography of Malcolm X is a monumental work; to actually see how that book took shape through Malcolm X’s handwritten corrections and notes is very powerful. Additionally, the omitted chapter, believed to be removed after Malcolm X’s death, places the work in a new context, and provide an understanding as to why it was excluded from the book in the first place. The possibilities for new revelations are nearly endless, and we are so proud that the Schomburg Center can bring this material to light for the first time.”

The materials will arrive at the Schomburg Center in the coming weeks. Scholars interested in using the materials must make an appointment with the Schomburg Center’s Manuscripts, Archives, and Rare Books Division. More information can be found at Schomburg.org.

The Schomburg Center already holds and makes accessible to scholars over 16 linear feet of Malcolm X manuscript material, including a diary, letters, speeches, photographs, and journals. Those items are on long-term loan at the Schomburg Center from Malcolm X’s family.

 

Los Angeles -The original May 9, 1754 “Pennsylvania Gazette” newspaper featuring Benjamin Franklin’s famous “JOIN, or DIE” cartoon sold last night for $50,000 at Nate D. Sanders Auctions.

''JOIN, or DIE'' featuring a severed rattlesnake is widely considered the most influential political cartoon in American history. This edition of the “Pennsylvania Gazette” being auctioned is the first printing of the “JOIN, or DIE” cartoon. It is the only known copy besides the one held in the Library of Congress’ permanent collection.     

Franklin was exasperated by the colonists' failure to join forces with the French against westward expansion in the Seven Years’ War.  Franklin created the rattlesnake cartoon, sliced into eight pieces symbolizing the American colonies, to dramatically enforce the effective message: join together as one cohesive body, or die. Franklin also published an editorial in the “Pennsylvania Gazette,” urging the colonists to work together, reading in part, ''...The Confidence of the French in this Undertaking seems well-grounded on the present disunited State of the British Colonies ... while our Enemies have the very great Advantage of being under one Direction, with one  Council, and one Purse ...'' 

The symbol of the dis-united rattlesnake would echo over twenty years later to inspire the colonists to unite against the British.  In 1774, Paul Revere added the ''JOIN, or DIE'' cartoon to the nameplate of his paper, the ''Massachusetts Spy.'' In 1775, the Continental Marines used a coiled rattlesnake “Don’t Tread on Me'' flag as their motto. The phrase likely influenced John Stark, the New Hampshire Revolutionary War General whose toast was, ''Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils.'' Stark’s phrase inspired New Hampshire's motto and suggests that personal liberty is one of the highest human values and a founding principle of the United States. 

Franklin's choice of a rattlesnake is perplexing for several reasons: as the timber rattlesnake was found throughout the colonies but not in England. Franklin argued in a 1751 editorial that the colonists should ship rattlesnakes to England in exchange for the criminals that England was sending to America. Franklin seemed to embrace the rattlesnake as a metaphor and would argue its virtues during the American Revolution. 

Bidding on the newspaper began at $40,000. 

Additional information on the newspaper can be found at 
https://natedsanders.com/__JOIN__or_DIE___Newspaper_From_Benjamin_Franklin_-LOT49832.aspx

 

Screen Shot 2018-07-24 at 10.26.11 AM.pngLondon—Monday 30th July is the 200th anniversary of the birth of Emily Brontë who wrote Wuthering Heights. Peter Harrington, the UK’s largest rare bookseller, is delighted to offer a first American edition of Wuthering Heights; an exceedingly rare collection of poems published by Emily, Charlotte and Anne Brontë and library sets of the Brontë sisters’ novels, for sale.

Wuthering Heights was published in 1847 under the pseudonym Ellis Bell and shocked readers with its ill-fated and unconventional relationship between Heathcliff and Cathy. Emily Brontë’s name didn’t appear in the first edition and she died in 1848 just a year after it was published, at the age of 30, without knowing how famous her and her novel would become.

This year also marks the 40th anniversary of the song ‘Wuthering Heights’ by Kate Bush. It was released in 1978 and was inspired by Emily Brontë’s novel and the fact that Kate Bush shares a birthday with Emily Brontë. Kate Bush will be 60 on Monday 30th July.

As Pom Harrington the owner of Peter Harrington says “Emily Brontë only wrote one novel which became a literary classic after her death. The first and second English editions of Wuthering Heights are extremely rare, so we are pleased to be able to offer this first American edition of her famous novel for sale. Emily along with Charlotte and Anne also published ‘Poems by Currer, Ellis, and Acton Bell’, (their pseudonyms), in 1846 which was the Brontë sisters first publication and we are delighted to have one of the first 1,000 copies of this very rare book for sale too.”  

This is an excellent copy of the first American edition, second overall edition of Wuthering Heights, published in New York in April 1848 by Harpers and Brothers and priced at 75 cents. The book does not contain Emily Brontë’s name and the publisher on the title page misattributed the book to Charlotte Brontë saying ‘By the author of Jane Eyre’.

The first English edition of Wuthering Heights was published in 1847 and the second English edition in December 1850, after the American edition. The first edition was rushed out by the publisher Thomas Cautley Newby in December 1847 to try and capitalize on the unexpected success of Jane Eyre, which was published by one of Newby’s rivals. Newby then embarked on an advertising campaign to confuse the identity of the three Bell “brothers”, suggesting that all the novels were the work of one person which led to the mistaken attribution on the title page of this edition.

Peter Harrington is a member of the Antiquarian Booksellers' Association and offers an unconditional guarantee of every item’s authenticity and completeness as described.

Image: Wuthering Heights by Emily Brontë, 1848 ($11,300) 

51f97461d64d50eb3c0f907f_1100x660.jpgNew York—The Morgan Library & Museum is proud to announce the gift of Wall Drawing 552D by the LeWitt Family, in honor of Richard and Ronay Menschel. This large-scale drawing will be on view at the Morgan beginning summer 2018.  As one of the pioneers of Conceptual art, LeWitt first became famous for his three-dimensional structures based on variations on the square and the cube. Turning to drawing shortly after, LeWitt radically transformed the medium through innovative approaches such as drawing directly on the wall.

In celebration of his legacy, Wall Drawing 552D will be presented in Gilbert Court for at least two years. LeWitt’s tilted cube playfully complements Renzo Piano’s geometric architecture, notably the nearby Clare Eddy Thaw Gallery, informally referred to as “the cube.”

In a radical gesture, LeWitt made his first wall drawing by drawing directly on the wall in pencil, for an exhibition at Paula Cooper Gallery in 1968. “In conceptual art the idea or concept is the most important aspect of the work,” wrote LeWitt in 1967, “All of the planning and decisions are made beforehand and the execution is a perfunctory affair.” Consistent with his groundbreaking writings on the subject, each wall drawing exists primarily as a set of detailed written instructions, which are then executed by draftspersons. At the end of exhibition, the drawing is painted over, challenging conventional notions of artistic authorship and status. Visitors will be able to witness the installation process for Wall Drawing 552D between June 29 and August 22, 2018. 

LeWitt conceived over a thousand such wall drawings using graphite, colored pencil, crayon, ink, ink wash, and acrylic. Many of LeWitt’s wall drawings from the 1980s feature the cube and its derivative forms, but with a heightened interest in color and perception. To achieve rich and luminous surfaces—inspired by his visits to Italian Renaissance frescoes—LeWitt devised a specific system of superimposing pigments, layer upon wet layer, with ink-soaked rags

Several wall drawings are visible today in public spaces in Manhattan, such as the lobby of the Museum of Modern Art, the Jewish Museum, the lobby of 26 Federal Plaza, and the 59th Street-Columbus Circle subway station. However, Wall Drawing 552D is a rare example of LeWitt’s use of ink washes. First conceived and created in 1987 at the Royal Scottish Academy in Edinburgh, Scotland, it will be approximately 20 feet high and 30 feet wide. 

“Sol LeWitt’s work has not only transformed the world of art, but has also enlivened and enriched the atmosphere of numerous public spaces,” said Colin B. Bailey, director of the Morgan. “Since 2010, the Gilbert Court has been the site of exciting public installations of contemporary art. We are grateful to the LeWitt Family for this generous gift and delighted to pay tribute to the twentieth century master.”

The Morgan will celebrate the wall drawing during Free Friday hours on Friday, September 7, 7-9 PM, with a screening of the documentary Sol LeWitt: Wall Drawings (2010), directed by Edgar B. Howard and Tom Piper and a special “pop-up” bar.

Image: Sol LeWitt (1928-2007), Wall Drawing 552D, A tilted form with color ink washes superimposed. The walls are bordered by 8" (20 cm) black bands. Color ink wash, dimensions variable. First Drawn by:  David Higginbotham, Linda Taylor, Jo Watanabe. First Installation: Royal Scottish Academy, Edinburgh, Scotland, December 1987.Gift of the LeWitt Family in Honor of Richard and Ronay Menschel. © 2018 The LeWitt Estate / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York. Courtesy Paula Cooper Gallery, New York

The Book Club of California is delighted to announce that John Windle and Chris Loker have funded an annual lecture series titled, “The Windle - Loker Lecture Series on the History of the Illustrated Book.” The lecture series is scheduled through 2022, and will bring to Book Club venues important national and international experts who will speak on the illustrated book within these five eras: 

·      Medieval and renaissance manuscript illustration (11th to 15th century)

·      Early woodcut illustration in printed books (16th to 18th century)

·      Pre-Raphaelite / Art Nouveau book illustration (19th century)

·      Artist book illustration (20th and 21st century)

·      The Future of the illustrated book (21st century and beyond)

This lecture series will occur once a year as a Monday evening presentation, offered to Club members and their guests. It will explore the beauty, scholarship, and stunning craftsmanship of illustrated books from medieval times to today. The final lecture in the series will furnish intriguing insights into the possible future of the illustrated book in our hypertext world, a fascinating and timely topic. The five lectures will be presented either in San Francisco, Los Angeles or San Diego, to allow Club members throughout California the opportunity over time to participate in this enjoyable evening program in different locations.

The Windle - Loker Lecture Series will focus on presenting some of the most distinguished subject matter experts in their fields. They will hale from across the US and from the UK, and will present us with tales of alluring books and full-color images of the best the illustrated codex has offered over the centuries. The first lecture will occur on August 6, 2018 with the academic (and entertaining) team of famed book collector Mark Samuels Lasner and Margaret D. Stetz from the University of Delaware, speaking on Pre-Raphaelite and Art Nouveau book illustration. The second lecture, in 2019, will feature speaker Dan De Simone, whose special collections career has included tenures at the Library of Congress and the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C.—Dan will speak on the topic of early woodcut illustration in printed books.

John Windle, an antiquarian bookseller for fifty years and a Club member for much of that time, has served on the BCC board several times, most recently as Vice President and as chair of the Publications Committee. His well-known bookshop, John Windle Antiquarian Bookseller, is located just a few blocks from our Club. John is a constant supporter of all aspects of the BCC, also serves on the board of the Bancroft Library, and is a long-standing member of the Grolier Club. Chris Loker, John’s wife, has worked with him in the antiquarian book business for fifteen years, specializing in antiquarian children’s books. She recently curated the successful Grolier Club exhibition One Hundred Books Famous in Children’s Literature, and will publish in May 2019 the academic volume A Shimmer of Joy: Children’s Picture Books in America, 1900-2015. Chris currently serves on the Grolier Club Council and is the chair of their Publications Committee. She also serves on the board of Rare Book School in Charlottesville, VA. John and Chris are delighted to support the Book Club with the Windle - Loker Lecture Series, and look forward to seeing Club members at those lecture events.

Join or Die Newspaper 55404a_lg.jpegLos Angeles—The original May 9, 1754 “Pennsylvania Gazette” newspaper featuring Benjamin Franklin’s famous “JOIN, or DIE” cartoon will be auctioned by Nate D. Sanders Auctions on July 26, 2018.

''JOIN, or DIE'' featuring a severed rattlesnake is widely considered the most influential political cartoon in American history. This edition of the “Pennsylvania Gazette” being auctioned is the first printing of the “JOIN, or DIE” cartoon. It is the only known copy besides the one held in the Library of Congress’ permanent collection.     

Franklin was exasperated by the colonists' failure to join forces with the French against westward expansion in the Seven Years’ War.  Franklin created the rattlesnake cartoon, sliced into eight pieces symbolizing the American colonies, to dramatically enforce the effective message: join together as one cohesive body, or die. Franklin also published an editorial in the “Pennsylvania Gazette,” urging the colonists to work together, reading in part, ''...The Confidence of the French in this Undertaking seems well-grounded on the present disunited State of the British Colonies ... while our Enemies have the very great Advantage of being under one Direction, with one  Council, and one Purse ...'' 

The symbol of the dis-united rattlesnake would echo over twenty years later to inspire the colonists to unite against the British.  In 1774, Paul Revere added the ''JOIN, or DIE'' cartoon to the nameplate of his paper, the ''Massachusetts Spy.'' In 1775, the Continental Marines used a coiled rattlesnake “Don’t Tread on Me'' flag as their motto. The phrase likely influenced John Stark, the New Hampshire Revolutionary War General whose toast was, ''Live free or die: Death is not the worst of evils.'' Stark’s phrase inspired New Hampshire's motto and suggests that personal liberty is one of the highest human values and a founding principle of the United States. 

Franklin's choice of a rattlesnake is perplexing for several reasons: as the timber rattlesnake was found throughout the colonies but not in England. Franklin argued in a 1751 editorial that the colonists should ship rattlesnakes to England in exchange for the criminals that England was sending to America. Franklin seemed to embrace the rattlesnake as a metaphor and would argue its virtues during the American Revolution.

Bidding on the newspaper begins at $40,000.

Additional information on the newspaper can be found at 
https://natedsanders.com/__JOIN__or_DIE___Newspaper_From_Benjamin_Franklin_-LOT49832.aspx

Original NASA -Red Number- Color Photograph Image credit Heritage Auctions copy.jpgDallas, TX - The vast personal collection of Neil Armstrong, who as the first man to walk on the moon changed the course of human history, will be presented in a series of auctions beginning November 1-2, 2018 by Heritage Auctions. The Armstrong Family Collection will offer never-before-seen artifacts from his momentous lunar landing to private mementos - including pieces of a wing and propeller from the 1903 Wright Brothers flight that Armstrong took with him to the moon, a gold pin from Gemini VIII, Armstrong’s first mission, and historic correspondence about the planning that went into the moon mission.  The auctions will coincide with the 50th anniversary of the historic Apollo 11 mission. 

“There will be flown items, autographed items and items of historical significance,” son Mark Armstrong said. “There will be items that make you think, items that make you laugh and items that make you scratch your head.” 

On July 20, 1969, a global audience glued to their TVs, as Armstrong stepped onto the lunar surface with his now legendary words: “That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind.” The event marked a new era for humanity, and established the United States’ technological dominance and influence as a superpower.

“He was never about himself, so I would expect that he didn’t give much thought about how he would be remembered,” son Rick Armstrong said. “With that being said, I think he would be pleased to be remembered as being part of a program that demonstrated amazing things can be achieved when people come together to dedicate themselves towards a common goal.” 

The Armstrong Family Collection is an extraordinary archive, chronicling the life and career of one of the most historic figures of the 20th century through the lens of the objects he loved, collected, and preserved for decades. Heritage Auctions has scheduled three auctions for the collection, the first time these personal items have been offered for sale: November 1-2, 2018; May 9-10, 2019; and November 2019.

Among the highlights of the 2,000+ items in the Armstrong Family Collection:

  • Apollo 11 Robbins Medallions, including an extremely rare gold example, which were flown on the famous lunar landing mission. Minted by the Robbins Company, of Attleboro, Massachusetts, the sterling silver medallions were paid for by the crews and available for purchase only by NASA astronauts.
  • Material from the Wright Brothers Flyer, the plane that accomplished the first successful manned flight in 1903. Armstrong carried fragments of the wing and propeller on Apollo 11.
  • A Purdue University Centennial, 1869-1969, Silk Flag, flown on Apollo 11 and carried by Armstrong to the moon. Purdue was Armstrong’s beloved alma mater.
  • Important Correspondence, including a truly unique and historical document underscoring the planning behind the landmark event. In a letter, a NASA public affairs official states to the Apollo program manager that he felt it should be left up to the astronauts to decide what to say when they walk on the surface of the moon.
  • A gold pin flown on Gemini VIII, Armstrong’s first spaceflight. A damaged thruster almost cost Armstrong and his fellow crewmember their lives, but Armstrong expertly guided the spacecraft safely back to earth.
  • Armstrong’s Boy Scouts Cap. Armstrong became an Eagle Scout—the organization’s highest rank—at the age of 17. 

To prepare the collection for auction, the Armstrong family is collaborating with Collectibles Authentication Guaranty, a firm tasked with preserving and documenting the collection’s authenticity and provenance. The firm, a member of the Certified Collectibles Group, is working in conjunction with Heritage Auctions to ensure every item from the collection is photographed and cataloged so that, if needed, they can be referenced later for research or any other purpose. 

“Neil Armstrong’s bravery and skill defines what it means to be an American hero,” said Todd Imhof, executive vice president at Heritage Auctions. “We are privileged to be working closely with the Armstrong family to honor Neil’s lifetime legacy with items reflective of all his achievements, not just his famous lunar landing. These are some of the most iconic historical items ever to be sold.”

The Armstrong Family Collection debuts at auction November 1-2, 2018 at Heritage Auctions.

Image: Neil Armstrong: Original NASA Color Photograph. Credit: Heritage Auctions

141_1.jpgFalls Church, VA - Quinn's Auction Galleries and its subsidiary Waverly Rare Books & Prints will host a July 26 Fine Art Prints, Posters, and Works on Paper sale at the company’s Falls Church, Virginia gallery. The 458-lot evening auction will commence at 6 p.m. Eastern time, with absentee and Internet live bidding available through LiveAuctioneers or Invaluable.

Works included in the auction range from the late 19th century to present day, with special attention paid to new collectors. “There are more than 200 lots with estimates of $400 or less,” said Catherine Payling, director of Waverly Rare Books & Prints. “Each is a carefully chosen, excellent-quality artwork that any collector would be proud to own and enjoy.”

Leading the selection is Marc Chagall’s (French/Russian, 1887-1985) color lithograph on Arches paper titled Avenue de la Victoire, Nice. It measures 24½ by 18 1/8 inches (sight), is artist-signed in pencil and numbered 59/150 from the 1967 Charles Sorlier edition “Nice and the Cote d’Azur.” This very rare lithograph is expected to bring an auction price of $10,000-$15,000.

A most unusual addition to the sale is an Andy Warhol (American, 1928-1987) cancelled silkscreen mesh from the circa-1962-1967 “Marilyn” serigraph series. The extremely rare artwork-in-negative comes with the original box that was used to transport it from the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, to Warhol’s manager, Fred Hughes, at the artist’s Manhattan studio residence. From Mr. Hughes, the silkscreen mesh passed to the consignor, who worked at the Warhol Foundation. Estimate: $3,000-$5,000

A circa-1951/55 etching and aquatint by Aaron Douglas (American, 1899-1979) titled Three Trees (Vineyard Haven) depicts a gentle waterside setting at a Martha’s Vineyard (Mass.) community long favored by African-American artists who vacationed there. The atmospheric work captures the trio of trees swaying in the wind amid distinctive island vegetation. Measuring 6¼ by 10 inches (full sheet), it will be offered at auction at Quinn’s for only the second time in 60+ years. Estimate: $4,000-$6,000.

There are two monotypes in the sale by Washington, D.C.-area favorite Sam Gilliam (b. 1933-). A Fog in the Hollow, 1974, is signed and dated in pencil and measures 32½ by 45 inches, framed. Peter’s Tweeter, a 1974 serigraph and string in colors on rag paper is also pencil-signed and dated by the artist, measuring 28¾ by 39 inches, framed. The works will be auctioned consecutively, each with a $3,000-$5,000 estimate. 

One of the greatest of all nature photographers, Ansel Adams (American, 1902-1984) is represented in the auction by a 1947 gelatin silver print titled Fresh Snow, Yosemite Valley, California. An un-editioned press photograph, it was used in promotional material for “Ansel Adams and the West,” a Museum of Modern Art (NYC) exhibition that ran in September and October of 1979. It comes with the original press release and advance fact sheet from the show and is estimated at $3,000-$5,000.

More modestly estimated but no less desirable, a devilish 1906 Leonetto Cappiello (French, 1875-1942) lithographed poster advertising the absinthe aperitif “Maurin Quina” was printed by P. Vercasson, Rue de Lancry, Paris, and is reasonably estimated at $800-$1,200. Another fine choice for new to intermediate collectors, or those who simply want an artistic splash of color for their walls, is Graham Sutherland’s (British, 1903-1980) vibrant travel poster designed in 1964 for the Cote d’Azur Alpes Maritimes Affiche. Originally aimed at the German market, its imagery and message promote travel to France’s Cote d’Azur. Estimate: $300-$500.

The sale includes original drawings, watercolors and mixed-media pieces by many other artists favored by collectors but too numerous to mention, including Dali, Toulouse-Lautrec, Whistler, and Rockwell Kent. Additionally, there are more than a dozen 20th-century self-portraits by such artists as Knaths, Martin Lewis, Isaac Friedlander and Prentiss Taylor.

Quinn’s Thursday, July 26, 2018 Modern Prints, Poster & Works on Paper gallery auction will commence at 6 p.m. Eastern Time. All remote forms of bidding will also be available, including absentee, phone and live via the Internet through LiveAuctioneers.com or Invaluable.com. For additional information on any item in the auction, call 703-532-5632, ext. 575; or email waverly@quinnsauction.com. Quinn’s is located at 360 S. Washington St., Falls Church, VA 22046. Online: www.quinnsauction.com.

Image: 141 - Rockwell Kent (American, 1882-1971), The Drifter, 1933, wood engraving, ed. 250, pencil-signed. Estimate: $1,500-$2,000. Courtesy of Quinn’s Auction Galleries

 

overstreet48.jpgDallas, TX - Collectors and fans of comics and comic art can download a copy of the 48th edition of The Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide 2018-19 through Heritage Auctions, at HA.com.

Clients who bought the 47th edition are eligible to receive a discounted download of the newest version, and those who ordered last year’s version within the last 30 days qualify for a free upgrade to the newest version - a $30 value.

Regarded as the definitive resource in the hobby, the guide, which is available for $30, covers more than a century of comic book history. Among the most important and useful features is users’ ability to search lots through the use of keywords, including the title of a book, the name of the lead character, the company that produced the book or the artist and/or writer.

Considered a must-have tool among collectors of all levels, the Overstreet guide is a thoroughly researched volume that is alphabetically indexed and includes extensive pricing, historical information and insights in the comics and comic art marketplace.

The 48th edition of the Overstreet guide is available in formats that support both PC and Mac operating systems.

“The best collectors are those armed with the most information, and this guide is the ultimate resource of all kinds of valuable information that comics collectors need,” Heritage Auctions grader and consignment director Aaron White said. “One of the goals of all departments at Heritage Auctions is to make sure our clients have the information needed to be confident and comfortable with the decisions they make, and the Overstreet guide provides that.”

The newest Overstreet Price Guide cover features images of the Green Lantern and the Flash by artist Ethan Van Sciver. Also included are a movie poster-styled tribute to the 50th anniversary of the Planet of the Apes. The Hall of Fame limited edition features new American Flagg artwork by creator Howard Chaykin.

The Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide can be downloaded here for just $30, offering collectors access to an unmatched cache of information in a new format that is one of the best investments available in the hobby. Those who ordered the 2017-18 version of The Overstreet Comic Book Price Guide within the last month may request a free digital upgrade by sending an e-mail to Webmaster@HA.com.

Irving copy.jpgDayton, OH - Writer John Irving (The World According to Garp, The Cider House Rules, A Prayer for Owen Meany), whose novels champion outsiders and often explore the bigotry, intolerance, and hatred directed at sexual minorities, will receive the 2018 Ambassador Richard C. Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award, organizers of the Dayton Literary Peace Prize announced today.

Named in honor of the celebrated U.S. diplomat who played an instrumental role in negotiating the 1995 Dayton Peace Accords that ended the war in Bosnia, the award will be presented to Irving at the Dayton Literary Peace Prize Gala on October 28, 2018. Founded in 2006, The Dayton Literary Peace Prize is the only international literary peace prize awarded in the United States. It honors writers whose works use the power of literature to foster peace, social justice, and global understanding. The Ambassador Richard C. Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award recognizes authors for their complete body of work.

Born in 1942, Irving published his first novel, Setting Free the Bears, in 1968 when he was twenty-six. He has been nominated for a National Book Award three times — winning once, in 1980, for his novel The World According to Garp, the story of T.S. Garp, a man born out of wedlock to a feminist leader. He received an O. Henry Award in 1981 for his short story “Interior Space.” In 2000, Irving won the Oscar for Best Adapted Screenplay for his novel The Cider House Rules, which explores the complex issues of abortion, racism, and addiction. In 2012, Irving won a Lambda Literary Award for his novel In One Person, the coming of age story of a bisexual man grappling with his sexual identity. His novels have been translated into more than thirty-five languages and his all-time best-selling novel, in every language, is A Prayer for Owen Meany, which deals with matters of faith, spirituality, and social justice. Irving, who lives in Toronto, is currently at work on his fifteenth novel — a ghost story called Darkness as a Bride

“John Irving’s body of work creates worlds that allow the reader to explore the contradictions of twisted morality, the consequences of suspicions of the other, the absurdities of pride and ignorance, and the tragedy of a lack of sympathy and empathy for our fellow humans: characteristics that make peace unreachable,” said Sharon Rab, the founder and chair of the Dayton Literary Peace Prize Foundation. “Through books—especially Irving’s books—readers learn to understand and identify with people who are different from themselves.” 

On winning the Ambassador Richard C. Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award, Irving said: “Novels and stories invite people into a writer’s worldview. For forty years and counting, I’ve written about sexual difference and sexual minorities — at times, when the prevailing literary culture labeled it bizarre or niche. I’ve written with the hope that the bigotry, hatred, and flat-out violence perpetrated on sexual minorities would become a relic of the past. In that sense I’ve written in protest — I’ve written protest novels. And yet, if I’ve written characters whose stories give them access to the breadth of human experience and emotion, I’ve done my job as a writer. Novels are my platform; if a prize helps bring attention to my subject matter, then I welcome it.”

Irving will join the ranks of past winners of the Ambassador Richard C. Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award, formerly called the Lifetime Achievement Award, including Studs Terkel (2006), Elie Wiesel (2007), Taylor Branch (2008), Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn (2009), Geraldine Brooks (2010), Barbara Kingsolver (2011), Tim O'Brien (2012), Wendell Berry (2013), Louise Erdrich (2014), Gloria Steinem (2015), Marilynne Robinson (2016), and Colm Tóibín (2017).  

Finalists for the 2018 Dayton Literary Peace Prize will be announced on August 14, 2018.

About the Dayton Literary Peace Prize

The Dayton Literary Peace Prize honors writers whose work uses the power of literature to foster peace, social justice, and global understanding. Launched in 2006, it has established itself as one of the world’s most prestigious literary honors, and is the only literary peace prize awarded in the United States. As an offshoot of the Dayton Peace Prize, the Dayton Literary Peace Prize awards a $10,000 cash prize each year to one fiction and one nonfiction author whose work advances peace as a solution to conflict, and leads readers to a better understanding of other cultures, peoples, religions, and political points of view. Additionally, the Ambassador Richard C. Holbrooke Distinguished Achievement Award is bestowed upon a writer whose body of work reflects the Prize's mission; previous honorees include Wendell Berry, Taylor Branch, Geraldine Brooks, Louise Erdrich, Barbara Kingsolver, Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn, Tim O'Brien, Marilynne Robinson, Gloria Steinem, Studs Terkel, Colm Tóibín and Elie Wiesel. For more information visit the Dayton Literary Peace Prize media center at http://daytonliterarypeaceprize.org/press.htm.

AntiquarianAuctions.com is an online auction site dedicated to the sale of rare and out-of print books, maps & prints, documents, letters, ephemera and vintage photography.

All pricing is done in US$. No buyer’s premium is charged. 

1529939538vesuvius.jpgLot 1 della Croce (Vincenzo Alsario) Vesuvius Ardens Sive Exercitatio Medico-Physica Motum & Incendium Vesuvii Montis in Campania XVI Mensis Decembris, Anni MDCXXXI Published: Js. Jenkins, London, (1814-1815) 

Estimate: $1,500/2,000  

Scarce work of 1632 about Vesuvio mountain by the physician from Genoa Vincenzo Alsario della Croce (b. 1570). He was teacher of medicine in Rome for more than 20 years, and the first one describing epilepsy. Physician of the Popes Gregorio XV and Urbano VIII, Alsario was expelled from Rome for his bad character "bisbetico, litigioso, millantatore soverchio e poco prudente" 

Lot 2 Couch (Jonathan) A History of the Fishes of the British Isles Published: London, 1862-5

Estimate: $1,600/2,000 

Couch was born in 1789 in Polperro in Cornwall and died there in 1870, having spent his life being interested in more or less everything,from potatoes to pilchards, although he was by profession a doctor. A History of the Fishes of the British Islands made a valuable contribution not only to science, but to the art of angling and it was relied on as a reference work for many decades after his death. The value of Couch's contribution lay not so much in his classification and descriptions of the species, but in his paintings, which were so accurate that they were relied for reference by later biologists, even when Couch's written identification was wrong. 

Lot 183 Blaeu (Willem) Africae nova descriptio [A new description of Africa]

Published: Amsterdam, 1634/5
Estimate: $1,600/2,000 

This landmark carte-a-figure map was published in 1634/5 and made by one of the Dutch master mapmakers. The map is in the uncommon 2nd state: Blaeuw (or Blaeu) signed the map using the name Guiljelemo (William) Blaeuw, having changed his surname in 1617 from Guil. Janssonio (i.e. Janssonius), which also was the surname of his arch- rival, Johannes Janssonius. 

Lot 241 Burton (Richard Francis) Zanzibar Published: London, 1872 Estimate: $1,500/2,000 

Zanzibar served as a base for the great journeys of exploration into Africa of the nineteenth century. Burton and John Hanning Speke set off from Zanzibar in 1857 on their expedition to the Great Lakes, also with the hope of discovering the source of the River Nile. One of the most important books of early travel & exploration into East Africa. 

Lot 309 Lewis (Sinclair) The Trail of the Hawk (Inscribed First Edition) Published: Harper & Brotthers, New York, 1915

Estimate: $2,200/2,500 

The fairly scarce first edition of this early and rather unsuccessful novel by Sinclair Lewis, the first US writer to win the Nobel Prize. This was his third book and the second under his own name. From the library of Dennis Wheatley, with his ex libris (by Frank C. Pape) on the front pastedown. With a wonderful full page inscription on the front free endpaper: "To Laurence Gomme, the only man living who can make one actually buy those strange exotic luxuries, books! With Mr. Wrenn's keen gratitude, & mine, Sinclair Lewis. Aug 31, 1915”.

Lot 317 Waugh (Evelyn) Robbery Under Law Published: Chapman & Hall, London, 1939 Estimate: $600/800 

A near fine copy in the original fresh blue cloth with bright gilt lettering on the spine. Internally very clean and unmarked with mild offsetting to the endpapers and two small inoffensive abrasions on each of the front and rear pastedowns. In an about very good dustwrapper which is price- clipped and has some edge chipping, most noticeably an 8mm. deep piece missing at the top of the rear flap. 

Lot 318 Bernard (Émile) & Dubois (Urbain François) La Cuisine classique, études pratiques, raisonnées et démonstratives de l'école Française appliquée au service de la Russie.

Published: Paris, 1856 

Estimate: $600/900 

Fine copy of the authorised first edition of one of the greatest treatises of modern era cooking: this work is considered to have been “the finest expression of the Golden Age of the French grande cuisine” (Britannica), and it chronicles “a progressive step up from the style of French cookery based on the work of [Marie Antonin] Careme” (OldCookBooks.com). 

Urbain Dubois and Émile Bernard were arguably the best known chefs of the 19th century. Dubois ran the palace kitchen of the King and Queen of Prussia, and is “credited with introducing the custom of having servants wait table” (Feret, 42). Bernard was one of France’s most talented pastry chefs, as well as Napoleon III’s personal chef. La Cuisine Classique is regarded as the most important of the six culinary works from Dubois’ hand. 

Lot 321 [Wharton (Edith) Editor] The Book of the Homeless (Le Livre des Sans-Foyer)

Published: Charles Scribner's Sons, New York, 1916 Estimate: $2,500/2,500 

Unique unbound, uncut and unopened copy of the limited edition: "Of this book, in edition to the regular edition, there have been printed and numbered one hundred and seventy-five copies deluxe, of larger format [all signed by Updike]. Numbers 1-50 on French hand-made paper ... Numbers 51-175 on Van Gelder paper." This copy on Van Gelder paper is numbered 65. 

AntiquarianAuctions.com is an online auction site dedicated to the sale of rare and out-of print books, maps & prints, documents, letters, ephemera and vintage photography. 

Dealers and collectors worldwide have been selling and bidding on the site since 2010. Only established booksellers who are members of major national trade associations such as ABA, ABAA, PBFA or SABDA or are of good standing in the trade are permitted to sell on the site. 

Auctions are held every five weeks and run on the model of a timed auction for one week. 

All pricing is done in US$. No buyer’s premium is charged. Next auction: Auction #69: 30 August - 6 September 2018 

 

BH-425 - SWEDISH UNDERGROUND POSTERS - 5-16-14_Page_038_Image_0001.jpgIt's big! Book lovers by the hundreds, will be heading to Brooklyn this Fall for what has become one of the largest and most popular literary events in the country.  Brooklyn Book Week, as it is informally known, is a week-long celebration of books both old and new. It kicks off with the return of the Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair (BABF) to Greenpoint's Brooklyn Expo Center, September 8 & 9.    

The 100-exhibitor Fair is the largest regional book fair of its kind. The depth and diversity of exhibitors, talks and galleries makes it a showcase for the best of the best in vintage and rare books; prints, photos and ephemera. This is the Fair where rare book librarians from top libraries and museums mix with collectors and fair-goers of all ages.  Exhibitors, heralding from 20 states, Italy, England and Canada, will have on display and for sale over 50,000 items!    

This year the BABF features a fair-within-a-fair --The Brooklyn Print & Photo Fair, highlighting exhibitors of fine prints, vernacular and found photos. Six new gallery exhibits devoted to fine prints are featured in the new section, with works ranging from prints by such well-known artists as Milton Avery, and Paul Cadmus to Russian art that spans the early 1900s to 2007. In the exhibit room show-goers will find the largest known assembly of artwork produced by leading Swedish and Scandinavian artists of the 1960s and 1970s counterculture -- the Swedish Underground Exhibition. Exhibition organizer, Johann Kugelberg, founder of Boo-Hooray, which is known for its archival collections of pop, punk and underground art, will conduct a tour of the exhibition and a talk humorously titled, "Why is the Swedish Underground Important: I Don't Speak Swedish, Sunday at 2:00pm."  

The Fair is also celebrating a special birthday--Frankenstein is 200 years old this year! Mary Shelley's famous novel was first published in 1818 when she was eighteen and there is lots of activity surrounding the occasion. New York City's Morgan Library will mount an exhibition this coming October, titled It’s Alive! to commemorate the anniversary. The Morgan Library’s John Bidwell and New York Public Library curator Elizabeth Denlinger will present a preview of the exhibition at the BABF on Saturday at 5pm. Find out why the book's message is a relevant today as it was when it was written. 

Another Fair "first" is an exhibit of historic photo booth images compiled by film and darkroom photographer, Nakki Granin. Russian immigrant, Anatol Josepho, built the first curtain-enclosed photo-booth in 1925 and "quickie photography" took off. Goranin, author of "The American Photobooth," has brought together images from her vast photobooth collection, curated especially for this event. If you have a family album or box filled with family photos, you are certain to enjoy this exhibit.

Love learning more? Don't miss BABF’s series of exciting talks throughout the weekend. Exhibitor Lorne Bair will discuss how to collect ephemera of the 20th and 21st century social movements. Anna Jozefacka, Lyda Klich and Juliana Kreinik, authors of "The Propaganda Front: Postcards from the Era of World Wars," will cover what makes the perfect propaganda postcard, illustrated with examples from the late 19th century through WWII. On a lighter note, exhibitor Garrett Scott will present a talk, "From Aristotle to Asa K. Butts, or the Literature of Earth Closets, Troublesome Monkeys, Sex and Reform in 19th century America. Heather O'Donnell, founder of Honey and Wax Booksellers in Brooklyn, gives us a look at "New Directions in Book Collecting." Lectures and exhibits are free with pre-registration online.

And here's another new BABF feature that's sure to be popular. Been cleaning your attic or basement and want to know what that old book or document your found is worth? Bring up to three items to the Fairs' appraisal clinic in the Brooklyn Expo Center's lobby on Sunday from 11am-1pm. There is no charge for the appraisal and admission to the BABF is not required.

Don't miss the Fair's "Bagels & Books," opening preview Saturday from 10am, benefiting scholarships at the University of Virginia's Rare Book School.  It's a great way to get a jump start on all of the fun and great shopping. Tickets are $30 and available online at a discounted price at brooklynbookfair.com.  

Fair Hours:  Sat., September 8th, noon-7pm; Sun. September 9th, 11am-4pm

Admission:  Weekend pass:  $15 for adults; Sunday admission $10

Contact:  info@booklynbookfair.com, 781-862-4039

Image: The Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair will present The Swedish Underground Exhibition in the Brooklyn Expo Center’s Exhibit Room.  Curated by Johan Kugelberg, founder of Boo-Hooray this is one of the largest assemblies of artwork and photography produced by leading Swedish and Scandinavian artists of the 1960s and 1970s counterculture.

North Adams, Massachusetts—The Artist Book Foundation (TABF) will celebrate the Hyperrealist sculptor Carole Feuerman at TABF’s Louis and Susan Meisel Gallery in Building 13 on the campus of the Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art (MASS MoCA). 

The exhibition: Swimmers: Recent Works by Carole Feuerman, runs from June 15 through September 29, 2018. Featured are five of Feuerman’s sculptures, both monumental and smaller works in bronze, resin, and marble, and 10 prints of diamond dust and mixed media. The exhibition features several exclusive works created specifically for The Artist Book Foundation. 

On Thursday July 26, there will be a reception and book signing with the artist from 5:00 pm to 7:00 pm. 

Feuerman’s hyperrealistic human-figure sculptures express a refreshing perspective on the mundane but intensely personal activities of modern life. Her powers of observation and versatility find unique expression through various materials that include marble, bronze, and painted resins, while she incorporates both ancient and contemporary methods in the creation of her works. These sculptures offer the viewer a gorgeous and shimmering glimpse at transitory, contemplative moments in time, often captured in a veil of clear resin that replicates tumbling water droplets. 

Feuerman has had solo museum retrospectives at the The Palazzo Strozzi Foundation in Florence, Italy; the Circulo de Bellas Artes in Madrid, Museum of Art, El Paso, TX; the Bass Museum of Art, Miami Beach, FL., and Art-St-Urban, St. Urban, Switzerland and the Teatro Romano e Museo Civico in Fiesole, the Venice Biennale, the Musei di Rimini, and Huan Tai Hu Museum in the Jiangsu Province among others. Her work was featured at the Smithsonian National Portrait Gallery in Washington, DC; The State Hermitage in St. Petersburg, Russia, Grounds for Sculpture, Trenton, NJ. She also had a solo show in Hong Kong, in the Olympic Fine Arts exhibition at the 2008 Summer Games in Beijing, Palazzo Grazie in the Piazza della Repubblica in Florence. In China, she has exhibited in Hong Kong, the National Museum of China, Beijing. She has exhibited in Korea at the Clayarch Gimhae Museum, Daejeon Museum, and Suwon Museum. In Germany, she has exhibited at the Nassauischer Kunstverein Wiesbaden, the Contemporary Art Museum in Aachen, and in Kassel during Documenta 14 (2017). In Spain, she exhibited at Museo de Bellas Artes de Bilbao and the Academia de Bellas Artes de Madrid. In Mexico, she has exhibited at Marco Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Monterrey, and Denmark at the Arken Museum of Modern Art. 

Carole Feuerman’s selected collectors include the Emperor of Japan, President Bill Clinton and Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, Norman Brahman, the Caldic Collection, Mark Parker, Nike, Ariela Wertheimer, Robert Hurst, and Malcolm Forbes. 

The Artist Book Foundation, a 501c3 organization, believes that artist books, like the artwork that inspires them, serve as a vital source of knowledge and cultural insight for current and future generations. For more information, visit our website at artistbkfoundation.org

 

1276515.jpgNew York - Doyle is pleased to auction an extensive collection of angling books assembled by Arnold “Jake” Johnson (1930-2017) of Bozeman, Montana. Comprising over three hundred books, this remarkable collection will be offered in a timed online-only auction on Doyle.com. Bidding will commence on Friday, July 13. Bidding will close on Tuesday, July 24 beginning at Noon EDT. The public is invited to the exhibition at Doyle on Friday, July 20 and Monday, July 23.

The collection offers a wide range of material, from rare works dating to the 18th century to finely produced recent publications. Fishing for trout, salmon and fly-fishing are well represented, as are deep sea and sport-fishing. Featured are copies of important titles with inscriptions or fine provenance, including books from the libraries of Dean Sage, Edward Sands Litchfield, Samuel B. Webb, C.R. Morphy, Bibliotheca Piscatoria Lynniana, and Robert Hoe. Also noteworthy are volumes signed by Zane Grey and other major anglers and artists. The sale offers books in a range of price points and presents an exciting opportunity to add to an established collection, form the foundation of a new collection, or find a unique gift for an angling enthusiast.

A true bibliophile, Johnson was an inveterate collector of rare items related to angling, travel, expeditions in India and Africa, English sporting and color-plate, 19th century big game hunting, and Western Americana. His collection comprises hundreds of rare books, hand-written accounts of hunting expeditions, striking examples of 19th century photographic travel albums, and elusive bibliographies and facsimiles of major works. The collection will offered in an ongoing series of live and online auctions.

Bidders may begin placing bids on Friday, July 13 on Doyle.com. The sale will close on Tuesday, July 24 beginning at Noon EDT. Lots will close sequentially, one lot per minute, with a soft close. Should any bids be placed in the final minute, bidding will remain open on that lot for an additional 3 minutes.

EXHIBITION
All of the books will be on public exhibition at Doyle on Friday, July 20 from 9am-12pm and Monday, July 23 from 10am-4pm. Doyle is located at 175 East 87th Street in Manhattan.

Image: Lot 132: HALFORD, FREDERIC M. Dry Fly Entomology, a brief description of the leading types of natural insects serving as food. Estimate: $700 - $1,000 

 

a4007bc46d7ceb5e1bb3c53c45d29272415d07c8.jpegBoston, MA -  A handwritten letter from  Bob Dylan to an old Greenwich Village friend will be auctioned by Boston-based RR Auction. 

The one-page letter postmarked July 26, 1975. Letter to musician Debbie Green Andersen, in part: "Usually I write songs and put it all there so I don't write too many letters. Are you still in New York? I am. If you are, I am making a record starting Monday. You can sing on it if you want. Columbia Studios. 50th and Madison. Studio E. If not maybe next time."

The recipient, Debbie Green (1940-2017), was a talented folk musician who taught Joan Baez the guitar and later toured and recorded with her husband, singer-songwriter Eric Andersen, as part of the Greenwich Village folk scene during the 1960s. 

The couple moved to California in 1970, had a child, and then separated. In early 1975, after a dinner with Eric Kaz in the Village, Green made an impromptu vocal performance at The Bitter End in what turned out to be a surprise audition for Bob Dylan’s Rolling Thunder Revue concert tour. When Green returned to her Mill Valley home for the summer, she found this letter from Dylan, who, impressed by her performance, inquired if she wanted to sing on his forthcoming Columbia Records album Desire. 

In spite of the flattering offer, Green had to refuse: ‘I couldn’t have gone on tour for that long anyway. Sari was in school and I was a mom.’ The recording of Desire pushed ahead, as did Dylan’s historic Rolling Thunder Revue tour, which played a total of 57 shows from October 30, 1975 to May 25, 1976, and was highlighted by a benefit concert for imprisoned boxer Rubin 'Hurricane' Carter on December 8th in Madison Square Garden.

Additional featured lots include: 

Beatles fully signed 1963 Parlophone mono first pressing of “Please Please Me.” 

Paul McCartney handwritten lyrics for “Through Our Love.”

Elvis Presley’s gold and diamond ring. 

Jim Morrison handwritten poem, discovered in the famed “127 Fascination.”

Guns N’ Roses: Slash’s 1992 AMA for Favorite Heavy Metal Artist. 

Prince handwritten lyrics for the unreleased song “Go,” in purple ink.

Prince’s personally owned and worn purple shirt, circa “Purple Rain” era.

The Marvels of Modern Music from RR Auction will begin on July 12 and conclude on July 19. More details can be found online at www.rrauction.com.  

 

Screen Shot 2018-07-13 at 7.56.05 AM.pngBoston, MA - Skinner, Inc. is hosting a live auction of Early English Books: A Single Owner Sale on July 20 in Boston. Interested bidders are invited to preview items and meet with specialists in person on July 18, 19, and 20 or anytime online.

Skinner’s specially scheduled July book auction features a single-owner collection from California that includes high spots of English literature, culture, religion, and history from before 1700. Early English books have been prized by book collectors since the 19th century, and this important collection, formed over decades of careful selection from the best dealers and auction houses worldwide represents a unique opportunity to acquire early books that are rarely available for sale.

A Shakespeare Fourth Folio from 1685 is a highlight of the sale, along with first edition works by Erasmus, Thomas More, Francis Bacon, John Milton, John Donne, Thomas Hobbes, Robert Boyle, Galileo, and others. Topics most don’t associate with the period are also represented; including works on hunting, falconry, cider-making, child-rearing, swimming, surveying, money exchange, and practical mathematics.

Bidders will find works related to the upheaval among the British monarchy from this period, including King Henry VIII’s re-writing of religious doctrine, and other material from the Reformation, works related to Queen Elizabeth during the turbulent time after Henry VIII’s death, and others concerned with the execution of Charles I.

The collector, a retired physician accumulated a number of early books of folk and herbal remedies that give insight to English medical practice dating back to the mid 1500’s.

Andrea Mays, author of The Millionaire and the Bard, will also be on hand at Skinner’s Boston gallery on the evening of July 19th to give a talk about Henry Folger’s obsession with collecting the works of Shakespeare and anything else he could obtain with an Elizabethan connection. The Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, D.C. is his permanent monument. 

Skinner Boston is honored to have the opportunity to share this collection with its clients in New England this summer, and to celebrate culture and history with this selection of rare and important books.

Previews and Bidding

Previews for the Early English Books: A Single Owner Sale auction will be in our Boston, MA gallery on Wednesday, July 18 from 12PM to 5PM, Thursday, July 19, from 12PM to 7PM and Friday, July 20, from 9AM to 12PM. Free and open to the public, department director, Devon Eastland will be available to answer questions about the material and participating at auction. The fully illustrated print catalog may be purchased Skinner website or by phone order at 508-970-3234.

About Skinner

Skinner attracts top consignments and commands record-breaking prices in the international auction marketplace. With renowned expertise and extraordinary service, Skinner is the place for buyers, sellers and the passionately curious. Skinner appraisers are familiar faces on PBS’s 15-time Emmy Award-nominated ANTIQUES ROADSHOW. Visit us in Boston, Marlborough, New York or Miami, or online at https://www.skinnerinc.com.

Image: Shakespeare, William (1564-1616) Mr. William Shakespear's Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies. Published according to the true Original Copies, London, 1685 (Lot 161, Estimate $65,000-80,000)

 

L_2017_146_226v copy.jpgLos Angeles - The J. Paul Getty Museum announced today the acquisition of the Rothschild Pentateuch, the most spectacular medieval Hebrew manuscript to become available in more than a century. The acquisition was made possible with the generous support of Jo Carole and Ronald S. Lauder.

“The Rothschild Pentateuch will be the greatest High Medieval Hebrew manuscript in the United States, and one of the most important illuminated Hebrew Bibles of any period,” says Timothy Potts, director of the J. Paul Getty Museum. “Its richly illuminated pages - a great rarity in the thirteenth century - make it a work of outstanding quality and importance that represents the pinnacle of artistic achievement of its day. It will be one of the most signal treasures of the Department of Manuscripts and indeed of the Getty Museum overall.”

Potts adds: “It is especially gratifying that this landmark acquisition was generously supported by our Trustee Ronald S. Lauder and his wife, Jo Carole.”

Created by an unknown artist and dated 1296, the manuscript’s pages are filled with lively decorative motifs, hybrid animals and humanoid figures, and astonishing examples of micrography--virtuosic displays of tiny calligraphy in elaborate patterns and designs. The vibrant colors and gleaming gold distinguish this manuscript from most medieval Hebrew book production, which followed a largely textual tradition. It stands apart from other medieval examples through the appeal and extent of its illustrated program. The text contains features that indicate it may have been written in France for Jewish emigres who had been expelled from England in 1290. The illumination was likely completed in France or Germany.

The Pentateuch contains the central sacred text of Judaism--the Torah in the strictest sense--comprising the Five Books of Moses: Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers, and Deuteronomy. The manuscript’s lavish illumination divides the text into sections to be read weekly so that the entire Torah would be read over the course of a year. The opening of each of the five books is celebrated with monumental Hebrew initials intertwined with lively marginal figures and, in one case, a full-page illumination.

With its seemingly endless variety of illuminated motifs ranging from the imposing to the whimsical, the Rothschild Pentateuch is a prime example of the heights of originality and magnificence that Hebrew illumination achieved and stands as the most extensive illuminated program of any northern European Hebrew Bible to survive from the Middle Ages.

In a rare deviation from the rest of the manuscript’s aniconic approach, there is one illumination featuring full human figures that was added at a later date. In the second half of the fifteenth century one page was replaced with a new insertion, carefully replicating the text and commentaries. The folio can be identified as the work of Joel ben Simeon, one of the most celebrated Jewish artists known from the period. The replacement miniature represents the sole figural narrative in the Rothschild Pentateuch, but was inspired with the same kind of ingenuity that characterizes the rest of the manuscript.

“This acquisition allows us to represent the three Abrahamic religions of the period, and for the first time brings a medieval Hebrew illuminated manuscript to the Los Angeles area,” says Elizabeth Morrison, senior curator in the Manuscripts Department. “The cohesiveness of the visual program combined with its unbounded ingenuity shows how medieval artisans approached the complex problem of page design and tackled a project as ambitious as the Rothschild Pentateuch.”

The Rothschild Pentateuch was created in 1296 perhaps for a patron originally from England. It was carried through the centuries from France or Germany to Italy and Poland, and was eventually acquired by Baroness Edmond de Rothschild at some point before 1920, and then given after World War II to a German-Jewish family, who later settled in Israel, as a part of an exchange agreement.

Adds Morrison, “The storied voyage of this manuscript follows the history of the Jewish diaspora across time and space. This newest addition to our collection will allow us to present a more inclusive story of the Middle Ages at a time when the Getty is increasingly looking to a global approach in the visual arts.”

The Rothschild Pentateuch will make its debut at the Getty Center in Art of Three Faiths: A Torah, a Bible, and a Qur’an on view August 7, 2018 to February 3, 2019, an exhibition showcasing for the first time the sacred texts of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. The practitioners of these three faiths have been called people of the book for their shared belief in the importance of divine word, rendered in medieval manuscripts in glowing gold and luminous colors on parchment. Three spectacular examples from the Getty’s permanent collection, including a Christian Bible and a Qur’an together with the newly acquired Torah, will be featured in this spotlight show.

Image: Menorah of the Tabernacle (Book of Leviticus) from the Rothschild Pentateuch, France and/or Germany, 1296. Leaf: 10 7/8 x 8 1/4 in. (27.5 x 21 cm). Ms. 116 (2018.43), fol. 226v

Heritage ST copy.jpgDallas, TX - A Star Trek poster by illustrator Bob Peak is expected to compete for top-lot honors in Heritage Auctions’ Movie Posters Auction July 28-29 in Dallas.

Star Trek IV: The Voyage Home by Bob Peak (Paramount, 1987) (est. $40,000-80,000) is the largest and arguably the most detailed of all Star Trek posters designed by Peak. A renowned commercial artist whose greatest acclaim comes from his developments in the design of modern movie posters, Peak’s artwork has appeared on the cover of numerous magazines, including Time, TV Guide and Sports Illustrated. The brilliant color used for the evening sky of San Francisco offers stark contrast to the Klingon Bird of Prey flying just over the Golden Gate Bridge. The 40-by-57-1/2-inch poster is done on illustration board mounted on foamcore, is signed by Peak and comes with a gold frame.

“Bob Peak was a popular and important movie poster artist who produced a number of posters for various Star Trek films, and this is as dramatic as any of them,” Heritage Auctions Vintage Posters Director Grey Smith said. “His subtle portraits of several of the film’s primary characters offer an extraordinary balance to the bold images of the sunset and the Bird of Prey. This poster is a large and striking image that would be a significant addition to any collection.”

Science fiction fans also will be drawn to The War of the Worlds (Paramount, 1953). Half Sheet (22" X 28") Style B (est. $20,000-40,000), a rare Style B half sheet that is one of the most iconic and elusive images in the genre. Featuring Martian warship imagery not included in many other posters for the original release of George Pal’s powerful adaptation of H.G. Wells’ science fiction novel.

Offered with the same $15,000-30,000 estimate are a pair of posters highlighting films featuring classic superheroes: a six sheet from The New Adventures of Batman and Robin (Columbia, 1949) and a Superman Cartoon Stock (Paramount, 1941) one sheet.

The Batman and Robin six sheet spotlights the second serial in which Robert Lowery and John Duncan play the leading roles. This series, spread over 15 chapters, pits the Caped Crusader and Boy Wonder against the Wizard, a villain with a device that can control all motor-driven vehicles remotely. This is a rare poster, the first in this format ever offered through Heritage Auctions.

The Superman one sheet celebrates the decision by Paramount to create a series of cartoons, despite outside interest in making Superman into a Hollywood serial. Under the leadership of Max and Dave Fleischer, Paramount created 17 cartoons, which are widely considered some of the best work to emerge from Paramount’s cartoon division. Paramount did not issue individual one sheets for the series, opting instead to create this stock one sheet with a blank imprint area where the individual cartoon titles could be written or printed.

A massive (91-1/4-by-62-1/2-inch) full-bleed horizontal French double grande poster for From Here to Eternity carries the same $15,000-30,000 estimate. Featuring artwork by Rene Peron, this auction marks the first time Heritage Auctions is offering this rare poster for the Academy Award-winning masterpiece in this large format. Peron’s artwork captures one of the most famous scenes in film history: the passionate clench on the beach between co-stars Burt Lancaster and Deborah Kerr.

Widely considered to be among the greatest film posters of all time, a Things to Come (United Artists, 1936) one sheet (est. $15,000-30,000) was inspired by another science fiction film based on another H.G. Wells-inspired screenplay. The film is based on his 1933 novel The Shape of Things to Come and his 1931 non-fiction The Work, Wealth and Happiness of Mankind. Among the always-rare posters for this early sci-fi epic, this one stands out in part because of the 1930s deco-designed version of the future.

A 27-by-41-inch one sheet from The Lady Eve (Paramount, 1941) highlights the transition of stars Henry Fonda and Barbara Stanwyck from Academy Award-nominated dramatic actors into comedy. Based on the story Two Bad Hats, Preston Sturges’ adaptation ultimately led to an Oscar nomination for Best Writing: Original Story for author Monckton Hoffe. Despite minor restoration, this poster is sure to appeal to collectors of comedy posters.

A set of four Help! (United Artists, 1965) door panels (est. $10,000-20,000) was created for the Beatles’ second feature film and is among the rarest of promotional items for the Fab Four. Despite being displayed in the press book, door panels rarely were ordered by theater owners, because so few theaters had adequate space to display them. Even for those that did have the space, the panels were expensive: a full set cost $7.50, while a one sheet cost just $0.15. Sets like this were made even more hard to come by because many sets that were ordered for the film’s initial showing were broken up and given away, one at a time, to fans. In addition, Help! is the only Beatles film for which door panel sets were produced.

Other top lots include, but are not limited to:

·         The Jaws of Death by Unknown (Cannon, 1976) Original Acrylic Poster Artwork (est. $12,000-24,000)

·         The Wolf Man (Universal, 1941) Half Sheet (est. $10,000-20,000)

·         Creature from the Black Lagoon (Universal International, 1954) One Sheet (est. $10,000-20,000)

The Star Trek IV poster projected to lead the 927-lot auction is just one of four posters in the sale of posters designed by Peak, a collection that also includes:

·         Star Trek II: The Wrath of Khan by Bob Peak (Paramount, 1982) Original Mixed Media Concept Artwork: est. $6,000-12,000

·         Rocky III by Bob Peak (United Artists, 1982) Original Mixed-Media Concept Poster Artwork: est. $5,000-10,000

·         My Fair Lady (Warner Brothers, 1964) Italian Photobustas: est. $800-1,600

Frazetta 5 copy.jpgDallas, TX - History has a chance to repeat itself when Frank Frazetta Escape on Venus Painting Original Art (1972) (est. $500,000+) is expected to claim top-lot honors at Heritage Auctions’ Comics & Comic Art Auction Aug. 2-4 in Dallas, Texas.

If that ends up happening, the events will mirror those that took place at the firm’s comics auction in Chicago, which was held in May. Another Frazetta painting, Death Dealer 6, sold for nearly $1.8 million to boost the total return from that auction to just over $12 million. Each was a world record.

“Any time world records fall, that’s a tough act to follow,” Heritage Auctions Senior Vice President Ed Jaster said. “On the other hand, Frank Frazetta’s paintings are enormously popular, and is one of many exceptional lots in this auction, which has options sure to entice collectors of all levels.”

Created in 1972, Escape on Venus was used as the cover of the 1974 re-issue of the Edgar Rice Burroughs novel of the same name, and also was released as a print later in the 1970s. Known for his ability to depict sensuous, strong women in fantastic environments, Frazetta loved to challenge himself, which often meant varying his technique and palette. This technique is part of the explanation for his ability to help observers direct their focus where he wanted. In this case, the brightly colored tiger, with its piercing yellow-green eyes, and the knife-wielding woman draped in jewels draw the viewer’s attention, while the trees and plants around the borders of the painting are done in more subtle, muted earth tones, which only increases the focus on the woman and tiger in the middle of the image.

A copy of Incredible Hulk #1 (Marvel, 1962) CGC VF/NM 9.0 Off-white to white pages (est. $300,000+) is such a prized Marvel key in this grade that Heritage Auctions has offered only two in a higher grade. Ranked #2 on Overstreet’s list of the Top 50 Silver Age Comics, this issue includes the origin and first appearance of the Hulk. The first issue in the original series is the only one in which the title character appeared in grey, before ultimately turning green in what is widely accepted as a continuation of the process that made Dr. David Banner turn into the Hulk. Other characters also abandoned their original grey looks: Iron Man upgraded his armor from grey to gold, while one of the original X-Men, The Beast, evolved from his original grey look to a blue and black hue.

The “Special Once-In-A-Lifetime” proclamation on the cover of Gene Colan and Bill Everett Iron Man and Sub-Mariner #1 Cover Original Art (Marvel, 1968) (est. $100,000+) is no exaggeration. Iron Man and Namor the Sub-Mariner appeared together after each had shared a title with other characters: Namor had teamed with the Hulk in Tales to Astonish, and the Hulk kept that numbering, while Iron Man had paired up with Captain America in Tales of Suspense in a series from which Captain America kept the numbering. The end result of the dual splits was Namor and Iron Man joining forces for this single-issue series, after which they split broke out into their own individual titles, so each enjoyed multiple #1 issues - one shared and one individual.

John Romita Sr. Amazing Spider-Man #55 Cover Doctor Octopus Original Art (Marvel, 1967) (est. $100,000+) offers the genesis of one of the most striking comic covers anywhere. This stunning image shows an extreme close-up image of supervillain Doctor Octopus, who is engaged in a battle with Spider-Man, who can be seen in the reflection of Doc Ock’s glasses. The image, positioned over a banner blaring “DOC OCK WINS!” is done by legendary artist John Romita, Sr., in twice-up scale in ink over graphite on Bristol board, cut and affixed to the larger Bristol board for a total image area of 13-1/4 by 20-1/4 inches.

Other top lots include, but are not limited to:

·         Detective Comics #35 Larson Pedigree (DC, 1940) CGC Conserved NM- 9.2 White pages (est. $75,000+)

·         Brian Bolland Batman: The Killing Joke Story Page 1 Original Art (DC, 1988) (est. $75,000)

·         Jack Kirby and Paul Reinman X-Men #1 Story Page 5 Original Art (Marvel, 1963) (est. $75,000)

·         Jack Kirby and Dick Ayers Tales of Suspense #75 Splash Page 1 Captain America Original Art (Marvel, 1966) (est. $75,000)

·         Wally Wood Weird Science #22 Cover Original Art (EC, 1953) (est. $75,000)

·         Dave Gibbons Watchmen #7 Nite Owl's Hovercraft Cover Original Art (DC, 1987) (est. $60,000)

365-Cappiello copy.jpgNew York—Swann Galleries’ auction of Vintage Posters on August 1 brings to market the largest selection of food and drink advertisements the house has ever offered, along with premier examples of Art Nouveau, wartime propaganda and resort posters.

Leading the sale is Alphonse Mucha’s exquisite quartet, Times of the Day, 1899. Four allegorical women in diaphanous gowns represent Morning Awakening, Daytime Dash, Evening Reverie and Nightly Rest. The set carries an estimate of $40,000 to $60,000. Also available are the iconic Bières de la Meuse, 1897, and Salon des Cent, 1896 (each $8,000 to $12,000). Mucha’s extremely rare poster promoting the exhibition of works from his magnum opus, The Slav Epic, at the Brooklyn Museum in 1920, makes its second appearance at auction. Printed in only two colors, this unusual work is valued between $10,000 and $15,000.

Bacchanalian advertisements for wine, food and liquor from a singular collection are led by scarce work by Leonetto Cappiello: Carnaval / Vinho do Porto, 1911. The image has been seen at auction only once before, when this exact poster was offered in 2005 and acquired by the consignor. It is estimated at $20,000 to $30,000. Another rare poster by the artist is Fêtes du Congrès International des Étudiants, 1907, showing a female Bacchus squeezing grapes into her companion’s goblet ($8,000 to $12,000). More than 20 of Cappiello’s most famous posters will be offered, along with another 20 works by Luciano Achille Mauzan, including his cheerful Cirio / Extracto de Tomates, 1930, with an estimate of $3,000 to $4,000. Scrumptious highlights by Adolphe Mouron Cassandre, Ludwig Hohlwein, Georges Lepape, Manuel Orazi and J. Spring will also be available.

A sobering counterpoint to the festivities is a collection of 20 posters from the American Temperance Society, circa 1950s, with such taglines as Alcohol Destroys Feminine Loveliness and Alcoholic Beverages of Any Kind Do Not Mix with Football. The group is expected to sell for $2,000 to $3,000.

British and American propaganda from both World Wars includes James Montgomery Flagg’s iconic I Want You for U.S. Army, 1917, and Wake Up, America! / Civilization Calls, 1917 ($7,000 to $10,000 and $3,000 to $4,000, respectively). Britain’s iconic Keep Calm and Carry On, 1939, in excellent condition ($12,000 to $18,000) takes the opposite approach to This is the Enemy, Karl Koehler’s searing portrait of Nazi inhumanity, that won the National War Poster Competition of 1942 and is valued at $3,000 to $4,000.

A fine etching by Jean Dupas makes a rare appearance in a posters auction. The work is a detail from his 1928 painting, L’Enlèvement d’Europe, though this 1931 printing is sometimes called Le Taureau Noir. Showing two women with enormous bushels of flowers riding a bull, it carries an estimate of $3,000 to $4,000.

The complete catalogue with bidding information is available at www.swanngalleries.com.

Additional highlights can be found here.

Image: Lot 365: Leonetto Cappiello, Carnaval / Vinho do Porto, 1911. Estimate $20,000 to $30,000.

IMG_1056 copy.jpgHartford, CT—Advertising and paper lovers, rejoice! Papermania Plus, the Northeast’s largest vintage advertising and ephemera show, returns to the XL Center Saturday, August 25, 2018 for the 74th time. The show has been running continuously in Hartford since 1975 and is one of the top shows for advertising, paper and memorabilia collectors in the country. 

Papermania Plus offers serious collectors and the merely curious a treasure trove of vintage items, including postcards, movie posters, photographs, rare books, fine art prints, baseball cards, maps, sheet music, autographs, and much more. Even items such as old stock certificates from long-bankrupt companies — valuable for their design, not the company they represent — can be found. Then there’s the “Plus” part: pins, tin-types, vintage bottles, metal and wooden sign, and advertising samples of all kinds. 

“[Papermania Plus] showcases the importance of printed material before the Internet,” says show promoter Gary Gipstein. “The breadth and depth of material on display here is staggering. I can’t believe some of the things that our vendors bring in. Just the availability of old postcards alone is amazing; tens of thousands of postcards with historic scenes of places around the world. It’s amazing. And that’s just a start.” 

The show is one of the largest on the circuit. Dozens of vendors from across the country will bring items to sell, share, and display. The public is encouraged to bring in their own treasures for an appraisal from 11 am to 2 pm. Among the appraisers this year is Gary Sohmers, famous for his appearances on the 7-time Emmy nominated PBS-TV program “Antiques Roadshow.” “We are extremely fortunate to have Mr. Sohmers at Papermania Plus again this year,” Gipstein said. 

"A show of this sort is an invitation to an old-fashioned swap session," Gipstein said. “You know, the kind where you have a chance to pick up a rare Topps Baseball Card you’ve been looking for, or a backstage pass and poster from that Grateful Dead concert you were at. You can also search for a mint copy of the first Batman comic book, Stephen King’s Castle Rock newsletters, rare Civil War pictures or WWII insignias and combat ribbons, and even rare LP’s. There are stereo view cards, stock certificates and many kinds of eccentricities of interest to everyone.” 

Papermania Plus at the XL Center in Hartford runs from 9 am - 5 pm Saturday, August 25, 2018. Tickets are $9. Seniors and students with a valid ID card can get half-price admission. 

Complete information can be found at www.papermaniaplus.com, or by joining the PaperMania Plus community on Facebook. You can follow @PapermaniaPlus on Twitter and Instagram. 

2f4858467e4c7a99061de570fee1600d5f05cfb9.jpegBoston, MA - A rare handwritten letter by German theologist, monk and religious reformer Martin Luther will be auctioned by Boston-based RR Auction. 

The one-page letter in German, signed “Martinus Luther D,” circa September 1, 1543. An extensive, uncommonly well-preserved letter to Georg Buchholzer, Provost of St. Nikolai in Berlin, regarding the latter’s altercation with the Brandenburgian court preacher Johann Agricola from Eisleben (also known as ‘Magister Eisleben’) about the treatment of the local Jews. Prince Elector Joachim II, who in 1539 had introduced the Reformation to Brandenburg and whose tolerant politics toward Jews enraged the population, had long desired a reconciliation between Luther and his former disciple Agricola, and he must have suspected that Provost Buchholzer was poisoning Luther’s mind against his court preacher. Buchholzer therefore wrote to Luther requesting an interpretation of some Biblical verses by which Agricola justified his pro-Jewish stance, and in his answer Luther insists that Buchholzer has done well to preach against the Jews and shall continue to do so, ignoring the habitual liar Agricola. 

In part (translated): “Grace and Peace. My dear Provost! I must be brief with writing, for the sake of my weak head. You are aware that you have no previous association with me, nor I with you, other than that you recently wrote to me asking for an explanation regarding several statements. And even if you were to write me many things about M. Eisleben, how could I believe you alone? For whoever says that you or anyone in Berlin or in all of Brandenburg is inciting me against Eisleben, if he says so unwittingly, may God forgive him, but if he says it knowingly, then he is a roguish liar, as well as M. Eisleben himself has lied frequently, here in Wittenberg. M. Eisleben needs nobody to incite me against him; he himself is much better at that, much better than anyone whom he might suspect of such dealing. He knows that full well….In my opinion, he will give up his life before he gives up his lying.—You have preached against the Jews and fought serious battles over that with the Margrave….And you were quite right to do so. Stand fast and persevere! The words against you which you quoted to me, allegedly protecting the Jews, I will not hope to be true, nor shall I believe that M. Eisleben ever will preach or ever has preached such. I do not yet consider him so deeply fallen. May God prevent him!…For then M. Eisleben would not be the Elector’s preacher, but a true devil, letting his sayings be so shamefully misused to the damnation of all those who associate with Jews. For these Jews are not Jews, but devils incarnate who curse our Lord, who abuse His mother as a whore and Him as Hebel Vorik and a bastard, this is known for certain. And anyone who is capable of eating or drinking or associating with such a foul mouth is a Christian as well as the devil is a saint….You may show this letter to whomever you wish. I do not know, nor do I care, who wrote the other three letters from Wittenberg to Berlin. You will undoubtedly confess this to be the first letter you ever received from me. For your name and person were previously unknown to me.” 

The letter bears several corrections in Luther’s own hand. The date of receipt is noted by Buchholzer at the foot of the reverse: “Received by me in Berlin on Wednesday after St Egyd [5 September] anno etc. 43.” 

Accompanied by a handsome custom-made quarter leather clamshell case. 

Luther had apparently forgotten that several years previously, in late 1539, he had answered a letter of Buchholzer’s inquiring about Catholic rites still in use in Reformed Brandenburg. More notably, although Luther is writing to a fellow scholar, this letter is written in German so that the recipient may show it “to whomever he wishes”—that is to say, to the Elector himself, thus providing Buchholzer with a writ of protection against any suspicion which Joachim may harbor against him. The Hebrew words invoked by Luther, “Hebel Vorik” [vanity and emptiness], are taken from Isaiah 30:7. They were part of a Jewish prayer in which Jews thanked God for having made them different from those peoples who worshipped “Hebel Vorik,” though Luther construed the words as a code for Jesus Christ. Luther’s anti-Judaism had not always been this radical—as a young man he had spoken out judiciously against the traditional defamation of Jews and against all forms of forcible conversion, but he soon grew increasingly bitter, and by 1543 his attitude was one of undisguised loathing. His most notorious antisemitic pamphlet, ‘On the Jews and Their Lies,’ was published only months before the present letter was written. With the same rhetorical skill with which he had previously ridiculed the papacy he now invoked a grotesque abhorrence of Judaism. As an embodiment of his sentiments in his later years, demonstrating how precisely the antisemitic church politics and discourse of the 1540s matched Luther’s instructions, this letter has been quoted or paraphrased by several important biographies of the Reformer.

Less than two years later, in a letter dated March 9, 1545, Luther would write to Elector Joachim II directly, warning him against the ‘tricks’ of the Jews, in whom he is said to have too much confidence, adding that he is ‘glad that the Provost [Buchholzer] is so severe on those Jews, which is a proof of his loyalty to your Grace; and I encourage him to continue in the path he has chosen.’ 

“Although we think of Martin Luther as a reformer, this letter reminds us of his unrepentant anti-semitism,” said Bobby Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction. 

Luther died on February 18, 1546, after years of struggling with illness. 

The Fine Autographs and Artifacts auction from RR Auction began on June 29 and will conclude on July 11.  More details can be found online at www.rrauction.com.

When: July 11 - September 22, 2018

Where: 28 W. 27th St., 3rd Floor, NY, NY

Gallery Hours: M-F, 11a-6p; Sat, 10a-5p

Admission: Free

Organized by Elisabeth Lortic, independent curator and co-founder of Les Trois Ourses (Paris)

BASIC-SPACE-fanny-millard-04OPT.jpgThis exhibition brings to the forefront ideas and concepts articulated by the early 20th century Futurist-informed artist Bruno Munari. It is a thoughtful and dynamic exploration of play, invention, movement, and color. It brings together a body of artworks which are child friendly, and, more importantly vehicles to engage children in creative learning processes. Like children, artists explore alternate materials, and take them to the limit of their possibilities.

Artists include: Ianna Andreadis, Marion Bataille, Mauro Bellei, John Cage & Lois Long, Remy Charlip, Ivan & Jane Chermayeff, Paul Cox, Louise-Marie Cumont, Sophie Curtil, Milos Cvach, Sylvia de Swaan, Sonia Delaunay, Olafur Eliasson, Marco Ferreri, Barbara Henry, Keith Godard, Wennie Huang, Coline Irwin, Katsumi Komagata, Kumi Korf, Warja Lavater, El Lissitzky, Richard Long, Iela & Enzo Mari, Piet Marée, Barbara Mauriello, Scott McCarney, Fanette Mellier, Fanny Millard, Bruno Munari, Thomas Ockerse, Eugenia & Vladimir Radunsky, Kurt Schwitters/Kate Steinitz/Theo Van Doesburg, Alma Siedhoff-Buscher, Claire Van Vliet, and Laurence Weiner 

Opening: Wednesday, July 11th, 6:00 pm

Roundtable Discussion: Wednesday, July 18th, 6:30 pm

Roundtable Discussion: Tentatively scheduled for Wednesday, September 19th, 6:30 pm

ALSO ON VIEW: SUMMER 2018 ARTIST MEMBERS EXHIBITION

In addition to Look, Look, Look, The Center presents this summer’s Artist Members Exhibition Opulence: Not Everything that Glitters is Gold on view through September 20, organized by Alexander Campos, Executive Director & Curator, The Center for Book Arts.

Opulence is the Center’s 2018 Artist Members Exhibition, featuring artist members as well as invited artists, focusing on artworks that look behind the velvet curtain, in particular at our current economic, social, political, ecological, and cultural issues/concerns. Oxymoron, contradiction, and irony are key to these playful works that have multiple layers of meaning and interpretations. 

Artists Include: Lynne Avadenka, Doug Beube, Rosemarie Chiarlone, Béatrice Coron, Kaleta Doolin, Bonnie C. Epstein, Eileen Ferara, Anne Gilman, Iris Grimm, Lyall Harris & Patricia Silva, Aaron Krach, Carole Kunstadt, Marlene MacCallum, China Marks, Norma Marquez, Peter O’Brien, Lisa Occhipinti, Iviva Olenick, Rocco Scary, Richard Reitz Smith, Gail Smuda, Mary Ting, Sally Totsi, Harvey Tulcensky, and Karen Viola

Roundtable Discussion, Wednesday, July 25, 2018, 6:30 pm

Roundtable Discussion, Wednesday, September 12, 2018, 6:30 pm 

Visit our website for up-to-date details on all events and programs:  www.centerforbookarts.org

Image: Fanny Millard, Basic Space, 2015, Courtesy of the Artist

DT1.jpgNew York—When Ralph Baione and Anthony Giammona were looking to donate their extensive collection of book binding tools and equipment, they learned of the Center for Book Arts and sought out the space. Baione paid a visit to the Center to see what it is all about. “It is important for me that these tools stay in use. If you send them to a museum, people can look at them, but they can’t use them,” Baione shared.

He spoke with Emilie Ahern, Audience Development Coordinator at the Center for Book Arts, to learn more about the programming offered at the Center. As soon as he saw the thriving community of students, instructors, residents, and renters, he knew the Center was “the perfect fit.”

The collection includes over 900 hand tools and over 120 brass wheels used for gold tooling and embossing. A book binder who rents studio space at the Center said, “Most book binders have maybe 10 to 15 of these tools in their collection over their lifetime. To have access to over 900 is just incredible.”

The Center for Book Arts will ensure that these tools go to good use. Through their educative and studio rental programs, the Center will include these tools in their classes and will also allow renters to use the tools for their own projects. “This equipment will not sit in a corner. We have created sample books of the patterns and designs and have already had renters start using the tools in their own work. We are excited to expand our offerings with this collection,” said Ahern.

In addition to the hand tools and brass wheels, the collection includes brass type to be used for foil stamping and embossing, a Kensol heat stamping machine, board shears to cut oversized paper and book board, and a leather skiving machine. “We are incredibly humbled and grateful to receive this generous donation,” Ahern shares, “It is not every day that a collection this large and in ready-to-use condition is bequeathed with the intent to be accessible to all.”

The Center for Book Arts offers studio rental programs, residency programs, book binding and letterpress education, book arts exhibitions and much more. Anyone interested in using these tools or learning how to use these tools can come by the Center during open hours or can call for more information.

Auction Guide