June 2018 Archives

Lady from Shanghai.jpgCleveland, OH - The art and design of classic, vintage, original movie posters will take center stage at Gray’s Auctioneers & Appraisers on Wednesday, July 11th, as over 100 original movie posters and banners will come up for bid online and in Gray’s showrooms at 10717 Detroit Avenue in Cleveland. The posters are all out of an important single-owner collection from Ohio.

Certain to attract bidder attention will be lot 327, an iconic movie poster from the inimitable 1947 Orson Welles classic film, The Lady from Shanghai, starring Rita Hayworth. Like all the best movie poster designs, this one distills the essence of the moving image into a single frame, combining text, design, photography and advertising into a unique and unforgettable work of art. 

Another lot to watch is #290, a rare linen-backed movie banner for the early talkie The Saturday Night Kid (Paramount Pictures, 1929), starring Clara Bow, nicknamed “The It Girl” and the actress who came to personify the Roaring 20s and was its leading sex symbol. The Lady from Shanghai and The Saturday Night Kid are both graded B+ and carry estimates of $6,000-$8,000.

In all, more than 400 quality lots will come under the gavel, starting at 11 am Eastern time. “This delightful summer auction is filled with fine art, vintage movie posters, furniture and decorations consigned by collectors and estates from Cleveland and the surrounding area,” said Serena Harragin, CEO of Gray’s Auctioneers & Appraisers. Live online bidding is available now at Graysauctioneers.com.

Fans of silver will have much to consider, beginning with the two Wallace sterling silver Grand Baroque flatware services for 12 (lots 38 and 39), both produced in the 20th century and having identical estimates of $2,000-$4,000. The approximate troy weights are 131.53 oz. and 144.3 oz.

An exceptional German silver tea and coffee service by J.D. Schlessinger Sohne, Hanau (circa 1900-1920), comprising a kettle with a burner on a stand, coffee pot, teapot, creamer, sugar bowl and a waste bowl, all set on a matching oval tray with cherub handles and monogrammed, should realize $8,000-$10,000. All the pieces boast footed shaped ovoid bodies with acanthus reserves.

A charming set of four German rococo style .800 silver and gilt pepper shakers and salt cellars (circa 1900), possibly by J.D. Schlessigner, Hanau and having cherub supports and foliate designs, should breeze to $3,000-$5,000; while a Russian silver and cut glass 18-piece men’s grooming set (circa 1886), weighing 46.80 ozt., fully hallmarked, should make $2,000-$4,000.

A pair of horse racing-themed oil on canvas paintings by William Garrett van Zandt (Am., 1857-1942), both from the collection of Oliver and Joyce Murphy, are lots 11 and 12 and are estimated at $3,000-$5,000 each. One is titled Checkerberry (1913), 17 inches by 20 inches; the other Miss Harris M (1918), 18 inches by 25 inches. Both of the paintings have been artist signed and dated.

Other fine art star lots will include an oil on canvas by Louis Aston Knight (Fr., 1873-1948), titled La Chaumiere de Diane, Beaumont-le-Roger, Normandy, signed, measuring 42 inches by 55 inches framed (est. $8,000-$10,000); and an oil on canvas by Antoine Blanchard (Fr., 1910-1988), titled View of the Arc de Triomphe, signed, 15 inches by 30 inches (est. $5,000-$7,000).

Two artworks share the same $2,000-$4,000 pre-sale estimate. One is an unsigned figural oil on canvas done in the manner of John Singleton Copley (Am., 1737-1815), titled Gentleman and Lady with Children in a Courtyard. The other is a Floral Still Life oil on canvas painted in the manner of Jean-Baptiste Monnoyer (Fr., 1636-1699), unsigned, with inpainting and craquelure. 

Lot 27a is a fantastical untitled welded steel sculpture by an unknown artist, somewhat akin to a tree that has been twisted and curled around itself to a point of sublime abstraction. It’s nature rendered into the mechanical.  The 20th century creation, standing 64 inches tall by 58 inches wide and 28 inches deep, makes a strong artistic statement and is estimated to bring $400-$600.

Another astounding sculptural creation, this one lot 28 by Susie Frazier Mueller (b. 1970), has an enormous guitar sitting on a tubular steel stand as its focal point and is titled Imagine Harmony with Nature (Guitar Mania for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame). The 2002 work, 10 feet 9 inches tall and made using slate roofing tiles, tree branches and mixed media, should hit $2,000-$4,000.

Gray’s Auctioneers are open for in-person previews at the Cleveland showrooms July 5th-11th, from 10am -5pm Eastern; and Saturday, July 6th, from 12 noon ‘til 4 pm. The fully illustrated catalog is now online at GraysAuctioneers.com. Telephone and absentee bids are also accepted.

Gray’s Auctioneers are northern Ohio’s leading licensed auctioneers and appraisers of fine art, antiques, decorative arts, rare books, fine jewelry and antique rugs. The boutique auction house has over two decades of experience in the art business. Experts at Gray’s offer traditional real estate services and specialists there have worked with museums, educational institutions, corporations and private collectors to achieve the full value of collections at auction. 

Gray’s Auctioneers & Appraisers is always accepting quality consignments for future auctions. To inquire about selling a single piece, an estate or a collection, you may call them at (216) 226-3300; or, you can send an e-mail to Serena Harragin, CEO, at sharragin@graysauctioneers.com

To learn more about Gray’s Auctioneers & Appraisers and the live and internet auction planned for Wednesday, July 11th, at 11 am, visit www.graysauctioneers.com. Updates are posted often.

Image: Lady from Shanghai: Iconic movie poster from the inimitable 1947 Orson Welles classic film, The Lady from Shanghai, starring Rita Hayworth (est. $6,000-$8,000).

kiowa copy.jpgDallas, TX - A Kiowa warrior’s book of drawings documenting his captivity by the U.S. Army in 1875 sold for $396,500 in Heritage Auctions’ June 26 Ethnographic Art Auction, pushing the sale to more than $1 million.

The bound book of 33 images is a stunning discovery of the earliest recorded drawings by Etahdleuh Doanmoe, one of 71 tribal members imprisoned in an effort to force Western assimilation and crush resistance to reservations. The auction also offered Self Portrait, Etahdleuh Doanmoe, Kiowa, circa 1878  - the only known self-portrait by Etahdleuh in his full war panoply - which sold for $27,500, and Kiowa Ledger Drawing, circa 1878, also by Etahdleuh Doanmoe, which sold for $25,000.

“Etahdleuh is considered a master artist in a genre called ledger art, which is an extension of traditional paintings done on buffalo robes,” said Delia Sullivan, Senior Specialist of Ethnographic Art at Heritage. “The group was an exceptionally historic find.”

An imposing, hand-painted panel recording a scene from the Blackfoot War by a chief known as Big Spring, sold for $23,750. Measuring 103 inches wide, the war record panel is one of many painted by elderly Blackfoot warriors for display in the hotels at Glacier National Park.

Dated to the 1880s, an ornate Sioux Girl’s Beaded Hide Dress with Belt, ended at $10,625 and a fascinating Sioux Buffalo Hide Bow Case and Quiver, accompanied by three arrows and a sinew backed bow, closed for $10,000.

Among the highlights of the auction’s selection of tribal art, included a 36-inch long coil of Solomon Islands Feather Money from Tevau, Santa Cruze, which sold for $18,750. The currency was fashioned from wood, fiber and feathers from the scarlet honeyeater, whose red feathers were an insignia of rank and divinity in Polynesia.

A Gold Necklace dated to 200 to 400 AD from Calima, Colombia, brought $10,000 and a separate Gold Necklace from the same era, sold for $8,000. An Olmec Jade Scepter, from 1,000 to 500 BC, sold for $7,500. 

Additional highlights include:

·         Night Guard, circa 1985, a bronze by Apache artist Allan Houser, sold for $11,875.

·         A Sioux Beaded Hide Bowcase and Quiver with Recurved Bow and Arrows, circa 1880, brought $6,875

·         An Olmec Jade Blood-letter tool, from about 1,000 - 500 BC sold for $5,750.

hefner.jpgChicago — Potter & Potter Auctions is excited to present this extraordinary archive as part of the company's 619 lot Fine Books and Manuscripts Sale to be held on Saturday, July 28th, 2018. American entrepreneur Hugh Hefner (1926-2017) is best known as the original "Playboy" and the editor of the magazine of the same name. His over the top antics and personal and professional choices made international headlines for over half a century. He met Jane Borson Sellers at Steinmetz High School in Chicago in the early 1940s and maintained a close relationship with her over the course of his life. Sellers' collections of Hefner letters, drawings, cards, photos, and clippings capture the extraordinary nature of Hugh's lifestyle and career in touching, personal, and intimate ways. 

This sale offers a dozen Hugh Hefner lots with materials dating from the early 1940s thorough 2017.  All eyes will be on lot #445, an archive of correspondence between Hefner and Sellers. This collection includes over 60 typed signed letters and autograph letters, dating from Hefner’s last year of high school in Chicago to his two-year service in the Army; snapshots of Hefner and other members of his high school gang; high school yearbook clippings; and a photo of Hefner’s 1949 wedding to Millie Williams.  Many of the letters are embellished with original ink cartoon drawings by Hefner. The whole collection is neatly and chronologically organized in a binder, as organized by Borson, with her typed summary of the letters.  The preface of the archive is a note from "Hef" on Playboy letterhead dated May 31, 2002, which states: “As I understand it, the contents of personal correspondence is the legal property of the person who wrote the letters, but you have my permission to do whatever you like with them. They are yours with my love—for all the dreams and memories we’ve shared.” This once-in-a-lifetime offering is estimated at $10,000-20,000.

Hefner was a talented amateur cartoonist and considered becoming one professionally.  He appreciated fine cartoon artwork, and his publication always featured cartoons by the most famous cartoonists of the era. Several of his original early cartoons are included in this sale and reveal a rather funny and playful side of the future Playboy.  Lot #449, an original Hefner High School Cartoon entitled “My Typical Day at Steinmetz,” is estimated at $1,000-2,000.  This two page ink and watercolor cartoon from 1943 includes a labeled, hand-drawn diagram titled “Dissection of Soft Shell Clam,” reflecting the curriculum of Hefner's zoology class that day.  

Another headliner in the Hefner collection is lot #452, Hugh Hefner's 1944 signed high school senior class sepia print photograph.  This handsome headshot measures 8-3/8 x 6-1/8 and is inscribed, “To one of the sweetest, swellest gals I know-/Hef.” Of course, the “gal” here is Jane Borson Sellers.  It is estimated at $1,500-3,000.

According to Gabe Fajuri, President at Potter & Potter Auctions, "This archive reveals the private, personal, pre-Playboy side of Hugh Hefner - something very few, if any of his millions of fans got a glimpse of. Hefner lived on a grand scale, and was constantly in the spotlight, yet the letters he exchanged with his high school classmate show he was not just larger-than-life - he could also be down to earth. Offering historically significant, unique material of this nature is a true thrill." 

Image: Archive of Early Hefner Correspondence. Estimate $10,000-20,000

June30_01_pics.jpgIthaca, NY — National Book Auctions, located just outside Ithaca, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog.  

This catalog features rare, antique and decorative books as well as select additions of ephemera. Featured are themed private libraries including titles relating to horse racing and art history. A selection of fine bindings will be offered, including antique fancy leather bindings and rare selections from the Folio Society and Easton Press.                   

Antique and rare books are numerous in this catalog. Among the earliest examples are the 1788 printing of Carey's "The American Museum or Repository of Ancient and Modern Fugitive Pieces," and Longus' "Les Amours Pastorales de Daphnis et Chloe," produced in 1779 with engraved plates. Also offered are first printings of important modern titles such as J.M. Barrie's "Peter and Wendy," "Giant" by Edna Ferber, Hemingway's "Men without Women" and others. Additional rare and antique selections relate to travel & exploration, books-on-books, theology, children's, decorative antique sets, art history, special printings by the Folio Society and Easton Press, and beyond.                         

Several interesting collections will also be showcased. Highlighted is a substantial private collection of titles chronicling the history of horse racing. Topics covered include breeding, history, the Preakness, Belmont and Kentucky Derby, and beyond. Another large collection includes an exhaustive art history reference library that belonged to a scholar who specialized in the work of Mary Cassatt. Two other private collections center on railroad history, including logging by railroad, and ornithological reference with titles examining the history of bird illustration.        

Found throughout this catalog are interesting ephemera offerings and many group lots of desirable titles.     

National Book Auctions is a public auction service specializing in books, ephemera, and art. National Book Auctions is a targeted service offering experience and expertise unique to marketing antique and modern books and ephemera for consignors and collectors alike. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of collectible, signed, and first edition books. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-269-0101 or email mail@nationalbookauctions.com.

 

131-Hayes copy.jpgNew York—On June 21, the auction of Revolutionary & Presidential Americana from the Collection of William Wheeler III at Swann Galleries saw a 91% sell-through rate for important autographs, letters and documents from some of the biggest players in American history. Wheeler, a manufacturing consultant from a long line of New Englanders, devoted much of his adult life to acquiring illuminating pieces of Americana from the Revolutionary War and nearly every president.

Wheeler harbored a special fascination with the life and deeds of Andrew Jackson, which led to a run of 34 significant letters and documents signed by the president, 88% of which found buyers. Highlights included a retained copy of a letter to be published by editor Thomas Eastin, providing his own account of the altercations that would lead to his killing Charles Dickinson in a duel. One of two known complete drafts, it reached $7,000. An 1833 autograph letter signed as president to his adoptive son, Andrew Jackson, Jr., a request that he go to their plantation (the Hermitage) in response to reports of grieving and ailing slaves, sold for $9,375.

The 1876 presidential election between Rutherford B. Hayes and Samuel Tilden was overshadowed in South Carolina by the gubernatorial contest on the same ticket. An archive of 153 items relating to the election, which resulted in riots, lynch-mobs and a contested victory for the governorship, topped the sale at $23,400.

Also available was an autograph letter signed by Patrick Henry to Colonel William Fleming requesting that the militia in Montgomery County, Virginia, be prepared in the case of an attack by Native Americans in 1778. The letter more than doubled its high estimate, selling after breakneck bidding to a collector for $16,250. Additional Revolutionary highlights included a brief autograph letter signed to Ira Allen, the brother of Ethan Allen, from Thomas Paine, concerning a missed connection at the subversive Caffe Boston in Paris in the 1790s ($10,000), and a pay order signed by 15 members of the Massachusetts House of Representatives “to defray [the] costs” of express rider Jonathan Park on his urgent ride to Philadelphia in May 1776 ($13,750).

In addition to fresh perspectives on monumental events, the auction provided an endearing human side to some of history’s most well-known players. A fine example is a heartfelt letter from Charles Pinckney to Tobias Lear, George Washington’s secretary, upon learning of the first president’s death in 1799. He wrote, “I shall not attempt to express my feelings on this occasion: language cannot describe them. In him I have lost a friend & father. Say everything proper for me to Mrs. Washington & Mrs. Lewis. I cannot console them; but I can weep with them." This rare missive was purchased by an institution for $16,250, above a high estimate of $10,000.

Specialist Marco Tomaschett was especially pleased with the institutional attention to the auction, saying, “Museums and archives recognized the historical significance of the personal correspondence featured in this sale, especially the letter from Pinckney acknowledging the death of Washington.”

The next auction of Americana at Swann Galleries, featuring The Harold Holzer Collection of Lincolniana, is scheduled for September 27, 2018. The next auction of Autographs at Swann Galleries will be on November 8, 2018. The house is currently accepting quality consignments for autumn auctions.

Image: Lot 131: Rutherford B. Hayes, archive related to the 1876 election in South Carolina. Sold June 21, 2018 for $23,400. (Pre-sale estimate $5,000 to $7,500)

 

Sylvia Plath Pulitzer Prize in Poetry 54980b_lg.jpegLos Angeles - The Pulitzer Prize in Poetry awarded to Sylvia Plath posthumously in 1982, will be auctioned by Nate D. Sanders Auctions on June 28, 2018.

Plath was awarded the Pulitzer Prize in Poetry for “The Collected Poems,” which was edited by her English poet husband, Ted Hughes. Hughes was presented the Pulitzer Prize on behalf of his late wife. The certificate was inherited by Plath and Hughes’ daughter Frieda Hughes.

Plath lived a short, but productive life. She was born in Boston in 1932 and studied at Smith College in Northampton, Massachusetts as well as Newnham College at the University of Cambridge. She received critical acclaim for popularizing “confessional poetry” in the 1950’s. Plath’s best-known works were the Bell Jar, The Colossus and Ariel. Sylvia Plath committed suicide in 1963.

The certificate was signed by Pulitzer President Michael Sovern and is stamped with the gold Pulitzer seal.  

Bidding begins at $40,000.

Additional information on the model can be found at 
https://natedsanders.com/Sylvia_Plath_s_Pulitzer_Prize_in_Poetry-LOT49694.aspx

Plath’s Driver’s License.

Also going under the hammer is Sylvia Plath’s 1958 driver license. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts license was issued on October 27, 1958. Plath signed her name twice as “Sylvia P. Hughes.” Bidding begins at $8,000.

Additional information on Plath’s driver’s license can be found at https://natedsanders.com/Sylvia_Plath_Twice_Signed_Driver_s_License_From_19-LOT49695.aspx

  

1584-003.jpgYork, PA - So far this year in the world of pop culture, only Avengers: Infinity War has been able to rival the excitement level generated by Hake’s record-setting March auction. Led by a fresh-to-the-market issue of Detective Comics #27 that sold for a staggering $569,000, the sale took in $2.35 million and emphatically validated the demand for Golden and Silver Age comics and original comic art. Once again it’s time for collectors to fasten their seat belts, as Hake’s rolls out a blockbuster July 10-12 online-auction event brimming with rare memorabilia from hundreds of popular categories.

The insatiable demand for original comic art and the prices such works are realizing at auction indicate the gap is closing between comic and mainstream fine art. An excellent case study may be in the making with the original art for two Frank Frazetta covers entered in Hake’s July auction. Frazetta, who died in 2010, was best known for his fantasy and horror art, but his gift was not confined to those genres. The two auction lots represent the color covers for issues #2 and #4 of Blazing Combat, a comic/magazine published from October 1965 to July 1966. The publication featured war stories in both contemporary and period settings, but its run was short, lasting only four issues. Each of the Frazetta cover artworks from this obscure publication is offered with a $75,000-$100,000 estimate. “If someone were to acquire both of the artworks, they would own fifty percent of the title’s run,” said Alex Winter, president of Hake’s Americana. “That’s very desirable and almost unheard of in comic-art collecting.”

The Ron Lim original pen-and-ink art for page 9 of Silver Surfer, Vol. 3 #36, published by Marvel in April 1990, delivers a double dip of mutant superhuman and Titanian Eternal, Thanos. One panel of the 11 1/8 by 17-inch storyboard shows Thanos with his Star Gem, while another depicts a raging battle scene with Thanos going toe to toe with Thor in the center of the action. This significant page, which offered a portent of things to come in The Avengers’ universe, is estimated at $5,000-$10,000. 

Another important artwork is Alex Ross’s original color page created in 1994 for Marvels, a four-issue comic series that examines the Marvel universe, its superheroes and supervillains from the perspective of an “everyman” character. The gouache-over-pencil art from issue #4, page 41 consists of six panels with images of various Marvel characters. Estimate: $10,000-$20,000. Also at the top of the art category is Greg Hildebrandt 2017 acrylic-on-canvas painting of Wonder Woman in Golden Age attire. Created as a tribute to Wonder Woman’s 75th anniversary, it could hit $10,000-$20,000.

An outstanding lineup of 1,300 comic books from the Golden through Modern Age will be auctioned, and of those, 450 are CGC certified. Many are first issues or represent the first appearance of a key character, as is the case with Detective Comics #38, which introduces Batman’s sidekick Robin the Boy Wonder. Published by DC in April 1940, this comic - which is CGC-graded 5.5 Fine - explains Robin’s origin and features the likable new character in boldly colorful cover art by Bob Kane and Jerry Robinson. “This comic, which is completely fresh to the market, is part of a recently discovered Golden Age comic book collection whose original owner purchased the comics new off the rack in the 1930s and ’40s,” said Winter. Compared to the aforementioned Detective Comics #27 that Hakes sold for well over half a million dollars, there are only around a dozen more known copies of Detective Comics #38, per the CGC worldwide census. “It could far surpass its auction estimate of $50,000-$75,000,” Winter said.

Hake’s also will be offering another helping of impossibly rare action figures from the renowned Russell Branton Star Wars collection. Highlights include: a 1977 Kenner Star Wars Darth Vader action figure, AFA-graded 95 Mint and encapsulated on 12 Back-A blister card, $20,000-$35,000; an AFA-graded 80 Near-Mint Luke Skywalker in 12 Back-C blister card with original Double-Telescoping Lightsaber, $10,000-$20,000; and an Anakin Skywalker prototype for Kenner’s 1985 Star Wars: The Power Of The Force toy line, marketed after it was offered as a Return Of The Jedi mail-in offer, $20,000-$35,000. In March, Part two of Branton’s collection beat the overall high estimate by 40 percent, inspiring Hake’s to conduct podcasts focusing on the July selection.

Movie and concert posters have attracted a legion of loyal fans to Hake’s sales. This time the auction house has amassed over 200 choice examples from all eras and genres. The movie section includes some key sci-fi pieces, such as a one-sheet for the 1951 film Man From Planet X, $2,000-$5,000; and a lobby card set for MGM’s 1956 classic Forbidden Planet, $2,000-$5,000. Concert posters are led by a boxing-style window card for “The Biggest Show of Stars for 1960,” starring Frankie Avalon, $10,000-$20,000; a 1964 Sam Cooke poster, $2,000-$5,000; and an important 1966 Frank Zappa Mothers of Invention poster from the band’s first New York City appearance, $2,000-$5,000.

Other premier auction items include a fresh-to-the-hobby original 1913 photo-postcard depicting the multi-racial All-National Baseball Club, $10,000-$20,000; and a boxed Donald Duck Rocket tin-litho friction toy of unknown French manufacturer. One of only two such examples encountered by Hake’s in 51 years, it is estimated at $2,000-$5,000.

For the political memorabilia connoisseur, Hake’s offers an extraordinary rarity - a 1916 campaign button with American patriotic imagery around a portrait of Republican presidential candidate and Supreme Court Justice Charles Evans Hughes. While Hughes was unsuccessful in his run against the incumbent Woodrow Wilson, the only known example of his ”Give Me Hughes” campaign button is a landslide winner with collectors and commands a $10,000-$20,000 estimate. 

Hake’s Americana Auction #224 has opened for bidding by phone, mail or online at hakes.com. The first session will close on July 10, 2018, while the second session will conclude on July 12. July 11 is an interim day in which bidders can peruse the catalog and prepare for further bidding. To request a free printed catalog or for additional information on any item in the sale, call toll-free: 866-404-9800 or 717-434-1600. Email: hakes@hakes.com

Image: 1584: Frank Frazetta (American, 1928-2010) original art for cover of Blazing Combat #2, Jan. 1966, 23 x 23.75in. (framed), Frazetta family endorsement. Est. $75,000-$100,000. Courtesy of Hake’s Americana

 

75c6a5b578d417f90f99878c5709e9dc26757f84.jpegBoston -  Victor Niederhoffer is more than a well-known hedge fund manager, champion squash player, bestselling author and statistician. He is also a world-class collector. 

RR Auction is pleased to present more than 100 rare and significant letters from his vast collection beginning June 22 - June 28. Niederhoffer only selects content-rich and historically vivid correspondences, and these offerings are the best examples of the diverse writers featured, from the arenas of politics, science, sports, literature and more. From Werner Heisenberg to Thomas Jefferson to Charles Darwin, each intimate letter sheds a rare light on their personal day-to-day lives. In Victor’s own words:

“Books and letters have always been an important part of my family life. My father was a policeman in the book publishing area of east New York. In those days, they didn’t sell their overstock - they dumped them in the East River. They hired policemen to do the unloading. My father was paid 50 cents an hour to dump them in the river; instead, he saved them. Our house of about 750 feet, plus wife and two children, had his book collection. The whole house and basement were lined with books.” 

“Letters were always a traditional highlight of our family. The parents, the adults have always written letters supporting their children. My grandfather sent one to the coach of the Brooklyn College team when his son was taken out of the football game; I wrote my first letter when my daughter was taken out of a third grade talent contest.” [You can read about both of these, and the uproar they caused, in the Niederhoffer memoir, "The Education of a Speculator," pg. 115-116.]

“When I learned that books and letters were available, I started collecting at 25. Very eclectic interests. The publishers and sellers have told me that often people collect one or two fields; what’s unique about me is that I collect in every field. Each week, the sellers would come to my office. If I’d had a good week in the market, I’d use my entire winnings. I bought them from key sellers in the area, and from auctions.”

“I collected for about 20 years, buying most in the 1970s. I kept them in archival volumes and often looked at them with great longing and nostalgia. I gained a lot of happiness looking through them and sharing with my family.”   

“The letters form a real tapestry of history. Nothing was bought just to fill a hole. They all show a tremendous vitality and the key events of their time."

“What’s amazing is that all the writers were very salient; e.g., presidents Grant or Monroe or Jackson, you never think of them as great intellectuals. Reagan, Teddy Roosevelt… they always wrote great, poignant letters. I prefer letters to historic documents, because by the time they come to the president, they’re antiseptic and for posterity. Letters explain how people were really feeling. It gives you a feeling of what the normal day-to-day life was.”

A highlight of the collection is a Ronald Reagan heartfelt and heartbreaking letter to his daughter. Written during a particularly trying period, this emotional letter captures Reagan reflecting on his family’s history as well as on his own mortality.

The one-page letter on both sides of his personal letterhead signed “Love, Dad,” and is dated December 24,1989. Letter to his estranged daughter, Patti Davis, in full: "Alright I’ll quit bothering you but I had more in mind than arguing politics. The line in the song says it all; 'The days dwindle down to a precious few.' On Feb. 6th I’ll be 80 years old. Your mother and I are hard put to understand the separation between us and our first born. It didn’t just happen with your growing up and leaving home. I can recall your mother coming home in tears after driving you to school. She couldn’t understand your complete silence even to the point of your not saying 'goodbye.' Was it having to share with a newborn brother? I remember a loving daughter who never let us leave the house without waving goodbye from the window. We have some snapshots that reveal a difference in a little girl. We ask ourselves, 'what did we do wrong?' We were once a loving family. Well as I said earlier 'I’ll stop bothering you' but I don’t understand the separation of our family. I recall a little girl sitting on my lap and asking me to marry her. Her mother across the room behind her signaled me to say 'yes.' So I did and explained we’d have to wait til she was a little older."  Accompanied by the original mailing envelope, addressed in Reagan's own hand and bearing a pre-printed free frank. Also includes a handsome leatherbound presentation folder. (Estimate: $20,000+)

“It’s a moving letter from father to daughter in the hopes of reconciliation, which would come at last in the mid-1990s following the news of his diagnosis with Alzheimer’s,” said Bobby Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction.

Additional highlights include:

General Washington Revolutionary War-dated letter resupplying his troops prior to the 1779 Sullivan Expedition. (Estimate: $20,000+)

Thomas Jefferson letter successfully reducing taxes on American cargo with the aid of the Marquis de Lafayette. (Estimate: $25,000+)

Werner Heisenberg on the atom bomb and the Nazi government: "I was never in doubt about the fact that the German regime consisted in its most official positions of fools and scoundrels.” (Estimate: $30,000+)

Charles Darwin replies to a German physician: "Such cases certainly occur in non-Jewish families.” (Estimate: $7,500+)

Louis Pasteur writes a page of "Notes on the Cell Structure of the Silk Worm.” (Estimate: $15,000+)

“I’m pleased that these letters are going to contribute to awareness of the greatness and impact of these people. I hope the recipients enjoy them and will share them with their colleagues and families, the same way I have,”  said Niederhoffer. 

The Significant Letter Collection of Victor Niederhoffer will be auctioned beginning June 22 and will conclude June 28. More details can be found online at www.rrauction.com

Polyglot copy.jpgLondon - Christie’s is pleased to offer discerning collectors the opportunity to view and acquire the Plantin Polyglot Bible during its summer auction of Books and Manuscripts on 11 July in London (estimate: £400,000 - £600,000). Produced by the Plantin Printing workshop in Antwerp almost 450 years ago for King Philip II, this monument of biblical scholarship is now returning from where it originated and will be on public view at the Plantin Museum on 21 and 22 June*. 

Also known as the Biblia Regia, this is considered the greatest achievements of the Plantin printing press. Printed in its original languages and the Latin Vulgate, this polyglot Bible features beautiful and exotic types and exemplifies an epitome of typographical design. 

King Philip II of Spain had originally commissioned 13 copies on vellum for his personal use, and only 11 of these sets survive today. Sent to him by Plantin in 1572, it remained in royal ownership until c.1788 when Charles III gave it to his son, which then followed on by descent to the present owner. This is the only copy in private hands as all other copies are owned by institutions. Seven are located in Spain, while the others reside in London, Turin and the Vatican. 

Meg Ford, International Director Books and Manuscripts comments - “The Renaissance press of Christopher Plantin set out to produce the finest Bible in all Christendom, and Christie’s is exceptionally pleased to bring back for the first time in almost 450 years, a deluxe vellum copy of this masterpiece to its place of origin and the very presses that printed it. This is a once in a lifetime opportunity for collectors and bibliophiles to view the deluxe Biblia Regia at the Plantin Museum on 21 and 22 June and Christie’s look forward to offering this set with royal provenance in its auction in London on 11 July.” 

Museum Director Iris Kockelbergh says - “The return of the Biblia Regia in its original home is an emotional moment. Seeing this masterpiece on paper is extremely moving and the version on parchment, on show now, surpasses this experience. We look forward to welcoming local and international viewers on 21 and 22 June to the Plantin Museum, a Unesco World Heritage site, where they can explore the world of the influential Plantin and Moretus family. 

Senior Curator Dirk Imhof, Plantin Museum, Comments - “Language can scarcely do justice to its extraordinary beauty and perfection of condition” a quote of Thomas Dibdin when he saw a version of the Biblia regia on parchment, The Bibliographical Decameron, Londen, 1817 

*The Plantin Polyglot Bible will be on view at the Plantin Museum on 21 June from 10.00am to 17.00pm and on 22 June from 10.00am to 12.00pm. 

 

255.jpgChicago, IL — Potter & Potter's recent magic sale offered collectors a phenomenal selection of automatons, apparatus, ephemera, Houdiniana, broadsides, and mystery clocks, many from the David Baldwin Magic Collection. David M. Baldwin (1928 - 2014) had a lifelong passion for magic and a remarkable eye for the extraordinary; Potter and Potter also sold highlights from this collection in October, 2016.  After the hammer fell for the last time, 33 lots made $1,000-1,999; 26 lots sold for $2,000-$9,999; and six lots lapped the five-figure mark!  Prices noted include the company's 20% buyer's premium. 

A trio of Baldwin's outstanding antique mystery clocks took the top spots in this sale. Lot #28, a lavishly decorated Robert-Houdin glass column mystery clock, made $36,000. It told time via a single arrow-shaped hand, which was set against a gilt-brass framed glass dial with Roman numerals.  Coming in second was lot #30, a two handled Robert-Houdin square dial mystery clock which sold for $24,000. This gilt-framed example featured a beveled dial with Roman and Arabic numerals and a dotted minute track, a marble platform, and two decorative swans.  And things were on the move with lot #32, a c. 1860 French magician automaton mantel clock. This breathtaking timepiece featured a magician who on the hour - or at will - turned his head and produced and transposed objects from his table.  It surpassed its high estimate to realize $21,600.  

Old and newer magic apparatus, with many fine examples from legacy manufacturers, was another spellbinding category in this sale.   Lot #1, c. 1890 European card bouquet, formerly owned by the proprietors of the Petrie-Lewis (P&L) magic company of New Haven, CT, made $11,400 on its $6,000-8,000 estimate.  This mechanically complex device was believed to be the only known example of this effect.  Lot #12, a German c. 1900 spirit bell and clock dial combination made by Carl Willmann more than doubled its low estimate to ring in $10,800. Lot #170, a modern Pillar of the Magi by John Gaughan & Associates modeled on an Otto Maurer design climbed to $10,200 on its $3,000-5,000 estimate.  Lot #197, a surprise Fabergé-Style Egg from Pywacked Magic in Germany beat its high estimate four times over to make $4,560. And lot #67, a c. 1930's American wooden “Sure Shot” dice box changed hands at $900 on its $100-200 estimate. 

Merchandise - including props, ephemera, and personal items -  associated with the legendary magician The Great Raymond (Maurice Francois Raymond, 1877-1948) proved quite popular with collectors. Lot #255, an important scrapbook of Raymond’s early escape act clippings and ephemera from the 1906-08 timeframe sold for $9,000 on its $1,000-2,000 estimate.  This archive included some of the earliest and perhaps only extant material from this period of Raymond’s career.  Lot #263, another archive of Raymond materials consisting of 1930's era clippings and playbills, made the cut at $2,160. Lot #246, a collection of professional correspondence and letters to The Great Raymond delivered $3,600 on its $200-400 estimate.    And lot #277, Raymond's fine English alligator wallet carried the day at $1,800.  This handsome accessory was detailed with a central “R” medallion and sterling silver corners bearing Birmingham hallmarks. 

This sale came full circle with museum-quality selections of books, posters, photos, and other magic rarities.  Lot #231, an archive of Del Ray (Raymond Petrosky, c. 1927-2003) photographs and ephemera, and a draft biography by Spooner soared to $4,560 on its $150-250 estimate. The collection included Del Ray’s gilt metal Lifetime Membership card in the Academy of Magical Arts.  And lot #316, a pair of 1922 Houdini Shelton Pool stunt news photos picturing the escape artist outside and within the coffin sold for $1,800 on their $250-350 estimate. These glossy silver prints had their news service hand-stamps and annotations on verso. 

According to Gabe Fajuri, President at Potter & Potter Auctions, "The sale marked another strong showing for items from David Baldwin's collection. We were particularly pleased with the results for the Okito-made props, and Del Ray-owned items. Houdini proved to be a hit, too. All in all, it was a very good day for magic collecting and magic collectors alike." 

Potter & Potter, founded in 2007, is a Chicago area auction house specializing in paper Americana, vintage advertising, rare books, playing cards, gambling memorabilia, posters, fine prints, vintage toys, and magicana - antiques and collectibles related to magic and magicians. The company's next sale, featuring fine books and manuscripts, will be held on July 28, 2018. For more information, please see www.potterauctions.com

Image: Earliest Archive of Raymond Ephemera. Realized $9,000

Tripe_301257-113_GreatBell.jpgNew York - Woodland Views, an exhibition of work by photography’s early masters, is on view at Hans P. Kraus Jr. Fine Photographs through July 27, 2018. The exhibition presents primarily 19th century landscapes beginning in 1844 by William Henry Fox Talbot, John Dillwyn Llewelyn, Benjamin Brecknell Turner, Henri Le Secq, Roger Fenton, Gustave Le Gray, Joseph, vicomte Vigier, and Captain Linnaeus Tripe, among others. 

Guided by Sir Walter Scott’s prose, William Henry Fox Talbot (1800-1877), the inventor of photography on paper, travelled to Scotland in October 1844 to photograph scenes from the life of Scott. Four converging triangles of alternating tones in Loch Katrine, a surprisingly modern 1844 salt print from a calotype negative, evokes a mood appropriate to Scott’s influential 1810 poem “Lady of the Lake.”

Pheasant and Ferns, an 1850s albumen print from a glass negative by the Welshman John Dillwyn Llewelyn (1810-1882), is a carefully observed tableau of a stuffed pheasant in a densely embroidered setting of ferns and ground cover and is a fine example of Llewelyn’s high regard for the medium.

Benjamin Brecknell Turner (1815-1894) first took up photography in 1849. Like many of the early practitioners he was a “gentleman amateur” for whom photography was a passion, not a profession. In the early 1850s he photographed picturesque, quintessentially English scenes: ruined abbeys and castles, thatched barns and half-timbered houses, crumbling cottages, ancient oak trees and woodland paths, such as the albumen print from a waxed calotype negative, In Loseley Park, from 1852-1854. Turner’s poetic images reveal the beauty of vernacular subjects and the moral worth of tradition, nature, and rural life.

Gustave Le Gray (1820-1884) trained as a painter in the studio of Paul Delaroche and exhibited in the Paris Salon. By the late 1840s Le Gray had become an innovator of photographic processes, developing the waxed paper negative around 1848. Saturating the paper with beeswax and light-sensitive chemicals made the image sharper than that resulting from the calotype process devised by Fox Talbot in the 1830s and 1840s. The waxed paper of Le Gray’s process could be prepared in advance and developed days after exposure allowing photographers to minimize the quantity of equipment in the field. Le Gray influenced a generation of 19th century photographers including J. B. Greene, vicomte Vigier, Henri Le Secq, and Roger Fenton.

Le Gray’s own exceptional vision is reflected in his landscapes and seascapes. His poetic photographs taken in the forest of Fontainebleau are masterpieces of light and shadow. The exhibition includes Le Hêtre, Fontainebleau, an albumen or coated salt print from a waxed paper negative, dating from the early 1850s. 

A student of Le Gray, Joseph, vicomte Vigier (1821-1894) produced a series of work from paper negatives in the Pyrenees in the summer of 1853. Bagnères de Luchon. Chemin trace par l’avalanche dans la forêt de Saint-Just, a fine salt print, evokes the sublime by depicting a mountain slope devastated by an avalanche. Vigier’s ambitious views of the Pyrenees earned unanimous praise from his contemporaries as proof of the universal and timeless language of photography.

Rangoon. The Great Bell at the Shwe Dagon Pagoda, Burma an albumenized salt print from a waxed paper negative of 1855 by Captain Linnaeus Tripe (1822-1902), features a majestic tamarind tree towering over a pagoda which it nearly obscures, the Great Bell just visible beneath the tamarind’s overspread branches and leaves. Tripe was the official photographer attached to a British diplomatic mission to Burma in 1855, instructed to gather information regarding the country and its people. Tripe’s architectural and topographical views are of great documentary importance as they are among the earliest surviving photographs of Burma.

Attributed to the Circle of the sculptor Charles Simart, two 1850s salt prints from enlarged collodion negatives, Branch of apples and Apple blossoms, are charged with the same energy as quick pencil sketches in an artist’s sketchbook. Made by an unidentified photographer with barely a nod to conventional practice, these prints are filled with a great sense of purpose. The apple tree details were photographed from life and feature the sharp resolution associated with prints made from collodion negatives. Appearing at first glance to be enlargements from smaller negatives these contact prints from enlarged copy negatives, make the familiar strange.

Image: Image caption: Captain Linnaeus Tripe, Rangoon. The Great Bell at the Shwe Dagon Pagoda, Burma, 1855. Albumenized salt print from a waxed paper negative, 27.2 x 35.0 cm

Stefan_Gunnesch_The_Uncanny_4.jpgFreud on the Couch: Psyche in the Book, a new exhibition featuring book works inspired by the psychoanalytical concepts of Sigmund Freud, will travel to Minnesota Center for Book Arts (MCBA) from July 20-September 30, 2018. Freud on the Couch features works by nearly 30 international artists that either directly or indirectly draw from Freudian concepts, theories, and themes. This provocative exhibition asks viewers to find parallels between the ways that visual art and psychoanalysis act as frameworks for the collective unconscious. MCBA will host an opening reception on Thursday, July 26 from 6-8 pm in the Open Book Cowles Literary Commons.

Artists featured in the exhibition include Thorsten Baensch, Sarah Bryant, Crystal Cawley, Ken Campbell, Maureen Cummins, Anne Deguelle, Gerhild Ebel, Stefan Gunnesch, Karen Hanmer, Anna Helm, Susan Johanknecht, M. M. Lum, Jule Claudia Mahn, Patrizia Meinert, Simon + Christine Morris, Didier Mutel, Susanne Nickel, Yasutomo Ota, Waltraud Palme, Veronika Schäpers, Robbin Ami Silverberg, Herbert Stattler, Marian St. Laurent, Ines von Ketelhodt, Carola Willbrand, and Sam Winston. Through various forms of book art, they explore Freudian concepts such as the dream state, consciousness, memory, multiple personalities, fixation, and ego/id, combined with analytic techniques such as hypnosis and free association.

Freud on the Couch was organized by Susanne Padberg of Vienna’s Galerie Druck & Buch, which is located next door to the famous Berggasse 19, the house where Freud founded psychoanalysis. The traveling exhibition comes to Minnesota Center for Book Arts from the Center for Book Arts in New York, where it made its U.S. debut. Following its showing at MCBA, the exhibition will continue on to the San Francisco Center for the Book.

As the largest and most comprehensive center of its kind in the nation, Minnesota Center for Book Arts celebrates the book as a vibrant contemporary art form that takes many shapes. From the traditional crafts of papermaking, letterpress printing, and hand bookbinding to experimental artmaking and self-publishing techniques, MCBA supports the limitless creative evolution of book arts through book arts workshops and programming for adults, youth, families, K-12 students, and teachers. MCBA is located in the Open Book building in downtown Minneapolis, alongside partner organizations The Loft Literary Center and Milkweed Editions. To learn more, visit www.mnbookarts.org.

ImageThe Uncanny by Stefan Gunnesch

fahrner_r665043_94_b18918_003_2000x2000_low.jpgLos Angeles -  For most of us, books are a central part of daily life, but for artists they are also an essential medium for contemporary art - both as a tradition to be challenged and a form for experimentation—as much as sculpture, painting, and other classic forms of artmaking.  On view at the Getty Research Institute from June 26 through October 28, 2018, Artists and Their Books / Books and Their Artists presents more than 40 of the liveliest and most unexpected examples of artists’ books from the GRI’s Special Collections.

“Books are at the heart of the Getty Research Institute’s collections, from fifteenth and sixteenth-century illustrated editions to the avant-garde experiments of the early 20th century to our large and varied collection of more than 6,000 books made by artists from the 1950s to today,” said Andrew Perchuk, acting director of the Getty Research Institute. “These striking works often make their way into the GRI’s collections through our relationships with contemporary artists or they come as part of artists’ archives, which we collect in depth. Artists’ books resonate with the GRI’s interest in exploring creative processes and are a fundamental and often understudied element of art history. I am certain our visitors will find these extraordinary examples evocative and compelling.”

Artists' books occupy a creative space between traditional books and contemporary works of art, often questioning what a book can be. This highly visual and experiential exhibition focuses on artists' books that can be unpacked, unfolded, or read in alternative ways. Some are made to be shown on the wall or displayed as sculptures or installations. The exhibition highlights the myriad incarnations and innovative roles for books in contemporary culture.

“When artists make or design books, they delve into the possibilities of this distinctive cultural object in ways that expand our notions of what a book can be,” said Marcia Reed, chief curator of the Getty Research Institute and one of the curators of the exhibition. “The book holds a special status in contemporary art practice, and we look forward to sharing examples from this critical collecting area of the GRI with wider audiences. Because the GRI’s collections of artists’ books are not well known, for several years we have been working on a publication that shares selected works from postwar and contemporary collection of artists’ books. This exhibition and the related catalogue is born of that research. Together this stunningly designed volume and the exhibition of selected artists’ books—slightly different from the book—show the breadth of our collection of artists’ books as well as illustrating how books designed and made by artists extend the boundaries of the GRI’s rare book collections.”

Some of the artists in the exhibition, such as Tauba Auerbach and Dieter Roth specialize in making art in the form of books, or have established small presses, like Sam Francis’ Lapis Press in Santa Monica and Venice and Felicia Rice’s Moving Parts Press in Santa Cruz. Many others who are primarily known as sculptors, painters, or performance artists have also experimented in artists’ books, including Ellsworth Kelly, Anselm Kiefer, Barbara T. Smith and Wei Tan. 

“Many of the works in this exhibition might not look like a book at all, but they all play with the idea of what a book is and how to engage with it,” said Glenn Phillips, exhibition co-curator and head of modern and contemporary art collections the GRI. “It is interesting to note that while many artists have devoted their practices to making books, there are so many more artists working in other media who have made books at some point in their careers. Although they may be challenging to display and even collect, books seem to have the same appeal to artists as they do to other readers - the objects themselves can be just as compelling as the content within.

The books, multiples, and unique objects included in the exhibition take different shapes, some made with surprising materials, while being made to be looked at or interacted with in different ways. For example, The Philosopher’s Stone, 1992, a unique book-object by Barbara Fahrner and Daniel E. Kelm, is a geometric paper egg that holds nuggets of wisdom to be revealed as corners are turned down and intricately drawn panels filled with handwritten text are unfurled. Once fully taken apart, it is no easy feat to put the angular ‘pages’ of this book-inspired paper sculpture back together.

One of the more recent works in the exhibition is DOC/UNDOC (2017) by Felicia Rice and Guillermo Gómez-Peña. Riffing on earlier boxes assembled by Marcel Duchamp, this is a high-tech aluminum case that holds an altar, a cabinet of curiosities, and a Mexican wrestling mask.  Opening the case triggers lights and music, the sound art created for the piece by Zachary Watkins. Installation of this work will include a multimedia component giving visitors the opportunity to experience these interactive elements.

One of the earliest pieces in the exhibition stands out for its confrontational style - and smell. Dieter Roth’s work Poetrie, 1967, is a book made of 21 clear vinyl envelopes for pages, on which the texts of poems are printed. The envelopes contain urine, now desiccated and yellow green, retaining its distinctive odor, which may be getting stronger over time. The artist produced this book in an edition of 30; fifty years after their publication the see-through pages have wrinkled and changed color but still make a strong impression.

This summer sees the release of the Getty publication Artists and Their Books / Books and Their Artists, which inspired the exhibition. Edited by Marcia Reed and Glenn Phillips, this volume includes over one hundred important examples selected from the Getty Research Institute’s Special Collections. 

The publication also presents precursors to the artist’s book, such as Joris Hoefnagel’s sixteenth-century calligraphy masterpiece; early illustrated scientific works; and avant-garde publications. Mid twentieth-century works in the publication reveal the impact of Pop Art, Fluxus, Conceptualism, feminist art, and postmodernism on artists’ books. The selection of books by an international range of artists who have chosen to work with texts and images on paper provokes new inquiry into the long-term fertile relationship of art and books in contemporary culture. 

A full list of artists included in the exhibition Artists and Their Books / Books and Their Artists is below. The public can find more information about the exhibition, including a schedule of tours and public programs at www.getty.edu/research/exhibitions_events/exhibitions/artists_books/index.html.

The artists included in Artists and Their Book / Books and Their Artists are:

Anne Auerbach

Tauba Auerbach

Raffaele de Bernardi

Sandow Birk

Andrea Bowers

Chris Burden

Jan Činčera

Johanna Drucker

Dave Eggers

Felipe Ehrenberg

Olafur Eliasson

Timothy C. Ely

Barbara Fahrner

Guillermo Gómez-Peña

Jennifer A. González

Katharina Grosse

Robert Heinecken

Leandro Katz

Ellsworth Kelly

Daniel E. Kelm

Monika Kulicka

Sol Lewitt

Russell Maret

Didier Mutel

Katherine Ng

Clemente Padín

Felicia Rice

Dieter Roth

Ed Ruscha

Christopher Russell

Barbara T. Smith

Keith A. Smith

Buzz Spector

Beth Thielen

Gustavo Vazquez

Cecilia Vicuña

Ines von Ketelhodt

Zachary James Watkins

William Wegman

Wei Tian

Image: Barbara Fahrner (German, b. 1940) and Daniel E. Kelm (American, b. 1951). The Philosopher’s Stone, 1992. Museum board, paper, stainless steel wires, tubing, colored ink, pencil, watercolor. Unique. Los Angeles, Getty Research Institute, 94-B18918. © Barbara Fahrner and Daniel E. Kelm

 

 

edruscha_pool2_72dpi.jpgAustin, TX — The Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin presents the exhibition “Ed Ruscha: Archaeology and Romance” from Aug. 11, 2018, through Jan. 6, 2019. One of today’s most influential artists, Ruscha (b. 1937) is renowned for his category-defying synthesis of words and images, and for his deadpan renderings of the roadside landscapes, commercial signs and vernacular architecture of Los Angeles and the American West. Featuring more than 150 objects, this exhibition presents Ruscha’s celebrated books, photographs, drawings and prints alongside unpublished archival production materials, layout sketches and studio notebooks, providing visitors an unprecedented look into Ruscha’s creative process.

At the core of “Ed Ruscha: Archaeology and Romance” are Ruscha’s groundbreaking artist’s books, first appearing with the publication of “Twentysix Gasoline Stations” (1963) and quickly following with books such as “Various Small Fires and Milk” (1964), “Thirtyfour Parking Lots in Los Angeles” (1967), and “Nine Swimming Pools and a Broken Glass” (1968). The exhibition gathers the 16 books Ruscha produced between 1963 and 1978, including scarce copies of “Business Cards” (1968), “Babycakes with Weights” (1970), “Dutch Details” (1971) and “Hard Light” (1978). In a special presentation of Ruscha’s elaborate 1966 publication “Every Building on the Sunset Strip, the accordion-fold book is displayed completely extended in a viewing case more than 20 feet long.

The exhibition draws extensively from archival materials to examine eight of Ruscha’s books in depth. Opening with a group of vintage snapshots of gasoline stations taken by Ruscha in 1962, the exhibition features notes and sketches, handwritten lists of ideas for potential book titles, preliminary printing and binding specifications, paste-up layout materials and business records tracing the growth of Ruscha’s spirited, independent publishing enterprise. A section of the exhibition featuring Ruscha’s 1971 book “A Few Palm Trees” tracks the development of that project over four years, starting with a page of notes testing the title “Seventeen Hollywood Palm Trees and Their Locations” in 1968.

“Ed Ruscha: Archaeology and Romance” is the first major exhibition drawn from the Edward Ruscha Papers and Art Collection, a body of archival materials—selected by the artist and acquired by the Ransom Center in 2013—that pertain especially to his artist’s books. “These materials open up entirely new paths to understanding the conception, design and production of Ed Ruscha’s books,” says Jessica S. McDonald, the Nancy Inman and Marlene Nathan Meyerson Curator of Photography and curator of the exhibition. “A single page of jotted notes can reveal the initial flow and immediate refinement of ideas for several of these projects coming together at once.”

In addition to examining the process leading up to Ruscha’s landmark publications, the exhibition explores the ways in which the motifs introduced in those books—motifs such as the gasoline station, the apartment building, the palm tree and the swimming pool—have inspired later works in other media. Early examples include sketches and screenprints based on Ruscha’s photograph “Standard Station, Amarillo, Texas” (1962), as well as rare drawings after his photographs for “Some Los Angeles Apartments” (1965). Evident throughout the exhibition is Ruscha’s persistent engagement with the artifacts of American popular culture, the iconography of the road and the manufactured romance of Hollywood.

“Ed Ruscha: Archaeology and Romance” also explores the ways in which Ruscha has returned to the photographs initially made to populate the pages of his early books to produce new print portfolios. Some, such as “Gasoline Stations 1962” (1989), bring well-known photographs into new viewing contexts, while others offer surprising new images. The exhibition presents “Vacant Lots” (2003), a portfolio of four “outtakes” originally photographed for the book “Real Estate Opportunities” (1970); and “Three Palm Trees” (2009), a portfolio of three photographs printed without the masking that eliminated the sidewalks and buildings surrounding each of the palm trees pictured in the book “A Few Palm Trees” (1971).

Principally drawn from the Ransom Center’s Edward Ruscha Papers and Art Collection, “Ed Ruscha: Archaeology and Romance” includes additional loans from the artist’s collection, the Whitney Museum of American Art, Gagosian Gallery and private collections. In conjunction with the exhibition, the Ransom Center will host Ed Ruscha in conversation with curator Jessica S. McDonald on Thursday, Sept. 6 in Jessen Auditorium at UT Austin. This event and the exhibition are free and open to the public.

“Ed Ruscha: Archaeology and Romance” will be on view in the Ransom Center Galleries on Mondays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with extended Thursday hours until 7 p.m. On Saturdays and Sundays the galleries are open from noon to 5 p.m. Daily free docent-led tours are offered at noon, Thursdays at 6 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays at 2 p.m.

Image: Ed Ruscha (American, b. 1937), Pool #2, from the portfolio Pools, 1968; printed 1997. Chromogenic color print, 40.4 x 40.7 cm (image). Edward Ruscha Papers and Art Collection, 2013.16.2 © Ed Ruscha. Courtesy Harry Ransom Center.

Southern New England Antiquarian Booksellers (SNEAB) held our inaugural meeting of 2018 on April 2 at Historic Deerfield’s Memorial Libraries. Librarian David Bosse spoke on the history of the organization and collections, and gave members a tour of Historic Deerfield’s Henry N. Flynt Library and the Pocumtuck Valley Memorial Association Library. Lunch and business followed at New England Book Auctions in South Deerfield. Incumbent officers began new terms: Betty Ann Sharp, Bearly Read Books, Sudbury, Clerk; Eileen Corbeil, White Square Fine Books & Art, Easthampton, Treasurer; Peter L. Masi, Montague, Vice-president; Duane Stevens, Wiggins Fine Books, Shelburne Falls, President. 

SNEAB currently has 135 members. Our 2018 directory is published and available through members, brochure racks, and our website: www.sneab.com

On Sunday of Patriots day weekend, we sponsored Boston West Book & Ephemera Fair at Minuteman High School in Lexington managed by Marvin Getman, Impact Events Group. 

On Sunday, October 14, 2018, we will sponsor the 14th Annual Pioneer Valley Book & Ephemera Fair at Smith Vocational School, Northampton. www.pioneervalleybookfair.com promoted by John and Tina Bruno, Flamingoeventz. 

We are delighted to announce two new sponsorships. SNEAB will sponsor Book & Paper Row section of the Boston Antiques and Design Show, Shriners Auditorium, Wilmington, December 8, 2018 by agreement with Marvin Getman. By agreement with Flamingoevents, SNEAB will sponsor the Spring Paper Town - The Vintage Book, Paper & Advertising Show, Saturday, April 6, 2019 at Boxborough Regency Hotel & Conference Center. SNEAB is honored to add these popular and well-established shows to our calendar, and continue to collaborate with these dedicated and experienced promoters. We hope you will visit our website, member shops, and shows!

--Duane A. Stevens, President, Southern New England Antiquarian Booksellers (SNEAB)

New York, NY — What do The Jackson 5’s (and Michael Jackson’s) first recording contract, the Larry Richards “A Cinema Apart” Collection, Rosa Parks’ family home and her handwritten thoughts on the day she first met Dr. Martin Luther King, and Alex Haley’s manuscript for the Malcolm X biography (which includes many of Mr. X’s personal notes) have in common? They will be among the hundreds of extraordinary items being brought to the block by Guernsey’s, the New York City-based auction house, on July 25th and 26th at the historic General Scott Mansion on the corner of Park Avenue and 93rd Street, in New York City. Largely focusing on the Civil Rights Movement, African American movies, and music, this auction will include items that are of huge cultural and historical importance.

The Gregory Reed Collection is an archive of Civil Rights documents, rare books, and African-American musical ephemera, all from the offices of the prominent African-American lawyer who counted Rosa Parks among his clients. In an extraordinary two-page document, Mrs. Parks describes the occasion she first encountered Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Astonished that so young a man could speak so eloquently, she writes “I knew I would never forget him.” It was only months later that this giant of a little woman refused to give up her bus seat. Jail and death threats soon followed, causing Mrs. Parks to flee northward to Detroit where, along with her husband and extensive family, she found shelter in a small, 23’ x 23’ two-story wood home. Now, six decades later, that very structure (which is easily disassembled, and the buyer should know that there will be ample support available to assist in the easy assembly of the house) has been the subject of an international tour extensively covered by the media. The BBC and CNN reported on the story as did the New York Times, which ran three separate articles about the historic home. Most recently exhibited as part of a symposium with the Rhode Island School of Design, this truly historic Rosa Parks family home is in the auction with much of the proceeds directly supporting the Rosa McCauley Parks Heritage Foundation.

In 1992, the estate sale of the then late author Alex Haley was conducted. Internationally renowned for his historic novel, Roots, the top lot in the auction proved to be Haley’s original 257-page manuscript for the Autobiography of Malcolm X (as told to Alex Haley), with many handwritten notes and edits from both Malcolm X and the author. Separately sold in the event were the “lost chapters” - portions of the book thought too controversial to be published. Attorney Reed was the successful bidder back then; now, more than a quarter century later, these extraordinary documents will be offered again.

Comprised of hundreds of rare film posters, window and lobby cards, actor-worn clothing and more, the unique Cinema Apart Collection, assembled by the late Larry Richards, traces the course of African American cinema throughout the 20th century, and represents an important part of American and of cinematic history. In earlier times, films starring African American actors, or ‘all-black casts’ were made specifically for black audiences. These movies were not generally mainstream, and for a time their cultural significance not realized. Titles included Bronze Venus, Smiling Hate, Rhythm in a Riff, Congorilla, Two- Gun Man from Harlem, Voodoo Devil Drums, Midnight Menace, Porgy and Bess. Featuring names such as Paul Robeson, Lena Horne, Sammy Davis Jr., Eartha Kitt, Dorothy Dandridge, and Sidney Poitier, A Cinema Apart’s significance was recognized when a portion of it was selected for inclusion in the collection of the Smithsonian Museum. 

In the 1960’s, emerging, wannabe record labels were almost too numerous to count. One of the upstarts, out of Gary, Indiana, was Steeltown Records, headed by William Adams. At a performance in a junior high school gym, Adams was riveted by five young men (boys, really). From this unheralded performance sprang The Jackson 5 and the then nine-year old Michael Jackson. On November 21, 1967, a contract between Steeltown and the Jackson Five was worked out and signed by Joe Jackson on behalf of his sons. Agreeing to “employ Steeltown, Inc.,” a career began that changed the world. Consigned directly by Mr. Adams, that remarkable contract is in this auction!

Long considered one of Jazz’ greatest piano players, Art Tatum died at age 47. Now, more than sixty years later, his estate has honored Guernsey’s by the inclusion in this event of many of Art’s most enduring treasures. Included among these is his stunning Steinway Grand piano, and a vintage Bulova wrist watch inscribed to the pianist and given to him by none other than Frank Sinatra.

The vast majority of the approximately 700 items in this auction are being offered without minimum reserve. The Gregory Reed Collection is being sold by court order. More information on this important event can be found at www.guernseys.com.  Online bidding will take place at liveauctioneers.com and invaluable.com.

e3321f07224129b9dfc50fbd_880x744.jpgNew York, NY— The Morgan Library & Museum has received an important collection of annotated scripts, notebooks, and correspondence from prominent American film director, producer, and screenwriter James Ivory (b. 1928). This collection, comprised of material representing thirty-two films, offers an illuminating record of Ivory’s work as a director and the history of Merchant Ivory Productions (ca. 1963-2010). In honor of this generous gift, the Morgan will display a selection of these remarkable items in the installation A Merchant Ivory Production from June 26 to October 28, 2018.

Over the course of nearly four and a half decades, Ivory collaborated with Indian-born film producer Ismail Merchant and German-born novelist Ruth Prawer Jhabvala. Merchant and Ivory worked on dozens of films together, twenty-two of which were written by Jhabvala. Well-known for their exquisite adaptations of the literature of Henry James (1843-1916), E. M. Forster (1879-1970), and Kazuo Ishiguro (b. 1954), the trio also collaborated on many original screenplays. 

Two of their films have won multiple Academy Awards. Most recently, Ivory won both an Oscar and BAFTA for Call Me by Your Name (2017), making him the oldest-ever winner in any category for both awards. Their extraordinary partnership is documented in more than 1,500 letters and telegrams that form part of this collection. Their correspondence reveals the collaborative origins, the artistic developments, and the logistical feats that went into the films of Merchant Ivory Productions. Ivory has called one 10-page letter from Jhabvala about their film Shakespeare Wallah (1965) “the most important letter [she] ever wrote to [him] concerning [their] collaborative work as screenwriters.” Many letters also include script fragments, press clippings, and other ephemera, which remain with the collection. 

Beginning June 26, visitors will be able to view the collection’s many highlights in the Lower Level of the Morgan, including the script materials for Call Me by Your Name and Ivory’s annotated copy of André Aciman’s 2007 novel of the same title that he used while writing the screenplay. Ivory’s added notes, changes, sketches, and inserts transform the scripts into an important research collection. 

The installation also features James Ivory’s annotated shooting scripts for the adaptations of Henry James’ The Bostonians (1984), E.M. Forster’s Maurice (1987), Kazuo Ishiguro’s The Remains of the Day (1993), and scripts of the production company’s films set in India such as Shakespeare Wallah (1965). Other exceptional items on view will be Ivory’s editing notebooks and the annotated “small scripts” that the director would use as quick reference on set and in the editing room.

“For a long time I’ve wanted to find a safe place nearby in New York for all the scripts I carried on to the sets of my films, a page or two each day, folded up in my back pocket, with things scribbled on them,” Mr. Ivory said. “I could never have imagined—dared not think—that they might someday end up in close proximity to the working papers of Albert Einstein and Galileo in the Morgan Library! But so it has happened, for which I’m very grateful to the Morgan for this honor and to its enthusiastic custodians for putting this installation together.”

“In addition to James Ivory’s achievements as a director and a screenwriter over the course of his sixty-year career, he was an innovator of filmmaking strategies,” said museum director Colin B. Bailey. “These materials will be the first of their kind in the Morgan’s collection, and will complement our Carter Burden Collection of American Literature, which includes strong holdings of screenplays and continuity scripts. We are enormously thankful for this extraordinary gift that will serve future generations of film scholars and historians.”

Image: André Aciman (b. 1951), Call Me by Your Name, New York: Picador, 2007, James Ivory’s copy. The Morgan Library & Museum, New York; gift of James Ivory, 2018. © Merchant Ivory Productions. Photography by Graham  S. Haber.

Screen Shot 2018-06-19 at 9.04.06 AM.pngThis July, Christie’s will present Quentin Blake: A Retrospective; Forty Years of Alternative Versions, a series of illustrations offered directly from the personal collection of one of Britain's best-loved illustrators. As part of Christie’s Classic Week, a selection of 30 illustrations by Quentin Blake will be presented in the Valuable Books and Manuscripts auction on 11 July, alongside a dedicated online sale of 148 illustrations open for bidding from 3 to 12 July. The works from this sale are being sold to benefit House of Illustration, Roald Dahl's Marvellous Children's Charity and Survival International. Quentin Blake: A Retrospective; Forty Years of Alternative Versions will be on view and open to the public from 7 to 10 July at Christie’s London. Estimates range from £200 to £10,000. 

The collection comprises works from the past 40 years of Quentin Blake’s career, showcasing some of the most celebrated literary characters of today, which have captured the imagination of generations of children including Roald Dahl’s Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, The Twits, and James and the Giant Peach to David Walliams’s Mr Stink. Alongside these cherished children’s stories, the sale presents collectors the opportunity to acquire works from various other projects that Blake has worked on including editions illustrated for The Folio Society and artwork for J Sheekey Restaurant, along with illustrations for various public spaces, such as St George’s Hospital, Tooting and the Maternity Unit at Angers University Hospital in France. 

Highlights include works for The Enormous Crocodile, Roald Dahl’s first book to be illustrated by Blake, and preliminary drawings showing the genesis of one of Roald Dahl’s best-loved creations, the Big Friendly Giant. These illustrations will be presented alongside further children’s favorites, including Fantastic Mr Fox, Billy and the Minpins and perhaps two of the most fearsome and wicked of Roald Dahl’s characters The Twits. In 2016, Blake completed a series of works for the Roald Dahl Centenary Portraits project, celebrating 100 years since the author’s birth: Charlie, Willie Wonka and Grandpa Joe, Matilda, and Sophie and the BFG are among the famous Roald Dahl characters depicted in a series of ten portraits by Blake, who asks the viewers to imagine the characters have been invited to sit for their portrait, thus truly bringing these well-known characters to life. Further works in the sale include drawings of Blake’s marvellous portrayal of Beatrix Potter’s protagonist for her long-lost work from 1914, The Tale of Kitty-in-Boots. The story was rediscovered in the archives of the Victoria and Albert Museum in 2015 and Blake’s illustrations of Kitty and her adventures have helped establish the story as a firm favourite within children’s literature. 

Alternative aspects of Blake’s work will be explored, including a group of pencil drawings from his exhibition Arrows of Love, depicting women avoiding or embracing Cupid’s arrow. These rarely-seen nudes reveal Blake’s personal reflections on the joy, folly and sorrow of love. Further illustrations presented in the sale include his work for the Atlantic Bar at J Sheekey restaurant in London, portraying J Sheekey’s chefs, sommeliers and patrons swimming among shoals of fish and sea-creatures. The under-the-sea theme is a particular favourite of Blake’s and is continued in the auction with drawings from the Jerwood Gallery's exhibition in 2015 'Life under Water: A Hastings Celebration', capturing the vibrancy of this historic seaside town. Blake’s work for The Folio Society presents a unique aspect of his oeuvre and the sale will include various examples from The Golden Ass by Apuleius, in which Blake captures the comic spirit of the text, along with the complexity of tone. Further works from the Folio Society will be presented, such as Victor Hugo’s 1829 novel Notre Dame de Paris and Russell Hoban’s genre-defying masterpiece Riddley Walker. 

Quentin Blake is one of today’s most recognised illustrators, known for his collaboration with writers such as Russell Hoban, Joan Aiken, Michael Rosen, John Yeoman and, most famously, Roald Dahl. He has also illustrated classic books and created much-loved characters of his own, including Mister Magnolia and Mrs Armitage. His books have won numerous prizes and awards, including the Whitbread Award, the Kate Greenaway Medal, the Emil/Kurt Maschler Award and the international Bologna Ragazzi Prize. He won the 2002 Hans Christian Andersen Award for Illustration, the highest international recognition given to creators of children's books. In 1999 he was appointed the first UK Children’s Laureate and in 2005 was created CBE. This was followed in 2013 by a knighthood for 'services to illustration' in the New Year's Honours. In 2014 Blake was admitted to the Legion d'Honneur.

vcsPRAsset_531423_107822_40f21660-fa68-4fe3-9e5f-af3ac90a8b2b_0.jpgLos Angeles, California - Van Eaton Galleries, one of the world’s premier animation artwork and collectibles galleries located in Sherman Oaks, California, has announced an extraordinary auction event highlighted by never-before published photographs of Walt Disney’s personal life, as well as a 1953 construction plot plan that Walt Disney drew on to show the boundary for Disneyland. The “A Brief History of the Walt Disney Studios” auction will take place on July 7, 2018 at Van Eaton Galleries located at 13613 Ventura Blvd in Sherman Oaks, California. The auction includes some of the most closely-related artifacts to the life of Walt Disney that have ever been offered for public sale.

Rare highlights include a complete set of exceptional personal photographs of Walt Disney and the Rancheros Visitadores social club. The photo archives depict Walt Disney riding on horseback and camping during one of the Rancheros Visitadores’ yearly excursions through the Santa Ynez Valley. This set includes several never-before-published photos of Walt Disney who took part in the excursions in the late 1930s and into the 1940s.

The photos clearly show a down-to-earth and very casual side of Walt Disney that few have ever seen (Estimate: $6,000-$8,000). Additionally, Van Eaton Galleries will offer a Walt Disney personally-signed Rancheros Visitadores Camp Site sign. This incredibly detailed hand-painted sign was for Walt’s camp site, “Camp Cine Q”.

The sign features the signatures of several of the club’s members including American artist Victor Clyde Forsythe who also created a sketch next to his signature. It also features Walt Disney’s signature accompanied by his personal drawing of Mickey Mouse. Original drawings of Mickey Mouse by Walt are among some of the most sought after Disney artifacts and are rarely seen (Estimate: $12,000-$15,000).

“The ‘A Brief History of the Walt Disney Studios’ auction doesn’t just tell the story of the Studio, but it tells the story of Walt and his team of talented artists and individuals who helped build the company,” says Mike Van Eaton, Co-Owner of Van Eaton Galleries. “We consider this one of the rarest opportunities we have had to show the world a side of Walt Disney that few have ever seen, through personal photographs and personally-signed or hand-drawn items. Many of these items have never come to auction before and are among the only such examples of these items that we have ever seen. To say we are excited about this auction is an understatement. Anyone who recognizes the incredible value of such items from Walt’s personal life will understand how significant this auction is.”  

A plot plan for Disneyland is among one of the rarest and most historically important items to be offered. In August of 1953, shortly after acquiring land in Anaheim, Walt Disney took a grease pencil and drew a triangle on this plot plan to represent where he wanted the Disneyland trains to run, thus creating the boundaries for the park and the beginnings of Disneyland as we know it. This original drawing by Walt represents the earliest known appearance of the shape of Disneyland and its location in Anaheim, and also represents Walt Disney’s personal involvement and input in every aspect of the creation of his park. (Estimate: $100,000-$200,000).

Walt Disney loved railroads so much that he had one built in his backyard. Van Eaton Galleries will offer a piece of Railroad Track from Walt Disney’s own backyard railroad (Estimate: $50,000-$60,000) as well as an extremely rare Walt Disney signed “Laugh-O-Gram” stock certificate from Walt’s early animation studio (Estimate: $8,000-$10,000). 

Nearly 600 items will be offered in the “A Brief History of the Walt Disney Studios” auction that range from furniture from the 1940’s Walt Disney Studio in Burbank, original Disneyland props, animation art from Disney cartoons and films from the 1920s through the 1980s, and much more. Other highlights include a Mickey Mouse Writing Tablet Salesman Sample (Estimate: $3,000-$5,000); a 1934 Colson Mickey Mouse Tricycle (Estimate:  $1,000-$2,000); a Disneyland “Snow White’s Scary Adventures” Tree Prop (Estimate: $5,000-$7,000); a Disneyland Donald Duck Walkaround Character Head (Estimate: $2,000-$3,000); A Disneyland Pluto Walk Around Character Head (Estimate: $2,000-$3,000); a Disneyland “Indiana Jones Adventure” Wait Time Sign (Estimate: $4,000-$6,000) and a Walt Disney “Mousecar” Award (Estimate: $2,000-$3,000)                  

BRIEF HISTORY OF THE WALT DISNEY STUDIOS” EXHIBITION AND AUCTION LOCATION

Van Eaton Galleries                                                                                                       

13613 Ventura Blvd

Sherman Oaks, California 91423

(818) 788-2357

LIVE AND ONLINE AUCTION:
11am July 7, 2018

At Van Eaton Galleries 13613 Ventura Blvd, Sherman Oaks, Ca 91423

Register at www.vegalleries.com/disneyauction
Online at www.vegalleries.com/bidnow

The “A Brief History of the Walt Disney Studios” Collection Exclusive Catalogs may be purchased at www.vegalleries.com/disneyauction

Winter Hawk copy.jpgNew York - Christie’s New York Books and Manuscripts sales total $12,853,250, across the two auctions that took place on June 14, 2018. The dedicated single-lot sale for John James Audubon’s The Birds of America (1827-1838) realized $9,650,000, establishing the second-highest price at auction for a full folio-set, with proceeds to benefit the Knobloch Family Foundation.

Other notable results included Audubon’s folio Quadrupeds of North America, 1845-46-48, which realized $348,500; the first issue of Shakespeare’s Second Folio, which sold for $175,000; an autograph manuscript by Charles Darwin (1809-1992) from his radical treatise on human evolution, which realized $112,500; and an autograph manuscript and letter by Thomas Paine (1737-1809), which sold for over three times the low estimate for $93,750

Additionally, strong results were achieved for 20th-Century lots including the first Olympic Gold Medal awarded for Basketball, to George Louis Redlein (1885-1968), St. Louis, 1904 which sold for $125,000; and Paul McCartney's 1970 affidavit initiating his lawsuit to break up the Beatles, with John Lennon's handwritten annotations throughout, which realized $125,000.

Image: The exceptional Duke of Portland set of Audubon's masterpiece. AUDUBON, John James (1785-1851). The Birds of America; from Original Drawings. London: Published by the Author, 1827-1838. PRICE REALIZED: $9,650,000 

 

New York—On June 13, the sale of Bonhams and TCM Present ... A Celebration of Robert Osborne was 100% sold, which included rare one-sheet posters and movie memorabilia from the estate of the beloved Turner Classic Movies host. The top lot of the collection was Bette Davis’ personal Sarah Siddons award, which realized $25,000 against an estimate of $10,000-15,000. A two-week online-only sale of additional lots from the estate starts June 14 and continues until June 28. TCM will donate its proceeds from the sale to The Film Foundation while proceeds from the sale of the posters will benefit the Gingold Theatrical Group.

Dr. Catherine Williamson, director of Entertainment Memorabilia at Bonhams, commented: “The affection for Robert Osborne was evidently clear at the auction. Bids poured out from every corner of the crowded room, as well as on the phone and online. The biggest surprise of the collection was the Stork Club ash tray, which sold for $23,750 against an estimate of $200-300. Fans realized the rarity of this relic from the classic New York night club.”

In addition to the Osborne estate, the June auction also featured classic Hollywood memorabilia from other sources and highlights included:  

  • A Frank Sinatra painting that hung at the Friars Club of Beverly Hills, oil on illustration board, which was the top lot of the sale and realized $31,250.
  • A Tom Hanks Army dress uniform from Forrest Gump Paramount, 1994, which realized $25,000
  • A Katharine Hepburn watercolor painting of the American Shakespeare Theatre, watercolor and ink on paper, which realized $23,750.

McCloskeyArt_0143.jpgCincinnati, OH — The Cincinnati Art Museum is proud to celebrate Hamilton, Ohio’s own Robert McCloskey (1914-2003) with the special exhibition Make Way for Ducklings: The Art of Robert McCloskey, on view July 20-September 9, 2018. The exhibition delves into the life and legacy of the writer and illustrator of numerous classic children’s books that have captivated readers of all ages for generations. The recipient of two Caldecott Medals and three Caldecott Honors, McCloskey was a major force in twentieth century children’s literature.

Organized by The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art in Amherst, Massachusetts, Make Way for Ducklings consists of over 100 original artworks, ephemera and rare preliminary book materials. While emphasis centers on the classic picture book Make Way for Ducklings (1941), the exhibition considers McCloskey’s entire body of work.

Cincinnati Art Museum Director of Learning & Interpretation Emily Holtrop is curator of the exhibition. “In line with the museum’s mission and strategic plan, the Cincinnati Art Museum is thrilled to welcome a collection of artworks that engage and delight visitors of all ages and generations,” says Holtrop. “McCloskey’s illustrations do more than visually captivate readers—they capture the essence of life’s simple pleasures, reminding viewers to enjoy the little things and savor each day.”

Robert McCloskey was born in Hamilton, Ohio, in 1914. He spent his childhood years in Hamilton and later attended Vesper George Art School in Boston in the early 1930s. McCloskey’s initial artistic attempts were unsuccessful; it wasn’t until he received encouragement from The Viking Press children’s book editor May Masse that his career began to take off. Three years after their initial meeting, McCloskey shared an early draft of his first book, Lentil, with Masse and was met with approval. McCloskey knew he had found his calling.

McCloskey’s books Lentil (1940), Homer Price (1943), and Centerburg Tales (1951) recall the artist’s boyhood in Hamilton, Ohio. In Blueberries for Sal (1948), One Morning in Maine (1952) and Burt Dow, Deep-Water Man (1963), the artist tells family-based stories set in his adopted state of Maine.

Also on view will be McCloskey’s illustrations for books by other authors, including Journey Cake, Ho! (1953) and Henry Reed, Inc. (1958). The exhibition culminates with a selection of independent work—watercolors and paintings—that connect McCloskey to such prominent twentieth-century American painters as Thomas Hart Benton and Edward Hopper.

The exhibition includes a family-friendly drawing activity and related programs will be held at the museum throughout the summer. They include: Connect: A program for adults with developmental disabilities and their caregivers on July 28, Gallery Experience: Robert McCloskey with Emily Holtrop on July 29, Moving Images: Robert McCloskey’s Homer Price Stories on August 2, Artist Workshop: Animal Illustrations on August 18, and Family First Saturday: Make Way for Ducklings on September 1. To learn more, please visit www.cincinnatiartmuseum.org/mccloskey

Make Way for Ducklings will be on view in the Schiff Gallery and Balcony, Galleries 234 and 235. Admission is free. 

Image: Robert McCloskey (1914-2003), United States ‘“Look out!” squawked Mrs. Mallard, all of a dither. “You’ll get run over!”’, 1941, Make Way for Ducklings [The Viking Press 1941], graphite on tracing paper, Courtesy of The May Massee Collection, Emporia State University Special Collections and Archives, Emporia State University

Belton, Missouri - The legend of Bonnie and Clyde may have to be rewritten or at least revised with the discovery of a trove of more than 40 previously unknown photographs of the notorious 1930s-era outlaws and various other family members that will be sold in an online-only auction ending Wednesday, July 11th, by Mayo Auction & Realty. There is no live bidding in the gallery. 

Mayo Auction & Realty is no stranger to Bonnie and Clyde. Several years ago the firm auctioned a gun found in the infamous “death car” that police riddled with bullets the day the couple was killed, then later sold another gun owned by the pair. “We’ve become the go-to auction company for market fresh Bonnie and Clyde collectibles,” said Robert Mayo of Mayo Auction & Realty. 

The catalog, with all lots, is online now for viewing and bidding, at www.AuctionbyMayo.com. A preview, where all the photographs can be seen by the public, will be held on Monday, July 9th, from 4-6 pm Central time, in the Mayo Auction & Realty gallery at 16513 Cornerstone Drive in Belton, Missouri. Belton is located just south of Kansas City, a short distance off Interstate 49.

The photos will come as a revelation to those who have only seen the widely published shots of the couple in full gangster mode, Bonnie with a cigarette dangling from her mouth and Clyde toting a machine gun. These show a softer, more human side to the pair: Bonnie all dressed up and wearing makeup in a studio glam shot, and Clyde looking dapper in a crisp three-piece suit.

The photos - small black and whites from the ‘20s and ‘30s - have a history as colorful and well-documented as Bonnie and Clyde’s meteoric rise to the top of the FBI’s Ten Most Wanted list. The group was purchased at a drive-in theater flea market in Texas, around 30 years ago, along with a Texas newspaper account of the couple’s murder dated the day they were killed.

The buyer was Bob Andrews of Oklahoma, who has held on to the photos all this time and is now ready to part with them. “This guy was selling what he claimed to be authentic photographs of Bonnie and Clyde that he said had been found hidden in the back of an old console radio, in an album and with the newspaper from the day after the couple’s murder by police,” he said.

Andrews said he didn’t believe the man and walked away. “But it kept gnawing at me and finally my wife said, ‘Oh, just go back and buy them.’ So I did.” Andrews said the man didn’t know anything else about the photos, just that they’d been kept hidden in the back of the radio and had changed hands several times. Only recently did Andrews decide to step forward with the photos.

But are they real? Yes, according to Marc Geyer, an auctioneer, appraiser and historian out of Mesa, Arizona, who worked on authenticating the photographs, indicating that he spent weeks researching and comparing the photos to other known images of the families. “In my opinion, I believe these photographs to be authentic,” Geyer said. “I believe the photo subjects to be Bonnie Parker, Clyde and Buck (Clyde’s brother) Barrow and various other family members and acquaintances. Their journey to this auction is the mystery.”

He has a theory, though. “Through my research, I find it is a strong possibility that these photos belonged to Emma Parker - Bonnie’s mother - and that when she died in 1944, the radio may have ended up with Bonnie’s sister, Billie Jean. When Billie Jean died in 1993, I believe that old radio was sold along with the rest of her estate. The photos were then discovered by the buyer.”

Assuming they are real, following is a list of some of the more historically significant ones:

  • Photos of Bonnie, Clyde and Billie Jean on the docks in Galveston, Texas. The ship in the photo (identified as the Edgemoor, accompanied by a pilot boat, the Mariner) was one that loaded lumber in Galveston. Men are seen in the background loading lumber.
  • A glamour shot of Bonnie, taken at Kelly Studio in Denison, Texas. This is a never-before-seen photo, but it was known that Bonnie and sister Billie Jean enjoyed playing dress-up and sitting for the photographer. Still, it doesn’t square with her gun moll image. 
  • Clyde dressed up in his Sunday best, too. Evidently, vanity wasn’t limited just to Bonnie. Clyde could have modeled for GQ (if there was a GQ in the ‘30s). The shot of him in a three-piece suit, hand propped on the door of a sedan, makes him look downright dapper.
  • A photo of the marker sign at the North Dakota-Montana state line. Again, like with Galveston, it was never previously reported that Bonnie and Clyde ever visited or spent time in either state. It’s assumed the photo was taken on a (possibly necessary) road trip. 
  • Bonnie holding one of her sister Billie Jean’s children. Bonnie never had children of her own, but she enjoyed doting on her younger sister’s kids, and especially took a shine to Billie Jean’s son, Buddy. 
  • Clyde in a photo next to anything but a Ford. Clyde Barrow was a Ford man all the way - wouldn’t drive or steal anything but. However, in one photo he’s shown next to what appears to be a 1926 Chrysler Imperial model E-80 with Illinois license plates from 1929.
  • Bonnie as a young girl, at around age 10. Photos of the outlaw as a child are extremely rare, and this one shows her with three other family members outside their Texas home: here sister Billie Jean, her mother’s late husband’s sister Ada, and a man written as “Ed”.
  • A photo of W.D. Jones, the young protégé and possible love interest. Little is known about Mr. Jones, except that he got caught up in Bonnie, Clyde, Buck and Blanche’s (Buck’s wife) shenanigans as a young man and was rumored to be Billie Jean’s lover.
  • Photos of the infamous “billy goat car”. The billy goat car was so-named because it had a goat-like hood ornament. In one classic photo, Bonnie is shown wearing the ornament on her head and smiling. Cars are in many of the photos - essential for quick getaways.
  • Any photos showing Clyde and Buck together. As career criminals, when one was being sent to prison, the other was just getting out. They were only out together on and before Nov. 29, 1929, when Buck was shot and arrested in Denton, Tex., and after March 1933.

Bonnie once wrote a letter to Clyde while he was in jail, dated Feb. 23, 1930, in which she pours out her lovesick heart: “I’ve got a Majestic Radiola and they drive me crazy with the music. All I’ve heard today is Lonesome Railroad Blues and I Sing All My Love Songs to You. It nearly drives me mad.” Could that be the very radio that contained these photos? We will never know.

One thing is certain, though. The legend of Bonnie and Clyde will only get larger and stronger with the sale of these 40-plus never-before-seen and historically significant photos. Whoever buys them - whether it’s a serious collector, a museum or corporate interest - they will be the custodians of a slice of American history that’s deep in legend and lore - and ready for revision.

HomerWithGulfStream copy.jpgBrunswick, Maine — This summer the Bowdoin College Museum of Art (BCMA) will present Winslow Homer and the Camera: Photography and the Art of Painting, the first exhibition to look at the role of photography in Homer’s artistic practice. On view June 23 through October 28, 2018, Winslow Homer and the Camera brings together over 130 objects by the artist across all mediums, ranging from master paintings to oil studies, drawings, prints, and photographs created in the United States and during his travels to Europe and the Caribbean. This comprehensive survey was inspired by the BCMA’s 2013 acquisition of a camera once owned by Homer and presents new research drawn in part from the museum’s extensive collection of works by the artist.   

Curated by co-director Frank H. Goodyear III and Bowdoin art history professor Dana E. Byrd, the exhibition will present a full picture of the artist’s working methods and will include noteworthy archival objects, such as three wooden mannequins, his palette and watercolor brushes, his walking stick and fishing net, and two of the three cameras he owned in his lifetime. Homer acquired his first cameras during a two-year sojourn abroad in England, a trip he took in his mid-forties seeking a new direction in his art. Upon his return in 1882, scholars noted a demonstrable change in his style of painting and choice of subjects. Taking this shift and the artist’s penchant for experimentation across mediums as a point of departure, Winslow Homer and the Camera questions how new visual technology impacted the artist’s production and engagement with subjects and unveils how photography became increasingly a part of Homer’s visual investigation and broader creative practice.  

“We are thrilled to present Winslow Homer and the Camera this June,” said Frank Goodyear, co-director and organizer of the exhibition, “Since the generous gift of Homer’s camera, my colleague Dana Byrd and I have been engaged in understanding how Homer’s interest in photography influenced his own artistic identity. This exhibition allows us to consider how Homer’s experimentation with photography solidifies the artist as a proto-modern figure, anticipating many of the trends and concerns of American and European artists who followed.”  

“The opportunity to examine Homer, a well-loved and well researched figure of American art, anew, has been so rewarding,” says Dana E. Byrd, “Utilizing the museum’s extensive collection of the artist’s work, Frank and I have uncovered a new facet of Homer, and we hope this pioneering framework will lead to continued revelations of how the iconic painter engaged with the modern world.” 

While Winslow Homer and the Camera: Photography and the Art of Painting draws principally from the BCMA’s Winslow Homer Collection, the exhibition will also feature works on loan from twenty-five institutions and collectors from across the United States. Following its presentation at the BCMA, the exhibition will travel to the Brandywine River Museum of Art in Chadds Ford, Pennsylvania. Museum Director Thomas Padon noted, “Homer defined the look of America in the second half of the 19th century and is central to key artists in our collection, which gives the exhibition particular resonance here at Brandywine.”

An illustrated catalogue of the same title authored by Byrd and Goodyear and published by Yale University Press will accompany the exhibition. The catalogue will serve as a significant contribution to the study of Winslow Homer and the cross-disciplinary study of painters and photography in American art.  

The Museum is also pleased to announce a series of exhibition related public programs throughout the summer and fall, featuring an array of perspectives on Homer, from art historians to fly fishermen. Highlights include: 

·      A keynote program led by exhibition co-curators Frank H. Goodyear III and Dana E. Byrd, providing an orientation to the exhibition’s themes in conjunction with the exhibition’s opening;

·      Gallery talks by art historians Susan Danly and Linda Docherty

·      Music performances by faculty from the Bowdoin International Music Festival inspired by the exhibition

The exhibition was made possible in part by Bank of America.  This exhibition is supported by an indemnity from the Federal Council on the Arts and the Humanities.

ImageWinslow Homer with “The Gulf Stream” in his Studio, ca. 1900, gelatin silver print, by an unidentified photographer. Bowdoin College Museum of Art, Brunswick, Maine.

 

Pablo Picasso.jpgCranston, Rhode Island - A pair of outstanding Rhode Island collections - one of gorgeous Tiffany pieces pulled from a home in Providence and the other the modern prints collection of Lucille Comes out of Warwick, all purchased from Multiple Impressions in New York - will be just part of Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers’ next big sale, planned for Saturday, June 23rd, at 10 am Eastern.

The auction will be held online as well as in Bruneau’s gallery, located at 63 Fourth Avenue in Cranston. Internet bidding will be available via Invaluable.com, LiveAuctioneers.com, ePaiLIVE (in Asia), Bidsquare.com, Bidlive.Bruneauandco.com, the Bruneau app, Auctionzip.com and eBay. Phone and absentee bids will also be accepted. Doors will open at 8 am on auction day.

“This sale will not disappoint,” Kevin Bruneau announced proudly. “As owner of the company I take pride in seeing such a comprehensive catalog come to be. Whether you collect Asian art, period furniture, modern prints or more, there is definitely something for you in the catalog.”

Travis Landry, a Bruneau & Co. specialist and auctioneer, added, “You name it, this sale has it. From Tiffany Studios to ancient Roman glass, American Fauvism and even a 1962 Rolls-Royce, there’s something for every collector. I can’t wait to see who takes home the Tiffany table lamp.”

He was referring to the circa 1905 Tiffany Studios (N.Y.) table lamp having a poppy shade consisting of variegated blue, green, red, purple and yellow Favrile glass with reticulated bronze overlay, supported by a twisted vine base. The 20 ¼ inch shade is impressed “Tiffany Studios 1537” and the base is impressed “Tiffany Studios 443”. The lamp should bring $30,000-$50,000.

Also from Tiffany Studios in New York is a beautiful circa 1910 paperweight Favrile glass vase, 10 inches tall (est. $15,000-$20,000). The piece is prolate form, with a thick rolled rim decorated with a freeform bleeding heart pattern in hues of red and purple throughout the iridescent amber Favrile glass. A lovely faint blue swirl pattern is cast over the entirety of the paperweight’s body.  

The Rolls-Royce is lot #1 and a strong contender for top lot of the auction, with an estimate of $30,000-$50,000. It’s a 1962 Silver Cloud II Standard Saloon, one of only 2,417 built between 1959-1962. The velvet green over sand left-hand drive car has a 380 cubic inch V-8 engine and is in remarkable condition. It once resided in the Yankee Candle Car Museum in Massachusetts.

A Fauvist landscape painting by the Swedish-born American artist Birger Sandzen (1871-1954), depicting Rocky Mountain National Park in Colorado, with two sloped trees amongst rockery on the edge of a river, with mountains in the background, carries an estimate of $20,000-$30,000. The work is signed lower right “Birger Sandzen” and comes in a 21 ¾ inch by 18 ½ inch frame.

In March, Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers made headlines in the trade papers when a gigantic 19th century Chinese archaic poem scroll painting - 24 feet wide by 29 inches tall - sailed past its estimate of $800-$1,200 to command $72,500. From the same estate, two more massive Chinese scrolls will be offered in the June auction, each one with a pre-sale estimate of $10,000-$20,000.

The first is a 26-foot-wide ink and watercolor depiction of three cliffside landscape scenes of robed scholars by the Chinese artist and poet Gai Qi (Chinese, 1773-1828). The Qing dynasty scroll is a masterpiece and museum-quality, signed throughout with calligraphy red seal chop marks. Gai Qi painted in Shanghai and was associated with Fei Dangxu (Chinese, 1801-1850).

The second is a Ming dynasty scroll painting by the Chinese artist Zhimian Zhou (1550-1610), a monumental ink and watercolor scroll depicting a panoramic landscape with birds perched amongst bamboo, foliage, pink flowers and rockery. Measuring 17 feet 4 inches long and 10 ½ inches high, it is museum quality, signed throughout with calligraphy and red seal chop marks.

The centerpiece of Lucille Comes’ modern prints collection is a portfolio of work by Joan Miro (Sp./Fr., 1893-1983), titled El Inocente (est. $4,000-$6,000).  Included are three etchings and an aquatint in color on Arches paper. Each work is signed and numbered (165 of 170). The portfolio is published by Robert Lydie Doutrou (Paris, 1974) with accompanying text by Xavier Domingo.

Also from Ms. Comes’ collection is Pablo Picasso’s Suite 347 No. 106 (Bloch 1586, Baer 1602), etching #47 of 50, signed by Picasso lower right and numbered lower left, with the date within the plate. Framed, the etching measures 22 ½ inches by 24 ¾ inches. It’s accompanied by the original receipt, dated Feb. 20, 1982 from Multiple Impressions. The estimate is $3,000-$5,000.

A circa 1880 room-size Persian Sultanaban rug, 16 feet 1 inch by 11 feet 10 inches, having a central field with burnt sienna ground with ivory and blue floral decoration surrounded by multiple bands of geometric and floral borders, is expected to change hands for $8,000-$12,000.

Also, an early 17th century Northwest European allegorical hand-woven Renaissance tapestry after The Nativity by Peter Paul Reubens (1577-1640), measuring 8 feet 1 inch by 7 feet 3 inches and most certainly from that period, exhibiting routine wear from age, should hit $2,000-$3,000.

Download the Bruneau app on Google play and iTunes. Phone and absentee (left) bids will also be accepted. Previews will be held on Thursday, June 21st, from 9-5; on Friday, June 22nd, from 12 noon until 9 pm; and on Saturday, June 23rd, the date of auction, when the doors open at 8 am.

Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers has announced a new schedule for 2018. There will be no pre-sale with the estate auctions, as before. They will usually be on the first Saturday of each month and will start at 11 am Eastern. Monday night auctions will be held the third Monday of every month.

To learn more about Bruneau & Co. Auctioneers and the auction on Saturday, June 23rd, visit www.bruneauandco.com. To contact Bruneau & Co. via e-mail, use info@bruneauandco.com

Image: Pablo Picasso’s Suite 347 No. 106 (Bloch 1586, Baer 1602), etching #47 of 50, signed by Picasso himself lower right and numbered lower left, with the date within the plate (est. $3,000-$5,000).

odnkkpcagocjmljb.jpgNew York—Swann Galleries’ auction of Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books on June 7 brought to market landmarks from the history of cartography and ornithology. The nearly 400 lots traced important developments in science and natural history, especially in North America.

Leading the auction was the hand-colored elephant plate of Fish Hawk from John James Audubon’s Birds of America, 1830, at $68,750. Audubon works, as well as those generally related to birds, performed well overall, achieving three of the top five highest prices in the sale. Another highlight was the first octavo edition of a complete subscriber’s copy of Birds of America, 1840-44, which was purchased by a collector for $22,500.

By delightful coincidence, all three of the most important “Beaver Maps” were in the sale and performed well. Nicolas de Fer’s L’Amerique Divisee Selon Letendue de ses Principales Parties, 1713, colloquially known as the “Original Beaver Map,” was the first major map to include an engraved cartouche of beavers in the wilderness. It was purchased by a collector for $30,000. The beaver motif was emulated and popularized later by Herman Moll in his circa 1735 atlas, The World Described, on the spread depicting New England, which came to be known as “The Beaver Map” for its ubiquity ($22,500). Finally, “The Dutch Beaver Derivative,” the moniker given to Henri Chatelain’s 1719 long Carte Tres Curieuse de la Mer du Sud..., reached $9,375.

Important post-Revolutionary American maps included the first 1827 issue of Herman Boye’s Map of the State of Virginia Reduced to come to auction in more than 50 years ($27,500). The first official map to delineate the exact boundaries of Pennsylvania, by Reading Howell, 1792, reached $5,980.

True to form, unusual plans of Manhattan sparked interest among buyers. A seven-part map compiled by Charles Kinnaird and issued by the Department of Docks in 1873 shows the original shoreline of the island, overlaid with proposed infrastructure including piers and bulwarks. Only five institutional copies are known to exist; it was purchased by a collector for $8,750. Another highlight was Egbert Viele’s “Water Map,” or Topographical Atlas of the City of New York, 1874, depicting the waterways of Manhattan before its development ($9,100).

Specialist Caleb Kiffer was delighted with the auction: “Yesterday's successful auction gave me a lot of confidence in the market. Top material performed very well with the mid-range market remaining strong as ever. The collectors were bidding with strength and it pleases me to see Swann keeping the door open to the private audience, as well as the trade, for high-quality collectible material. A few items, such as Boye’s Virginia and Audubon’s Fish Hawk have not hit the market in some time and it's encouraging to see the continued positive interest in great material like this.”

The next auction of Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books at Swann Galleries will be held on December 13, 2018. The house is currently accepting quality consignments.

Image: Lot 54: Nicolas de Fer, L’Amerique Divisee Selon Letendue…, wall map, Paris, 1713. Sold June 7, 2018 for $30,000. (Pre-sale estimate: $20,000 to $30,000)

 

Seattle, WA — ThriftBooks, the largest used bookseller in North America, is now open in India! The new storefront on the Amazon.in Marketplace makes it possible for customers in India to browse and shop over 6 million books that can be shipped to every province within the country.

ThriftBooks India offers an unparalleled selection of English language books (with free shipping) to the estimated 125 million English readers in India.

In coordination with Amazon.in, ThriftBooks offers a “Pay on Delivery” payment method to make shopping and buying more convenient for Indian customers.

“Our launch with Amazon.in is a part of our global initiative to put quality, affordable books into the hands of readers.” said Lance Pettit, Merchandising Manager for ThriftBooks.com and Marketplaces. “Indian customers have been asking for a way to easily find and shop for a greater selection of books. With Amazon.in and Easy Ship, we made this happen.”

Shopping is simple. Customers can go straight to the ThriftBooks India storefront, which lists the top 1 million titles ThriftBooks offers. Customers can also shop for any book on Amazon.in. If ThriftBooks India has the book for sale, it will show up on the Offers page for used copies.

About ThriftBooks

Based in Seattle, WA, ThriftBooks is the largest online seller of used books in the world, having sold more than 100 million books since its inception. Founded in 2003 and backed by KCB Management, ThriftBooks employs more than 700 people and operates 8 fulfillment centers in the US that purchase, grade, and distribute used and collectible books. ThriftBooks relies on proprietary software to identify and list books, as well as a sophisticated pricing model that dynamically prices books across a variety of online platforms, including ThriftBooks.com, ThriftBooks mobile app, ThriftBooks offers their selection on Amazon North America, Amazon Europe, eBay, Barnes & Noble, AbeBooks, and Alibris marketplaces.

Middleburg, Virginia - The National Sporting Library & Museum (NSLM) received a major grant from the Ohrstrom Foundation. The grant was made in May 2018 and will support the NSLM’s project to digitize its collections and share them online. The grant will make it possible for NSLM to purchase scanning equipment designed to take high-resolution images of pages of rare books. Once digital images have been made, they will be added to an online site where readers and researchers can access them from anywhere in the world.

“We are incredibly grateful to the Ohrstrom Foundation for their investment in this project,” said NSLM’s Executive Director Melanie Mathewes. “The NSLM has a superb book collection and we cannot wait to make it available to a wider audience.”

NSLM currently reaches an online audience of over 13,000 annually through its blog, Drawing Covert, and thousands more through social media. The addition of a digital collection will meet the needs of researchers across the globe who wish to access the unique materials in the Library’s collections.

John Connolly, NSLM’s George L. Ohrstrom, Jr. Head Librarian offers presentations and tours of the Library’s rare book holdings with a special focus on the antiquarian titles to be digitized in the project. The NSLM will continue to raise funds toward the project to grow it for future years. To schedule a Library tour or to donate to this exciting new project, contact John Connolly at JConnolly@NationalSporting.org or 540-687-6542 x18

The National Sporting Library & Museum (NSLM) is located in Middleburg, V.A., the heart of beautiful hunt country. Founded in 1954, the renowned research Library, and fine art Museum highlight the rich heritage and tradition of country pursuits. Angling, horsemanship, shooting, steeplechasing, foxhunting, flat racing, polo, coaching, and wildlife are among the subjects one can explore in the organization’s general stacks, rare book holdings, archives, and art collection. The NSLM offers a wide variety of educational programs, exhibitions, and family activities throughout the year, and is open to researchers and the general public. While there is no admission fee to the Library, the Museum charges $10 for adults, $8 for youths (age 13-18), and $8 for seniors. NSLM members and children age 12 and under are free. Library & Museum hours are Wednesday - Sunday 10:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

 

enokgkmddobcdilh.jpgNew York—On Thursday, June 21, Swann Galleries will close their auction season of books and manuscripts with Revolutionary & Presidential Americana from the Collection of William Wheeler III­-some 230 works on paper including autographs of 36 presidents, manuscript material illuminating the American Revolution and a premium selection of Jacksoniana.

The collection reveals a historian's perspective. Inspired as a child by the collections of the American Antiquarian Society, particularly their holdings of The Massachusetts Spy, Wheeler collected Revolutionary Americana with an eye towards answering questions of American history that caught his interest. The collector outlines this passion in an introduction to the catalogue.

Among Autograph Letters Signed by founding fathers is Revolutionary Americana perhaps less expected, including an 1818 sketch of the Battle of Bunker Hill by Henry Dearborn, who later served as Secretary of War. Drawn in the year he published An Account of the Battle of Bunker's Hill, which drew controversy as a criticism of General Israel Putnam, the sketch, along with autograph manuscript reflections on the battle, is estimated at $6,000 to $9,000. From this account, the offerings span the Revolution: a December 1775 ALS by Horatio Gates sends British prisoners of war to the Chairman of the Committee of Safety at Northampton, MA, and details how they should be treated; a 3 May 1776 pay order for an express rider named Jonathan Park to ride to Philadelphia, signed by several notable early patriots, marks the spread of news in a critical week of the Revolution ($4,000 to $6,000 and $20,000 to $30,000, respectively).

An Autograph Document Signed by Paul Revere discharges Captain Philip Marett from Revere's regiment in 1779 ($12,000 to $18,000). A Letter Signed by George Washington to Major General Nathanael Greene advises that the Commissary General of Forage, Colonel Biddle (whose letter was forwarded to Washington the same day), appeal to the legislature of New Jersey for money to save the Continental Army. The February 1780 letter, showing the challenges of the war in its later days, is estimated at $15,000 to $25,000.

Presidential Americana beyond Washington includes every president through Zachary Taylor, with exceptionally complete offerings through the middle of the twentieth century. Highlights include an Autograph Letter Signed by Thomas Jefferson in 1793 as Secretary of State to Governor Thomas Sim Lee, stating that the government is not authorized to intervene during the Citizen Genêt affair ($20,000 to $30,000). A run of autographs by Franklin D. Roosevelt provide evidence of his formative efforts with the foundation that now operates as the Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehabilitation in Georgia. 

The cover lot for the auction is a photograph of Harry S. Truman holding the famous erroneous Chicago Daily Tribune announcing "DEWEY DEFEATS TRUMAN." Truman signed and inscribed the photo, estimated at $12,000 to $18,000, "Too bad!" A copy of the famous misprint is also available and is expected to bring $1,500 to $2,500.

Perhaps the most notable run of presidential material is Wheeler's collection of Jacksoniana. Highlights include an Autograph Letter Signed by Andrew Jackson to editor Thomas Eastin: a retained draft for the 1806 published letter that led to the duel in which Jackson killed Charles Dickinson ($10,000 to $15,000). Other autographs relate to Wheeler's interest in Jackson’s fiscal ineptitude. A November 1829 Autograph Letter Signed, as president, to the Secretary of Treasury Samuel D. Ingham discusses changes to reduce the national debt, while an Autograph Note Signed in January 1832 arranges a meeting with a treasury auditor in advance of the nullification crisis (each $3,000 to $4,000). An ALS from after Jackson's presidency to Nashville Union editor J. George Harris expresses joy at the result of the 1842 congressional elections and criticizes the propagandizing that led to the election of Whig candidate William Henry Harrison in 1840.

The complete catalogue with bidding information is available at www.swanngalleries.com. Additional highlights can be found here.

ImageLot 55: Paul Revere, Autograph Document Signed, certifying the discharge of a captain from his regiment, 1779. Estimate $12,000 to $18,000.

Johnson Poster copy.jpgDallas, TX - A trio of extraordinary flags and banners sparked a flurry of competitive bidding, boosting the final total from Heritage Auctions’ David and Janice Frent Collection of Presidential & Political Americana, Part 3 auction to $1,152,076, exceeding the pre-auction estimate by nearly 20 percent. This auction was the third presented in the last year by Heritage Auctions featuring portions of the Frent collection. Each has exceeded its pre-auction estimate, and the three have produced a combined total of $3,274,023. Additional portions of the Frent Collection are scheduled to be included in at least four more auctions.

“Helping to put together the Frent collection has been one of the highlights of my career,” Heritage Auctions Americana Auctions Director Tom Slater said. “What they have been able to assemble is nothing short of extraordinary, which is why so many of the lots in this auction were pursued so vigorously.”

A William Henry Harrison: A Spectacular Large 1840 Silk Campaign Flag nearly tripled its pre-auction estimate when it sold for $87,500. As stunningly beautiful as any political flag of the era, the deep, rich colors offer a perfect background for the large centered image of the country’s ninth president. Part of the appeal to collectors is the fact that silk flags are particularly prone to condition issues, yet this one endured over the years in near-mint condition.

Another lot that nearly tripled its pre-auction estimate was a Van Buren & Johnson: The Very First Jugate Political Poster, which brought $56,250. A full-page feature in Running for President, 1789-1896, which was engraved and published by E. Durham in New York, this poster features the jugate portraits of the 1840 Democratic candidates, presidential hopeful Martin Van Buren and vice president candidate Richard Johnson, along with an eagle carrying a banner that reads “Liberty and Equality.” The photos of the candidates are positioned above their biographies, as well as detailed illustrations of Johnson at the Battle of the Thames and the Battle of Horse Shoe Bend.

A favorite among collectors is a Lincoln & Hamlin: Sought-after 1860 Campaign Flag Banner, which realized $31,250. In high demand among serious collectors of 19th-century political display items, the allure in this flag is due in part to the fact that Lincoln’s first name is spelled “Abram.”

A George Washington: Outstanding “Plain Roman GW” Inaugural Button, Possibly the Finest Example Known drew multiple bids until it closed at $21,250. A beautiful example of an elusive pattern, this button often is found in much lower grades, but the absence of wear, in addition to the gloss and patina and the original shank, make the condition of this example extremely rare. This button was acquired directly from Dewey Albert at the 1976 A.P.I.C. convention in Hartford, Connecticut. So pristine is the condition that Albert later added the notation “Best specimen known” by its image in his book on military and historical buttons.

One of the largest varieties of political flags ever produced, a Henry Clay: Spectacular Large 50” 1844 Campaign Flag Banner inspired 17 bids before ultimately bringing in $21,250. Featuring an outstanding portrait of Clay, the lawyer and statesman who represented Kentucky in both the United States Senate and the House of Representatives, the flag has an extraordinary display presence. This style is in particularly high demand among collectors because of the production of a Polk mate, offering collectors the prospect of owning a matching pair. Heritage Auctions will be offering a much rarer Polk mate in its Aug. 18 Americana & Political auction.

A John Quincy Adams: Profoundly Rare “Pewter Rim” from the 1828 Election, which drew $20,625, is an example of one of the most sought-after and valued political collectibles from the second quarter of the 19th century. Some, like this example, feature a mirror on verso, compared to other models that have a vice president or running mate. To collectors of this pewter rim series, this Adams variety - the lot here is one of just two known to exist - is considered the ultimate prize. Adams campaign memorabilia is extremely rare, making this one of the key offerings in the entire Frent collection.

Other top lots include, but are not limited to:                                                                                     

·         Lincoln & Hamlin: Spectacular Example of the Largest Size of 1860 “Doughnut” Ferrotype $20,000

·         Lincoln & Hamlin: Huge, Colorful 1860 Campaign Jugate Chart $16,250

·         Cox & Roosevelt: Supremely Rare Jugate 1920 Campaign Watch $15,000

·         Andrew Jackson: An Important Original Oil Portrait by Ralph E. W. Earl $11,875

·         Bryan & Stevenson: Perhaps the Best Jugate Poster Designed for this 1900 Democratic Ticket $11,250

 

blobid16_1528451737871.pngA newly discovered notebook containing the only known working drafts of Edward Thomas’s very earliest poems, is one of the highlights of Bonhams Fine Books and Manuscripts sale in London on Wednesday 20 June. It is estimated at £30,000-40,000.

Thomas (1878-1917) was already a well-established literary critic when he turned to writing poetry at the prompting of his friend, the American poet Robert Frost. The notebook - a school exercise book that belonged to his daughter, Myfanwy - is dated 17th and 18th December 1914, two weeks after his momentous conversation with Frost.  It includes handwritten drafts of three of his important early works, The Mountain Chapel, The Birds’ Nests and House and Man.     

The friendship between Edward Thomas and Robert Frost was important to both men.  Frost had moved to the UK in 1912 to revitalise his flagging career. His first book of poetry, A Boy’s Will, was published in 1913, and gained critical attention only after a positive review by Thomas.  Frost, knowing of Thomas’s increasing unhappiness with the daily routine of his career as a literary journalist, gave him the confidence to embrace poetry.

In 1915, despite suffering from intermittent emotional and physical ill-health, and being over the official recruitment age, Thomas volunteered to join the Army. He was killed on Easter Monday 1917 on the first day of the Battle of Arras, having arrived in France only a few days earlier.

Thomas had written poetry feverishly during the preceding two years and his work had been accepted for publication. Six works appeared under a pseudonym during his lifetime, but the first book in his own name, Poems - which included Birds’ Nests - was not published until after his death. The other two works from the notebook were printed in Last Poems in 1918.

Thomas’s reputation grew rapidly in the early 1930s and has never diminished. Dylan Thomas wrote of him: “It is as though we had always known his poems, and were only waiting for him to write them down.” Ted Hughes - a poet of a much later generation - wrote simply, “He is father of us all.” 

The notebook was given in 1922 by Thomas’s widow Helen to Jack Haines, a Gloucester solicitor and poet and close friend of both Frost and Thomas. Haines played an important role in the publication of Thomas’s work, and in an article in 1933, coined the term Dymock Poets to describe the group including Thomas, Frost, Rupert Brooke and John Drinkwater who had lived in and around the Gloucestershire village of the same name.   

Bonhams Head of Books and Manuscripts Matthew Haley said: “This is a very important discovery. Thomas tended to write ideas for his poems on scraps of paper which he then destroyed when he copied out the finished work. This notebook, therefore, is one of the few surviving examples of his creative process at work, and of great literary significance.”   

The notebook is one of more than 40 lots in the sale relating to Frost, Thomas and the Dymock Poets, including the handwritten definitive version of Frost’s well-known poem, Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening.

Image: (Left) Handwritten early draft of poem from Edward Thomas’s newly discovered notebook.  Estimate: £30,000-40,000. (Right) Portrait of Edward Thomas.

Lot 91.jpgWestport, CT - With politics so much in the news, it’s fitting that University Archives’ online auction slated for Wednesday, June 20th, is packed with presidential memorabilia - items from all the past U.S. Presidents, in fact. The auction features 266 lots of rare, highly collectible autographed documents, photos, manuscripts, books and relics, beginning at 10:30 am Eastern.

“It’s rare to find all of our past presidents represented in one single event, as is the case with this auction,” said John Reznikoff, the owner of Westport-based University Archives. “The examples are mostly high-quality and many have superior content. Most have been off the market for at least half a century.” The expected top earners are items from Washington, Lincoln, Jefferson, JFK and Reagan. Jackie Kennedy is represented as well.

But the auction features more than just U.S. Presidents. Other highlight lots pertain to aviation pioneer Orville Wright (of Wright Brothers fame), American Rev-War hero Nathaniel Greene, former British Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli and the German composer Johannes Brahms. People can register and bid now, at UniversityArchives.com or on the platform Invaluable.com.

Mr. Reznikoff added, “The auction is particularly strong in Revolutionary War period items, highlighted by items from the Charles I. Forbes collection, which haven’t seen the light of day in more than fifty years. Included in the group are more than a few items relating to George Washington, with a rare and superb letter from Nathaniel Greene to General Washington.”

The letter signed by Greene to Washington, dated June 24, 1780, informs Washington of his victory in New Jersey while serving as a major general in the Continental Army, one of the finest Greene letters known. Also sold will be a commission letter signed by Washington, dated Sept. 30, 1789, in which the president appoints William Lewis, a Quaker, as attorney for the District of Pennsylvania (Washington’s home seat). Both of the letters carry estimates of $10,000-$12,000.

An archive of three documents relating to the dismissal of Mary Katherine Goddard as Baltimore Postmaster (and printer of the Declaration of Independence) in 1789 by Postmaster Gen. Samuel Osgood, who said the position required “more traveling than a woman could undertake,” should realize $5,000-$6,000. Goddard pled her case to President Washington, who refused to consider it. It could be said that this was one of the very first women’s rights causes in the United States.

Letters dating to the dawn of aerial flight, all of them addressed to Arthur Ruhl, a writer with Collier’s magazine, will be sold as single lots. They include two letters written by Orville Wright, in 1908 and 1909, refusing requests for a flight as a passenger (est. $2,500-$3,000, $3,000-$5,000); a similar letter, only written by Katherine Wright, Orville’s sister, in 1910 (est. $300-$400); and a 1908 letter by Orville in which he ruminates on aviation (est. $3,000-$5,000).

A lengthy letter written around the 1850s by Johannes Brahms to his good friend and “concert master” Julius Otto Grimm, in which he implores Grimm to “just let loose and create beautiful music!”, is expected to gavel for $6,000-$8,000. The massive archive of nearly 160 autographed signed letters pertaining to Benjamin Disraeli, who ruled Great Britain from 1874-1880, penned to his second secretary, Algernon Turnor, including a leather album, should hit $40,000-$50,000.

A letter typed in German and signed by Albert Einstein on Aug. 29, 1931, in which he praises a musician colleague about being a conscientious objector, has an estimate of $2,600-$2,800 and comes with an English translation. Several lots pertaining to Jackie Kennedy will be offered, to include a four-page signed letter, written to her mother from London in 1955, two years after her marriage to JFK in which she alludes to his early affairs, should change hands for $3,000-$3,500.

Speaking of JFK, and returning to the presidents, a single-page typed letter signed by JFK on White House stationery, addressed to Edna Kelly, a Congresswoman and trailblazer for women’s equality, dated Aug. 20, 1962, has an estimate of $2,000-$4,000. Also, a nicely preserved letter written and signed by Abraham Lincoln as president (co-signed by Salmon Chase as Secretary of the Treasury), concerning Lincoln’s home state of Kentucky, should command $5,000-$6,000.

A letter written and twice signed by Thomas Jefferson, dated July 9, 1792 while he was serving as Secretary of State, addressed to the Governor of Vermont with content regarding the revolts in Vermont and the Treaty of Paris, is expected to fetch $6,000-$7,000; while an autographed letter written by Ronald Reagan on presidential card stock to his good friend “Hup” McArthur, in which he thanks him for “my 43rd anniversary of the 39th birthday,” should make $1,000-$1,200.

As with all University Archives online auctions, this one is packed with important, scarce and collectible signed documents and other items relating to some of the most famous names in all of history. The firm has become world-renowned as a go-to source for rare material of this nature.

University Archives was founded in 1979, as a division of University Stamp Company, by John Reznikoff, who started collecting stamps and coins in 1968, while in the third grade. Industry-wide, Reznikoff is considered the leading authenticity expert for manuscripts and documents. He consults with law enforcement, dealers, auction houses and both major authentication companies.

For more information about University Archives and the Wednesday, June 20th online auction, please visit www.universityarchives.com.                                               

Image: Lot 91: Letter written by Nathaniel Greene of the Continental army to George Washington, dated June 24, 1780, informing Washington of his victory in New Jersey (est. $10,000-$12,000).

gdnmdcenhnglclnk copy.jpgNew York—Swann Galleries broke long-standing records and brought new artists to auction for the first time in their June 5 Illustration Art sale. 76% of the rich selection of just over 250 works of art sold.

Contributing to the success of the auction was a section of works for historically important theater productions by noted set and costume designers. A promotional drawing by Al Hirschfeld for Cabin in the Sky, 1940, published in The Herald Tribune, was purchased by a collector for $32,500. Hirschfeld also designed the promotional poster for the 1943 film. An early sketch by Jo Mielziner for the set of the Tony award-winning first production of Death of a Salesman, 1949, far exceeded the previous record for a work by the artist, which had stood at $3,250—the ink and wash piece at Swann was purchased by a collector for $23,750. Costume designs by Erté and Elizabeth Montgomery, known as Motley, also performed well.

Topping the sale was Russell H. Tandy’s cover for one of Carolyn Keene’s popular Nancy Drew mysteries, The Secret in the Old Attic, 1944. Each detail of the watercolor and gouache painting was done by hand, including the precise text of the title and author’s name. After break-neck bidding, the work was purchased by a collector for $35,000, a record for the artist.

A record was also achieved by Ruth Eastman with a proposed cover for The Saturday Evening Post, titled Hitting the Links of Palm Beach, mid-1920s. The gouache painting on a printed Post cover reached $8,750, above a high estimate of $1,200. The record for a cover by Charles Addams for The New Yorker was not one of the dark gags for which he is known, but for the bright and hysterical Penguin Convention, 1977. The watercolor vista of innumerable penguins wearing nametags was also a record for any work in color by the artist: it sold to an institution for $30,000.

Another highlight was the auction debut of any work by George Wolfe Plank. Christmas Gifts, 1913, was one of more than 60 covers the artist produced for Vogue between 1911 and 1936. The elegant watercolor reached $22,500.

Works by beloved illustrators Harrison Cady, Arthur Rackham, Charles Schulz, Everett Shinn and Jessie Willcox Smith also performed well.

Specialist Christine von der Linn said of the sale, “We are thrilled with the results, as we were with the enthusiastic throng of attendees at the exhibition the preceding week. The desire for strong works that depict moments of mystery, nostalgia, humor, fashion and theatrical drama continues to fuel competition for the top lots.”           

The next auction of Illustration Art at Swann Galleries will be held on December 6, 2018. The house is currently accepting quality consignments.

Image: Lot 45: Russell H. Tandy, The Secret in the Old Attic, watercolor, ink and gouache, for Nancy Drew Mystery Stories #21, by Carolyn Keene, 1944. Sold June 5, 2018 for $35,000. (Pre-sale estimate: $15,000 to $25,000)

blobid8_1528279561472.pngLondon--Bonhams is offering an extraordinary selection of timeless film posters at its entertainment memorabilia sale on Wednesday 18 July in London. Leading the sale is a rare poster of the American classic King Kong, estimated at £50,000-70,000. It is one of only two copies of the Czech Poster known to exist.

Also on offer is a poster from the James Bond series, Diamonds are Forever, featuring Sean Connery, in his famous pose, clutching a gun to his chest, estimated at £20,000-30,000.

Other highlights in the sale include:

  • The Beatles: A Belfast Concert Poster, 1964, estimated at £25,000-28,000.
  • Le Mans: Original poster artwork by Tom Jung, Cinema Center Films/ Solar Productions, 1971. Estimated at £8,000-12,000. Thomas Jung is an advertising art director, grapHic designer and illustrator who is best known for his movie poster art work having also worked on Doctor Zhivago, Grand Prix, Star Wars, The Dogs of war and Once Upon a Time in America.

Image: Rare 1933 Czech King Kong poster (£50,000-70,000) and Diamonds are Forever poster (£20,000-30,000)

Leslie Hindman Auctioneers announced today that the firm has appointed Thomas Galbraith as Chief Executive Officer, effective June 4, 2018. He succeeds Leslie Hindman who founded the firm in 1982. The appointment follows a private equity investment that positions the firm for aggressive growth.
 
Galbraith co-founded The Petraeus Group in 2010. The consulting firm has provided growth and start-up strategies to Steven Murphy & Partners, Art Dubai, Paddle8, Arthena and numerous other luxury brands and VC firms. During this time, Galbraith also served as Managing Director of Paddle8 and prior to that as Director of Global Strategy for Artnet. He was most recently appointed interim CEO by the board of Twyla, a Google Ventures backed startup, tasked with repositioning the company towards a more profitable future.
 
Note from Founder + Chair, Leslie Hindman
 
“We are extremely excited to have Thomas join us as CEO. With his experience at the cross section of technology and art, and his reputation as a thought leader in the industry, we are poised for future expansion."
 
Note from CEO, Thomas Galbraith

"I am humbled and excited to join Leslie Hindman Auctioneers as CEO and lead the company into the next chapter. Leslie has built a formidable organization and I very much look forward to working with the talented team and bringing a new level of innovation to the industry. Our business is built on trust, customer service and expertise. I’m excited to bring in new technology to aid in these areas, helping us expand to new regions and markets and continue building an excellent team."

blobid5_1528110256103.jpgAn important archive of correspondence and writings from the father of Suprematism, Kazimir Malevich, leads Bonhams Fine Books and Manuscripts sale in London on Wednesday, 20 June. The 340-page collection, illuminating his artistic activities and personal life against the social and political background of the Soviet era, is estimated at £150,000-250,000.

Kazimir Malevich was the pioneer of modern abstract painting, and his work and thinking had a profound influence on the development of non-objective art in the twentieth-century. The archive, which reveals both his personal and artistic preoccupations, dates from 1913, shortly after his return from his momentous visit to Paris, and ends just before his death from cancer in 1935. It was in Paris that Malevich explored Cubism, developing the style and theory which led to his key work Black Square (1915), the keystone of Suprematist art. 

The correspondence and writings trace his development as an artist, theorist and defender of Suprematism. In one undated letter to the poet Grigorii Petnikov, written when he was already ill from cancer, Malevich claims: “The Black Square is the reality of life” and says of non-objectivity: “It is not the death of Art, but the death of the object in art.” He rails against Soviet state-backed Socialist Realist art, writing in 1921 to The People’s Commissar of Enlightenment, “It’s too bad that Pravda {the official newspaper of the Communist Party, and the Russian word for Truth} has taken control of all the truth.”

Malevich often went hungry and wrote of the frustrations of the Soviet system when attempting to obtain a bread ration. In one letter he complains that as the ration was given only to those who worked, he had to pretend his wife was his secretary, and had resorted to posting bread to himself in the country from Leningrad.

During Malevich final illness he wrote several poignant and nostalgic letters, recalling halcyon summers, mushroom-picking, gathering wood and the countryside he loved, and reproaching himself for not describing the beauty of nature in his painting. In 1934, for example, he wrote to Petnikov "The soft, objectless sound of the wind in the forest is pleasant to us for it is not the noise of the city, not the music of mankind, but the music of objectless nature... Wild nature is wonderful, and we too, being wild, can create wondrous phenomena...". 

The collection was formed by the writer and art collector Nikolai Ivanovich Khardzhiev (1903-1996), editor of the works of Vladimir Mayakovsky and a friend of Anna Akhmatova.

Bonhams Head of Books and Manuscripts Matthew Haley said: “This is probably the most important archive of Malevich’s letters and writings still in private hands. Malevich’s place in art history is assured but his correspondence also reveals a witty and shrewd observer, a good friend, and a likeable and courageous man of great warmth and humour.”

Kazimir Malevich (1879-1935) was a Russian avant garde artist and teacher, and a major figure in the history of art. His theories on the supremacy of pure feeling over objective representation - Suprematism - and the works he produced based on this concept, had a profound effect on 20th century art and culture.  Malevich had an uneasy relationship with the Soviet establishment, and fell out of favour in the late 1920s. His works and papers were confiscated, he was imprisoned briefly, and was forced to paint in a representational style for the rest of his life although he never abandoned his artistic beliefs.   

Image: An important archive of correspondence and writings from Kazimir Malevich. Estimate: £150,000-250,000.

226 copy.jpgFalls Church, VA — Quinn’s Auction Galleries and its specialist subsidiary Waverly Rare Books will join forces on June 7 and 9 in offering a high-quality selection of fine and decorative art, furniture, Asian antiques and modern first editions. The June 9 session features artworks by such stellar names as Georgia O’Keeffe, Amedeo Modigliani, and acclaimed Washington Color School painter and lyrical abstractionist Sam Gilliam. All forms of bidding will be available to those who cannot attend in person, including phone, absentee, and live via the Internet.

The June 7 session, presented by Waverly Rare Books, contains 486 lots of collectible books, prints, photos, ephemera and memorabilia. A highlight is the 150-lot collection of modern first editions, including The Great Gatsby, The Catcher in the Rye, The Grapes of Wrath, and titles by George Orwell, Jack Kerouac, Ray Bradbury, William Faulkner, Ezra Pound, Aldous Huxley, Herman Hesse, Rudyard Kipling and many more. Also featured are books, clothing and prints from the Estate of Dr. John Joseph McLaughlin, founder and longtime host of The McLaughlin Group; plus a collection of children’s and illustrated books; maps and atlases; and Old Master Prints.

The impressive grouping of first editions is led by a 1939 copy of John Steinbeck’s The Grapes of Wrath. Published by Viking Press, this desirable 1939 first edition retains its original dust jacket and is estimated at $2,000-$4,000. Two examples of F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, Scribner’s, 1925, contain the typographical errors denoting them as first edition first printings (each $800-$1,200); while another American classic, Ernest Hemingway’s The Old Man and the Sea, a 1952 first edition in a first-issue dust jacket (with no mention of the Nobel Prize Hemingway won for writing the novel) could easily surpass its $200-$400 estimate. A group lot of two Hemingway first editions - For Whom the Bell Tolls (1940, first-issue dust jacket) and A Moveable Feast (1964, with dust jacket) - is entered with a $200-$300 estimate.

Thomas Pynchon’s controversial 1973 novel Gravity’s Rainbow traverses science and speculative metaphysics in its storyline, which explores the mystery of a “black device” to be installed inside a World War II German V-2 rocket. A first edition with dust jacket, it is offered in the Waverly session with a $500-$700 estimate.

The collection of items from the estate of Dr. John McLaughlin (1927-2016) reflects both the intellectual and sartorial sides of the popular political commentator best known for his cerebral TV panel show The McLaughlin Group. There are dozens of custom-made blazers and suits, as well as polo shirts, silk ties, and other fine-quality accessories. The trademark tartan plaid sport coat McLaughlin wore on air every holiday season would be instantly recognizable to viewers. Its pre-sale estimate is $200-$400.

The star of Quinn’s June 9 Fine & Decorative Arts session is a circa-1966 Sam Gilliam oil-on-canvas work, Forest Bard. Purchased from a Washington, DC gallery shortly after it was created, the painting has remained in the same family ever since. Signed, titled and dated on verso, the 72- by 36-inch abstract executed in muted blue-green tones with peach and white accents is expected to make $30,000-$50,000.

Gilliam is enjoying the greatest success of his lifetime, but it has been a long time coming for the 84-year-old artist. “Sam Gilliam is regarded as a trailblazer. He was the first African-American artist to exhibit at the Venice Biennale, back in 1972. There has always been an interest in his paintings, especially here in the Washington, DC area, but it has only been in the last few years that his work has really caught fire,” said Quinn’s Sr VP Marketing Matthew Quinn. “Most of his auction records have been set in the last two years. Sotheby’s sold a 1971 Gilliam for more than $680,000 last September - a record price. It will be interesting to see what happens with the painting in our sale.” 

A fascinating study from Georgia O’Keeffe’s (American, 1887-1986) renowned series “Above the Clouds” was consigned by a private Virginia collector whose family was close to the O’Keeffes during the artist’s childhood years in Williamsburg.

“Georgia O’Keeffe kept in contact with the family throughout her life and even stayed with them when The College of William & Mary awarded her an honorary degree in 1938. She gave the family this drawing years later, as a token of her longtime affection,” Quinn noted. The study is artist-signed and carries an $8,000-$12,000 estimate.

A 1948 Jay Hall Connaway (American, 1893-1970) painting titled Winter Cottage Monhegan (Maine) showcases the artist’s ability to capture Monhegan Island’s unique atmosphere on canvas. It measures 27½ x 38 inches (framed) and comes with desirable extra provenance in the form of a card from the artist, on verso. Est. $1,200-$1,600

Other art highlights include an Amedeo Modigliani (Italian, 1917-1920) chalk-on-paper profile of a head, $4,000-$6,000; and a Robert Henry Rockwell (Virginia, 1885-1973) bronze titled Moose. It is signed and dated on the base: R H Rockwell 1940, 1/10. Estimate: $6,000-$9,000.

An important schoolgirl sampler created by Jane Likens (1812-1880), Shepherdstown, (West) Virginia, displays rice, chain and cross-stitches on linen; and is dated 1822. It was exhibited at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and has a record of provenance that includes the collection of James F. Scott, prior sale at Sotheby’s (Jan. 2013), and the collection of Connie Bergendoff of Old Lyme, New Hampshire. Estimate: $3,000-$5,000.

Also of note are a set of six Danish Modern Koefoeds Hornslet rosewood chairs with leather-upholstered seats, $800-$1,000; a Shreve & Co., sterling silver set comprising a platter, 12 bread plates and 12 chargers, $2,000-$4,000; and a Tiffany Studios “Arrowroot” lampshade and base with Tiffany Studios New York 534 label, $4,000-$6,000.

For additional information on any item in the June 7 or 9 auctions, call 703-532-5632 (ext. 575 for June 7 session; ext. 571 for fine/decorative arts) or email info@quinnsauction.com. Quinn’s and Waverly’s galleries are located at 360 S. Washington St., Falls Church, VA 22046. Online: www.quinnsauction.com. View the catalogue and bid absentee or live via the Internet through LiveAuctioneers

Image, Lot 226: Thomas Pynchon, Gravity’s Rainbow, first edition in dust jacket, Viking Press, 1973. Est. $500-$700. Courtesy of Quinn’s Auction Galleries

 

Cosmo.jpgAntiquarianAuctions.com is an online auction site dedicated to the sale of rare and out-of print books, maps & prints, documents, letters, ephemera and vintage photography.
All pricing is done in US$. No buyer’s premium is charged. 

Lot 1 

Jenkins (James) The Martial Achievements of Great Britain and Her Allies;
Published: Js. Jenkins, London, (1814-1815) Estimate: $6,000/7,000 

Originally published in thirteen parts, back wrappers carry Conditions of the Work stating that the artist is Heath (William), each number to contain four plates, price 21s. per number: the letterpress to be compiled from official documents only, publication monthly until complete from Dec. 1. 1814. One hundred sets on large paper at 42.s. a part: and finally, List of Subscribers to given on completion. - Abbey (J.R.) Life in England, In Aquatint and Lithography 1770-1860, number 365 

Lot 2 

[Skotnes (Cecil) Artist] & [Gray (Stephen) Poetry] 

Man's Gold (Limited Edition Art Portfolio) 

Published: Johannesburg, August 1975 to January 1979 

Estimate: $3,500/4,500 

This art portfolio is copy number 43 of an edition limited to 75 numbered copies. There were also 15 lettered artists’ proofs.
Some copies were issued loose so that the art works could be framed. This copy is bound by master craftsman Peter Carsten’s, as issued, in full Oasis goatskin leather with a darker brown coloured central strip on the upper side with a Skotnes blind stamped design. There are 28 original woodcuts, each one signed in pencil by Cecil Skotnes and numbered 43/75. Each woodcut was printed from the original blocks in 2 to 5 colours on Zerkall Buetten paper. 

Lot 3 

Heylyn (Peter). Chorographie and Historie of the Whole World. And all the principal Kingdoms, Provinces, and Seas, and Isles thereof Published: Henry Seile, London, 1657 Estimate: $8,000/9,000 

As an ecclesiastic Heylyn was a disputatious monarchist who served for a while as King's chaplain, as a geographer he was an English patriot, and it through these spectacles he describes 'the Whole World'. As he tells the reader: 'In the pursuance of this Work.. so have I not forgotten that I am an English-man, and which is somewhat more, a Church-man. As an English-man I have been mindful upon all occasions to commit to memory the noble actions of my Countrey; exploited both by Sea and Land, im[n] most parts of the World, and represented on the same Theaters on which they were acted.' 

Lot 8 

Miro (Joan) L'oiseau Solaire - De Luxe Limitied Edition Signed By Miro Published: Maeght Edteur, Paris, 1967
Estimate: $2,000/2,500

This is Issue 164-165 of this highly collected art periodical produced by the Maeght Art Gallery - Derriere Le Miroir, featuring 20th. Century artists and illustrated with many original graphics. The double issue on offer features the work of Joan Miro and is No. 114 of the De Luxe limited edition of 150 copies signed by Miro. Unlike the trade issue, it is printed on fine handmade Velin de Rives art paper. Issued as a loose leaved portfolio in an originally Miro lithographed cover, protected in a custom chemise and matching slipcase. With 5 original Miro colour lithographs (one triple page foldout), 5 additional Miro colour lithographs (two double page) and 22 reproductions in black and white. 

Lot 215 

[Fitzgerald (Edward) Translator] Rubáiyát of Omar Khayyám (Limited edition, war time printing, Cairo). Published: Mobile Maps Printing Co., Maadi, Egypt, 1943 Estimate: $600/700 

This is an edition of 25 copies of which this is no 18.
Loosely inserted is a handwritten note signed by Amslie Beckett which describes the production of this volume as follows:
This Rubaiyat was printed in the camp of the Mobile Maps Printing and Printing Co of the UDF (Union Defence Force) at Maadi Egypt in 1943 as a means to overcome boredom.
I designed the book and did the illustrations, which were made from lino taken off the Officers Mess bar counter. The engraving tool was made from one of the stays of a broken umbrella obtained at a nearby convent. Some of the illustrations are in seven or eight colours. 

Lot 282 

Speke (John Hanning) My Second Expedition to Eastern Intertropical Africa (Pre-publication pamphlet)
Published: Saul Solomon & Co., Cape Town, 1860
Estimate: $2,000/2,500 

This pamphlet is a slightly edited version of pages 155 -199 of Speke's What Led to the Discovery of The Source of The Nile (1864). At the start of his third expedition (the second journey to the Lakes 1860 - 3,) Speke travelled to Cape Town on the same ship as Sir George Grey, Governor of Cape Colony. Upon arrival Sir George obtained a donation of £300 from the Cape Parliament towards the cost of Speke's expedition together with the services of ten Hottentot volunteers. 

Lot 309 

Fleming (Ian). Live and Let Die. Published: Jonathan Cape, London, 1954 Estimate: $1,500/2,000 

First edition, first printing of the scarce second James Bond novel. The gilt decorations are moderately oxidised and dulled, as is common for this title, in this instance more noticeably on the spine lettering than on the medallion on the front board. Apart from this, a truly about fine copy. The boards are square and unmarked with no bumping of the corners or edges. Internally it is very clean and possibly unread with no markings or foxing. There is one tiny spot on the fore edge. In a supplied dustwrapper from a later edition which has reviews of the book on the rear flap and adverts for Moonraker and Diamonds are Forever on the rear panel. The dustwrapper is at least very good, complete and not price clipped (10s.6d.). The colours are bright with some light edge wear, most marked at the top of the spine. 

Lot 331 

Naval Intelligence Division Chine Proper. Geographical Handbook Series. Restricted Handbooks
Published: H. M. Stationary Office, London, 1944-45
Estimate: $400/600 

Probably one of the best-researched set of books on China during the turbulent period, covering all aspects of the vast country under occupation, with revolutionary movements thriving, civil war and uncertainty of the future. China Proper seems to be among the rarest Naval Intelligence Division Geographical Handbooks of the Second World War. 

AntiquarianAuctions.com is an online auction site dedicated to the sale of rare and out-of print books, maps & prints, documents, letters, ephemera and vintage photography. 

Dealers and collectors worldwide have been selling and bidding on the site since 2010.
Only established booksellers who are members of major national trade associations such as ABA, ABAA, PBFA or SABDA or are of good standing in the trade are permitted to sell on the site. 

Auctions are held every five weeks and run on the model of a timed auction for one week. 

All pricing is done in US$. No buyer’s premium is charged. Next auction: Auction #68: 19 - 26 July 2018 

Contact:
Antiquarian Auctions: Paul Mills P.O. Box 186 7848 Constantia, Cape Town South Africa E-mail: support@antiquarianauctions.com Tel: +27 21 794 0600 

Image: Lot 3, Chorographie and Historie of the Whole World 

 

john adams.jpgOn May 31st, PBA Galleries offered a significant selection of rarities in their Americana with Manuscript Material - Travel & Exploration - Cartography Sale.

A rare First Edition of The Federalist, the highlight of the auction, justifiably considered the most important book in the political history of the United States, soared to $223,500 over an estimate of $80,000-120,000 in bustling bidding by a full bank of phone bidders. The Federalist, presenting essays by founding fathers James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, and John Jay, meant to convince state legislatures of the fragile confederation that had just gained independence from Great Britain, to combine in a United States with a common government and purpose under the new constitution. This copy of the rare 1788 first edition, of which only 500 copies were printed, was one of the exceptionally rare deluxe copies printed on thick superfine royal writing paper, the two volumes bound in contemporary sheep. The importance of the Federalist to the early development of the great political experiment that was the United States cannot be overstated.  The strong price was the most a book has ever sold for at PBA Galleries, topping the $212,000 fetched by a first edition fetched in 2008 for a copy of the official account of the Lewis and Clark expedition.

A presentation copy of Jonathan Mayhew’s A Discourse, Concerning Unlimited Submission and Non-Resistance to the Higher Powers; with some reflections on the resistance made to King Charles I bearing the signature of John Adams, the second President of the United States volleyed between two online bidders to reach $10,800. Estimated at $8,000-12,000, the inscription for the presentation is not in Adams’ hand and although previous records named the recipient as daughter Abigail “Nabby” Smith, this is now thought to be in error and it is possible the book was presented to a more distant relation of Abigail Adams (nee Smith).

A typed letter, signed "Edgar." 22 lines, on letterhead of the Director of the Federal Bureau of Investigation, to Franklin Roosevelt’s special adviser Harry Hopkins in 1942, framed along with a copy of a newspaper article about the saboteurs, and a porcupine emblem they had carved while aboard a submarine sold for over twenty times the low estimate of $500 with a price realized of $10,200. J. Edgar Hoover relates that "When I saw you the other day, I believe I told you that the group of saboteurs who landed on Long Island from a German submarine had carved out, while on the submarine en route to the United States, miniature porcupines from aluminum. The reason that they selected the porcupine to be carved was because the submarine which they came on was named the 'Porcupine.' I am enclosing herewith two of these miniature porcupines, as I thought the President and you might like to have one each as a souvenir of this incident." Four saboteurs landed on Long Island, and four more in Florida. Two of them surrendered, and gave information to the FBI which led to the capture of the other six. The two informants were given lengthy prison sentences (commuted by Harry Truman in 1948) - the other six were executed.

The first appearance in a magazine of The Defence of Fort M’Henry, the four-stanza poem that was to become The Star-Spangled Banner, in the November 1814 issue of The Analectic Magazine commanded a price of $4,800 topping the high estimate of $3,500.  In 1950 Carroll Wilson wrote in Familiar Quotations (page 391) about the rarity of this issue of The Analectic Magazine in wrappers, stating that "No other copy of this . . . number is known to have survived in original state." Other copies have since come to light, but it is a rare survival.  As Filby & Howard document, this issue of the Analectic Magazine was published in early November, 1814, about seven weeks after the famous bombardment; the poem’s appearance here is preceded by numerous newspaper appearances and a few separate printings in small broadside formats, but this is its first publication in a "permanent" format. 

The Rough Riders, signed by author Theodore Roosevelt, trounced the presale estimate of $600-900 reaching a price of $3,600. This is Teddy Roosevelt's own account of his heroic actions in Cuba when he famously charged San Juan Hill, catapulting him to the Governorship of New York, the Vice Presidency and the White House.

PBA Galleries holds sales of fine, rare and collectible books every two weeks.  For more information regarding upcoming sales, consignments, or auction results, please contact PBA Galleries at (415) 989-2665 or pba@pbagalleries.com.

 

ha tintin.jpgDallas, TX - An auction dedicated to European Comic Art reached $1,257,082 as Heritage Auctions entered the collecting category with nearly 300 lots of high-end original art.

The June 2 sale offered a rarely seen set of original Tintin drawings by Belgian cartoonist Hergé, which sold for $425,000. A 12-panel page of inked original art from the story “The Red Sea Sharks,” published in a 1958 edition of Journal Tintin, was sold along with its pencil-on-paper design. 

“Our first auction of European Comic Art attracted a wide pool of active bidders, comfortably surpassing our original goal of $1 million in sales,” said Jim Halperin, Co-Founder of Heritage Auctions. “The sale’s 87 percent sell-through rate by volume also eclipses rates set at other houses, which typically reach 70 percent. We are very pleased with our debut.”

A 1978 page of Original Art from Corto Maltese, by legendary Italian comic book creator Hugo Pratt, sold for $62,500. 

Original art by the influential French cartoonist Moebius (Jean Giraud) attracted vigorous bidding. A full page of Original Art from the 1991 graphic novel The Black Incal - considered a pillar of contemporary science fiction - sold for $21,250 and a full page of Original Art from Upon A Star, from the artist’s critically acclaimed 1983 release, ended at $13,750. 

Woman with Blue Eyes, 1995, an original illustration by Italian artist Milo Manara, sold for $11,875. His early work in several Franco-Belgian comics magazines to later projects for Marvel Comics established Manara a worldwide fan base.

In addition to works by Europe’s finest cartoonists and illustrators, the auction also featured rare art from popular American artists. Original Art for “Gin,” a single-page advertising parody from Weirdo #15 by American satirist Robert Crumb, who has lived in France since 1991, sold for $20,000.

Jack Kamen’s 1951 Original Art for page 1 of Weird Science #9 sold for $18,750. Bursting with eye appeal and a bold portrait of his iconic character The Spirit, a Splash Page of Original Art by Will Eisner, published as a newspaper insert in 1950, ended at $16,250.

A hand-curated selection of animation art included original drawings from Walt Disney shorts and films from the 1930s and 1940s and pre-production concept art. An exceptional Mermaids Concept Painting for Peter Pan by Mary Blair (Walt Disney, 1953) brought four times its pre-auction estimate to sell for $16,250.

The auction was the first of its kind held by Heritage Auctions, the world’s largest auctioneer of vintage comic books and comic art. The auction was conducted by auctioneers at Heritage in Dallas, Texas, and included a viewing audience at Heritage Auctions Europe, a Dutch entity, in IJsselstein, the Netherlands. Viewing was available on internet streaming video with live bidding capability through HeritageLive!, the firm’s proprietary auction program.

Sargent .jpgNew York —American Art comes to Swann Galleries on June 14 with a highly curated offering of original works by artists living or working in the United States. The nearly 300 paintings, drawings and sculptures, encompassing the middle of the nineteenth century to the present, are expected to exceed $1.6M. Many have never before appeared at auction.

The auction will feature a strong section of works by PaJaMa, the artist collective consisting of Paul Cadmus, Jared French and Margaret Hoening French. Many of these works, from the collection of Jon Anderson and Philis Raskind-Anderson, are portraits by the members of one another and their partners and friends. For example, Cadmus drew Jon Anderson #1, 1965, and Portrait of Margaret French, 1944 ($15,000 to $20,000 and $8,000 to $12,000, respectively), and Jared French drew him in Portrait of Paul Cadmus, 1931, which is estimated at $7,000 to $10,000.

Jared French is additionally represented by Men in a Garden, circa 1934-35, a verdant oil painting of a semi-nude fête, carrying an estimate of $20,000 to $30,000. Three-dimensional works by French will also be offered: a circa 1935 marble carving entitled Etruscan Man, and a plaster bust of the photographer George Platt Lynes, circa 1940 ($3,000 to $4,000 and $40,000 to $5,000, respectively).

Nineteenth-century works shine in a variety of media, with highlights including Head of a Young Girl, circa 1875-78, a pencil drawing by John Singer Sargent. The sketch illustrates the artist’s mastery of color, form and light, and comes with an estimate of $15,000 to $20,000. An autumnal canvas by Worthington Whittredge of a River Landscape with Sailboat, is valued at $20,000 to $30,000. Paintings of the west include a landscape by William Bradford of Inspiration Point, Yosemite, 1879, a clement change from the Arctic vistas for which he is known ($15,000 to $20,000), and Joseph Henry Sharp’s oil painting Still Life with Poppies, 1890, at $10,000 to $15,000.

Early American Modernists present a strong selection of harbingers of movements to come. A charcoal and pencil drawing by Joseph Stella, The Sewing Lesson, 1908, previously exhibited at the Whitney Museum of American Art in 1994, was likely part of a commissioned series representing the immigrant communities of industrial Pittsburgh. At $20,000 to $30,000, it leads a selection of drawings by Stella, as well as a collage. Nine watercolors by Charles Burchfield will be offered, following the house’s success in June 2017, when all offered paintings by the artist were sold. These are led by Brook, 1916, with an estimate of $12,000 to $18,000. Bathers, an elegant circa 1910 painting by Abraham Walkowitz, embodies his mature style; it is valued between $5,000 to $8,000.

John Steuart Curry, known primarily for his forceful Regionalist prints, returns to the theme of the American heartland in an oil painting titled Plowing Before a Storm, circa 1935. The work, valued between $15,000 and $20,000, is one of few paintings in the artist’s oeuvre. From his circle, Thomas Hart Benton and Rockwell Kent will be represented by sketches and watercolors.

Following Swann’s offering of works from his personal collection in 2017, Will Barnet will be represented in this auction by a sketch of Boy and Cat, 1984 ($5,000 to $8,000), and an oil painting of a Park Scene, 1937, most likely in New York’s Central Park, at $7,000 to $10,000.

Joseph Cornell’s Untitled, a circa 1960 collage for the avant-garde artist Kasoundra Kasoundra, featuring a silhouette of Don Quixote and a macaw, carries an estimate of $12,000 to $18,000.

Contemporary works include a striking landscape painting by Wolf Kahn titled Poisonous Yellow-Green, 2001, with an estimate of $15,000 to $20,000. Four canvases by Leonard E. Fisher include his signature floating objects motif, intended to evoke hope and gaiety. The patriotic The 4th of July, 2014, leads the pack at $10,000 to $15,000, while the 1996 Bubbles is valued at $8,000 to $12,000.

Sketchbooks by Peggy Bacon, Rockwell Kent, Henry Varnum Poor, Fairfield Porter and Mahonri Young offer insight into the minds and processes of the artists.

The complete catalogue with bidding information is available at www.swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 12 John Singer Sargent, Head of a Young Girl. Estimate $15,000-20,000.

Screen Shot 2018-06-01 at 10.01.29 AM.pngLondon—This July, Sotheby’s will offer for sale the original map of Winnie-the-Pooh’s Hundred Acre Wood by E.H. Shepard. Possibly the most famous map in children’s literature, this charming sketch from 1926, has been unseen for nearly half a century and will be offered with an estimate of £100,000-150,000 at the English Literature, History, Science, Children’s Books and Illustrations sale in London on 10th July. 

Featuring on the opening end-papers of the original 1926 book, the sketch introduces readers to the delightful imagination of Christopher Robin and his woodland friends. Exactly 40 years later the map played a starring role in the landmark Disney film - Winnie-the-Pooh and the Honey Tree - where it was brought to life as an animation in the film’s opening sequence. 

As well as mapping the magical world of Winnie-the-Pooh the sketch also captures the unique personalities of A.A. Milne’s much-loved characters. Eeyore is depicted in his “rather boggy and sad” “gloomy place” with his head hanging sluggishly in the grass, whilst the energetic Roo bounces towards the “sandy pit” where he plays. A solitary Winnie-the-Pooh sits thoughtfully looking out over the wood to his friend, Christopher Robin, who stands with boyish arrogance looking back. 

The charming childishness of Christopher Robin is marked by clumsily spelt locations, such as “NICE FOR PICNICKS” and “100 AKER WOOD”, as well as a compass marked with points spelling out the title character’s name. Shepard’s own amusing personality seeps into the illustration, as the map is signed off with the words “Drawn by me and Mr Shepard helpd". 

The map will be offered alongside four further original Winnie-the-Pooh illustrations by E.H. Shepard, none of which have been seen for almost 50 years. Among them is a most poignant illustration showing Christopher Robin and Pooh walking hand-in-hand to ‘an enchanted place on the very top of the Forest’ to say their final goodbye. In the emotional conclusion to his much-loved book - The House at Pooh Corner, A.A. Milne finally signs off with one of the most heart-rending farewells in children’s literature: "…wherever they go, and whatever happens to them on the way, in that enchanted place in the top of the Forest a little boy and his bear will always be playing." The illustration, printed as a double-page, is, excluding a silhouette of the two friends, the penultimate time we see Christopher Robin and Pooh together as they make their way to the place of parting. 

Two additional illustrations taken from Chapter Six of The House at Pooh Corner show the characters and a game of ‘Pooh Sticks’. Originally reproduced on pages 95-6 of the published book, the ink drawings record the creation of the game with the first drawing showing Pooh, Piglet, Roo and Rabbit eagerly peering over the Poohsticks bridge, and the second, depicting an unexpected but comic turn of events, with Eeyore floating from beneath the bridge. 

The fourth, perhaps most familiar image, is a re-drawn version of another illustration from the "Poohsticks" episode which concludes with Christopher Robin, Pooh and Piglet left on the famous bridge by themselves. The tone of the illustration is somewhat different with the excitement of the Poohsticks game changing to a more contemplative mood, with the three friends looking wistfully at the river beneath them, saying nothing. Used twice in the published book, within the chapter and also as the frontispiece, this illustration accompanies a moment of unified friendship and forgiveness, in which Piglet breaks the silence and volunteers his view that "Tigger is all right, really" and Pooh suggesting further that, "Everybody is really... But I don't suppose I'm right...". 

The five original illustrations will be offered in Sotheby’s English Literature, History, Science, Children’s Books and Illustrations sale in London on 10th July 2018 with a combined estimate of £310,000-440,000. 

Image: E.H. Shepard’s The Original Map of the Hundred Acre Wood Original ink drawings, signed, 1926. Estimate  £100,000 -150,000.

Ithaca, NY—National Book Auctions, located just outside Ithaca, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog.   

This catalog features rare, antique and decorative books as well as select additions of ephemera. Featured are prized first printings of titles such as "Uncle Tom's Cabin" and "Cannery Row." A selection of fine bindings will be offered, including antique fancy leather bindings and rare selections from the Folio Society and the Limited Editions Club.

Antique and rare books are numerous in this catalog. Among the earliest examples are the 1631 printing of Selden's "Titles of Honor," Roscoe's "Life of Lorenzo de Medici, Called the Magnificent," produced in two leather-bound volumes in 1796, and the 1735 printing of the "Dramatick Works of John Dryden," in six volumes. We're also pleased to offer in this catalog a first printing of the "B" binding of "Uncle Tom's Cabin," and the scarce signed limited edition of the "Works of Theodore Roosevelt," complete in 24 volumes produced over the years 1923 to 1926. Additional rare and antique selections relate to travel & exploration, circus history, pulp, books-on-books, theology, children's, decorative antique sets, art history, special printings by the Folio Society and Limited Editions Club, and beyond.                          

Several interesting collections will also be showcased. Highlighted are first printings of modern firsts such as Steinbeck's "Cannery Row," and "Breakfast at Tiffany's," by Truman Capote. A collection of children's books and related items is highlighted by first printings of Dr. Seuss titles, an original, framed signature by Kate Greenaway, and antique juvenile pulp magazines.        

Found throughout this catalog are interesting ephemera offerings and many group lots of desirable titles. Of particular note are numerous groupings of original vintage and antique science fiction and fantasy pulp magazines including titles such as "Amazing Stories," "Astounding Science Fiction," "Fantastic Adventures" and others.     

National Book Auctions is a public auction service specializing in books, ephemera, and art. National Book Auctions is a targeted service offering experience and expertise unique to marketing antique and modern books and ephemera for consignors and collectors alike. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of collectible, signed, and first edition books. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-269-0101 or email mail@nationalbookauctions.com.

 

Baltimore, Maryland - The Baltimore Art, Antique & Jewelry Show, now in its 38th year, is Maryland’s largest antiques event and one of the most important and anticipated shows of the summer for dealers and collectors. With countless international exhibitors drawn from the United States, Canada, France, Italy, England, China and Japan, the Baltimore Show attracts tens of thousands of patrons including knowledgeable collectors, museum curators, dealers, decorators and shoppers from all over the World. Show guests can discover many great items ranging from $100 to museum quality treasures with values of more than $1,000,000.

The Baltimore Art, Antique & Jewelry Show returns Labor Day Weekend (August 30 - September 2, 2018) transforming the Baltimore Convention Center into an epic experience for all who attend. From the lush carpet lined aisles, to the lavish floral arrangements and full-service restaurants located in the center of the show, the Baltimore Show is a must attend event for the novice buyer to the serious collector. 

The show attracts fine art dealers and serious collectors from around the globe and is known as the most important silver show in the nation, with leading silver specialists ranging from early coin, Georgian, Irish, Russian and Victorian to local Baltimore Stieff, modern Louis Tiffany and George Jensen. The quality and quantity of antique and fine estate jewelry on offer is the attraction for many knowledgeable patrons seeking bargains for both personal use and resale inventory. In addition, the show boasts quality dealers specializing in Japanese and Chinese art and antiques.

There are more than 200,000 individual items in the show, including vintage and estate jewelry, American and European silver, furniture of all kinds, crystal, art glass, ceramics, quilts, Art Deco, Art Nouveau, lamps, ethnic art, paintings, decoys, Chinese export, bronzes, music boxes, sewing collectibles, oriental rugs, textiles, posters, country store, antique armor and military, political memorabilia and much more. Everything is for sale.

Highlights will include a Norman Rockwell painting titled “Boy Graduate,” offered by M.S. Rau Antiques; a vintage antique 1941 Bally Quarter Reliance slot machine offered by Maryland dealer, Larry Debaugh; and a wheel thrown, carved sculpted, high-fired porcelain with Celadon glaze titled “Double Dragon with Ruby Eyes” on display by Lee Gallery & Studios.

The Baltimore Art, Antique & Jewelry Show is much more than a retail show, with an extensive array of prominent estate jewelers, antiquarian book dealers, and exhibitors offering everything from majolica to contemporary art and fine crafts, there is truly something for everyone at the show.

"We are thrilled to be bringing the show back to Baltimore for the 38th consecutive year. Each year the Baltimore show expands the variety of genres on offer which reinforces its reputation as the largest art, antique and jewelry show, not only in Maryland and the Mid-Atlantic region, but in the United States" stated Scott Diament, CEO of the Palm Beach Show Group.

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