November 2017 Archives

London—Today we reveal the British Library’s cultural highlights for the year ahead, including:

  • James Cook: The Voyages, a major exhibition marking 250 years since Captain James Cook set sail on three voyages that changed the world
  • Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms, a spectacular exhibition exploring the riches of Anglo-Saxon art and ideas over six centuries
  • The acquisition of Booker Prize-winning author Penelope Fitzgerald’s personal archive
  • A landmark exhibition commemorating the 70th anniversary of the Empire Windrush bringing hundreds of Caribbean migrants to their new home in the UK 

James Cook: The Voyages (27 April 2018 - 28 August 2018) 

To mark 250 years since Captain James Cook’s ship Endeavour set sail from Plymouth, this major British Library exhibition will tell the story of Cook’s three great voyages through original documents, many of which were produced by the artists, scientists and seamen on board the ship.  

From Cook’s journal detailing the first crossing of the Antarctic Circle to handwritten log books, stunning artwork and intricate maps, this exhibition will chart the three voyages, which spanned more than a decade, and shed new light on the experiences of people on the ship and in the places visited.

Today we can reveal that drawings by the Polynesian high priest and navigator Tupaia, who joined the first voyage at Tahiti and accompanied Cook to New Zealand and Australia, will be going on public display for the first time together, alongside works by expedition artists Sydney Parkinson, John Webber and William Hodges.  Tupaia’s paintings include a series of depictions of Tahitian society and culture, as well as drawings from New Zealand and Australia.

The exhibition will also examine the scientific work of the expeditions and will feature some of the original natural history drawings made on the voyages, including the first European depiction of a kangaroo drawn by Sydney Parkinson, on loan from the Natural History Museum.

The British Library holds distinguished collections of original maps, artworks and journals from the voyages and, alongside rare printed books and newly commissioned video content, the exhibition will seek to shed new light on encounters that completed the outline of the known world and formed the starting point for the following two centuries of globalisation.

Tickets will be available to buy on the British Library website from 1 December 2017.

Roly Keating, Chief Executive of the British Library, said:

‘From James Cook’s Endeavour to the Empire Windrush, we’ll be taking our visitors in 2018 on an unforgettable series of voyages and encounters, across cultures, continents and centuries - culminating in one of the most ambitious exhibitions we have ever mounted: the extraordinary treasures of the Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms.’

Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms (19 October 2018 - 19 February 2019)

In autumn 2018, the British Library will be staging a landmark exhibition on the history, art, literature and culture of Anglo-Saxon England, across six centuries from the eclipse of Roman Britain to the Norman Conquest.  

Highlights from the British Library’s outstanding collection of Anglo-Saxon manuscripts will be presented alongside a large number of exceptional loans.  

Today we are delighted to announce that Codex Amiatinus, one of three giant single-volume Bibles made at the monastery at Wearmouth-Jarrow in the north-east of England in the early eighth century and taken to Italy as a gift for the Pope in 716, will be returning to England for the first time in more than 1300 years, on loan from Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana in Florence. It will be displayed with the St Cuthbert Gospel, also made at Wearmouth-Jarrow around the same time, and acquired by the British Library in 2012.

We can also reveal that we will be displaying a number of major objects from the Staffordshire Hoard, found in 2009, including the pectoral cross and the inscribed gilded strip, on loan from Birmingham and Stoke-on-Trent City Councils.

Bringing together the four principal manuscripts of Old English poetry for the first time, the British Library’s unique manuscript of Beowulf will be displayed alongside the Vercelli Book on loan from the Biblioteca Capitolare in Vercelli, the Exeter Book on loan from Exeter Cathedral Library, and the Junius Manuscript on loan from the Bodleian Library.

Dr Claire Breay, curator of Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms, said:

‘The Anglo-Saxon period saw the formation of the kingdom of England and the emergence of the English language and English literature.  Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms will be the most spectacular exhibition to date of manuscripts and related objects covering the whole Anglo-Saxon period.’

Karl and Eleanor Marx Treasures Gallery display (1 May 2018 to 5 August 2018)

As part of the commemorations of the 200th anniversary of Karl Marx’s birth, this Treasures Gallery display will explore the role the British Museum Reading Room, a predecessor institution of the British Library, played in the life and work of Marx and his daughter Eleanor, a notable writer and political activist in her own right. 

The display will include correspondence by Marx, his family and Friedrich Engels, covering both personal and political affairs, as well as rare copies of first editions of Marx’s writings, several of which he himself donated to the Library.  Among these is a copy of the first French translation of Capital, which is believed to feature annotations in Marx’s own hand. 

Michael Palin Treasures Gallery display (7 August 2018 - 11 November 2018)

Following the British Library’s acquisition of Michael Palin’s archive earlier this year, there will be a free display in the Treasures Gallery focusing on the development of his literary and creative career.

The display will trace a line from his early days with The Frost Report and Monty Python’s Flying Circus to his successes across fiction, stage and screen, as well as exploring his humour, versatility, multi-faceted imagination and enduring appeal.

The archive covers 1965-1987 and includes over 50 ‘Python Notebooks’ containing drafts, working material and personal reflections relating to Palin’s Monty Python writing. It also includes his personal diaries kept during this period, and project files comprising material relating to his film, television and literary work.

Acquisition: Penelope Fitzgerald’s archive

The British Library is delighted to announce it has acquired a significant collection of papers belonging to the Booker Prize winning writer, Penelope Fitzgerald (1916 - 2000).  

Born into a distinguished family and confronted with domestic and economic crises throughout her life, Penelope Fitzgerald launched her literary career at the age of 58 and is now regarded as one of the finest British novelists of the 20th century.  

The collection comprises literary notebooks and drafts, including from her first novel The Golden Child (1977) to later novels including The Gate of Angels (1990) and The Blue Flower (1995), along with diaries and family and personal correspondence with figures including Muriel Spark, Rebecca West and Penelope Lively.  

The archive also includes Fitzgerald’s personal library, which comprises her heavily annotated teaching copies of editions of Beckett, Milton and Austen amongst others. 

Joanna Norledge, Lead Curator of Contemporary Literary and Creative Archives at the British Library, said:

‘The Penelope Fitzgerald archive includes a lot of unpublished material, particularly her ideas and notes on unrealised creative and critical projects, and is a great source to be mined.  From Fitzgerald’s notebooks and correspondence to her personal library, the collection provides significant research value as it elucidates her professional, intellectual and writing life.’

The archive is currently being catalogued and will be available in British Library Reading Rooms from late 2018.  For more information on how to become a Reader, please visit the British Library website.

Windrush (1 June 2018 to 21 October 2018)

Next year marks 70 years since the Empire Windrush arrived at Tilbury Docks in Essex carrying hundreds of Caribbean migrants to Britain. It also marks the passing of the British Nationality Act, which established common citizenship and enabled all British subjects to settle in Britain.

Through literature, personal correspondence and official reports - from a 1940s suppressed report detailing labour protests and rebellions across the Caribbean to E.R. Braithwaite’s annotated typescript of To Sir, With Love - this free Entrance Hall Gallery exhibition will explore the significance of the arrival of the Windrush within a broader narrative of Caribbean history.  

Though the arrival of the Windrush was initially met with fear-mongering and prejudice, the ship has since come to symbolise the origins of British multiculturalism. This exhibition, however, will tell a different and deeper story of Caribbean people’s struggles for self-expression and recognition across the 20th century. 

We are delighted to announce that we will be exhibiting Andrea Levy’s manuscript of her award-winning 2004 book Small Island. The novel was loosely based on the experiences of Levy’s parents, who emigrated to Britain from Jamaica in 1948, and the manuscript will be displayed alongside other items her father brought with him on the Windrush.

British Library in China 

In 2017 the British Library took some of its most specular collection items, including Charlotte Brontë’s handwritten manuscript of Jane Eyre and one of the earliest quarto editions of Romeo and Juliet, to China for the first time.  

The British Library will open further displays at Shanghai Library in March 2018 and in Hong Kong in November 2018, following the success of exhibitions in Beijing and Wuzhen.

The British Library will also continue to expand its online presence aimed at Chinese audiences with the Chinese language version of Discovering Literature now featuring more than 200 digitised items and 70 interpretative essays.

Discovering Literature: Medieval 

Launching in January 2018, the British Library will publish 50 medieval manuscripts and early print editions, including the single surviving manuscript of Beowulf and Caxton’s pioneering illustrated print edition of the Canterbury Tales, on Discovering Literature.  

The site will also investigate a range of themes including multilingualism, gender, faith and heroism, and cover key genres including epic poetry, dream visions and riddles.

Discovering Literature is a free website aimed at A-Level students, teachers and lifelong learners, which provides unprecedented access to the Library’s literary and historical treasures and has received over 6.5 million unique visitors since launching in 2014.

The British Library has already published collections relating to Shakespeare and the Renaissance, the Romantic and Victorian periods, and 20th century literature and drama, and will continue to add to the site until it covers the whole rich and diverse backbone of English literature from Beowulf to Zadie Smith.

Events programme

The British Library will be hosting a series of events to accompany the Library’s 2018 cultural programme; from Philip Pullman talking about his writing life to Harriet Harman discussing 100 years of women having the vote and Brian Eno showcasing a selection of music from his work as a visual artist in our Entrance Hall.  

Tickets for events between January and March 2018 can be purchased online from Friday 1 December by Members and are on general sale from Friday 9 December.

 

Bidsquare's Holiday Gift Guide

6ef7d710-91d5-4cbe-b1aa-ba1030fd14ec.jpgNew York, NY—Bidsquare is kicking off holiday shopping with a gift guide that will impress anyone who is hard to buy for. There's one in every family - the person who has (almost) everything! The impossible, particular and eccentric personalities are the most exciting to surprise. Impress those on your list with not only a creative gift, but something you had to roll up your sleeves and bid on!

For the Hobbyist Collector

Help someone start their fine print, poster or vintage sign collection. Book worms will crunch through the pages of first and limited edition options, while those with the need for speed can cruise happily through catalogs featuring vintage toys, luxury collectibles and blinking oddities. 

The Forever Decorator

Satisfy the ultimate nest maker, the person who simply cannot turn away a special object. With a massive group of Picasso ceramics and an extraordinary lamp auction coming up, you won't want to miss your chance to hack into these unique holiday selections.

For the Seriously Styled

There's no time like the present and watch auctions are happening this minute! If you know someone who enjoys the finer things in life, flip through fashionable auctions that include impressive jewelry, handbags, silk scarves, couture and other wearable wonders. 

For Those Busy in the Kitchen

A favorite holiday sound is the banging of pots and pans - a sure sign of the scrumptious meal to come! Do you know someone with a passion for table top decor? Take a peek at items that will spice up your hosts' distinguished taste!

Bid now on curated art, antiques and collectibles. With rare and authentic items added everyday, you can bid on an impressive gift or browse for your own collection. View online sales now at www.bidsquare.com.

About Bidsquare

Bidsquare is a curated platform where collectors can discover and bid on rare and authentic fine art and antiques from over 130 vetted auction houses and galleries. Bidsquare is the destination for individuals and collectors seeking exceptional, one-of-a-kind pieces, with new, unique property added every day. Visit http://www.bidsquare.com to view all auctions. 

Image: Top Row: Rattan Bicycle, Estimate $800-1,200; Jim Dine, Hand Painting on the Mandala, 1986, Estimate $6,000-8,000; Lionel Standard Gauge #33 Toy Train Outfit, Estimate $200-400.Bottom Row: Ray Bradbury, 18 works with First Editions; Estimate $400-600; Monumental Architectural Signage, Crown, Estimate $3,000-4,000; Baby Bugatti, Electric-powered Child's Car, Estimate $6,000-8,000

77-Lepape copy.jpgNew York—Swann Galleries will close the auction season with their popular sale of Illustration Art on Thursday, December 14. The house’s newest department specializes in original works of art intended for publication. This will be the largest selection of material they’ve offered to date, both by number of lots and overall value.

The star of the sale is Georges Lepape’s ethereal portrait of Madame Condé Nast in a Fortuny gown against a dark sky. The watercolor painting with gold highlights, Après la Tempête, served as the cover of Vogue at the end of World War One. Lepape inscribed the work to its subject, and included symbolic details such as the tri-color pin on her lapel and dispersing storm clouds. The work carries an estimate of $25,000 to $35,000, and will be closely watched after the house set an auction record for the artist in September 2016.

A vibrant and charming portion of the sale is devoted to familiar protagonists in children’s literature. A large watercolor by Jerry Pinkney, the first African-American artist awarded the Caldecott Medal, features his recurring characters Brer Rabbit and Brer Bear in Further Tales of Uncle Remus, with a value of $20,000 to $25,000. Madeline, Miss Clavel, and the 11 schoolgirls make an appearance, alongside a large painting by Ludwig Bemelmans of the Verandah Grill Luncheon on the Queen Mary ($30,000 to $40,000 and $12,000 to $18,000, respectively). Fans of Maurice Sendak will delight in a glimpse at the master’s process through a study and finished watercolor featuring the beloved Little Bear family from Bears Around the World, 1981, with a value of $15,000 to $25,000.

A Great Gallumphing Galoot! is a unique llama-like creature drawn by Theodor Geisel, also known as Dr. Seuss, in the front endpaper of Dr. Seuss’s ABC. The inscription to the book’s original owner reads, in part “…how very sorry I am that it has taken so long to get your book back to you. I’m hoping to have made it up to you (somewhat) with the added time and care that went into it.”  It is valued at $8,000 to $12,000.

December 2017 is the 80th anniversary of Snow White, 1937, the first feature film produced by Walt Disney and a milestone in the history of cinema. A scrapbook in this sale, kept by an inker working on the project, records the production and reception of the film, replete with 20 original animation drawings of the protagonists and supporting characters, ephemera relating to the feature, and a page of very specific Director’s notes in what appears to be Disney’s own hand ($7,000 to $10,000).

Since its formation, the Illustration Art department at Swann Galleries has gained a reputation as a preeminent resource for original cartoons and covers published by The New Yorker. Their strongest offering yet, with nearly 30 new-to-market works, is led by an iconic cartoon by Charles Addams, originally published in 1947, titled Movie Scream. The ink-and-watercolor drawing includes a portrait of his then-wife Barbara Jean Day, who inspired the iconic Morticia Addams ($12,000 to $18,000). Political jabs by Tom Toro published as recently as February 2017 prove the longevity of the medium. Colorful covers include beloved works by Abe Birnbaum, Arthur Getz and Garrett Price. Peter Arno’s iconic 1956 cover Party Crashers is expected to sell between $4,000 and $6,000.

A novelty map of the 1939 New York World’s Fair by Elmer Simms Campbell will also be available. The style is reminiscent to the artist’s famed A Night-Club Map of Harlem, 1932, which sold at Swann in May 2016 for a record $100,000. The World’s Fair map lampoons the modernity of the event as well as the international pavilions, with characteristic commentary and dialogue from the figures populating the fair ($3,000 to $5,000).

Advertising illustration is led by two John Philip Falter oil paintings for Four Roses Whiskey, 1942, estimated at $15,000 to $20,000 each. Other highlights include a Lucille Corcos illustration for a Fortune article ($4,000 to $6,000), a Charles M. Schulz pen-and-ink drawing of Snoopy for Hostess ($2,000 to $3,000) and a concept drawing by Saul Steinberg for a 1953 Jell-O Instant Pudding commercial ($2,500 to $3,500).

The complete catalogue and bidding information is available at www.swanngalleries.com.

Lot 135: Georges Lepape, Après la Tempête, watercolor, ink, graphite and gold highlighting, cover illustration for Vogue, 1919. Estimate $25,000 to $35,000.

Lot 116.jpgWestport, CT - A baseball bat signed by both Babe Ruth and Hank Aaron, a baseball signed by Jackie Robinson, the life raft from Francis Gary Powers’s downed U-2 spy plane and several pieces of dishware from Ronald and Nancy Reagan will all come up for bid Wednesday, December 6th, in University Archives’ online-only auction, beginning at 10:30 am Eastern time.

The 211-lot auction is a fabulous assemblage of autographed documents, rare books, relics and manuscripts. The full catalog can be viewed now, at www.universityarchives.com, with internet bidding facilitated by Invaluable.com. The sale is packed with important, scarce and collectible signed documents and other items relating to some of the most important names in all of history.

“This sale is one of the most eclectic and interesting we’ve had to date,” said John Reznikoff, the founder and president of University Archives, based in Westport. “There is a strong Americana component, including many outstanding Kennedy lots, seven Lincoln lots and five Washington lots. Non-American lots will feature letters handwritten by Pavlov and Darwin’s son - something for just about everybody, and if the item is a gift, it will arrive in plenty of time for the holidays.”

The bat signed by Ruth and Aaron - possibly a one-of-a-kind - is a 15 ½ inch long mini wood bat made by the Kren Bat Company, founded in 1913. The Ruth signature is dark and vibrant. The bat has also been signed by former major league pitcher Charles “Dazzy” Vance and Lou Gehrig (although it’s unclear whether Gehrig’s wife signed on his behalf). The bat comes with two letters of authenticity (PSA/DNA and James Spence) and has an estimate of $6,000-$7,000.

The baseball signed by Jackie Robinson is a Brooklyn Dodgers National League Champions ball from 1956, also signed by many other team members, to include Roy Campanella, Gil Hodges, Sandy Koufax, Don Drysdale, Dick Williams, Don Zimmer, Duke Snider and manager Walter Alston. The ball, pre-certified by PSA/DNA and lightly soiled, should finish at $1,500-$1,700.

The yellow life raft believed to have been aboard Francis Gary Powers’ U-2 spy jet when he was shot down over the Soviet Union on May 1st, 1960, is an authentic Cold War relic, made of thick, inflatable plastic, containing a black flexible tube, with teeth marks used to inflate it. Consigned by Powers’s son - Francis Gary Powers, Jr., an expert public speaker on the U-2 incident and Cold War history - the raft comes with his letter of provenance and should bring $6,000-$7,000.

The dishware pieces from the Reagans will be sold as individual lots. They include a large and elegant crystal dessert coupe (est. $400-$500); a Steuben Glass Works wine glass (est. $400-$500); a consume bowl designed by Richard Ginori, with the pattern matched in a famous birthday photo of the Pres. and Mrs. Reagan (est. $400-$500); and an ironstone ceramic teacup and plate in the 1776 Independence pattern, made by Interspace of Japan (each est. $400-$500). 

JFK collectibles are always in huge demand and this sale’s got several. These include his silk scarf made by SULKA, very sophisticated and monogrammed “JFK” (est. $6,000-$8,000); his personally owned and used Zippo lighter, with great provenance and a graphic of the battleship U.S.S. Joseph P. Kennedy, Jr. (DD850) (est. $1,500-$2,000); and Kennedy’s bathing trunks from a rare, carefree moment aboard the famous family sailboat the Honey Fitz (est. $7,000-$8,000). 

Jacqueline Kennedy will also be represented in the sale, with a letter personally hand-penned in August 1966 to Luella Hennessy, John, Jr.’s nanny. The letter was written on Jackie’s personally hand-painted, decorated floral stationery, with Hyannis Port, Mass. letterhead and includes her lovely hand-painted florals to the stationery sheet and a watercolor scene to the envelope. The letter was written while John-John was recuperating from a tonsillectomy (est. $3,000-$3,500).

Collectors of presidential memorabilia can’t get enough of George Washington and Abraham Lincoln. Both are in the sale, multiple times. Beginning with Washington, a superb example of his signature, with his personal wax seal affixed, has an estimate of $6,000-$7,000; while an important 1781 Call for Recruits bi-fold on laid paper stock, signed by Benjamin Lincoln, a major general in the Continental Army under Washington, has an estimate of $2,000-$2,400.

Other Washington items will feature a piece of burgundy velvet from Washington’s personally owned and worn cloak (2 ½ inches by ¾ inch), descended from the family of Col. Tobias Lear, Washington’s personal secretary, matted and framed with a color print portrait of Washington. It has an estimate of $6,000-$7,000. Also, a 1792 broadside, signed by Washington, wherein he outlines the duties of consuls and vice-consuls of the new nation, should sell for $2,500-$3,000.

Seven Lincoln items will include a signed Civil War transport pass (est. $5,000-$6,000); a note written and signed just four days before his death (est. $6,000-$7,000); a bank check signed and engrossed in Lincoln’s hand, with historical provenance and a portrait (est. $8,000-$10,000); an assassination display featuring strands of hair from Lincoln and Secretary of State William H. Seward (est. $1,200-$1,400); an 1861 signed appointment document (est. $4,000-$5,000); and a superb signature of Mary Todd Lincoln (1818-1882), Pres. Lincoln’s wife (est. $2,000-$2,400).

A letter of thanks written in German in the late 1920s or early 1930s by Ivan Pavlov, to Leon Whitney, founder of the American Eugenics Society (and a man Hitler studied to prepare for his Master Race), should command $3,500-$4,000; and a letter written by Leonard Darwin, Charles Darwin’s son, also to Eugene Whitney, where he offers a reflective exploration of several of his father’s principles and refers to findings on ancestral cells, carries an estimate of $2,500-$3,000.

John Reznikoff started collecting in 1968, while in the third grade, and in 1979 he formed the company he runs today, University Archives, a division of University Stamp Co. Industry-wide, Reznikoff is considered the leading authenticity expert for manuscripts and documents and he consults with law enforcement, dealers, auction houses and both major authentication companies.

For more information about University Archives and the Wednesday, December 6th auction, please visit www.universityarchives.com.

Image: Bank check signed and engrossed in Abraham Lincoln’s own hand, with historical provenance and a portrait of Lincoln (est. $8,000-$10,000).

Boston, MA—After more than 20 years searching for America's hidden treasures, ANTIQUES ROADSHOW finds sensational first-time objects in six cities featured as part of season 22, premiering January 8. From eyewitness accounts of historic moments to items that are truly macabre, ROADSHOW appraisers, guests and locations make this a ground-breaking new season!

"I was amazed by the number of never-before-seen items discovered on this year's tour," says executive producer Marsha Bemko. "That mix of new treasures and sizzling stories along with our first event filmed at a Gilded Age mansion in Newport, RI fills this season with can't-miss episodes!"

Along with discovering the mystery of the mosquito and the masterpiece, viewers will see other first-time items such as: 

  • In Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, a head in a box! A plaster head, that is, of a convicted bank robber who fashioned the prop to aid in his attempted prison escape. Harrisburg episodes will air January 8, 15 and 22.
  • In New Orleans, Louisiana, a charming study of Andy Warhol painted by his friend, artist Jamie Wyeth, capturing Warhol with his beloved dog Archie. New Orleans episodes will air January 29, February 5 and 12.
  • In St. Louis, Missouri, a vintage Ozark Airlines poster, ca. 1960, featuring aircraft of the era and company logo illustrated through mid-century modern design. St. Louis episodes will air February 19 and 26, and March 26.
  • In Portland, Oregon, an eyewitness account of the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln captured in a letter written by the guest's grandfather, who was at Ford's theater that fateful night and captured a most remarkable description of John Wilkes Booth. Portland episodes will air April 2, 9 and 16.
  • In Green Bay, Wisconsin, a rare Cadillac "rain lamp," ca. 1968, used to promote the famous auto brand through modern design and a unique mineral-oil-on-wire feature that simulated rain. Green Bay episodes will air April 23 and 30, and May 7.
  • In Newport, Rhode Island, a one-of-a-kind 1939 Royal typewriter, plated by Cartier in 24k gold and presented to the guest's grandfather, who was vice president of sales at Royal during the period. Newport episodes will air May 14 and 21. 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW offers engaging ways to experience the season premiere and new episodes, including live tweeting with producers and appraisers Mondays at 8/7c PM; an after-show AR Extras LIVE broadcast on Facebook; the weekly AR Extras newsletter; and original feature articles, video archive and more on pbs.org/antiques.

Part adventure, part history lesson, part treasure hunt, 15-time Emmy® Award-nominated ANTIQUES ROADSHOW is a production of WGBH Boston. The series is the most-watched ongoing series on PBS and is seen by around 8 million viewers each week.

Screen Shot 2017-11-26 at 9.45.44 PM.pngLondon—This December, Sotheby’s London will offer a collection of 33 first editions of classic books, each with a beautifully original dust-jacket, created and generously donated by leading artists and designers to benefit House of Illustration.

Each artist selected a book they felt a strong connection to and then created a new dust-jacket or artwork in response to it. The re-worked classics include Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis, Lewis Carroll’s Through the Looking Glass, J.D. Salinger’s The Catcher in the Rye, Rudyard Kipling’s The Jungle Book, T.S. Eliot’s The Waste Land, D.H. Lawrence’s Sons and Lovers and George Orwell’s Animal Farm. 

Artists include Quentin Blake, Maggi Hambling, Raymond Pettibon, Lauren Child, Peter Blake, Chris Riddell, Richard Wentworth, Axel Scheffler, Audrey Niffenegger, Neil Gaiman, George Shaw, Paula Rego and Shaun Tan.

The auction includes the only piece of original artwork created by Quentin Blake for Beatrice Potter’s The Tale of Kitty-in-Boots that has ever come up for sale; a cover created by Gerald Scarfe with two new illustrations for The Making of Pink Floyd The Wall; and, ahead of his regeneration in the Dr Who Christmas special, Peter Capaldi has chosen to design a cover for Franz Kafka’s The Metamorphosis. 

House of Illustration is the world’s only public gallery solely dedicated to illustration and graphic arts with a creative programme of exhibitions, talks and events. A registered charity receiving no public funding, it works with schools across London on projects with young people that inspire creativity and enable them to communicate visually, overcoming barriers such as language, literacy levels and special educational needs. It is the only UK gallery commissioning illustration work for public display and runs the only UK residency for illustrators and graphic artists. 

Ahead of the sale, all works will be on display at Sotheby’s London (34-35 New Bond Street) from 8-11 December 2017. In total, thirty-one artists have donated to the sale. For more information, click here.

ab14f1bd43379bff4035038745ec03378b5938aa.jpegA remarkable collection of original Walt Disney Studios watercolor paintings from Pinocchio will be auctioned by Boston-based RR Auction. 

The complete set of 120 watercolors tell the story of Pinocchio, 1940, and the series of vivid and incredibly highly detailed paintings portray the memorable characters of the classic film, including Pinocchio, Jiminy Cricket, Geppetto, Figaro, Cleo, the Blue Fairy, Stromboli, Lampwick, and others. These original paintings were produced to make stickers to be included in boxes or tins of De Beukelaer cookies produced and sold in Belgium, which were collected by customers and pasted into a storybook album. 

These special paintings were painted by the top Disney artists located in England, who had been handpicked by Walt Disney. All the art was painted to model using Disney model sheets and instructions coming from the Disney Publicity Department in Burbank, California. The artwork then had to be approved by the studio, and, of course, Walt Disney himself.

Includes the complete De Beukelaer Pinocchio storybook containing the stickers for which this artwork was used. Although similar De Beukelaer sticker promotions were done for Snow White and Dumbo, the original watercolors for those have never surfaced. The cards and stickers are quite rare just by themselves, but to find the original paintings is a miracle! It is virtually unheard of to have a complete set of original Disney artwork, and it is unknown whether the artwork for Snow White and Dumbo even survived World War II. The artwork is on individual illustration boards, each measuring approximately 5 x 3.5 inches. (Estimate: $75,000+) 

“In over 50 years of collecting, our animation experts have never seen another single painting, never mind an entire set,” said Bobby Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction.

“It’s an absolutely outstanding one-of-a-kind collection of incredibly detailed Pinocchio artwork which is of tremendous rarity,” added Livingston. 

Additional highlights of the more than 100 Animation lots include: 

Sleeping Beauty and Prince Phillip production concept painting by Eyvind Earle from the Walt Disney Studios, 1958 film. This particular painting came to be the model for the cover design of the Sleeping Beauty 'Big Golden Book.' Estimate: $12,000+) 

It's a Small World original concept painting by Mary Blair for the facade of the 'It's a Small World' exhibit. (Estimate: $14,000+) 

Briar Rose production cel and partial production background from Sleeping Beauty. (Estimate:  $10,000+) 

Cinderella's Coach production concept painting by Mary Blair from Cinderella. (Estimate: $12,000+)

Maleficent and Goons production cels and pan production background from Sleeping Beauty (Estimate: $9,000+)

Wicked Witch production cel from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs. (Estimate: $9,000+)

Jenny and Joe production concept painting by Mary Blair from Melody Time (Estimate: $7,000+)

Flora, Fauna, and Merryweather production concept painting by Eyvind Earle from Sleeping Beauty (Estimate: $6,000+)

Mickey Mouse production concept painting from Fantasia (Estimate: $6,000+)

Snow White production concept drawing from Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (Estimate: $4,000+) 

The Fine Autographs and Artifacts from RR Auction began on November 17 and will conclude on December 6.  More details can be found online at www.rrauction.com

 

aedf.JPGIn collaboration with Gerald W. Cloud Rare Books, San Francisco, Maggs Bros Ltd is delighted to present an exhibition of work by the acclaimed contemporary book artist, Didier Mutel. The show features his most recent work, The First Atlas of the United States of Acid, from which the show takes its name, as well as earlier and rare book designs from Mutel’s 40-year plus career as an engraver, book artist, and printer.  

The First Atlas of the United States of Acid, 2017, was created in the historic tradition of lavish large format atlases. For centuries, etching and the aqua fortis (strong water - that is, acid) technique were used for the production of maps and atlases, rendering the geographical features and national boundaries that form our understanding of the world with elegantly drawn lines. Mutel’s eponymous etching studio was founded in 1793 as the Atelier Rémond; France’s oldest etching studio in continuous operation, over its notable history it printed the monumental engravings for La Description de l’Égypte (1809-29), among other such publications.

Mutel’s contemporary reimagining, The First Atlas of the United States of Acid represents the geographical borders of each U.S. State, along with each state’s Congressional members. However, correct in their proportional distribution, the members of the legislature have been reassigned by Mutel to artists, musicians, writers and philosophers from the Renaissance to now. In the plate Alabamacid, for example, the House of Representatives consists of Raphaël, Carl Andre, Merce Cunningham, Marcel Proust, François Villon, Lorenzo Ghiberti, Frederic Chopin and Edward Steichen. Meanwhile, cartoon superheroes run the Senate; in this instance, Kilowog (DC Comics).

In the technical tradition of etched atlases, and referencing the history of his own studio, the states in The Atlas are rendered in correct shape, size, and scale, but by the artist’s imagination the work is not a map based in reality as were its historic forebears, but rather a utopian version of a country characterised by hopeful reality and humorous fiction. It has taken close to three years to achieve the first copies of this ambitious work, which was printed on the historical presses of the Atelier Didier Mutel.

Also on show will be R217A (2016), a book by Mutel that reproduces the text of the United Nations Resolution 217A - the Universal Declaration of the Rights of Man - made on 10 December 1948 and ratified by the UN General Assembly in Paris by 58 member states. Mutel’s book work, printed in white on white paper, reminds us that these rights can be at times nearly invisible. The work is both an elegant metaphor and a tour de force of craftsmanship and printing.

Didier has said of his work: ‘I am deeply involved with the history, the tools and the techniques of etching and engraving. But my commitment is to feed new and contemporary ways to engrave, and not to engage in a contemplative nostalgia. The artist book is for me a great research geography, which allows all manner of exploration.

‘The rediscovery of its great sensual, sharp and endless attraction, goes farther than just the domain of the artist book, it deals with the way we produce, the time required to achieve exceptional results, and the objects we want to live with—the book for instance not as the memory of an old artifact but as a powerful and living dynamic contemporary field of creation.’

On Saturday 25 November, Didier Mutel will be at Maggs’ Bedford Square premises to discuss his historic engraving atelier (founded in Paris, 1793) and the current challenges for book artists and engravers. The artist will also discuss the development of his practice as a book artist from his early work up through his most recent books.

Tickets are free but booking essential, available via Eventbrite:

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/in-conversation-with-didier-mutel-contemporary-engraving-and-book-arts-tickets-39666266872

Image: Didier Mutel, The First Atlas of the United States of Acid. Plate 8, Alabamacid. Atelier Didier Mutel: Orchamps, France, 2017

96-PhilipKDick copy.jpgNew York—Swann Galleries’ auction of 19th & 20th Century Literature on Tuesday, November 14 offered a veritable library of scarce first editions and inscriptions by authors from the last two centuries. More than two thirds of the sale was devoted to twentieth-century literature, with myriad genres represented among the highlights.

Topping the sale was the deluxe centenary limited edition set of 18 volumes comprising the works of Ian Fleming, the creator of James Bond. Each tome is ensconced in a custom leather binding reflecting its contents: Casino Royale features playing cards, while Octopussy is adorned with undulating tentacles. The set, celebrating what would have been Fleming’s one-hundredth birthday, includes a selection of the author’s travel writings, previously unpublished stories and a copy of Chitty-Chitty-Bang-Bang. One of 26 lettered sets published in 2008, the work reached $30,000, tying the previous auction record.

Works by William Faulkner performed well, selling 100% of the lots offered. An association copy of the first edition of his first book, The Marble Faun, 1924, signed and inscribed by Faulkner and his mentor Phil Stone to Dorothy Wilcox, was especially important because its inscription was specifically referenced in Joseph Blotner’s Faulkner: A Biography, 1974 ($22,500).

An auction record was established for Het Achterhuis, known in English as The Diary of Anne Frank. The true first edition of the iconic work, in the exceedingly rare unrestored dust jacket showing the author’s name in yellow rather than blue, sold to a collector for $18,200.

Each of the four works by Philip K. Dick offered found buyers, with three of those surpassing their previous auction records. The cover lot for the sale, a signed first edition of World of Chance, 1956, reached $7,250, a record for the work, above a high estimate of $4,000. The stand-out lot was the first edition of The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch, 1965, inscribed by Dick: it far exceeded its high estimate of $3,000, finally selling for $16,250, a record for the work.

The auction debut of The Intelligent Investor, by Benjamin Graham, was well-received: financiers competed for the first printing of the first edition, in the original dust jacket, achieving $8,750, over a high estimate of $6,000.

John D. Larson, Specialist of 19th & 20th Century Literature at Swann Galleries, said of the sale: “The high sell-through rate and the high prices achieved once again demonstrate that the top-quality material will find enthused bidders. As always, condition is paramount, especially for books published after 1800.”

The next auction of 19th & 20th Century Literature at Swann Galleries will be held May 15, 2018. The house is currently accepting quality consignments.

Image: Lot 96: Philip K. Dick, The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch, first edition, inscribed, Garden City, 1965. Sold November 14, 2017 for $16,250, a record for the work. (Pre-sale estimate: $2,000 to $3,000).

Quincy Adams copy.jpgDallas, Texas--A rare and unusual photo of one of the first U.S. presidents is expected to sell for $50,000 or more when an image of President John Quincy Adams taken in 1846  crosses the block in Heritage Auctions’ Dec. 2 Americana & Political Auction in Dallas, Texas.

“Quincy Adams was the first American president to be photographed,” Heritage Director of Americana Auctions Tom Slater said, “and this newly-discovered example is one of the earliest known presidential photographs.

The sixth-plate daguerreotype was taken at the Washington, D.C. Studio of John Plumbe Feb. 14, 1846, according to Adams’ diary entry. The location of this image was unknown until it was recently discovered in an antiques market in Paris.

Plumbe was one of the most prominent photographers of the day, and apparently had complete approval from Adams, who sat for him on four different occasions.

This image is housed in a case stamped on the brass mat with Plumbe’s name and lined with paper reading “Manufactured at the Plumbe National Daguerrian Depot/New York.” The image is accompanied by a detailed letter of authentication by William F. Stapp, who served as the Curator of Photographs at the Smithsonian Institution’s National Portrait Gallery from 1976-91.

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, London, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

Codez Quet.jpgThe Codex Qutzalecatzin represents one of the most important indigenous manuscripts from the earliest history of America to become available in the last century.

The Library of Congress has acquired the Codex Quetzalecatzin, one of the very few Mesoamerican manuscripts to survive from the 16th century. After being in private collections for more than 100 years, the codex has been digitally preserved and made available online for the first time to the general public at loc.gov/resource/g4701g.ct009133/.

The codex, also known as the Mapa de Ecatepec-Huitziltepec, represents one of the most important indigenous manuscripts from the earliest history of America to become available in the last century. Only few examples of manuscripts of this kind have endured the ravages of time.

While digitizing the codex at the Library, the Librarian stated: “The acquisition of the map, because of its relevance to the early history of the European contact with the indigenous people of America, makes an important addition to the early American treasures at the Library of Congress, including the Oztoticpac Lands Map and the Huexotzinco Codex. It’s a rare document of world history and American history in general.”

The manuscript dates from 1593, a time when many cartographic histories were being produced as part of a Spanish royal investigation into the human and community resources in the American colonies. The Codex Quetzalecatzin serves as an example of these maps that were largely made by indigenous painters and scribes.

As with many Nahua, indigenous group, manuscript maps of the period, the Codex Quetzalecatzin depicts the local community at an important point in its history and the iconography that makes up the map reflects some Spanish influence.

“The codex shows graphically the kinds of cultural interactions taking place at an important moment in American history,” said John Hessler, curator of the Jay I. Kislak Collection for the archaeology of the early Americas of the Library of Congress. “In a sense, we see the birth of what would be the start of what we would come to know as the Americas.”

Hessler added: “The codex relates to the extent of land ownership and properties of the family line known as “de Leon,” most of the members of which are portrayed on the manuscript. With Aztec stylized graphics, the map illustrates the family’s genealogy and its descent from Quetzalecatzin, who in 1480 was the major political leader of the region. It also shows churches, some Spanish place names and images suggesting a community adapting to Spanish law and rule.”

In the codex, certain features that point to indigenous authorship include pre-Hispanic stylistics, such as symbols for rivers, roads and pathways, and hieroglyphic writing. The marginal notations with alphabetic writing utilizing the Latin alphabet and the names of some of the indigenous elites, such as “don Alonso” and “don Matheo,” are clues to its colonial era composition. This is evidence that some indigenous people enjoyed the Spanish title “don” and had been baptized with Christian names.

The codex has a great provenance. The Library acquired the manuscript from the collections of Charles Ratton and Guy Ladriere in France. From previous owners like William Randolph Hearst, who also owned the Jefferson Bible, to the first Viscount Cowdray, the codex can be traced all the way into the 19th century.

The manuscript belongs to a larger group of interrelated pictographic documents, called “Pinome Group,” from northern Oaxaca and Southern Puebla in Mexico. The codices include the Tecamachalco Canvas, Cuevas Codices and Fragmented Codex, which together show the extent, the people and history of the region.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States - and extensive materials from around the world - both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office.  Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

Dracula Poster.jpgDallas, Texas - One of just two surviving movie posters for the 1931 horror classic Dracula set a world record for the most valuable movie poster ever sold at auction when it brought $525,800 Saturday, Nov. 18, in a public auction held live and online by Heritage Auctions.

The poster surpassed the previous auction record of $478,000 which was also set (twice) by Heritage Auctions. Heritage had just sold the only known surviving Italian issue movie poster from 1946 for Casablanca in July 2017, which matched their own previous world record from November 2014 for an only-known 1927 copy of the poster for London After Midnight.

This particular poster style from Dracula depicts the menacing visage of actor Bela Lugosi, who transformed the character into the now-famous Universal Monster. Recently discovered in the San Diego, California, collection of a noted film historian, collectors and experts consider it one of the most desirable horror movie posters ever produced.

The family of its longtime owner, Lt. Col. George J. Mitchell, Jr., an Associate Member of the American Society of Cinematographers, placed the poster up for auction. Mitchell had owned the poster since the 1950s.

“The reason my dad purchased the poster is because he loved horror films. He was drawn to the Bela Lugosi poster because it brought back childhood memories of seeing the film when it was first released,” Mitchell’s son, Arthur Mitchell said. “He remembered going to the theater … and remembered that there was an ambulance stationed in the lobby, in case anyone was so scared they needed medical attention.”

The elder Mitchell was a longtime cinematographer and photographer, who after World War II and a 20-year career in the U.S. Army, started a small film production company in San Diego, and did video work for AFL and NFL Films, the San Diego Zoo and training films for assorted branches of the military.

“It is a matter of opinion, but this poster probably is the most beautiful of all of the styles,” Heritage Auctions Vintage Posters Director Grey Smith said, “and one of only two styles that pictures Bela Lugosi in realistic terms or a faithful rendering - the other is a photographic image.”

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, London, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

LOBEL.jpgAmherst, MA--The Caldecott Medal, an annual award bestowed upon "the most distinguished American picture book for children," is one of the most prestigious prizes in children's literature. Next month, The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art will celebrate the 80th anniversary of the distinguished award in the exhibition Eighty Years of Caldecott Books, on view December 12, 2017 through May 13, 2018.

First conferred in 1938, the Caldecott Medal is named in honor of nineteenth-century British illustrator Randolph Caldecott, acknowledged as the father of the modern picture book for his lively drawing style and sense of humor. Each year the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC)--a division of the American Library Association--selects the fifteen members that form the Caldecott committee. This group reads, critiques, and discusses hundreds of picture books before voting on a winner.

Eighty Years of Caldecott Books presents a chronological look at the winning titles from 1938 to the present. It also represents The Carle's first book-focused exhibition. "While we always have books available for visitors to read in our galleries, the books in this exhibition are the art objects themselves. As first editions, they are valuable historical artifacts," says Ellen Keiter, the Museum's chief curator. Keiter organized the exhibition with Barbara Elleman, former editor-in-chief of Book Links, published by the American Library Association and, Distinguished Scholar of Children's Literature at Marquette University. While these rare books cannot be handled, guests will be able to read copies available in the Museum's Reading Library.

The exhibition will change on February 12, 2018 when the ALSC announces the winner of the 2018 Caldecott Medal and a new book is added to the display. In the interim, guests can cast their votes in the gallery for the book they believe should win the coveted honor. Online visitors to the Museum's website can vote too. 

"Eighty Years of Caldecott Books is a celebration of artistic achievement," says Keiter. "We have included original illustrations from several winning titles, many drawn from The Carle's permanent collection." On view are three artworks by Marcia Brown, one from each of her three Caldecott Medal books: Cinderella, or The Little Glass Slipper (1955), Once a Mouse (1962) and Shadow (1983). [Brown won an unprecedented three Caldecott Medals, a feat matched only by David Wiesner.] The other artists and artworks on display are: Ed Emberley, Drummer Hoff (1968), Uri Shulevitz, The Fool of the World and the Flying Ship (1969), Arnold Lobel, Fables (1981), Chris Van Allsburg, The Polar Express (1986), David Macaulay, Black and White (1991), Emily Arnold McCully, Mirette on the High Wire (1993), Paul O. Zelinsky, Rapunzel (1998), Simms Taback, Joseph Had a Little Overcoat (2000), Mordicai Gerstein, The Man Who Walked Between the Towers (2004), and Javaka Steptoe, Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat (2017). 

PROGRAMMING:

The Best of the Best in 2017 

December 16, 11:00am 

Free with Museum Admission 

In anticipation of the 2018 American Library Association Book & Media Awards, including the Newbery and Caldecott Medals and the Coretta Scott King Book Awards, join Susan Bloom and Cathryn M. Mercier from the Center for the Study of Children's Literature at Simmons College as they share their favorite books of the past year.

Meet Javaka Steptoe 

December 16, 1:00pm 

Free with Museum Admission

Artist and author Javaka Steptoe won the 2017 Caldecott Medal for his book, Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat. Hear Steptoe discuss his research and art for Radiant Child, and what his year has been like following a Caldecott win.

Book signing to follow program. Can't make it to the event? You may reserve signed books online or contact The Carle Bookshop at shop@carlemuseum.org.

Randolph Caldecott: The Man Who Could Not Stop Drawing

with children's book historian, author, and critic Leonard S. Marcus              

April 7, 2018, 1:00pm 

Free with Museum Admission

This illustrated talk introduces the sly, fun-loving Victorian whose kinetic drawing style and keen feeling for life culminated in the invention of an art form the world has come to embrace: the children's picture book. Celebrate this true original as the American Library Association marks the 80th anniversary of the coveted prize named for him: the Randolph Caldecott Medal.

The 8th Annual Barbara Elleman Research Library (BERL) Lecture 

Celebrating the Caldecott: The stories behind some of the great Caldecott Medal and Honor Books with editor, author, and scholar Anita Silvey

Saturday, April 28, 2:00 pm 

Free with Museum Admission

The Barbara Elleman Research Library (BERL) Lecture is an annual event featuring the country's preeminent scholars, book collectors, researchers, editors, authors, and illustrators in the field of children's literature.

About The Carle

The mission of The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, a non-profit organization in Amherst, MA, is to inspire a love of art and reading through picture books. A leading advocate in its field, The Carle collects, preserves, presents, and celebrates picture books and picture-book illustrations from around the world. In addition to underscoring the cultural, historical, and artistic significance of picture books and their art form, The Carle offers educational programs that provide a foundation for arts integration and literacy.

Eric Carle and his wife, the late Barbara Carle, co-founded the Museum in November 2002. Carle is the renowned author and illustrator of more than 70 books, including the 1969 classic The Very Hungry Caterpillar. Since opening, the 43,000-square foot facility has served more than 750,000 visitors, including 50,000 schoolchildren. The Carle houses more than 11,000 objects, including 7,300 permanent collection illustrations. The Carle has three art galleries, an art studio, a theater, picture book and scholarly libraries, and educational programs for families, scholars, educators, and schoolchildren. Educational offerings include professional training for educators around the country and Master's degree programs in children's literature with Simmons College. Museum hours are Tuesday through Friday 10 am to 4 pm, Saturday 10 am to 5 pm, and Sunday 12 pm to 5 pm. Open Mondays in July and August and during MA school vacation weeks. Admission is $9 for adults, $6 for children under 18, and $22.50 for a family of four. For further information and directions, call (413) 559-6300 or visit the Museum's website at

www.carlemuseum.org

Image: Arnold Lobel, Illustration for Fables [Harper & Row, 1980]. Gift of Adrianne and Adam Lobel (The Estate of Arnold Lobel). © 1980 Arnold Lobel.

Oxford, England—The origins of early English graphic design are explored in a new exhibition opening at the Bodleian Libraries’ Weston Library. Designing English: Graphics on the Medieval Page, open from 1 December 2017, brings together a stunning selection of manuscripts and other objects to uncover the craft and artistry of Anglo-Saxon and medieval scribes, painters and engravers.

Designing English looks at the skills and innovations of these very early specialists who worked to preserve, clarify, adorn, authorize and interpret writing in English. For almost a thousand years most texts had been written in Latin, the common European language. Beyond the traditions established for Latin, books in English were often improvisatory, even homespun, but they were just as inventive and creative. In an age when each book was made uniquely by hand, each book was an opportunity for redesigning. The introduction of the English text posed questions: How did scribes choose to arrange the words and images on the page in each manuscript? How did they preserve, clarify and illustrate writing in English? What visual guides were given to early readers of English in how to understand or use their books?

The exhibition explores all elements of design, from the materials used, such as the size and shape of animal skins used to create parchment, to the design of texts for different uses, such as for performing songs, plays or music. Medical texts and practical manuals feature alongside ornate religious texts, including rare examples of unfinished illustrations that reveal the practical processes of making pages and artefacts. The use of English is traced from illicit additions made to Latin texts, to its more general, every day use, and spread to more ephemeral formats.

The exhibition features incredible early manuscripts held in the Bodleian collections, one of the largest medieval collections in the UK, alongside loan items from the Ashmolean Museum, Oxford and the British Museum.

Highlights of Designing English include:

-          The Macregol Gospels, one of the treasures of the Bodleian Libraries, dating from Ireland in around 800 CE, with English translations added to the original Latin text.

-          English translations of hymns composed by Caedmon (657-680), an illiterate cowherd who lived at Whitby Abbey and is the first named English poet.

The Alfred Jewel, an ornate enamel and gold jewel on loan from the Ashmolean Museum that contains the inscription ‘Alfred ordered me to be made’. The jewel is widely believed to have been commissioned by King Alfred the Great (849-899 BCE), who championed the use of English.

-          Gravestones and other medieval objects engraved with English text, including an Anglo-Saxon sword and a gold ring found at Godstow Abbey, Oxford.

-          Medical texts such as revolving ‘volvelle’ diagrams, magical charms and colourful drawings and diagrams for doctors. 

-          Some of the earliest known works in the English language, including Geoffrey Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales and early drama and songs

-          Examples of intricate texts with colour coded instructions on how to read them, such as an English translation of the Bible which may have belonged to Henry VI.

Designing English is curated by Daniel Wakelin, Jeremy Griffiths Professor of Medieval English Palaeography at the University of Oxford, one of the few posts in the world dedicated to the study of medieval English manuscripts.

Professor Wakelin said: ‘Medieval writers had to be graphic designers every time they wrote or carved their words. Tracing the earliest uses of English, from illicit annotations on Latin texts, to more everyday jottings in ephemeral formats, this exhibition celebrates the imagination and skill of these early writers. Their craft and inventiveness resonates today when digital media allow users to experiment with design through word processing, social media and customized products.”

Richard Ovenden, Bodley’s Librarian said: ‘The Bodleian Libraries holds one of the most important collections of medieval manuscripts in the world, and this exhibition celebrates all aspects of the ingenuity and craftsmanship that went into some of the most beautiful, and everyday items that still survive today. The exhibition provides an intriguing and surprising history of English literature in one room.”

To show the likeness of these medieval documents to modern craft, Designing English will, until 11 March 2018, be exhibited alongside Redesigning the Medieval Book: a display of contemporary book arts inspired by the exhibition. The exhibited contemporary artworks include calligraphy, prints, embroidery, pop-up books, videos, games and jewellery.

The exhibition will be opened by award-winning designer Jay Osgerby, who with Edward Barber, designed the new Bodleian Chair. The exhibition runs until 22 April 2018 and is accompanied by two new titles from Bodleian Library Publishing. A beautifully illustrated exhibition catalogue, Designing English: Early Literature on the Page, written by exhibition curator Daniel Wakelin is available in hardback for £30. A second title, Revolting Remedies from the Middle Ages, brings together weird and wonderful medical tips for everyday use in medieval England, some of which are displayed in the exhibition. Both titles are available to preorder from www.bodleianshop.co.uk.

An exciting programme of talks and events, including family-friendly activities, will be held over the course of the Designing English exhibition, starting with a special opening weekend celebration at the Bodleian’s Weston Library on 2 December. For more information visit www.bodleian.ox.ac.uk/whatson.

The Weston Library is one of the newest cultural destinations in Oxford and has welcomed more than 2 million visitors since opening to the public in March 2015. The Library has also won numerous architectural awards and was shortlisted for the RIBA Stirling Prize 2016.

 

The Folio Society is delighted to announce that their Limited Edition of Robert Hooke’s Micrographia won the Scholarly, Academic and Reference Book category at The British Book Design & Production Awards 2017, presented in London last week. 

The British Book Design & Production Awards is one of the most prestigious and popular literary events of the year, the awards recognise and promote excellence in the British book industry by celebrating the best editions of the year. 

The judges said: ‘Micrographia is a delightful book traditionally typeset with stunning illustrations of insects and plants including throw-outs for the larger illustrations. The book is beautifully quarter-bound in leather, with silver foiled sides and a silver gilt top, and presented in a cloth-bound slipcase. It may be a large format book but you will fnd it very hard to put down!’ 

Kate Grimwade, Production Director at The Folio Society said: ‘Folio are delighted to have won the Scholarly, Academic and Reference Books category with Micrographia. The images in the book were painstakingly reproduced and restored to their original glory from copies held at the Bodleian and the Museum of the History of Science in Oxford. With five throw-outs, gilded tops, a leather quarter-binding and a stunning blocked design, Micrographia encompasses the very best of Folio’s design and production values. 

 

Thames Bonhams.jpgDesigns for the Thames Tunnel, signed by Marc Isambard Brunel and his son Isambard Kingdom Brunel, sold for £200,000 at Bonhams Fine Books, Atlases, Manuscripts and Photographs Sale in London on Wednesday 15 November. The archive, which came with the signed Brunel family album in which the drawings were originally kept, had been estimated at £50,000-100,000.

Built between 1825 and 1837, the Thames Tunnel - which connects Rotherhithe and Limehouse in East London - was the first ever successful underwater tunnel. The techniques pioneered by the Brunels revolutionised tunnelling and had a significant impact on the development of the London Underground - indeed they were still influential in the construction of the Channel Tunnel in the late 1980s. The Thames Tunnel remains in daily use, 180 years after its completion, as part of the London Overground rail network.    

Bonhams Head of Books and Manuscripts, Matthew Haley, said: “This was a very important archive of what was described at the time as ‘The Eighth Wonder of the World’, and is still regarded as one of the greatest engineering feats of the 19th century. The high price paid reflects its huge significance.”

The sale made a total of £1,716,175 with premium.

Sale:          Fine Books, Atlases, Manuscripts and Photographs

Location:    Bonhams Knightsbridge

Date:          Wednesday 15 November at 1.00 pm

Specialist:   Matthew Haley, Head of Books and Manuscripts

 

Potter Bonhams.jpgA first edition of Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone by J K Rowling set a new world record at auction of £106,250 at Bonhams Fine Books and Manuscripts Sale in London on 15 November. It had been estimated at £30,000-40,000.

The book was inscribed to a friend and her family: ‘For Meera, Donnie, Nastassia and Kai, with lots of love from Jo (also known as J.K. Rowling)".  The inscription is dated one month and a day after the book was published on 26 June 1997, this being one of the first copies supplied to Rowling by the publisher.

Bonhams Head of Books and Manuscripts Matthew Haley said, “There is always a great deal of interest when first editions of Harry Potter books come to auction, especially, of course, in the very first one in the series. This particular example was not only in excellent condition, but it had the added attraction of a very personal inscription from the author herself.”

Among the other sale highlights were:

  • Designs for the Thames Tunnel, signed by Marc Isambard Brunel and his son Isambard Kingdom Brunel, which sold for £200,000.  The archive, which came with the signed Brunel family album in which the drawings were originally kept, had been estimated at £50,000-100,000.
  • An archive of manuscripts and letters from the estate of the famous 18th century actor David Garrick, sold for £112,500 (estimate £10,000-15,000)
  • A first edition of Christopher Saxon’s Atlas of England and Wales from 1859 made £106,000 (estimate £50,000-70,000)
  • A letter from Alan Turing to his former maths teacher was bought for £75,000 (estimate £20,000-30,000).

The sale made a total of £1,716,175 with premium.

New York—Christie’s is pleased to present Russian America and Polar Exploration: Highlights from the Martin Greene Library, a choice selection of important books chronicling the exploration of our planet’s extremes. The auction will take place on Thursday, December 7 at Christie’s Rockefeller Plaza. Spanning a period of 400 years, from the 16th to the 20th centuries, Martin Greene’s library includes myriad stories of adventure, scientific discovery, cultural encounters and geopolitical ambition. 

Martin Greene, a Seattle - based doctor and mountaineer, has spent decades collecting books relate d to his passion of travel and exploration. The selection offered in this sale contains rarities from first hand accounts to cartography — with a range including Pacific Voyages, the search for the Northwest and Northeast Passages, the search for Sir John Franklin’s lost expedition, and the race to the North and South Poles. Moreover, Greene has acquired the most important collection of books relating to Alaska when it was a Russian possession which has ever appeared at auction. 

Among the top lots is an extremely rare and beautiful account and atlas of Ivan Kruzenshtern’s voyage of 1802 - 1806, the first Russian circumnavigation of the globe (estimate: $350,000 - 450,000). Not only is it among the most splendid works of 19th century Russian printing it also contains important views of the Northwest Coast of America. Russia’s great rival Britain launched the greatest number of Arctic expeditions; dozens of which centered on the search for the missing explorer, Sir John Franklin, and his crew. Another highlight is an 1854 first edition of S.G. Cresswell’s illustrations of the Franklin Search expedition led by Robert McClure (estimate: $30,000 - 50,000), inscribed by the artist. McClure and his men were the first to traverse the Northwest Passage. America, too, entered the game and with great ambition. Charles Wilkes led the first ever American scientific voyage, the United States Exploring Expedition of 1838 - 1842. Another highlight is a rare Congressional issue of Wilkes’s account (estimate: $60,000 - 90,000). The project was plagued by budget overrun and only 100 sets of these official accounts were printed, many of which were destroyed in the 1851 Library of Congress fire. 

PREVIEW 

New York | Friday, December 1 to Wednesday, December 6. 

 

New York—Christie’s announces the fall various owner sale of Fine Printed Books & Manuscripts, encompassing over 200 lots including autograph manuscripts, cartography, literature, and historic artifacts to take place on December 5, 2017, with a stand-alone auction Russian America and Polar Exploration: Highlights from the Martin Greene Library to follow on December 7, 2017, at Christie’s New York.

Highlighting the various owner sale are important artifacts and manuscripts from pivotal moments of American history, including Brigham Young's copy of the 1823 Stone-engraved Declaration of Independence, one of only six known proofs executed on paper (estimate: $400,000-600,000); Abraham Lincoln’s Wooden Bench Mallet, the earliest artifact attributed to Lincoln in private hands (estimate: $300,000-500,000); an extremely rare autograph letter from Abraham Lincoln to Henry Asbury preparing for the Lincoln-Douglas debates (estimate: $500,000-700,000); and John F. Kennedy's own copy of the Inaugural Addresses of the Presidents of the United States with his own speech marked and corrected in his hand (estimate: $60,000-80,000).

Additionally, featured within the Americana section is a selection titled The Yorktown Campaign and the Franco-American Alliance: The Papers of the Marquis de Chastellux, featuring over 20 lots of autograph material and historical documentation belonging to the French general and philosopher to the founding fathers of the United States, led by an important manuscript map of New York City prepared by cartographers attached to Rochambeau’s forces during the Yorktown Campaign (estimate: $150,000-200,000); and important autograph letters by Benjamin Franklin, George Washington, the Marquis de Lafayette, and Jean Baptiste Donatien de Vimeur, Comte de Rochambeau.

Other top lots include objects emblematic of scientific acheviement, led by the 1978 Nobel Prize Medal in Physiology or Medicine awarded to Daniel Nathans "for the discovery of restriction enzymes and their application to problems of molecular genetics," (estimate: $400,000-600,000), with proceeds pledged to an endowment that supports the research of young biomedical scientists at the Johns Hopkins Medical School; and Albert Einstein’s telescope, the only scientific instrument owned by Einstein offered at auction (estimate: $200,000-300,000).

Highlighting culture and literature are the earliest Jackie Kennedy letters to appear at auction (estimate: $20,000-30,000); five iterations of an original unpublished love poem, by Bob Dylan to girlfriend Margie Rogerson (estimate: $8,000-12,000); A very rare original drawing by Ralph Steadman for Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas (estimate: $30,000-50,000); and prime examples of first editions with exceptional provenance including a superb copy of the privately printed first edition of Beatrix Potter's  The Tale of Peter Rabbit (estimate: $40,000-60,000); and Frank L. Baum's The Wonderful Wizard of Oz, the first edition belonging to actor Bert Lahr, who played the Cowardly Lion in the 1939 film (estimate: $30,000-50,000).

Also within the sale is a beautiful selection of illustrated and decorated manuscripts from The Jay T. Snider Collection, spanning centuries and continents, presenting an array of original handmade and painted works. Lots include documentation of nature, such as an album of Chinese watercolors of fruits and flowers, made in the 19th century (estimate: $50,000-80,000), to artists recording their travels, architectural drawings such as a Venetian Renaissance manuscript of imaginary fortresses (estimate $90,000-120,000), and illuminated religious texts, including A fine, richly illuminated Old Believers manuscript from 1818 (estimate: $90,000-120,000).

On December 7, the Books & Manuscripts department will also present a stand-alone auction, Russian America and Polar Exploration: Highlights from the Martin Greene Library, a choice selection of important books chronicling the exploration of the Earth’s antipodes. Additional information on this sale can be found here.

 

Ithaca, NY—National Book Auctions, located in Ithaca, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog.  

This catalog features rare, antique and decorative books as well as select additions of ephemera. Featured is a first session of selections from a substantial private library that belonged to a leader in the Knights of Malta fraternal order. A varied array of desirable antique volumes will also be offered, include titles covering early American history.            

Antique and rare books are numerous in this catalog. Among the earliest examples are the 1555 printing of Mirandola's "Illustrium Poetarum Flores," Foppens' "La Conversion de S. Augustin Decrite par Lui-meme," produced in 1690, and the 1679 printing of Alexandro's "Selecta Historiae Ecclesiasticae Capita." Additional rare and antique selections include titles relating to Egyptology, military history, Civil War, travel & exploration, Russian history, art history, decorative antique, children's, multi-volume sets, and beyond.                      

Several pleasing collections will also be showcased. Highlighted is our first session from a singular private collection that was owned by a high-ranking member of the Knights of St. John of Malta, also known as the Order of Knights of the Hospital of Saint John of Jerusalem or the Order of Hospitallers and linked to the Masonic fraternal order. In addition to titles specifically relating to the Knights of Malta, books in the collection relate to other fraternal movements, mysticism, New Thought, race, eugenics, Jewish history, conspiracy theories and more. This library also includes a number of works relating to Russian history, particularly from the revolutionary period, and some of these volumes are signed by members of the Czarist aristocracy and family.    

Found throughout this catalog are interesting ephemera offerings and grouped book lots offering a broad variety of topics.    

National Book Auctions is a public auction service specializing in books, ephemera, and art. National Book Auctions is a targeted service offering experience and expertise unique to marketing antique and modern books and ephemera for consignors and collectors alike. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of collectible, signed, and first edition books. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-269-0101 or email mail@nationalbookauctions.com.

George Washington Spy Letter Leads Auction

jhdjiebjfmagmioe.jpgNew York—Swann Galleries’ auction on Tuesday, November 7 saw fine results for Autographs by important historical figures in a variety of fields, from government to science to music. The total of $662K exceeded the estimate for the sale as a whole by almost $100,000, as lot after lot hammered above estimate.

The highlight of the sale was the Jimmy Van Heusen Collection, offering manuscripts by the composer as well as important letters, musical quotations and manuscripts by some of the most influential composers of the nineteenth- and twentieth centuries. Of the 76 lots offered from the collection, 93% found buyers, exceeding the high estimate for the section by more than $70,000. The top lot of the collection was an autograph musical quotation signed by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, showing nine bars from the first movement of Serenade for String Orchestra in C Major, 1888, which sold for $27,500, above a high estimate of $15,000. The first autograph musical quotations by Van Heusen ever to come to auction included the drafts for such hits as Swinging on a Star and Love and Marriage ($6,750 and $7,000, respectively). Each of the seven lots by Van Heusen sold well above their estimates, with the working draft of Call Me Irresponsible reaching $9,375, above a high estimate of $2,000. The proceeds from the sale of the Collection will benefit Cazenovia College, which Van Heusen attended when it was a high school.

The top lot of the sale was a letter from George Washington to his spymaster, Benjamin Tallmadge, requesting intelligence at the height of the Revolutionary War. It was written in November of 1780 from his headquarters in Wayne, New Jersey, concerning the British troop numbers and locations on Long Island. It sold for $40,000.

A strong selection of autographs by scientists was led by a signed photograph of Sigmund Freud by Halberstadt, signed & inscribed to American psychoanalyst Horace W. Frink, 1922, which sold for $20,000. A pair of photographic portraits signed by Albert Einstein and his wife, Elsa, reached $12,500.

Marco Tomaschett, Autographs Specialist at Swann, was pleased with the sale: “The strong results of the musical autographs demonstrate that there is healthy demand for this category.”

The next auction of Autographs at Swann Galleries will be held in Spring 2018.

Image: Lot 7: George Washington, Autograph Letter Signed, to his spymaster Benjamin Tallmadge, New Jersey, 1780. Sold November 7, 2017 for $40,000. (Pre-sale estimate $25,000 to $35,000).

Paris Photo and Aperture Foundation are pleased to announce the winners of the 2017 edition of the Paris Photo-Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Awards. Monsanto: A Photographic Investigation by Mathieu Asselin (Verlag Kettler) is the winner of $10,000 in the First PhotoBook category. The selection for Photography Catalogue of the Year is New Realities: Photography in the 19th Century by Mattie Boom and Hans Rooseboom (Rijiksmuseum/nai010). Museum Bhavan by Dayanita Singh (Steidl) is the winner of PhotoBook of the Year. A Jurors’ Special Mention is also given to La Grieta (The Crack) by Carlos Spottorno and Guillermo Abril (Astiberri Ediciones). 

A final jury at Paris Photo selected this year’s winner. The jury included: Florencia Giordana Braun, director and founder of Rolf Art gallery, Buenos Aires; Krzysztof Candrowicz, the artistic director of the Triennial of Photography in Hamburg; Mitch Epstein, New York-based, award-winning photographer whose most recent book, Rocks and Clouds, will be published by Steidl this fall; Nathalie Herschdorfer, director of Museum of Fine Arts, Le Locle, Switzerland; and Cristiano Raimondi, head of development and international projects at the New National Museum of Monaco and an invited curator for Platform 2017.

Regarding the jury’s selection this year, Mitch Epstein said, “Our jury choices speak to the pluralism of the medium; photography continues to be a vital language in the art, science, and documentary worlds.” Krzysztof Candrowicz added, “What I see in all the books points to a change in traditional thinking about the photobook, blurring the boundaries and expanding the scope of what a photobook can be.”

Cristiano Raimondi remarked on the First PhotoBook winner, Monsanto: A Photographic Investigation, “Asselin’s Monsanto is a courageous, investigative project that connects evidence-driven photography and visual research to the democratization of knowledge; it’s important that this book exists in physical form, as a document, and not just in the virtual world.” 

“Dayanita Singh has extended the concept of what a book might be with Museum Bhavan: a book of books,” said Mitch Epstein on the PhotoBook of the Year. “Her work is a sophisticated merger of Eastern and Western sensibilities, and celebrates the democratic possibilities of the offset multiple.”

On the winner of the Photography Catalogue of the Year, Natalie Hershdorker said, “New Realities takes what might be considered ‘dusty’ material of the nineteenth century and brings new perspectives and fresh design to enliven this classical material. It’s an important example of how to preserve and capture new interest in the history of photography.”

About the 2017 Paris Photo-Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Awards 

First PhotoBook: A $10,000 prize is awarded to the photographer(s)/artist(s) whose first finished, publicly available photobook is judged to be the best of the year. Twenty books from this category were selected for the Shortlist, were presented to the jury for the final selection, and are being exhibited during Paris Photo.

PhotoBook of the Year: This prize is awarded to the photographer(s)/artist(s) and publisher responsible for the photobook judged to be the best of the year. Ten books from this category were selected for the Shortlist, were presented to the jury for the final selection, and are being exhibited during Paris Photo.

Photography Catalogue of the Year: This prize is awarded to the publication, publisher, and/or organizing institution responsible for the exhibition catalogue or museum publication judged to be the best of the year. Five books from this category were selected for the Shortlist, were presented to the jury for the final selection, and are being exhibited during Paris Photo.

This year’s Shortlist selection was made by a jury comprising Gregory Halpern, winner of the 2016 PhotoBook of the Year Award; Lesley A. Martin, creative director of the Aperture Foundation book program and publisher of The PhotoBook Review; Kathy Ryan, director of photography, New York Times Magazine; Joel Smith, Richard L. Menschel Curator of Photography at the Morgan Library & Museum; and Christoph Wiesner, artistic director, Paris Photo. The Shortlist was first announced at the New York Art Book Fair, on September 22, 2017. The thirty-five selected photobooks are profiled in The PhotoBook Review, issue 013. 

Initiated in November 2012 by Aperture Foundation and Paris Photo, the Paris Photo-Aperture Foundation PhotoBook Awards celebrate the photobook’s contribution to the evolving narrative of photography, with three major categories: First PhotoBook, PhotoBook of the Year, and Photography Catalogue of the Year. Since the announcement of the 2016 winners last November, last year’s shortlisted titles have been exhibited in six venues internationally, including at Ivorypress, Madrid; Duesseldorf Photo Weekend, Germany; The Lumiere Brothers Center for Photography, Moscow; and Museum of Fine Arts, Le Locle, Switzerland.

Following Paris Photo, the exhibition of the 2017 Shortlist will travel to 6 pt Book Design Conference, Vilnius, Lithuania; Duesseldorf Photo Weekend, Germany; Month of Photography Los Angeles, Venice Arts, Venice, California; Photobookfest 2018, Lumiere Brothers Center for Photography, Moscow; Triennial of Photography, Hamburg, Germany; Photo Basel, Switzerland; Cortona on the Move, Italy; and Medium Festival of Photography, San Deigo, California, among other venues.

loveday-artwork_600.jpgSan Marino, CA— An exhibition opening next week at The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens will present a fresh, vibrant group of new works by seven artists responding to research they conducted in The Huntington’s vast collections over the past year. The exhibition “Collection/s: WCCW/five at The Huntington,” on view in the Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art from Nov. 18, 2017, through Feb. 12, 2018, is part of an initiative called “/five.” The installation features paintings, sculpture, textiles, video, and writings by artists Olivia Chumacero, Sarita Dougherty, Jheanelle Garriques, Zya S. Levy, Kiki Loveday (née kerrie welsh), Soyoung Shin, and Juliana Wisdom, who were selected in collaboration with the Los Angeles-based Women’s Center for Creative Work (WCCW). Objects in the exhibition include an archive of Sappho-inspired love letters on handmade paper, plaster castings of cacti, a video created in uncultivated areas of the Huntington’s grounds, and porcelain vessels and a tapestry inspired by 18th-century French masterworks.

The /five initiative is a contemporary art collaboration between The Huntington and five different organizations over five years that invites artists to respond to a range of themes drawn from The Huntington’s deep and diverse library, art, and botanical collections. The initiative is led by Catherine Hess, The Huntington’s chief curator of European art and interim director of its art collections and Jenny Watts, The Huntington’s curator of photography and visual culture. In /five’s first year (2016), The Huntington collaborated with NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laborary (JPL) to present the sound sculpture “Orbit Pavilion,” which referenced The Huntington’s history of aerospace, astronomy, and Earth science collections.

For the second year of the initiative, The Huntington chose WCCW, a Los Angeles-based nonprofit organization that cultivates feminist creative communities and practices, to explore the theme of collecting and collections.

“Henry Huntington was a collector at heart,” said Watts. “He began with books and moved on to land, plants, and, with the guidance of his wife Arabella, British and European art. The Huntingtons—who excluded women from the professional staff—surely never anticipated the myriad challenging, provocative, and insightful ways in which these 21st-century artists would interpret the collections, living and not.”

Additional information and photographs about the /five initiative, WCCW, and the artists and their works is available at huntington.org/five.

Image: Kiki Loveday (née kerrie welsh) (b. 1987), detail of object from What You Love, 2017. Installation of collected letters, objects, and ephemera by various contributors.

lincolnpapers_486x652.pngAbraham Lincoln’s papers from his time as a lawyer, congressman and the 16th president are now online in full color in a new presentation after a multi-year digitization effort at the Library of Congress.

The Library holds a collection of more than 40,000 Lincoln documents dating from 1774 through Lincoln’s presidency and beyond, including materials from his campaigns, Lincoln’s first and second inaugural addresses and the earliest known copies of the Gettysburg Address. The more than 20,000 original documents in the collection have been digitized as high-resolution images through a collaboration with agencies in Illinois.

“The thousands of manuscripts, documents and images that tell the story of Abraham Lincoln’s life are an invaluable resource, and more people than ever can study these primary sources from the Library of Congress,” said Carla Hayden, Librarian of Congress. “More than 150 years after Abraham Lincoln’s presidency, his model of leadership and public service continues to inspire us as a nation.”

The collection is online at loc.gov/collections/abraham-lincoln-papers/about-this-collection/.

Researchers, students and scholars around the world can get a realistic view, zoom in and read documents written by Lincoln and his correspondents. The collection includes original documents as well as transcripts of many of the historic papers. Full-color images of Lincoln’s papers were created using the highest resolution for digitized documents available at the Library.

Treasures from the collection include:

  • Lincoln’s printed copy of his second inaugural address. Historians believe he read from this copy to deliver his inauguration speech on March 4, 1865. For the first time, this document is included with the collection online;
  • Lincoln’s July 1862 preliminary draft of the Emancipation Proclamation;
  • A memorandum expressing Lincoln’s expectation of being defeated for re-election in 1864;
  • A condolence letter by Queen Victoria to Mary Todd Lincoln after the assassination of Abraham Lincoln.

The papers include Lincoln’s correspondence with his wife, members of his cabinet, military generals and other key figures.

Lincoln materials have long been some of the most frequently used resources in the Library’s collection by researchers and the public. “Civil War” and “Abraham Lincoln” have been among the top search terms on the Library’s website for more than 10 years.

The Lincoln Papers came to the Library in 1919 from Lincoln’s oldest son, Robert Todd Lincoln, who inherited the papers after his father was assassinated in 1865. The collection was first opened to the public in 1947 at the end of a moratorium period mandated by Robert Lincoln.

Digital images of the Lincoln Papers were first made available online in 2001 based on scans from microfilm. The refreshed digital collection now has been updated with additional features, full-color images and materials not included in the previous online presentation. The Library holds the papers of 23 presidents.

The Lincoln Papers are among several collections made available online during the past year. Other newly digitized collections include the papers of U.S. Presidents Ulysses S. Grant, Millard Fillmore, Franklin Pierce and James K. Polk; the papers of Alexander Hamilton, Sigmund Freud and Margaret Bayard Smith; more than 4,600 newspapers from Japanese-American internment camps; a collection of web-based comic books; and 25,000 fire insurance maps from communities across America, the first of 500,000 that will be accessible online.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

Waldseemuller5.JPGLondon - On 13 December Christie’s Valuable Books and Manuscripts sale will offer a copy of the first map to name America by the most important cartographer of the early sixteenth century, Martin Waldseemüller. The appearance of this previously unknown copy of the Waldseemüller gores (estimate: £600,000 - 900,000 / $800,000 - 1,200,000), 1507, marks a significant cartographic discovery. This revolutionary map not only names America for the first time, but is also the first map to illustrate separate South and North American continents, and is the earliest recorded printed globe. It is one of only 5 known copies and is the first accurate illustration of the world in 360 degrees, depicting a separate Pacific Ocean. A large wall map, produced by Waldseemüller around the same time, and also naming America, survives in a single copy and was acquired by the Library of Congress in May 2003 for $10 million. The Waldseemüller gores will be on view to the public from 9 December, as part of Christie’s Classic Week.

Julian Wilson, Senior Specialist, Books, Maps & Manuscripts: “The discovery of this unknown copy of the Waldseemüller gores marks the most exciting moment of my twenty-year career at Christie’s, his cartographic innovations had an enormous influence in the science of map-making and perhaps most significantly, defined history in naming America.”

In 1505, the cartographer Martin Waldseemüller joined a group of scholars known as the Gymnasium Vosagense. The group was sponsored by René II, the Duke of Lorraine, and based at Saint-Dié-des-Vosges, south-west of Strasbourg. Waldseemüller was tasked with creating a new globe, a large world map and a new edition of Ptolemy’s Geographia and while doing so, broke away from standard cartographic conceptions to visualise Amerigo Vespucci’s claims that the North and South American continents might be separate from Asia. Boldly defining the Pacific and western coast of South America long before any European had officially seen it, Waldseemüller placed the name ‘America’ on the New World for the very first time.

Only four surviving Western maps earlier than Waldseemüller's depict the Americas in any form. The earliest is the Juan de La Cosa manuscript portolan chart, circa 1500, (Museo Naval, Madrid), followed by the manuscript Cantino planisphere (Biblioteca Estense, Modena) dated to 1502 and the 1504/1505 Caveri (Canerio) manuscript portolan chart (Bibliothèque nationale de France, Paris). Waldseemüller was influenced by the Spanish and Portuguese mapping of their new discoveries, as evidenced in these three maps, where the Gulf of Mexico, Florida, Cuba and other Caribbean islands are quite distinct, and the north coast of South America follows the earlier prototypes. By contrast, Waldseemüller's gores have little in common with the only earlier printed map to show the Americas: this is the world map of Giovanni Matteo Contarini-Francesco Rosselli (1506), which survives as a single copy at the British Library. It depicts Greenland and Newfoundland as an extension of Asia, is without a Central American coastline west of Cuba and illustrates South America as an unfinished northern coastline. Waldseemüller's radical advantage over the Contarini-Rosselli map lay in his taking into consideration the accounts of Amerigo Vespucci’s voyages to South America. A Florentine employed by the Medici bank at Seville, Vespucci met Columbus in about 1497-98, and was inspired himself to conduct exploratory voyages to the New World. His major voyage of discovery occurred in 1499 when he passed the Cape Verde Islands, and then sailed much further down the South American coast than previous Western navigators.

Vespucci realised that the South American continent was much more extensive than had previously been understood, and that it was not, as Columbus had initially thought, the eastern perimeter of Asia. Vespucci's announcement of this news in his Mundus Novus (Rome, circa 1502), with its vivid description of the New World, became a bestseller around Europe. Vespucci's influence was critical to the cartographic advances of Waldseemüller and in view of this and Columbus’ fading fortunes in the early 1500s, Waldseemüller named the continent ‘America’ in Vespucci’s honour.

Image: WALDSEEMÜLLER, Martin (c.1470 - c.1522). World map in the form of a set of gores for a terrestrial globe. Saint-Dié-des-Vosges: 1507, estimate: £600,000 - 900,000 / $800,000 - 1,200,000

 

3379169_3 copy.jpgBoston, MA--A 24-page manuscript penned by Jack Ruby in prison, retracing his steps after Kennedy's assassination will be auctioned by Boston-based RR Auction. 

The manuscript comprehensively traces his steps in the aftermath of the Kennedy assassination but prior to the murder of Oswald, and corresponds with the testimony that Ruby gave before the Warren Commission on June 7, 1964. 

The "fellow" he refers to in these passages is Lee Harvey Oswald, and a month after his arrest Ruby told the FBI that his loaded snub-nosed Colt Cobra .38 revolver was in his right pocket during the press conference described here. This was the gun he used to shoot Oswald on the morning of Sunday, November 24th. Ruby maintained that it was never in his mind to kill Oswald until that morning, when he learned that Mrs. Kennedy might need to return to Dallas for a trial and relive her grief. An incredible window into Ruby's actions preceding the murder of Lee Harvey Oswald.

The handwritten manuscript in pencil by Jack Ruby written after he was convicted of the murder of Lee Harvey Oswald and sentenced to death.  The important manuscript details his movements on the evening of Friday, November 22, 1963, and the early hours of Saturday morning on November 23rd.  Earl Ruby, the brother of Jack Ruby, notes that this manuscript was to be used by Jack's lawyers if a new trial was granted to show that Jack's motives in the murder were not premeditated. 

“It’s an incredible window into Ruby's actions preceding the murder of Lee Harvey Oswald,” said Bobby Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction. 

Among other items to be featured: 

Jack Ruby's Monogrammed Suitcase used on Ruby's visit to a notorious gambler in Cuba

Jack Ruby bullet fired from the Gun that shot Oswald.

Jack Ruby Letter Ten days after shooting Oswald, Ruby writes from jail: "I loved my President and was in such deep mourning about his tragic passing, anyway you know the rest.”

Lee Harvey Oswald’s US Marine Corps knife.

Lee Harvey Oswald hand addressed envelope that bears several Russian postmarks.

The Fine Autographs and Artifacts from RR Auction began on October 27 and will conclude on November 8.  More details can be found online at www.rrauction.com.

An historic agreement will be signed in Jerusalem on 7 November 2017 between the National Library of Israel in Jerusalem, the Russian State Library in Moscow, and the Moscow-based Peri Foundation regarding the future of the Gunzburg Collection, which includes some of the most important Hebrew manuscripts and books in the world. Through the generous support of the Peri Foundation, 2,000 manuscripts and thousands of books in the collection will be digitized, making these significant works accessible online to both institutions as well as to the general public. 

The addition of the digitized Gunzburg Collection marks a significant milestone in the renewal process of the National Library of Israel, the home of the greatest collection of Hebrew books and manuscripts in the world, and advances its key aim to preserve the national memory of the Jewish people. The new high-quality images of the ancient Hebrew manuscripts will be integrated with the National Library of Israel's new and comprehensive digital platform: Ktiv, which will eventually include images of all known Hebrew manuscripts. 

The Russian State Library is Russia’s largest library according to the number of items - about 47 million - preserved in its collections. The Library was originally part of the Rumyantsev Museum, which opened in 1828. At present it is one of Russia’s national libraries and is located in Moscow where it holds the most comprehensive collection of books published in the Russian Federation.

The NLI is currently undergoing an extensive process of regeneration, the aim of which is to develop and adapt the institution to the twenty-first century. A key element of this process is the development of a new library building designed by world-leading architects Herzog & de Meuron, due to open in 2021.

The Peri Foundation was created in 2012 by Ziyavudin Magomedov, chairman of Summa Group. Central to the foundation’s aims is to create educational opportunities to unlock the potential of young people and to offer access to the latest technological developments.

Mr. Oren Weinberg, Director of the National Library of Israel, said: 

“We are enormously grateful to the Peri Foundation for enabling this landmark agreement with the Russian State Library, an institution that we hold in such esteem.  We are gratified that the digitized Gunzburg books and manuscripts will join other Hebrew manuscripts on Ktiv, a joint venture of the National Library of Israel and the Friedberg Jewish Manuscript Society, with the support of the Israel Ministry of Jerusalem and Heritage-Land Marks Project. Ktiv is one of the largest digital collections of manuscripts in existence.”

Lord Rothschild, funder of the NLI, said: 

“For many decades now the National Library has lived in hope of having access to the great Gunzberg Collection in Russia.  Thanks to the imaginative generosity of Ziyavudin Magomedov and the Peri Foundation and with the support of the Russian State Library, this will at last happen.  This is of particular sentimental importance to me as I happen to be an Executor of the estate of Isaiah Berlin’s widow, born Aline Gunzberg, a direct descendant of the Gunzberg family.”

Vladimir Gnezdilov, Acting General Director, Russian State Library, said:
“Modern information technology has opened new and unlimited possibilities for accessing the cultural values of countries and their peoples.”

Ziyavudin Magomedov, Founder, Peri Foundation, said:
“I personally consider this a project of the utmost importance. New technology has the potential to assist in comprehending one’s identity, history and culture, change approaches to education, and give access to the exploration of historical heritage. Humanitarian collaboration is extremely important for a balanced world.”

Rembrandt_Four Studies Male Heads_51951_PR copy.jpgCambridge, MA—The Harvard Art Museums announce the extraordinary gift of 330 16th- to 18th-century Dutch, Flemish, and Netherlandish drawings from the esteemed collection of Maida and George S. Abrams (Harvard A.B. ’54, LL.B. ’57), considered the best collection of such material in private hands. The gift further establishes the museums as the major site for the appreciation, research, and study of works on paper from the Dutch Golden Age in North America. This newest promised gift from the Abrams family brings tremendous depth and breadth to the museums’ holdings; the works represent over 125 artists and include extremely fine examples by major masters such as Rembrandt, Jacques de Gheyn II, Hendrick Goltzius, and Adriaen van Ostade, as well as a remarkable range of drawings by lesser-known masters who worked in a wide range of subjects and media. Impressive drawings by artists Nicolaes Berchem, Jacob Marrel, and Cornelis Visscher will help fill gaps in the museums’ collections. Taken as a whole, the Abrams Collection at the Harvard Art Museums reveals the critical role of drawing in the art world of the Dutch Golden Age. 

“George has generously supported the Harvard Art Museums over many decades and in countless ways; we are incredibly thankful for the role that he and Maida have played in galvanizing the study of drawings at Harvard and particularly for their commitment to telling the rich story of draftsmanship from the Low Countries,” said Martha Tedeschi, the Elizabeth and John Moors Cabot Director of the Harvard Art Museums. “The latest gift from the Abrams family is truly transformative for our museums—indeed, for the entire Boston area, especially as the city strives to become a major destination for the study and presentation of Dutch, Flemish, and Netherlandish art. Together with the newly founded Center for Netherlandish Art at the Museum of Fine Arts, we now can pursue institutional collaborations that will serve visitors and scholars from around the world.” 

Mr. Abrams and his late wife Maida made earlier gifts that brought more than 140 drawings to the Harvard Art Museums over the course of several decades. With their collective gifts, the museums now have the most comprehensive holding of 17th-century Dutch drawings outside Europe. 

“When the collection grows in quality and quantity in such a major way, suddenly there are stories you can tell with greater force and depth, with fewer gaps in the narrative,” said Edouard Kopp, been a key U.S. institution for the study and appreciation of drawings, and this gift will enable us to be an even more vibrant center, particularly for Dutch drawings.” 

News of the promised gift was shared on November 3, just a day before the museums hosted the symposium Dutch Drawings on the Horizon: A Day of Talks in Honor of George S. Abrams. The event brought together international experts on 17th-century Dutch drawings to discuss the exceptional draftsmanship of the Dutch Golden Age, from Goltzius to Rembrandt. Speakers and chairs at the event included George Abrams’s longtime friends and associates Arthur Wheelock, Peter Schatborn, Peter C. Sutton, Jane Turner, and William W. Robinson. 

In 1999, the Abrams gave an initial landmark gift of 110 drawings to the Harvard Art Museums. Many of those works had been included in the 1991-92 exhibition Seventeenth-Century Dutch Drawings: A Selection from the Maida and George Abrams Collection, which was on view at the Rijksprentenkabinet in Amsterdam, the Graphische Sammlung Albertina in Vienna, the Pierpont Morgan Library in New York, and the Fogg Museum. William W. Robinson, former Maida and George Abrams Curator of Drawings at the Harvard Art Museums, wrote the accompanying catalogue. The 2002-03 traveling exhibition and accompanying catalogue for Bruegel to Rembrandt: Dutch and Flemish Drawings from the Maida and George Abrams Collection, also written by Robinson, complemented (and supplemented) the previous catalogue by presenting the most significant acquisitions of the Abrams Collection since the 1991-92 show. Bruegel to Rembrandt was shown at the British Museum in London, the Institut Néerlandais in Paris, and the Fogg Museum. The 1999 gift led the museums to publish Drawings from the Age of Bruegel, Rubens, and Rembrandt (William W. Robinson, with Susan Anderson; 2016), a catalogue of 100 of the museums’ best drawings from this period; almost half of the drawings chosen were part of the Abrams gift. An exhibition of the same title was on display at the Harvard Art Museums from May 21 through August 14, 2016. 

“The Harvard Art Museums’ support of original scholarship and their dedication to training tomorrow’s leaders in the field have long been important to me and my late wife Maida,” said George Abrams. “As a result, I am delighted that our collection will now be housed at the museums and available to a range of audiences. With leadership from director Martha Tedeschi, who deeply understands the importance of works on paper, the museums now stand to have the leading Dutch drawings collection in the United States, with more excellent examples by Rembrandt and wonderful drawings by top draftsmen Hendrick Goltzius and Jacques de Gheyn II.” 

The Abrams Collection at the Harvard Art Museums has particular depth and strength in the following areas: 

  • High and low genre subjects, especially sheets by Adriaen van Ostade, Isaack van Ostade, and Cornelis Dusart 
  • Natural history watercolors (birds, plants, flowers, insects, etc.) by artists such as Jacob Marrel, Maria Sibylla Merian, Johannes Bronkhorst, Pieter Holsteyn II, Gerardus and Rochus van Veen, Margareta de Heer, and Pieter Withoos 
  • Rembrandt and his school, with a particularly impressive range of artists represented who studied directly under Rembrandt or contemporaries who came under the spell of his influential style 

“George’s generosity to the Harvard Art Museums never ceases to amaze me. He has supported us for decades: through gifts of art, steadfast advocacy, and advice,” said William W. Robinson, the former Maida and George Abrams Curator of Drawings at the Harvard Art Museums. “Now, with the commitment of his collection, the museums are able to carry on Harvard’s great tradition of drawings scholarship, taking it to an even higher level.”

At a dinner held in his honor on November 3, Abrams was appointed Knight in the Order of Orange- Nassau of the Kingdom of the Netherlands. The royal decoration was given by Dutch Consul General Dolph Hogewoning for Abrams’s significant contribution to the study and international promotion of Dutch art. The order bears the hyphenated name used by the royal family of the Netherlands since the 16th century and is a chivalric order open for those who have earned special merits for society: people who deserve appreciation and recognition from society for the special way in which they have carried out their activities.

Mr. Abrams has served for years as head of the Drawings Committee at the Harvard Art Museums and was instrumental in securing funds for the Drawings Department at the museums from the Stanley H. Durwood Foundation. These funds support a wide range of events, including the November 4 symposium Dutch Drawings on the Horizon: A Day of Talks in Honor of George S. Abrams. The Durwood Foundation also endowed a fellowship in Dutch art, currently held by Austėja Mackelaitė, who curated an exhibition of drawings from the Abrams Collection now on view, The Art of Drawing in the Early Dutch Golden Age, 1590-1630: Selected Works from the Abrams Collection.

Said Edouard Kopp: “Without George’s help, we wouldn’t be able to engage Harvard students with our drawings collection nearly as much as we do.” For example, Kopp brings museum curatorial fellows and Harvard students to Paris each year for the Salon du Dessin, a major event in the field, for a practicum in acquisitions.

Related Exhibition 

The Art of Drawing in the Early Dutch Golden Age, 1590-1630: Selected Works from the Abrams Collection is currently on view through January 14, 2018; it is installed on Level 2, in the museums’ galleries dedicated to 17th-century Dutch and Flemish art. The installation of 31 drawings explores the extraordinary developments in Dutch art in the period between 1590 and 1630. The works on view present some of the major themes in Dutch art, including the development of high and low genres, the study of landscape, and the interest in the nude; many of these subjects initially emerged in the medium of drawing. The works on display celebrate the role of drawing as a catalyst of creativity during the early Golden Age. 

Image: Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn, Four Studies of Male Heads, c. 1636. Brown ink and brown wash on cream antique laid paper. The Maida and George Abrams Collection, Boston, Massachusetts. Photo: © President and Fellows of Harvard College. 

 

304-Hopper.jpgNew York—A new auction record for any print by American master Edward Hopper was established at Swann Galleries’ auction of Old Master Through Modern Prints on Thursday, November 2. The extremely rare etching The Lonely House, 1923, sold for a record $317,000 to a buyer over the phone, above a high estimate of $200,000. The previous record for a print by the artist, set in 2012, was $80,000 lower. It was also the highest price for an etching ever sold by Swann Galleries.

All three works by Hopper in the sale found buyers. Les Poilus, an extremely rare 1915-18 etching of French infantrymen, reached $42,500, above a high estimate of $20,000, a record for the work.

Swann Galleries holds the top six auction prices for prints by Martin Lewis. In Thursday’s auction, the house beat its own record for Relics (Speakeasy Corner), 1928, one of the artist’s most iconic works. The work sold for $55,000, surpassing the previous benchmark established in 2016.

Several additional image records were established, including $65,000 for Rembrandt van Rijn’s Self-Portrait with Cap Pulled Forward, a circa 1631 etching. A record was also achieved for Arbre, 1892, an enigmatic lithograph by Odilon Redon ($47,500).

The important first edition of Francisco José de Goya’s Los Caprichos, circa 1799, lampooning the Spanish aristocracy and clergy, was sold for $106,250. Approximately 300 copies of the bound set of 80 etchings were produced in the first edition, before Goya withdrew the series from sale for fear of retribution. Few survive, as only 27 were sold and most of the rest destroyed; the copy offered lacked only one etching.

The sale featured a special section of prints from the estate of American artist Will Barnet, 94% of which found buyers. Multiple bidders were on the phones for the duration of the run of 31 works, sending many prices past their estimates. Bidding was especially competitive for three figurative prints of women with pets in the flattened ukiyo-e-esque style for which Barnet is celebrated. Woman, Cat and String, 1964, is especially emblematic of the style: the square color woodcut sold for $4,750, above a high estimate of $1,800. The 1975 color screenprint The Book and lithograph Silent Seasons—Summer, 1974, also performed well ($4,000 and $3,250, respectively).

Director of Prints & Drawings and Vice President of Swann Galleries, Todd Weyman, said of the sale, “Enthusiastic bidding across the board in this auction covering more than five centuries of graphic art centered on a record price for the most expensive printed work by Edward Hopper ever sold, and establishing international auction records for prints by Rembrandt, Redon, and Martin Lewis. We are very pleased.”

The next auction of fine art at Swann Galleries will be Contemporary Art on November 16, 2017.

Lot 304: Edward Hopper, The Lonely House, etching, 1923. Sold November 2, 2017 for $317,000. (Pre-sale estimate $150,000 to $200,000).

With a career spanning more than 50 years, legendary TV personality Dick Cavett is recognized as one of the most cultured and savvy talk-show hosts in the history of television.  The Library of Congress announced today that Cavett has donated 2,500 programs of his decades-long talk-show series—showcasing some of the golden moments in television—to the American people. 

The collection totals nearly 2,000 hours of programming—about 78 days worth of viewing—and features more than 5,000 guests.  The list of guests, many whom rarely appeared on late-night television, is a testament to Cavett’s appeal as a knowledgeable and thoughtful interviewer.   They include Muhammad Ali, Louis Armstrong, Fred Astaire, James Baldwin, Marlon Brando, Ingrid Bergman, Mel Brooks, Truman Capote, Noel Coward, Duke Ellington, Helen Hayes, Jim Henson, Katharine Hepburn, Alfred Hitchcock, John Kerry, Myrna Loy, Norman Mailer, Mickey Mantle, Groucho Marx, Arthur Miller, Toni Morrison, Paul Newman, Laurence Olivier, Anthony Perkins, Ronald Reagan, Jackie Robinson, Mort Sahl, Charles Schulz, Steven Spielberg, Gloria Swanson, Gore Vidal, Orson Welles, Tennessee Williams, Joanne Woodward and many more.

Many rock-and-roll musicians were also featured guests on his shows, including David Bowie, Judy Collins, David Crosby, Jimi Hendrix, Mick Jagger, Janis Joplin, John Lennon and Yoko Ono, Stephen Stills and Joni Mitchell.

“Dick Cavett turned interviewing into an art form,” said Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden. “He could talk to anyone, and his ability to listen and make the fascinating people who sat across from him more relatable guaranteed his place in television history.”

“I still have to convince myself that I actually interviewed and knew all of those incredible people,” said Cavett.  “Looking at the archive of my shows now is simply overwhelming for me. I’m thrilled that the Library of Congress will be the permanent repository for the collection. When I see one of the old shows now, my first thought is ‘What is that starstruck kid from Nebraska doing with whoever the genius of the moment happened to be.’”

Cavett’s archive represents a significant addition to the Library’s impressive collections of film and television icons, including Jerry Lewis, Bob Hope, Groucho Marx, Ernie Kovacs and Edie Adams, Danny Kaye, Johnny Carson and Lucille Ball and Desi Arnaz.  The Dick Cavett Collection will be available to qualified researchers in the Library’s Motion Picture and Television Reading Room in Washington, D.C.

Many of Cavett’s interviews with the famous and sometimes infamous were often filled with humor, startling revelations and high drama, including on-air altercations.  Collection highlights include:

  • A controversial confrontation between writers Gore Vidal and Norman Mailer about Mailer’s misogynistic tendencies and Vidal comparing him to Charles Manson;
  • The widow of Lee Harvey Oswald talks about her actions immediately after watching John F. Kennedy’s assassination on television;
  • A humorous conversation with Louis Armstrong reflecting on being in Chicago in the days of Al Capone; 
  • James Baldwin in a 1968 interview candidly talks about the negative perception of black activism and his view that integration is a euphemism for white superiority;
  • Mickey Mantle shares a startling personal secret about his teen years;
  • In a 1971 interview, John Lennon and Yoko Ono talk about their relationship and the Beatles;
  • Arthur Miller describes being blacklisted because of his protests against McCarthyism and the writing of “The Crucible”;
  • Lauren Bacall reveals her best-kept secret as a young star in Hollywood—her Jewish heritage;
  • The interview with Judy Collins, whose censored comments caused a firestorm;
  • Surrealist artist Salvador Dalí’s unorthodox appearance in 1970 with Lillian Gish and Satchel Paige.

A winner of three Emmy Awards, Cavett has been nominated for the award 11 times.  During his 35 years as a talk-show host, he has appeared on five different networks.  He was the host of the “Dick Cavett Show” on ABC from 1968 to 1975 and on public television from 1977 to 1982.  He also successfully hosted shows on CBS, USA and CNBC.  Cavett also hosted a series of programs on HBO and his compelling interviews were the inspiration for the PBS documentaries “Dick Cavett’s Watergate” (2014) and “Dick Cavett’s Vietnam” (2015).

Cavett is an accomplished actor and writer.  He appeared in a dozen feature films including “Beetlejuice” and “Forrest Gump.”  He wrote for Jack Paar’s and Johnny Carson’s late-night talk shows and authored four books, including the most recent “Talk Show: Confrontations, Pointed Commentary, and Off-Screen Secrets” (2010) and “Brief Encounters: Conversations, Magic Moments, and Assorted Hijinks” (2014). He has written an online opinion column for the New York Times since 2007 and for numerous other publications, including the New Yorker, TV Guide and Vanity Fair.

The Library of Congress Packard Campus for Audio Visual Conservation is a state-of-the-art facility funded as a gift to the nation by the Packard Humanities Institute. The Packard Campus is the site where the nation’s library acquires, preserves and provides access to the world’s largest and most comprehensive collection of motion pictures, television programs, radio broadcasts and sound recordings. The Packard Campus is home to more than 7 million collection items. It provides staff support for the Library of Congress National Film Preservation Board, the National Recording Preservation Board and the national registries for film and recorded sound.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

Brooklyn, NY—Brooklyn Public Library (BPL) today announced Tommy Pico as the 2017 Fiction & Poetry Prize recipient for IRL (Birds, LLC) and Richard Rothstein as the Nonfiction Prize recipient for The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America (Liveright Publishing) for the third annual Brooklyn Public Library Literary Prize presented by the Brooklyn Eagles, BPL’s young donor group.

Created in 2015, the Prize recognizes new works that reflect the Library’s mission to convene renowned writers, scholars, critics, and artists with members of the borough’s diverse community to discuss urgent social, political, and artistic issues that resonate with Brooklynites and the world at-large.

“With the Brooklyn Public Library Literary Prize, our dedicated librarians honor vital contributions to contemporary literature,” said BPL President and CEO Linda E. Johnson. “In dramatically different ways, Rothstein’s meticulously researched exposé and Tommy Pico’s gleefully honest poetry spark the kind of dialogue the Library strives to foster throughout the borough and beyond.”

Nominations for the 2017 prize were submitted by BPL librarians from across the system’s 60 branches, with 29 librarians participating in the Prize committee to select the long- and shortlists. BPL’s Director of Outreach Services Nick Higgins and Coordinator of School Outreach Amy Mikel joined an esteemed panel of prominent authors and cultural leaders that included Claudia Rankine, Chris Hayes, and Téa Obreht to select the prizewinners.

Rothstein and Pico will accept their awards, which come with a $5,000 prize, tomorrow at the Brooklyn Classic, the signature fundraising event of the Brooklyn Eagles. This year’s co-chairs for the Brooklyn Eagles’ nonfiction and fiction and poetry prize committees are Charles Duhigg, Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and best-selling author of The Power of Habit and Smarter Faster Better, and Ashley Mihlebach, National Account Manager at HarperCollins.

“The Brooklyn Eagles are proud to honor the achievements of Richard Rothstein and Tommy Pico with the Brooklyn Public Library Literary Prize,” said Charles Duhigg, Nonfiction Prize Committee Co-Chair. "Their works embody many of the values the library holds most dear: debate and discussion, ideas that challenge us to think differently, and a belief that the right book can change the world."

About the Winners

In The Color of Law, Richard Rothstein, a leading authority on economic and housing policy, debunks the myth that American cities became segregated through individual prejudices, income inequality, or the actions of private institutions. Rothstein argues the laws and policy decisions passed by local, state, and federal government bodies led to officially segregated public housing and to the rapid decline of previously integrated neighborhoods. His powerful history sheds light on an untold story in America’s turbulent racial history that begins in the 1920s, and contextualizes its enduring legacy by pointing to outbursts of violence in Baltimore, Ferguson, and Minneapolis, among other cities.

“In these troubled times in which frightening white supremacist activities have been exposed, there is also a growing willingness by many to re-examine, with unprecedented frankness, the legacies of slavery and Jim Crow that determine the inequality we still experience today," said Rothstein. "I am personally gratified by the Brooklyn Public Library’s recognition of The Color of Law, but especially grateful for how such recognition contributes to this national re-examination.”

The Color of Law was selected by the Nonfiction jury that featured Chris Hayes (Emmy Award-winning MSNBC news anchor and New York Times bestselling author), Claudia Rankine (poet, National Book Award finalist, and MacArthur Fellow), Siri Hustvedt (Man Booker-longlisted novelist, essayist, and international lecturer on psychoanalysis and neuroscience), James Shapiro (award-winning Shakespeare scholar and Columbia University professor), Simon Critchley (moderator of The New York Times opinion series "The Stone" and philosophy professor at The New School for Social Research), and Amy Mikel (BPL Coordinator of School Outreach).

“We, as a society, are right now deep in what The Color of Law addresses, and Dr. Rothstein’s research gives people a context regarding the decisions that have been and continue to be made about policies that affect everyone in America,” said Claudia Rankine. “It’s about democracy—how it goes wrong, how it should be enacted—and the fact that this book is being championed by the library, one of our most democratic institutions, will allow more people to read it and be exposed to its arguments.”

Tommy Pico is a Brooklyn-based queer writer originally from the Viejas Indian reservation of the Kumeyaay nation. IRL is an extended poem, composed like a long text message, that draws from the epic tradition of A.R. Ammons, ancient Kumeyaay Bird Songs, and Beyoncé’s visual albums. It follows a reservation-born, queer 20-something from Brooklyn looking to understand and define his identity amidst the challenges of emerging adulthood, sexual discovery, social media and the digital age, and a keen awareness of how he is shaped by the legacy of the U.S.’ fraught relationship with Native American communities.

IRL is a dive into a character's indigenous religion, or rather its violent theft, and what he does to keep himself tethered to life in its absence,” said Pico. “Seeing it awarded a literature prize by a library is pretty cosmic. When I was young and bullied, libraries gave me books and books gave me a reason to want to keep going.” 

Pico was awarded the Fiction & Poetry prize by a jury that featured Téa Obreht (novelist, National Book Award finalist), Anderson Tepper (Vanity Fair editor and Brooklyn Book Festival international committee co-chair), Imbolo Mbue (novelist, winner of the 2017 PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction), Jack Halberstam (eminent queer theorist and Columbia University professor), and Nick Higgins (BPL Director of Outreach Services).

“Tommy Pico's IRL delights and surprises, defies categorization, and challenges our narrative and linguistic expectations,” said Téa Obreht. “It is, on every level, a remarkable achievement.”

About the Prize

The Brooklyn Public Library Literary Prize is supported by the Peck Stacpoole Foundation. Brooklyn Public Library is grateful to sponsors of the 2017 Brooklyn Classic: EvensonBest, Compass, Marvel Architects and the Tillary Hotel; and to food and beverage sponsors Sixpoint Brewery, New York Distilling Company, Colson Patisserie, Heights Chateau, and Tito’s Handmade Vodka.

The 2017 Brooklyn Public Library Literary Prize shortlists were comprised of Killers of the Flower Moon: The Osage Murders and the Birth of the FBI by David Grann; Fear City: New York’s Fiscal Crisis and the Rise of Austerity Politics by Kim Phillips-Fein; and The Color of Law: A Forgotten History of How Our Government Segregated America by Richard Rothstein in Nonfiction, and Exit West: A Novel by Mohsin Hamid; What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky: Stories by Lesley Nneka Arimah; and IRL by Tommy Pico in Fiction & Poetry.

Northampton, Massachusetts - The region’s leading used & antiquarian booksellers and fine letterpress printers, book binders, paper makers, and artist book makers will be showcased at the third edition of the Northampton Book and Book Arts Fair on Saturday, December 2, 2017, 1 to 5 pm and Sunday, December 3, 2017, 10 am to 4 pm at the Smith College Campus Center. 

In addition to an exhibition and sale, the fair will feature a keynote address, “Among the Gently Mad,” on December 2nd at 5:15 pm by Nicholas A. Basbanes at Smith College Graham Hall Auditorium in the Brown Fine Arts Center.  Basbanes will sign copies of his books from 3:00 to 4:00 pm at the Smith College Campus Center.  

Admission to the book fair and the event program is free and open to the public. 

For more information, go to: www.northamptonbookfair.com

Keynote Talk by Nicholas A. Basbanes: Among the Gently Mad. Saturday, December 2, 5:15 pm at Smith College, Brown Fine Arts Center, Graham Auditorium 

Basbanes, is an acclaimed bibliophile and independent scholar of book culture and history. His talk is a reflection drawn on thirty years of in-the-field research conducted among a variety of book people:  collectors, booksellers, librarians, conservators, and readers -- people he affectionately refers to as the "gently mad." 

Basbanes is the author of nine critically acclaimed works of cultural history, with a particular emphasis on various aspects of books and book culture. His first, A Gentle Madness: Bibliophiles, Bibliomanes, and the Eternal Passion for Books (1995), was a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award for nonfiction, and was named a New York Times Notable Book. His most recent, On Paper: The Everything of Its Two Thousand Year History (2013) was the recipient of a National Endowment for the Humanities research fellowship, and was one of three finalists for the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Nonfiction. 

The author will sign copies of his books on Saturday, December 2 from 3:00 to 4:00 pm at the Northampton Book and Book Arts Fair at the Smith College Campus Center.

In 2015 Basbanes was awarded a Public Scholar research grant by the NEH in support of his work-in-progress for Knopf, Cross of Snow: The Love Story and Lasting Legacy of Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.  He also writes the “Gently Mad” column for Fine Books & Collections magazine, lectures widely on book related subjects, and is a frequent contributor to Humanities magazine. 

Northampton Book and Book Arts Fair Exhibitors by Location

Massachusetts:

Boomerang Booksellers, of Northampton 

L&T Respess Books, of Northampton

Double Elephant Press, of Northampton     

Zea Mays Printmaking, of Northampton             

White Square Fine Books & Art, of Easthampton

Warwick Press, of Easthampton 

Grey Matter Books, of Hadley 

Sara Krohn Papermaker, of Holyoke

Shelburne Falls Booksellers 

Wiggins Fine Books, of Shelburne Falls 

New England Auctions, of Deerfield

Brier Hill Gallery, of Ashfield and West Roxbury

Swamp Press, of Northfield 

Monroe Bridge Books, of Greenfield

Messenger Press, of North Adams

29 Press, of Cheshire 

Willow Bindery, of Shrewsbury

Third Year Studios, of Boston

Herringbone Bindery, of Boston 

Laurie Alpert, of Brookline

Carol Spack Original Antique Maps, of Framingham

Vermont:

Auger Down Books, of Brattleboro, VT

Book Arts Guild of Vermont

Country Bookshop, of Plainfield, VT

Shattuck Studio and Gallery, of Rutland, VT

Maine:

Design Smith Creative Ventures, of Camden, ME

New Jersey:

Le Bookiniste, of Hopewell, NJ

Jeffrey Bergman Books, of Fort Lee, NJ

Memory Press, of Plainsboro, NJ

New York

Furious Day Press, of New York

Connecticut

Colebrook Book Barn, of Colebrook, CT

John Bale Books, of Waterbury, CT

Yesterday’s Gallery, of East Woodstock, CT

Robin Price, of Middletown, CT

Pennsylvania:

William Hutchinson, of Mendenhall, PA

For more information and digital images of exhibitors, go to:  www.northamptonbookfair.com/exhibitors

The Northampton Book and Book Arts Fair is produced by Book Arts Promotions, in association with community sponsor Smith College Libraries. Media sponsor is New England Public Radio, WFCR-FM and WNNZ-AM.  Book Arts Promotions is a collaboration between Mark Brumberg, of Boomerang Booksellers and Duane A. Stevens, of Wiggins Fine Books.  

Screen Shot 2017-11-03 at 8.22.41 AM.pngKitty Maryatt, Director Emerita of the Scripps College Press, has re-created the Blaise Cendrars/Sonia Delaunay 1913 publication, La Prose du Transsibérien, at Two Hands Press. The new edition was printed by letterpress and has hand-painted pochoir. The edition is 150 copies, with 30 hors commerce. The publication date is January 1, 2018; the price for the book is $3500. Pre-publication sales are starting November 1 through December 30, 2017 with a discounted price of $2750. 

The type for the book was printed in June of 2017 by printer Richard Siebert in San Francisco. Two Hands Press licensed a high-resolution scan of La Prose from The Palace of the Legion of Honor in San Francisco. Richard removed the surrounding pochoir colors from the Blaise Cendrars poem and then went through the whole text for weeks, cleaning up nearly every letter. Sixteen photo-polymer plates were needed to print the four 16 x 23 inch pages, with each one printed in four colors: orange, ruby red, green and blue. Each of the 1000 sheets was printed four times on his Heidelberg letterpress.

The gouache color for the Sonia Delaunay imagery is hand-applied using thin metal stencils (pochoir = stencil in French). There are about 25 aluminum stencils for each of the four sheets, or 100 in all. The 50 or so colors have been selected with great care to match the original books. Maryatt worked primarily with originals at the Getty Research Institute, Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and the Palace of the Legion of Honor, and viewed nine other originals in the US, France and England.

About 75% of the first copies were done in France where Kitty and her assistant Chris Yuengling-Niles spent almost two months working daily with Christine Menguy at Atelier Coloris, who fine-tuned their skills in the pochoir process.

The book is folded once down the center and 21 times across to result in a book that is 3.625 by 7.25 inches. On one side you see the Delaunay image and on facing side, the Cendrars poem with the enhancing pochoir surrounding the type. The book is held unattached in its vellum folder. A booklet will accompany La Prose with an English translation of the poem by Timothy Young and will have a description of the processes.

If you are interested in more details about the project, please go to laprosepochoir.blogspot.com. For a reservation form, send an email to twohandspress@gmail.com.

Screen Shot 2017-11-01 at 9.30.14 AM.pngThe Grolier Club is heralding the Winter holiday with the exhibition Radiant with Color & Art: McLoughlin Brothers and the Business of Picture Books, 1858-1920. More than 200 vibrantly colored children’s illustrated picture books, drawings, watercolors, and ephemera are on view from December 6, 2017 to February 3, 2018.  

The exhibition focuses on the accomplishments and technological innovations of McLoughlin Brothers, the influential late 19th century children’s book publishing firm. Rising from the gritty printing district of lower Manhattan, the McLoughlin Brothers embraced cutting edge technologies like chromolithography, creative branding techniques, and competitive business tactics.  

Based upon the impressive collections of the American Antiquarian Society (AAS), a national research library and learned society located in Worcester, MA, the exhibition documents the variety of juvenile imprints created by the McLoughlin Brothers, and surveys the broad influence and appeal of this under-studied publisher of illustrated children’s literature.

Drawn from the impressive archive of McLoughlin Brothers artwork and picture books held at the AAS, the exhibition delves into the early history of American juvenile literature publishing during the period from 1858 to 1920, using the production and merchandising practices of McLoughlin Brothers to explore the serious business of entertainment for children.

Radiant with Color & Art is co-curated by Laura Wasowicz, AAS curator of children’s literature and Lauren Hewes, AAS Andrew W. Mellon Curator of Graphic Arts. The exhibition is funded in part with support from the Gladys Krieble Delmas Foundation.

Founded by John McLoughlin, Jr. (1827-1905) and Edmund McLoughlin (1833/4-1889) the firm was one of the first to concentrate exclusively in works for children producing illustrated books as well as printed paper dolls, toy soldiers, games, and valentines. They created 1,000 titles in about 150 series between 1860 and 1890.  

The McLoughlin Brothers reached both low and middle-class customers by diversifying their stock and offering various price points for their products ranging from one penny to a dollar per book. Through strategic partnerships and collaborations they expanded their distribution nationwide. They also repurposed their imprints to cross promote and sell other items such as clothing and food and worked with D. Appleton and Company to create Spanish language imprints that were sold throughout Latin America. 

The publishing house was also an innovator in printing technology,  exploiting a new process of printing from relief etched zinc plates called chromotypography, and later mastering the intricacies of  lithographic printing in color. By 1905, they were credited with having one of the largest lithographic printing establishments in the country with a Brooklyn-based factory stretching over five acres.  The firm printed books on all subjects, drawing from both European and American sources to produce everything from fairy tales and nursery rhymes, to books on popular culture and holiday-themed titles. On exhibit is an 1889 book,  A.B.C of Objects for Home and School. Kindergarten First Book, that emphasized the importance of literacy by featuring a mother reading with a child on the cover.  It was a wordless book and was distributed to schools around the world. 

Noteworthy in the books are depictions of humor, race and social mores that provide a unique view into the cultural norms of the times in which they were created. Additionally, the McLoughlin Brothers were well known for their  portrayals of Cinderella and—appropriately for the holidays—Santa Claus.

The publishers hired cartoonist Thomas Nast in 1869 to create a picture book version of the poem The Night Before Christmas.  Recognizing the poem’s potential, the firm periodically issued updated versions featuring modern toys and style of dress and created branded products to accompany the books. On display is the original watercolor for the cover design of an 1888 edition of The Night Before Christmas,  part of the firm’s art archive used for consultation during the design and republishing process. 

Cinderella was a mainstay of the McLoughlinn Brothers.  With its simple design and appealing hand-colored illustrations, the ca. 1858 Cinderella, one of the first titles issued by the publishers after they formed their partnership, looked like countless other picture books for children issued in the 1840s and 1850s. Over forty years later, the firm was still publishing the fairytale, but Cinderella was given a new look as seen in the ca. 1912 watercolor design by New York artist Sarah Noble Ives.    

The McLoughlin Brothers had harnessed the talents of popular 19th century American illustrators, including Thomas Nast, Sarah Noble Ives, Justin H. Howard, Ida Waugh, and Richard André to herald the dawn of the fin de siècle “picture book beautiful.” 

FREE LUNCHTIME EXHIBITION TOURS:

Public tours of the exhibition will be offered by the co-curators 

Friday, January 5, noon-1 pm (Laura Wasowicz, curator of children’s literature, AAS) 

Monday, January 29, 1 pm-2 pm (Lauren Hewes, Andrew W. Mellon Curator of Graphic Arts, AAS)

CATALOG: 

A fully-illustrated 144-page color catalog of Radiant with Color & Art: McLoughlin Brothers and the Business of Picture Books, 1858-1920, published by the American Antiquarian Society, will be available at the Grolier Club.

About the Grolier Club

Founded in 1884, the Grolier Club is America’s oldest and largest society of bibliophiles and enthusiasts in the graphic arts. Named after Jean Grolier the Renaissance collector renowned for sharing his collection with his friends, the club maintains a 100,000 volume library, publishes books and presents public exhibitions, lectures and symposia to foster an appreciation of art, history, printing and production of books and works on paper.  

About the American Antiquarian Society 

The nation’s first national historical organization, the American Antiquarian Society (AAS) is both a learned society and a major independent research library devoted to pre-twentieth century American imprints.  The Society was the recipient of the 2013 National Humanities Medal, the first independent research library to be so honored.  The Society sponsors a broad range of programs - visiting research fellowships, research, education, publications, lectures, and concerts - for constituencies ranging from school children and their teachers through undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, creative and performing artists and writers, and the general public.  

VISITING THE GROLIER CLUB

47 East 60th Street  

New York, NY 10022  

212-838-6690 

www.grolierclub.org  

Hours: Monday - Saturday, 10 am to 5 pm

Admission: Exhibitions are open to the public free of charge 

cadogan.pngShapero Modern in conjunction with Sladmore Contemporary is delighted to present Still Reading, an exhibition of paintings by Nancy Cadogan and sculptures by Martin Jennings. Cadogan’s oil paintings of books are shown alongside bronze maquettes and busts from Jennings's statues of literary figures. 

Cadogan’s paintings engage with ideas of time and a private dialogue with literature. The genesis for the series originates from 2011, when she made her first book paintings for the London Antiquarian Book Fair. They capture the immense potential and excitement of reading and the possibilities of language within their diminutive scale. In one sense, the works are typical of the still life genre and record a sense of time passing. In another, they reflect on the concept of stillness more widely, as a rare condition within our hyper-networked contemporary reality, and instead celebrate quiet reflection. 

As Cadogan has stated, ‘The book - the actual physical paper bound object full of words - is a treasure in this modern era. A book contains an entire universe you can only bring to life in your imagination, if you agree to give it time. It is a tribute to privacy, an honouring of the interior life.’ 

Image: Nancy Cadogan, When the Lights Go Down, 2017

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