July 2017 Archives

Casab.jpgDALLAS, Texas (July 30, 2017) - The only known surviving Italian issue movie poster for Casablanca sold Saturday, July 29, for a record $478,000 at a public auction of vintage movie posters held by Heritage Auctions in Dallas, Texas. Measuring a massive 55.5 by 78.25 inches, the 1946 Casablanca Italian 4 Fogli poster matched the world record for the most valuable movie poster ever sold at public auction.

“The buyer has just set a world record and acquired what we in the poster collecting world would equate to a masterpiece,” said Grey Smith, Director of Vintage Posters at Heritage Auctions. “The stunning artistry put into this poster makes it stand head and shoulders above any paper produced for the film.”

Previous Italian posters for the film have sold for as much as $203,000 and U.S. issues of the poster have fetched $191,200. Each of the previous record holders were sold by Heritage Auctions, the world’s largest auctioneer of vintage movie posters.

The poster is the first of its kind to surface in recent history. Featuring artwork by Luigi Martinati, the image of the cast of characters is considered the best image found in any of this film's numerous advertisements, Smith said.

The auction featured additional rare posters from the film with a half sheet poster auctioned for $65,725 and a post-war Spanish release poster selling for $35,850. 

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

Maurice Sendak.jpgAt the upcoming Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair, September 8-10 at the Brooklyn Expo Center in Greenpoint, the world of Maurice Sendak comes vividly alive. In celebration of the inauguration of a new Works on Paper section, the fair will mount a gallery-style exhibition and sale of Sendak’s original works - his first solo show to be held in his native Brooklyn, now more than five years after his death in 2012.

He is considered the most important children’s book artist of the twentieth century.  When his iconic book, “Where the Wild Things Are,” was published more than fifty years ago, his editor commented that it was “the first American picture book for children to recognize that a child has powerful emotions - anger and fear, and after the anger is spent, to be where someone loves him best of all.”

Show goers will see first-hand why Sendak’s illustrations continue to be internationally beloved by children and adults all over the world. This special event will feature original drawings, watercolors, vintage posters, signed prints and etchings, most of which have never been offered for public sale. They have been collected over a period of more than a half century and largely acquired directly from the artist himself. This is an unprecedented opportunity to own a fine art print, actually produced under the artist’s supervision in 1971 from some of his favorite book images. A selection of first edition books will also be available, many of them hand-signed by Mr. Sendak, including a signed first printing of his 1963 Caldecott Award masterpiece.

His love of books began at age four when he was confined to bed with scarlet fever, and he approached his early illustration work with deep attention to accuracy and close observation of nature and animals.  He also knew that every book must have a dimension of the fantastic, where the mundane and the magical freely mix.  In “Where the Wild Things Are,” Max’s rambunctiousness, the fearful “Wild Things” themselves and the poetry in Sendak’s writing all have contributed to the book’s popularity and longevity.  

The son of Polish immigrant parents, Sendak decided to become an illustrator at age 12, after watching Walt Disney’s Fantasia.  He came of age as an illustrator in the 1950s when the market for children’s books was growing due to an historic surge in the birthrate.  When “Where the Wild Things Are” was first published, the illustrations created some controversy, as they were so different.  Little could he have foreseen the book’s enormous success and the influence he would have overall. 

Comedian Stephen Colbert spoke for the world when he said, “we are all honored to have been briefly invited into his world.”

Image: Ink and watercolor original drawing of two “Wild Things” viewing an exhibition of their creator Maurice Sendak, 11-3/4 x 10-1.4 inches. Copyright © The Maurice Sendak Foundation. The exhibition and sale of works by internationally beloved children’s book author, Maurice Sendak, at the upcoming Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair, September 8-10 at the Brooklyn Expo Center in Greenpoint, is the first to be held in his native Brooklyn. 

Boxborough Paper Town Show, Sept. 16

Startling Stories.jpgBOXBOROUGH, MA - SEPTEMBER 16, 2017: Flamingo Eventz is pleased to announce the return of the popular Boxborough Paper Town - The Vintage Paper, Books & Advertising Collectibles Show. This is the original Boxborough Paper Show where you’ll find all things Paper - from classic Ephemera to Books, Board Games, Postcards, Advertising, Classic Vinyl, and more! A long time favorite of both dealers and customers, we continue to make changes and improvements to ensure continued growth and success. We’re bigger, better, more diverse, and with lots of new dealers…this is the paper show to attend for the rare, unusual and hard-to-find treasure!

Scheduled for Saturday September 16, 2017 at the Boxborough Regency Hotel & Conference Center - previously known as the Holiday Inn - in Boxborough, MA, Exhibitors from across the Northeast will gather to present an outstanding array of fine, rare & unusual old books, maps, postcards, autographs, prints, posters, advertising, and much, much more. Plus, we have appraisals by well-known appraiser John Bruno, star of the PBS series Market Warriors, and guest appraisers from 12-2pm. Interested parties - both dealers & customers - should contact Flamingo Eventz at 603.509.2639 / info@flamingoeventz.com.

Exhibitor Specialties include: Advertising Covers, African American, Americana, Architecture, Art, Art Deco, Auctions, Autographs, Aviation, Baseball, Books, Bibles, Black History, Black Power, Calendars, Calling Cards, Christmas, Circus, Civil War, Cook Books, Charts, Children’s Books, Cocktails, Design, Dogs, Die Cuts, Documents, Engineering, Engraving, Ephemera, Erotica, Esoterica, Fantasy, Fashion, Fishing, Floridiana, Folklore, Folk Music, Foreign Language, Furniture, Games, Gardens & Horticulture, Graphics, Historic Documents, Horses, Hunting, Illustrated Books, Interior Design, Japan, Judaica, Letters, Logbooks, Manuscripts, Maps, Maritime, Medicine, Middle East, Military, Modernism, Music, Native American, Natural History, Nautical, Naval, New York City, New York State, New Jersey, Novelties, Olympic Games, Pacifica, Photographs, Photography, Pochoir, Polar, Pop-Ups & Moveable Books, Poetry, Postcards, Posters, Presentation Copies, Presidential Archives, Press Books, Prints, Pulitzer Prize Winners, Psychedelica, Puppetry, Puzzles, Railroad, Reference, Revolutionary War, Russia, Scholarly, Science, Science Fiction, Sports, Sporting, Technical, Theatre, Theology, Trade Cards, Trade Catalogues, Travel & Exploration, Travel Brochures, Typography, U.S. Coastal History, Vanity Fair Prints, Valentines, Voyages, Watercolors, Whaling, Wine, Yachting. These, and many other specialties, will be found at this event. Be sure to check our website, FlamingoEventz.com, for complete details and easily downloaded Discount Coupons.

Date/Hours: Saturday, September 16, 2017, 9am-3pm

Location: The Boxborough Holiday Inn, 242 Adams Place, Boxborough, MA 01709. Directly off I-495, exit 28.

Admission: Adults: $7 ($1 Discount with Ad or Website Coupon), Young Collectors 12-21: $4, plenty of free parking.

Appraisals: By John Bruno, Star of Market Warriors, and guest appraisers 12-2pm at $5/Item.

Directions: I-495 Exit 28, East on Massachusetts Ave (Rt. 111), right on Adams Place to Hotel. Check our website: flamingoeventz.com for easily downloaded maps.

Miscellaneous: Food & refreshment available at the Hotel restaurant during show hours.

Information: For Dealer or Customer information, please call or click 603.509.2639 / info@flamingoeventz.com

Background: Flamingo Eventz, LLC presents the finest, most innovative, successful, and respected Book & Ephemera Fairs, Antiques Shows, and Vintage Flea Markets in the Northeast. The Brunos have over 25 years experience as antique dealers and over 22 years experience as professional show promoters. They are members of the Antiques & Collectibles National Association (ACNA), and John Bruno is an antiques appraiser and television personality who can be seen on the PBS series Market Warriors.

The Library of Congress Junior Fellows Summer Interns yesterday presented more than150 rare and unique items from 15 Library divisions. “Display Day” was open to the public for the first time since the program’s inauguration in 1991.

The display provides the opportunity for fellows to discuss the historic significance of the collection items they have researched and processed during their 10-week internships. Examples included:

  • An early draft and a stage manager’s copy of playwright Tennessee Williams’s “The Glass Menagerie” from approximately 1944
  • Blueprints for the Statue of Liberty’s pedestal
  • A letter handwritten by Abraham Lincoln on the subject of Shakespeare
  • Undergraduate lab drawings and Boy Scout and Eagle Scout membership cards that belonged to Pulitzer Prize-winning entomologist E. O. Wilson
  • Preliminary drawings of the Louvre Pyramid and presentation drawings of the East Building of the National Gallery of Art created by architect I. M. Pei
  • A postcard from Jackie Kennedy Onassis to I. M. Pei, sent in 1989
  • Paper samples cut from books of various ages to demonstrate paper deterioration
  • A Theobald Boehm and Rudolph Greve flute in C, created in Munich between 1839 and 1846
  • Spanish legal documents, including a will and a land receipt from the 1500s and trial proceedings from the 1850s
  • Cassette tapes with audio of Chilean poet and Nobel laureate Gabriela Mistral and Argentine poet Jorge Luis Borges, recorded in the 1950s
  • Images of bald eagles from the Library’s digital collections used in a new educational activity booklet for student visitors to the Library
  • Letters, artwork, and papers sent by prominent writers, including Ted Berrigan and Charles Bukowski, to the St. Mark’s Poetry Project
  • Illustrated children’s books translated into Yiddish, including fairytales by the Brothers Grimm and “The Elephant’s Child” by Rudyard Kipling, from the 1910s and 1920s

To view the complete list of display items, visit this Library link.

Working under the direction of Library curators and specialists in various divisions, 37 Junior Fellows—selected from more than 900 applicants across the country—explored the institution’s unparalleled collections and resources. They were exposed to a broad spectrum of library work: research, copyright, preservation, reference, access, standards, information management and digital initiatives.

Through the Junior Fellows Program, the Library of Congress furthers its mission to provide access to a universal record of knowledge, culture and creativity as exemplified by its collections, while supporting current and future generations of students and scholars.

The Junior Fellows Program is made possible through the generosity of the late Mrs. Jefferson Patterson and the Knowledge Navigators Trust Fund. A lead gift from H. F. (Gerry) Lenfest, former chairman of the Library’s James Madison Council private-sector advisory group, established the Knowledge Navigators Trust Fund with major support provided by members of the council. For more information about the Junior Fellows Program, visit loc.gov/hr/jrfellows/.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov, and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

(CONCORD -July 2017) The Concord Museum recently announced Doris Kearns Goodwin as the Honorary Chair of the public phase of Revolution: The Campaign for the Concord Museum, which will support a new 13,000 square foot Education Center and courtyard, a new Gateway to Concord Orientation Center, and expanded Museum gallery space to showcase the Museum’s extensive collections. Goodwin, a world renowned presidential historian, Pulitzer Prize-winning author, and Concord resident, is known as “America’s historian-in-chief.”

We are thrilled that Doris Kearns Goodwin is serving as Honorary Chair of the Campaign for the Concord Museum,” said Executive Director Margaret Burke. “Doris is a strong advocate for the value of history and history education. Her leadership signals the importance of what we are trying to achieve at the Museum.” 

The new Education Center and Museum expansion is being developed to address the Museum’s burgeoning needs. Over 12,000 students and teachers participated in the Museum’s curriculum-based school programs last year - nearly double the number of students served in 2011. The Museum through its Paul Reveres Ride program provides free transportation to the Museum and waives program fees for more than 3,000 students from Lowell, Lawrence, and Everett.

Doris explained, “For someone who has loved history for as long as I can remember, to enjoy and share the riches of the Concord Museum is such a pleasure. I’m proud to be involved in helping expand the physical space and the reach of this museum that tells not only the history of Concord, my home town for the last 40 years, but also the history of this country.”

To date the Campaign for the Concord Museum has raised $11.7 million towards the $13 million goal. Approximately $10 million of the Campaign funds will support the new Education Center and Museum renovations. The remaining $3 million will be added to the Museum’s endowment to support enhanced programs. Visit https://concordmuseumcampaign.org/ Revolution: The Campaign for Concord Museum for more information. Any size donation is greatly appreciated.

DALLAS, Texas (July 26, 2017) - Thought lost for more than a generation, a cover to Zap Comix #1 - a masterpiece of Underground Comix art by master Robert Crumb - may sell for as much as $100,000 in Heritage Auctions’ Aug. 10-12 Comics & Comic Art Auction in Dallas. The three-day event features early, key books in high-grade condition and original comic art never before seen at auction.  

“According to singer/songwriter Graham Nash, who has owned this art for many years, the Zap #1 cover is a very important piece in the arc of Robert's journey as a great artist,” said Ed Jaster, Vice President at Heritage Auctions. “This long-lost piece is a wonder to behold." 

A Mile High Pedigree copy of Science Comics #2 (Fox, 1940) graded at a CGC 9.2 is on offer and is expected to surpass $25,000. This classic Lou Fine Dynamo cover is 77 years old, and the next-highest-graded copy to come to public auction was a FN- 5.5 in 2008. 

Wonder Woman’s first appearance in All Star Comics #8 (DC, 1942) may cross the block for roughly $75,000. In addition to All Star Comics #8, the first appearance of the Justice Society of America in All Star Comics #3 (DC, 1940) CGC 5.5 FN- copy is being offered, as well, and could exceed $25,000.

The Amazing Spider-Man #14 (Marvel, 1964), graded NM/MT 9.8 by CGC, is expected to sell for at least $60,000, and The Amazing Spider-Man #1 (Marvel 1963), Stan Lee Verified Signature, graded by CBCS at a 9.0 is projected to realize $40,000.

Heritage’s first-ever presentation of Steve Ditko’s Doctor Strange artwork -  Strange Tales #141 Page 8 Original Art - features not only the good doctor, but also the Ancient One and Dormammu (est. $45,000). X-Men #2 Page 6 Original Art depicts the first appearance of the evil mutant The Vanisher, and is expected to cross the block at $35,000. A Tarzan Comic Strip Original Art from Hal Foster in 1933 depicts Tarzan’s face-off against the “Waters of Death” (est. $30,000). 

Watchmen #12 Story Page 3 (DC, 1987) is expected to surpass $25,000, and this is not the only Watchmen original art in the auction. Other Watchmen original art gems that will be available include Watchmen #8 Story Page 24 (est. $20,000) and Watchmen #11 Story Page 24 (est. $20,000).

Additional highlights include, but are not limited to:

o   Dick Sprang The Batcave Revealed Batman and Robin original art: est. $25,000

o   Thor #197 21-Page Story original art: est. $20,000

o   Richard F. Outcault Buster Brown Sunday Comic Strip from May 31, 1903: est. $35,000

o   The Amazing Spider-Man #5 (Marvel, 1963) CBCS NM+ 9.6: est. $25,000

o   Detective Comics #35 (DC, 1940) CGC VG+ 4.5: est. $50,000

o   Masked Marvel #2 Mile High Pedigree (Centaur, 1940) CGC NM 9.4: est. $12,500

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

Bloomsbury Auctions  - The Glory of Science .jpegThis Autumn Bloomsbury Auctions celebrates the study and observation of the physical and natural world in The Glory of Science. The auction will take place on 14th September at 24 Maddox Street, London W1S 1PP and will include striking photographs, maps prints and autographs.

A single owner collection of vintage NASA photographs from the Gemini missions 1965-1966 will be on offer. The Gemini program was the bridge between the Mercury and Apollo programs and was created in order to test equipment and mission procedures in Earth orbit and to train astronauts and ground crews for future Apollo missions. There were also 14 scientific, medical and technological experiments on board. 

Astronauts Jim Lovell and Edwin “Buzz” Aldrin were part of the Gemini Missions and an auction highlight is a photograph of Buzz Aldrin from 1966 (pre-selfie sticks), thought to be the first self-portrait taken space (est. at £800-£1,200).

Also in the auction is a rare astronomical reference work dated 1681 and compiled by Stanislaw Lubieniecki which provided information about recent comets of the day as notified by contemporary astronomers to Lubieniecki. TheTheatrum Cometicum contains numerous engraved illustrations, many folded, and is bound in contemporary mottled calf, (est. £10,000-15,000).

The correspondence of Nikola Tesla, the Serbian-American inventor best known for contributing to the design of the alternating current electricity supply system, is another auction highlight. In a typed letter, signed ‘N. Tesla’ and dated 1898, he explains to the Editor of The Photogram that he regrets ‘not to be able to oblige you in the matter at present’, (est. £1,500-1,800). And, in a fragment of an autograph letter, signed ‘Ch. Darwin’, the world-famous naturalist and geologist writes to George Cupples, the author of Scotch Deer Hounds and their Masters (1894), and signs off with ‘Pray give my very kind remembrance to Mrs Cupples’, (est. £2,000- 3,000).

The auction is open for consignments until 1st August. 

 

July29_01_pics.jpgITHACA, NY--National Book Auctions, located in Ithaca, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog.  

This catalog features rare, antique and decorative books as well as select additions of ephemera. American history figures prominently across the catalog, include titles relating to the opening of the American West. A private estate library being presented includes volumes dating back to the 17th century.             

Antique and rare books in this catalog include numerous titles. Among the earliest examples are the 1609 printing of Lugduni's "Pavli Comitoli Perusini Societatis lasu Theologi," bound in vellum, Grose's "Antiquities of England and Wales," produced in eight volumes in 1784 and featuring folding hand-colored maps, and the two-volume 1749 printing of de Puysegur's "Art de la Guerre," ("Art of War") with folding maps, charts and diagrams. Additional rare selections include the 1868 printing of Baird's "Cabinet Maker's Album of Furniture," the three-volume 1794 printing of Payne's "Universal Geography," with hand-colored engravings and folding maps, and Ludlow's "The Hasheesh Eater," produced in 1857.                     

Several pleasing collections will also be showcased. Highlighted is a sizable group of antique volumes relating to American history, including the opening of the West, and featuring such examples as 1845 printing of Fremont's "Report of the Exploring Expedition to the Rocky Mountains," retaining the original folding map, and the decorative "Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant," produced in two volumes in 1885. Other vintage and antique pieces also include decorative bindings, books-on-books, book binding, military history, theology, travel & exploration, history, Civil War, children's, multi-volume sets, and much more.   

Found throughout this catalog are interesting ephemera offerings. These lots include bound compilations of Civil War issues of "Harper's Weekly," the 1951 Picasso issue of "Verve" magazine, and Frederik de Wit's hand-colored engraved map of "Brabantiae," produced c1680. Additional ephemera categories include rare photogravures, postcards, black Americana, antique autograph albums and others.   

National Book Auctions is a public auction service specializing in books, ephemera, and art. National Book Auctions is a targeted service offering experience and expertise unique to marketing antique and modern books and ephemera for consignors and collectors alike. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of collectible, signed, and first edition books. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-269-0101 or email mail@nationalbookauctions.com.

 

 

A RARE PAIR OF VINCENZO CORONELLI 18 12-INCH TERRESTRIAL AND CELESTIAL GLOBES on stands, ITALIAN, PUBLISHED 1696 copy.jpgThis August, Bonhams Knightsbridge will showcase highlights from its autumn and winter auctions. The exhibition will run from Tuesday 1 August to Friday 1 September inclusive, Monday - Friday, 9.00am - 5.00pm. It will be closed on Monday 28 August for the Bank Holiday.

The exhibition of exceptional works of art include:

  • A very rare pair of 18 inch Coronelli globes dated 1696 by the Venetian cosmographer and cartographer Vincenzo Coronelli, who made globes for, among other important figures, Louis XIV of France. They will be offered in the Important Instruments of Science and Technology Sale, 31 October. Estimate: £100,000-150,000.
  • A collection of items relating to Admiral Lord Nelson, including a Chamberlain's Worcester Fine Old Japan pattern plate from Nelson's service (£25,000-30,000). The Admiral commissioned the service on a visit to Worcester in 1802, but it was unfinished at the time of his death in 1805. He bequeathed it to his paramour, Emma, Lady Hamilton who was not amused to also receive the bill. Also on show will be Nelson’s armchair from H.M.S. Victory, a gift from Lady Hamilton (£30,000-50,000). Both the armchair and the plate will be offered in the Marine Sale at Knightsbridge,18 October.
  • The large bronze sculpture ‘Perseus Arming’ by Sir Alfred Gilbert, one of several versions created by the artist of his famous statue of the same name now in Tate Britain. It will be offered for sale in Bonhams Important Design Sale at New Bond Street on 25 October and is estimated at £40,000-60,000.

Managing Director of Bonhams Knightsbridge, Jon Baddeley said, “We have a number of exceptional auctions at Knightsbridge over the coming six months. Our August preview can include only a small fraction of the rare and important things we have to offer, but it will give a fascinating insight into what’s on the horizon.”

Other highlights include:

  • The Castillo de San Juan de Ulúa, Veracruz, Mexico by the British landscape painter Thomas Egerton (1797-1842) to be offered in the Travel and Exploration Sale in Knightsbridge on 7 February 2018.  Egerton spent much of the latter part of his life in Mexico, where he and his eight-month pregnant teenage lover were mysteriously murdered in 1842. (£200,000-300,000). The painting will be on display until 18 August.
  • An important unrecorded London Delftware puzzle jug, Pickleherring Quay pottery, circa 1649-51 in the Fine Glass and British Ceramics Sale at Knightsbridge on 15 November (£15,000-25,000).
  • A wonderfully evocative depiction of the battle of Trafalgar, Oak, Hemp, and Powder, Trafalgar, 1805 by Charles Edward Dixon in the Marine Sale at Knightsbridge on 18 October (£20,000-30,000).
  • A screen-used costume made for David Bowie as Jareth the Goblin King, in the 1986 cult film Labyrinth.  Bowie also provided music for the soundtrack. To be offered in the Entertainment Memorabilia Sale in Knightsbridge, on 13 December (£20,000-30,000).
  • A striking red Poissons vase by the French glass designer and maker René Lalique. The highly successful and influential Poissons series was introduced in 1921, and this example is estimated at £12,000-15,000. It will appear in the Decorative Art and Design Sale on 26 September
  • A German Enigma Machine built in 1933.  A rare example of the cypher machines used by the German military to transmit secret information. The work of Alan Turing in breaking the German code is said to have shortened World War II by several years and saved countless lives. Estimated at £60,000-80,000 it will be offered in the Important Instruments of Science and Technology Sale, 31 October.

Pieces from the following auctions will be on display. These auctions will take place at Bonhams Knightsbridge unless otherwise indicated.

Decorative Arts and Design    26 September

The Marine Sale   18 October

Important Design (New Bond Street)   25 October

Important Instruments of Science and Technology   31 October

Fine Books and Manuscripts   15 November

Fine Glass and British Ceramics   15 November

Coins and Medals   22 November

Antique Arms and Armour   29 November

Entertainment Memorabilia   13 December

Travel and Exploration (until 18 August)   7 February 2018

Minnesota Center for Book Arts (MCBA) is proud to announce the winner of the 2017 MCBA Prize, The Book of Disquiet by London-based book artist Tim Hopkins.

For the 2017 competition, a three-member jury reviewed over 100 submissions representing 12 nations around the world, and narrowed the field to five finalists. These five works were judged at MCBA during Book Art Biennial 2017 (BookArtBiennial.org), a program series including exhibitions, workshops, and a two-day symposium. The winner was announced at a gala award ceremony on Saturday, July 22. 

Hopkin’s 2017 edition of Fernando Pessoa’s The Book of Disquiet takes a recognized classic and builds out from that book’s unique history, form, and content to create a viable reading experience that adds to the feeling and atmosphere of the novel itself. The texts that make up The Book of Disquiet were found in a box in Pessoa’s room after his death, in bundles of manuscript and typescript fragments and in no fixed order. It consists of the everyday thoughts of a single character, Bernardo Soares. The Half Pint Press edition of The Book of Disquiet takes 61 of the hundreds of fragments and presents them on a variety of paper and non-paper ephemera (some found, some made). Each fragment was typeset by hand and printed by hand on an Adana Eight-Five tabletop letterpress in an edition of 80. The fragments are presented unbound and with no fixed order in a hand-printed box. 

This edition responds to the original’s form, or lack of form, by restoring disorder to The Book of Disquiet: the fragments are to be picked out as the reader pleases. This reflects the origin of the text itself and also makes possible connections between fragments which may be less available in a bound, ordered edition; Soares was prone to letting his mind wander during long nights in his room and the book gives a sense of that wandering mind.

In addition to the title, Tim Hopkins receives a $2,000 cash prize. The four finalists each receive a $500 cash award.

The MCBA Prize 2017 jury consists of: 

Steven Daiber, of Red Trillium Press/ Aqui en la lucha in Massachusetts;

Simon Goode, co-founder of London Centre for Book Arts;

Karen Kunc, of Constellation Studios, and Cather Professor of Art at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln.

Finalists for The MCBA Prize 2017 included:

Hannah Batsel (Chicago, IL ), Maneater

Tim Hopkins (London, England), The Book of Disquiet

Ines von Ketelhodt (Flörsheim, Germany), Alpha Beta

Ellen Knudson (Gainesville, FL ) Ingress / Egress

Nader Koochaki (Beasain, Guipúzcoa, Spain), Soineko Paisaia / Dorsal Landscape 2009-2015

The jury also awarded three Special Recognitions of Merit:

Ann Kalmbach & Tatana Kellner (Rosendale, New York), The Golden Rule

Christine McCauley (London, England), Mist 

Sue Huggins Leopard (Rochester, New York), This Past Winter

View all of the entries for The MCBA Prize 2017 in MCBA's online gallery, MCBAPrize.org.

The MCBA Prize was presented in conjunction with Book Art Biennial 2017 (July 15-23), a series of events, exhibitions and workshops that explore contemporary practice in the book arts. This year's theme— Shout Out: Community Intervention, Independent Publishing, and Alternative Distribution—featured programming that amplifies individual and collective voice through grassroots artistic practice.

To learn more, visit BookArtBiennial.org.

LOS ANGELES, July 24, 2017 - Alfred Eisenstaedt’s signed photographs of some of his most memorable subjects including the Kennedys, Richard Nixon, Winston Churchill and Katherine Hepburn will be auctioned by Nate D. Sanders Auctions on July 27, 2017. 

Eisenstaedt was one of America’s most treasured photographers. As a photojournalist for Life Magazine, Eisenstaedt took some of the most memorable images of the 20th century including V-J Day in Times Square, the unforgettable photo of a GI kissing a nurse during a parade in Times Square to celebrate the end of World War II.

Eisenstaedt traveled around the world to shoot captivating and important subjects from world leaders to famous show business performers. President John F. Kennedy gifted Eisenstaedt with two of his signed books, Profiles in Courage and To Turn the Tide, as a token of gratitude for photographing Kennedy and his family on numerous occasions for Life.  Frequent Eisenstaedt subjects Harry Truman and Charlie Chaplin also provided “Eisie” with autographed memoirs. The Kennedy, Truman and Chaplin books are featured in the auction.

Eisenstaedt died in 1995.

This auction features 12 Eisenstaedt-signed photos from his personal collection, which belonged to his late sister-in-law Lucille Kaye after his death.

Additional information on the Eisenstaedt collection can be found at 
http://natedsanders.com/catalog.aspx?searchby=3&searchvalue=eisenstaedt

About Nate D. Sanders Auctions

An industry leader in documents and autographs, Nate D. Sanders Auctions has conducted auctions in Los Angeles since 1990 and now holds major auctions on a monthly basis. Owner Nate Sanders is recognized for his knowledge of sports, historical and Hollywood memorabilia. To learn more visit natedsanders.com

249- AL HIRSCHFELD (AMERICAN, 1903-2003) copy.jpgPhiladelphia, PA - On Wednesday, August 9 at 10am, Freeman’s will present The Collector’s Sale. With more than 400 lots spanning the breadth and depth of almost every specialist department, the sale offers something for everyone and for every budget. 

The sale will be of particular interest for the budding community of young collectors developing in Philadelphia. The city was recently named by the real estate website, Trulia, as the best place for millennials, as the vibrant age group were most likely to be homeowners here than elsewhere in the country. With a trend of new and affordable housing, buying at auction allows one to own a unique piece of furniture or décor, imbued with history and timeless style for not much more—and in many cases, less—than the cost of an item from the ubiquitous Scandinavian flat-packed home store. Many of the items in the sale have estimates below $1,000. For those needing to furnish and decorate new home, The Collector’s Sale is an immediate solution to a daunting task. In addition to the affordable estate property, the auction also includes property originally unsold in one of our numerous fine sales each year. This premium property, now reduced in estimate, could not be more attractive on the market. 

Illustrator and caricaturist Al Hirschfeld was a longtime staple on the pages of The New York Times and New York Magazine, among various publications. His classic black ink drawings, made with a crow’s quill, of celebrities and Broadway stars have become synonymous with his name. Freeman’s is pleased to include more than 30 Hirschfield works in the sale, including drawings of the cast of “Friends,” jazz age dancer Josephine Baker, Ringo Starr, Bette Davis, Clint Eastwood, and two self-portraits. Each of the prints comes framed and ready to hang on your wall. 

Design enthusiasts will enjoy a selection of pieces by some of the biggest names in mid-century modern furniture, including Harry Bertoia, Eero Saarinen , Florence Knoll, and Hans Wegner, whose “wishbone” chairs have been imitated but never duplicated. The sale includes a Saarinen “Tulip” dining table and four matching chairs, as well as a side table. The iconic fluted shape of the enameled aluminum defined design in the 1970s, and each of the pieces in The Collectors Sale can be purchased for significantly less than buying a new production model today. 

With close to 100 items from our Asian Arts department, including a massive Chinese celadon jade mountain, and a variety of Chinese porcelain, hardstone, and jadeite vases, your mantelpiece will never look bare. The sale also includes decorative silver items, such as ornate silver serving trays and tea services, to elevate your next book club meeting or weekend brunch. 

Whether your style is traditional, mid-century modern, art deco, Victorian, French provincial, or an eclectic mix of everything, The Collectors Sale has the décor you are looking for. The exhibition will open with a preview party on Friday, August 4th from 6:00-8:00pm, to coincide with First Friday.

THE VIEWING AND AUCTION WILL TAKE PLACE AT 1808 CHESTNUT STREET

Saturday, August 5, 12-5pm 

Sunday, August 6, 12-5pm 

Monday, August 7, 10am-5pm 

Tuesday, August 8, 10am-5pm 

By appointment only on the morning of the sale 

AUCTION

Wednesday, August 9 at 10am at Freeman’s

PR_Expired_Book_02.jpgExpired (October 2017) is an exquisite new monograph by American photographic artist Kerry Mansfield that pays homage to the beauty and grace found in the collective and shared experience of time worn and well-read library books. The book's title is drawn from an official designation bestowed by a librarian upon a library book that is considered too damaged to be borrowed and read any longer. Some of these "expired" books are sent to be pulped and recycled, while others languish in storage or turn up in garage sales and on eBay.

This is where Mansfield steps in. For her, the discarded library book is a relic to be cherished and revered. Over the course of several years, she embarked on a mission to locate expired library books across the country and bring them back to life through her photography. With meticulous composition and artful lighting, Mansfield lovingly illuminates every damaged detail elevating these aging books into permanent works of art.

In her artist statement, Kerry Mansfield writes: "The volumes documented in 'Expired' serve as specimens akin to post-mortem photography in the Victorian Era, when family members only received the honor of documentation upon their demise. Each picture serves as an homage, calling out palpable echoes etched into the pages by a margin-scrawled note, a yellowed coffee splatter or sticky peanut butter and jelly fingerprints. It's easy to feel a sense of abuse and loss, but they say much more. They show the evidence of everyone that has touched them, because they were well read, and often well loved. They were not left on shelves, untouched."

In Expired, we witness beauty and poignancy in the tattered edges, torn covers, broken spines, water logged pages, and other defects brought on by time and neglect. Mansfield also photographs the ephemera of the library going experience: the little paper check-out cards where alongside the stamped due date the borrower's signature signifies a sacred promise to return the book on time or face a fine, or, worse, a scolding from the librarian.

The titles Mansfield captures range from the classics we love such as Harper Lee's "To Kill a Mockingbird," Dr. Seuss's "Hop on Pop," and "The Hardy Boys" series to more obscure books such as Evelyn Sibley Lampman's "The Shy Stegosaurus of Cricket Creek" and "The Flutes of Shanghai."

The Process

After culling through thousands of books, Mansfield chose each title based on specific characteristics that she felt best displayed the love poured into library books over their years on the stacks. Currently, over 180 ex-library books have been individually photographed by Mansfield. Every book was carefully assessed, documented and alphabetically archived. The series is comprised of 175 photographs. The book presents 73 of these images. Mansfield still has over 75 books left to shoot and is planning Expired (Volume II).

Book Design

Expired is elegantly designed to have the look and feel of a novel. The book features a red ribbon page marker, a tipped in image on the back cover, and mounted on the inside of the back cover is a physical library check-out card that is signed by the artist on the author line and inserted into a pocket stamped "Expired."

"We must take time to celebrate the swiftly disappearing communal experience offered by library books as they are being replaced by downloads, finger swipes, and plastic newness. If you listen carefully, you can hear the aching poetry -- the burden of the years that calls from their tattered pages," says Mansfield.

Expired will appeal to art and photo book collectors, writers, avid readers, librarians, sociologists, and anyone who cherishes the fading emblems of our collective reading history. 

About the Artist:

Kerry Mansfield is a San Francisco based photographer whose work explores time and how it effects our perceptions of what we see. Born in New Jersey in 1974, Kerry graduated with a Bachelor's Degree in Photography from UC Berkeley and did further studies at CCA (California College of the Arts) to refine her sense of space and architecture. Her work has been exhibited globally and garnered numerous honors including LensCulture's Single Image Award, multiple World Photography Organization and IPA Awards, and as a Critical Mass Finalist for three straight years. A host of press and publications, ranging from the PDN Photo Annual to The New York Times, have featured several of her bodies of work, including the most recent Expired series. For more information, go to: www.kerrymansfield.com

Book Specifications:

The Trade Edition

12"x12" 120 Smyth sewn pages 

Case bound linen cover

Leather wrap spine

Library check-out card in envelope

Red page marker ribbon

Blind embossed title

Tipped-in back cover image

$65 US

The Limited-Edition Box Set

SIGNED Limited Edition PRINT

Only 50 numbered copies

Linen clamshell case

Blind embossed title

Hand signed

Linen covered clamshell case

Includes all Trade Edition details

$350 US 

Both editions can be purchased by going to: www.kerrymansfield.com

 

Milton in Translation (Cover) copy.jpgThe works of John Milton have been translated more than 300 times and into 57 different languages - including onto sheets of toilet paper by a Yugoslavian political prisoner - extensive new research has revealed. 

A new book titled ‘Milton in Translation’ has been put together by Milton scholars and translators from across the globe to explore how wide reaching the impact of the 17th Century poet is and mark the 350th anniversary of his masterpiece ‘Paradise Lost’ (1667).  

It represents the world’s first detailed research into how Milton has been translated and read across the globe, and reveals previously unknown stories of the writer’s significance.

It has been produced by Prof Angelica Duran, Professor of English and Comparative Literature at Purdue University (USA), Dr Islam Issa, Lecturer in English Literature at Birmingham City University (UK), and Dr Jonathan R Olson, newly appointed Assistant Professor of English at Grand Canyon University (USA).

They recruited a global array of contributors who researched the number of translations, the languages and the significance of Milton across dozens of countries and hundreds of texts.  

Among stories uncovered, they found that in the 1960s, imprisoned Yugoslav communist party official turned dissident, Milovan Djilas, translated Milton onto rolls of toilet paper using a three-inch pencil hidden inside an orange and smuggled it out of prison. 

They also discovered a wide range of previously unknown facts. For instance, that translations were produced to replace lost manuscripts during China’s Cultural Revolution and that Josef Jungmann, the poet and linguist considered to be largely responsible for creating modern Czech language, took delight in translating Milton’s work. 

Dr Islam Issa, Lecturer in English Literature at Birmingham City University, who came up with idea, said:

“The inspiration for this book came in 2012 after the 10th International Milton Symposium in Tokyo, the first time the gathering had been held outside Europe or North America. It hit us how international Milton had become. It became particularly exciting finding how many languages Milton's work had been translated into since he was famously a multilingual himself.

"This book shows the real reach of literature, even if it's from 350 years ago. It also confirms that Milton's works, particularly ‘Paradise Lost’, have themes that are both universal and adaptable to different contexts.”

Among other findings, the book explores the relationship between Milton and politics across the world, reflecting the anti-establishment character of the author who played a role in ordering the execution of King Charles I. 

Translations were often found to mirror periods of rebellious ideology or nationalism such as in Soviet Estonia where the translation was an act of national resistance, during the Winter War of Finland when the country was gaining independence from Russia, and in the Middle East during the recent Arab Spring uprisings.

The book finds that translations of Milton’s work have been closely linked to religion in Iran and Israel, and specifically with Christianity in Italy, Poland, Portugal and Spain, where the Catholic Inquisition played a part in limiting and delaying some translations. 

Dr Issa added:

"The book isn't just about Milton. For me, the most fascinating thing was seeing how all around the world, religion and politics have been so closely linked with what people choose to translate and how they go about it.

“There were many common trends. So readers going through independence took real interest in Milton's revolutionary ideas. Or interestingly, translators in Egypt, Estonia and Spain from completely different times self-censored the exact same sexual scenes". 

Discoveries also include that Milton's works have been translated into more languages in the last 30 years than in the previous three centuries combined, emphasising the global political liberation and changing landscape of the 21st Century. 

‘Milton in Translation’ has been published by the Oxford University Press. 

 

1007.jpgThe July 15, 2017 sale at National Book Auctions (NBA) featured a broad range of rare and collectible books and ephemera.

Figuring prominently were titles relating to the opening of the American West as well as emblem books dating back to the early 17th century. Another standout offering was an early edition of Alexander von Humboldt's magnum opus "Voyage aux Regions Equinoxiales du Nouveau Continent." This highly decorative set with calf-backed, marbled, and gilt-stamped boards fetched $1,125 against a high estimate of $400. This pleasing result reflects the recent resurgence of interest in von Humboldt thanks to Andrea Wulf's 2016 bestseller "The Invention of Nature," which credits the German geographer with "forever chang[ing] the way we see the natural world."

Noteworthy ephemera lots included a very early issue of Detective Comics featuring Batman and Robin, which was discovered among personal papers during a complete estate clean-out conducted by NBA's full-service sister company Worth Auctions. Also showcased were an envelope franked by James A. Garfield; an original drawing by Rube Goldberg inscribed to the famous conservationist Horace Marden Albright; and a suite of vintage gravure prints by such iconic early 20th century photographers as Imogen Cunningham and Charles Sheeler.

Further complementary material will be featured in NBA's upcoming sale on July 29, 2017. NBA's cataloged live sales take place in the Galleries at Worth Asset Brokerage in Freeville, New York (just six miles north of Cornell University) and are simulcast to a global bidding audience via Invaluable. For more information about bidding or consigning, mail@nationalbookauctions.com or call 607-269-0101.

Image: Voyage aux Regions Equinoxiales du Nouveau Continent.

Hippie sex commune007 copy.jpgCambridge, MA (July 2017) -- The search for something beyond the limits of ordinary experience—for transcendence—has preoccupied humankind for millennia. Religion, the occult, philosophy, music, endorphins, sex, Ecstasy: various paths have been taken in the hope of achieving it. In Altered States: Sex, Drugs, and Transcendence in the Ludlow-Santo Domingo Library, on view at Houghton Library 5 September-16 December, one collector’s quest to document the history of this search through rare books, manuscripts, photographs, posters, prints, comics, and ephemera is celebrated. 

Investment advisor Julio Mario Santo Domingo, Jr. (1957-2009) assembled the world’s largest private collection documenting psychoactive drugs and their physical and social effects. His interest was broad, from cultivation and synthesis to the many cultural and counter-cultural products such altered states of mind have inspired and influenced. Rich in scientific, medical, legal, and literary works, the Ludlow-Santo Domingo (LSD) Library documents in depth both the benefits of controlled use and the horrors of addiction. 

The exhibition, curated by Leslie A. Morris, Curator of Modern Books and Manuscripts at Houghton Library with the assistance of colleagues throughout the Harvard Library system, focuses on eight major topics represented in the LSD Library: opium, cocaine, hallucinogens, marijuana, sex, social protest, underground comix, and ephemera. “The incredible variety of material in the LSD Library has transformed our collection,” said Morris. “The Library can now support innovative new research on 20th-century culture and counterculture. And it’s very cool stuff!” 

Highlights include illustrations of poppies in a 16th-century doctor’s manual; an album of delicate 19th-century Chinese paintings showing stages of opium production; a binding with mirror and Amex card for cutting cocaine by artist Damien Hirst; self-portraits drawn under the influence of LSD; and posters from the Black Panthers and the May 1968 student protests in Paris. A selection of classic literature, including work by Samuel Taylor Coleridge, Thomas De Quincy, Charles Baudelaire, William S. Burroughs, and Allen Ginsberg; and association copies such as Adolf Hitler’s annotated Kokain by Pitigrilli and Timothy Leary’s notes on Aleister Crowley’s Diary of a Drug Fiend, rub shoulders with pulp fiction such as Marijuana Girl, and underground comix illustrated by R. Crumb and Trina Robbins. Medical works on therapeutic drug use, and true-life tales of crime and addiction, provide a sobering reminder of the danger of excess. 

Sex, another path towards transcendence, is explored through poet Pierre Louÿs’s sex diary; erotica by Rachilde, Guy de Maupassant, and Pauline Réage; the first X-rated comic, Barbarella; and Jeffrey magazine. Works on birth control, AIDS prevention, and the Illustrated Presidential Report of the Commission on Obscenity and Pornography, and a female condom, show the individual and social consequences such exploration may provoke. 

The LSD Library came to Harvard in 2012. The collection is shared between various libraries at the University; this exhibition includes material from the Botany Library, Countway Medical Library, Fine Arts Library, Harvard Film Archive, Houghton Library, Law Library, Schlesinger Library, and Widener Library. “Since its arrival at Harvard in 2012, the Ludlow-Santo Domingo Library has been one of our most heavily used collections for research and for teaching,” said Thomas Hyry, Florence Fearrington Librarian of Houghton Library. “With this exhibition, we now look forward to presenting selections from this remarkable collection and to welcoming a broad audience of visitors who can engage with and learn from it.” 

Programs 

Complementary events include:
o Lectures by Don Lattin, author of the Harvard Psychedelic Club, and Laurence Bergreen, author of Casanova: The World of a Seductive Genius
o A film series at the Harvard Film Archive
o Social protest inspired poetry readings and other events hosted by Houghton 

Library’s Woodberry Poetry Room
o Altered Gazes: Sex, Drugs, and Rock & Roll at Schlesinger Library, an exhibition at Harvard University’s Schlesinger Library 

Houghton Library 

Houghton Library is Harvard University’s principal repository for rare books and manuscripts, literary and performing arts archives, and more. The library’s holdings of primary source material are managed by an expert staff and shared with scholars, students and the public in the reading room, and through exhibitions, lectures, seminars, publications and courses. 

Houghton Library is located in Harvard Yard, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. It is open Monday, Friday and Saturday 9am-5pm, and Tuesday through Thursday 9am-7pm. Houghton Library is closed on Sundays. Exhibitions are free and open to the public. 

Image: Ronald Jamer. Hippie Sex Communes. Los Angeles: Echelon Book Publishers, 1970. SD Library Pulp Fiction Collection, Houghton Library, Harvard University.

Symposium_banner.jpgCambridge, MA (July 2017) - Houghton Library, Harvard College’s primary rare books and manuscripts library, recently announced the capstone event of its 75th anniversary year, a symposium that asks bluntly, “Houghton Library: Who Cares?” The event, scheduled for this October 5th-6th, will examine the library’s legacy, mission, and path forward through the lens of that central question and provocation. 

Florence Fearrington Librarian of Houghton, Tom Hyry looks forward to “an engaging symposium that will address, from a variety of perspectives, many of the most pressing challenges and promising opportunities faced by Houghton Library and the special collections and archives profession. We hope and expect,” he continues, “that the symposium will result in a renewal of mission and the development of new directions for the library.” 

Fourteen speakers and panelists who connect to Houghton’s collections in a range of ways - as creators and collectors, readers and interpreters, colleagues in cultural heritage from around the world - will join the audience to grapple with questions around care and concern for the collections, as well as the scholarship, art, and inquiry that come out of engagement with libraries like Houghton. Organizers of the event hope to face boldly questions and concerns, cultivating an informed optimism about the future of special collections and archives that is tempered with an understanding of the problems they face in our current cultural climate. 

“Anniversaries tend toward the celebratory and self-congratulatory; our organizing committee hoped instead to use this opportunity to self-challenge and really do the work of building a case for care with this dynamic group of speakers and thinkers,” says Emilie Hardman, Houghton’s Research, Instruction, and Digital Initiatives Librarian, chair of the organizing committee. 

Each day of the symposium will feature a keynote lecture, the first delivered by Jamaica Kincaid, the world-renowned novelist and essayist. Kincaid will be followed by Johanna Drucker, internationally known for her work in the history of graphic design, typography, experimental poetry, fine art, and digital humanities. Symposium attendees will also hear opening remarks from Henry Louis “Skip” Gates, Director of the Hutchins Center for African and African American Research at Harvard University, and Drew Gilpin Faust, president of Harvard. For a full schedule, presenter profiles, registration for the waitlist, and other information, please visit: houghton75symposium.org. 

Want to know more? houghtonlibrary_events@harvard.edu or +1 617-998-5210 

Houghton Library 

Houghton Library is the principal repository for Harvard University's collections of rare books, manuscripts, and archives. The library’s holdings of primary source material are managed by an expert staff and shared with scholars and the public in the reading room, and through exhibitions, lectures, seminars, publications and courses. 

Houghton Library is located in Harvard Yard, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA 02138, USA. It is open Monday, Friday and Saturday 9am-5pm, and Tuesday through Thursday 9am-7pm. Houghton Library is closed on Sundays. Exhibitions are free and open to the public. 

 

old ny photo 1.jpgThere’s even more to experience, more to enjoy and - best of all -- more to buy, when the Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair returns to the Brooklyn Expo Center in Greenpoint, September 8-10, 2017. One of New York City’s most eagerly awaited fall events, the 100-exhibitor fair, produced by the Impact Events Group, is among the largest regional antiquarian book fairs in the country.  

This year show goers will be introduced to a whole new world of collectible treasures with the debut of a “Works on Paper” gallery. Sunlight from the exhibition hall’s large windows will flood into individual gallery spaces where exhibitors have brought together outstanding collections of prints, drawings, etchings, engravings, lithographs and photography to add to the fair’s abundance of rare and vintage books from top dealers from across the U.S., Canada and Europe. Whether you’re looking for a book under $50, a rare edition, or a fine print to cherish for years to come, you’ll find it at this fair. With the addition of the Works on Paper gallery, the Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair’s expanded offerings make it feel like two great shows in one!

To celebrate the debut of the Works on Paper gallery, the Fair will mount an exhibition and sale of works by the late Maurice Sendak, beloved children’s author and illustrator. The first gallery-style showing and sale to be held in the artist’s native Brooklyn, this special event will feature original drawings, watercolors, vintage posters, signed prints and etchings, most of which have never been offered for public sale. 

These have been collected over a period of fifty years and were largely acquired directly from the artist himself. This is an unprecedented opportunity to own a fine art print, actually produced by the artist in 1971 from some of his favorite book images, for as little as $25.  For the serious collector, an exceptional signed first edition of the artist’s most famous children’s book, “Where the Wild Things Are,” is being offered by Enchanted Books for $22,500.  

If the work of Matthew Carter looks familiar, it’s because you might use it yourself - on your computer. The Center Street Studio is bringing a dramatic exhibit of a print portfolio by the renowned digital type designer, who has seven of his designs in the collection at the Museum of Modern Art. This portfolio consists of the 26 letters of the alphabet in his favorite typefaces of his own creation, which will be displayed on a 24-foot wall.  Some of the fonts include his best known, such as Verdana and Georgia, as well as some from type designs still in progress. 

Pop-up Mania is a series of events devoted to books filled with characters that pop right up out of its pages. Ellen Rubin, known as the Pop-Up Lady, is an expert on the history of moveable paper and will give an informative talk, “A History of Pop-up Books: 900 Years of Paper Engineering” on Saturday. She will also present an amazing exhibit from her massive collection of rare pop-up books from around the world.  On Sunday, parents and children alike will enjoy joining her for a 20-minute dramatic reading of the pop-up book, The Three Little Pigs. Fun for the entire family!

Joining her on Sunday is Matthew Reinhart, a world-renowned children's book author, illustrator and paper engineer. He will share the secrets of how to transform paper into magical, moving, three-dimensional structures that defy imagination in his demonstration, “Cut, Fold And Repeat.” Matthew is known best for designing the impossible in his acclaimed pop-up books, among them the New York Times bestselling “Star Wars: A Pop-Up Guide To The Galaxy, Cinderella: A Pop-Up Fairy Tale, Dc Super Heroes: The Ultimate Pop-Up Book and Mommy ?, produced with the legendary Maurice Sendak.. 

For people new to collecting rare books or prints, two talented professionals will present informative talks on Saturday. The History Channel’s “Pawn Stars” personality and rare book specialist, Rebecca Romney, will talk on “The ABC’s of Starting a Rare Book Collection,” and sign copies of her newly published book, “Printer’s Error:  Irreverent Stories from Book History.”  Art appraiser and renowned print specialist Jeannot R. Barr will share the fine points of getting started on a print collection in his presentation, “Starting a Print Collection on Any Budget. It’s a unique opportunity for collectors at all levels to learn directly from experts.

One of the signatures of this show is its depth of variety. Visitors could spend hours combing the aisles for personal favorites:  nostalgic snapshots of early New York from the vast collection of Stacy Waldman, owner of the House of Mirth; Brooklyn-based bookseller Lizzy Young’s vintage cookbooks and ephemera, including menus from the ocean liner RMS Lusitania. A collection of beautifully bound books from Austin Abbey Rare Books, has gilt-embossed covers that turn into glowing miniature works of art under direct light; and a huge collection of vintage luggage labels from Sheryl Jaeger of Eclectibles is sure to induce romantic visions of faraway places. World War II history buffs will be drawn to two important and very rare propaganda postcard collections that demonstrate how history unfolds on paper. Exhibitor Kurt Sanftleben’s Black Album, a collection of ten propaganda postcards, is the earliest depiction of Nazi atrocities against Poland’s Jewish citizens. Emil Allakhverdov’s Anti-Nazi, Anti-Soviet postcards, were reconfigured illustrations from a Ukrainian children’s book, published after the defeat of Nazi Germany in 1945. 

A Friday evening preview benefiting Rare Book School, is a must for those wanting to get first pick from the fair’s thousands of rare items before doors open on Saturday.  

LOCATION:

Brooklyn Expo Center

79 Franklin Street

Greenpoint, Brooklyn

HOURS:

Friday Preview - 5:00-9:00 pm (benefit for Rare Book School)

Saturday, September 9 -11:00 am to 7:00 pm

Sunday, September 10 - 11:00 am to 5:00 pm.

ADMISSION PRICES:

Friday Night Preview Benefit -- $25.00

General Admission Weekend Pass for $15 or $10 on Sunday 

Visit: www.brooklynbookfair.com for more information and discount admission tickets.

9781783301874.jpgFacet Publishing have announced the release of Freda Matassa’s new book Valuing Your Collection: A practical guide for museums, libraries and archives 

Assigning a financial value to a cultural object is always difficult, as there is no right answer. It is one of the many tasks of the curator, whether they work in a gallery, museum, archive or library, yet it is a role for which few have had any training and that many approach with a lack of confidence. Even if there is a profound knowledge of the subject matter, there may be insufficient experience in the market for cultural objects. However, although it may not be easy, it has to be done.

In Valuing Your Collection, collections management expert Freda Matassa examines the issues around valuing objects in cultural collections, describing current practice in museums, libraries and archives, and giving practical advice on how to assign values. Matassa looks at the difference between value and worth and at how cultural value can be translated into monetary terms. She outlines the arguments over whether financial values should be assigned at all and provides guidance on how to approach a valuation by making comparisons and using a step-by-step process for which templates for a wide range of collections are provided.

Matassa said, “Valuation is fraught with difficulties for cultural collections. Finance is not their core business. Curators have little or no training and are reluctant to mention money as it may detract from significance. My book is designed to give the non-specialist confidence in their decision making.”

Valuing Your Collection: A practical guide for museums, libraries and archives | Jul 2017 | 240pp | paperback: 9781783301874 | £59.95 | hardback: 9781783301881 | £119.95 | eBook: 9781783302147

Freda Matassa FRSA MA (Hons) DipAL DipEd is a well-known UK expert on collections management who advises, teaches and lectures internationally. Currently Director of Matassa Toffolo, a museum-standard art consultancy, former Head of Collections Management at Tate Galleries and co-founder of the European Registrars Conference, she is expert adviser on several European projects for museum standards and to the Minister of Culture on Immunity from Seizure. She was named one of the Top 50 Women to Watch in the arts and is the author of Museum Collections Management (Facet, 2011) and Organizing Exhibitions (Facet, 2014).

The book is published by Facet Publishing and is available from Bookpoint Ltd | Tel: +44 (0)1235 827702 | Fax: +44 (0)1235 827703 | Email: facet@bookpoint.co.uk | Web: www.facetpublishing.co.uk. | Mailing Address: Mail Order Dept, 39 Milton Park, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 4TD. It is available in North America from the American Library Association.

Gigli copy.jpgDALLAS, Texas — Some of the most recognizable cultural figures and historical events are represented in the prints offered in Heritage Auctions’ Photographs Online Auction. Bids have been registered for a number of pieces with the end of bidding arriving July 19.

Highlighting the auction is long time LIFE magazine photographer Ormond Gigli’s Girls in the Windows, New York City, 1960 (est. $35,000-45,000), an impressive-sized (46 by 46 inches) print that is widely regarded as one of the most famous fashion shots of the 1960s.

“This auction is a testament to the evolving fine-art photography market and our over one million registered bidder-members that we are able to offer such high-value and iconic photographs in an internet-only format,” said Nigel Russell, Heritage Auctions Director of Photography.

Photographer and environmentalist Ansel Adams is represented with his Aspens, Northern New Mexico, 1958 (est. $15,000-25,000). This photo came to auction from the current owner who received it directly form Adams in 1977.

One of the most memorable photos ever published by LIFE magazine V.J. Day , Times Square, New York City, 1945 also referred to as “The Kiss” by Alfred Eisenstaedt (est. $8,000-12,000), numbered 175/250, captures the celebration of V-J Day in New York City. The Germany-born photographer recorded some of the most influential and iconic images of the 20th century.

Additionally, American photographer Herb Greene built his career around his portraits of the infamous band The Grateful Dead. This shot of the band with rock legend Bob Dylan aptly titled Bob Dylan and the Grateful Dead, 1987 (est. $1,500-2,500), is classic Greene and is one of many pop culture-themed photos available.

Other top lots include but are not limited to:

Hiroshi Sugimoto’s Saint Benedict Chapel from the series Architecture of Time, 2000: est. $10,000-15,000

Josef Hoflehner’s Jet Airliner #43, 2011: est. $6,500-7,500

Yousuf Karsh’s Winston Churchill, 1941: est. $3,000-5,000

Nicholas Nixon’s The Brown Sisters, Cambridge, 1986: est. $6,000-8,000

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

nielsen copy.jpgDALLAS, Texas - A record-breaking $1.4 million worth of rare animation art, concept drawings and poster art changed hands in Heritage Auctions’ Animation Art Auction July 1-2 in Dallas. The event featured a grand selection of original Fantasia artwork, and the leader of the famed Disney musical feature was Kay Nielsen’s depiction of the demon Chernabog in the Night on Bald Mountain Concept Painting, which sold for an astounding $59,750.

“This was our sixth consecutive Animation auction to top the $1 million mark,” said Jim Lentz, Director of Animation Art for Heritage. “Our formula has been to auction primarily fresh material that never had been offered for sale before, with almost no reserves, and to cross-promote it to a new generation of bidders as well as seasoned animation collectors. We plan to continue in this vein and also to continue emphasizing the whole range of animation from 1928-2000."

A beautiful Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs Old Hag and Snow White Production Cel exceeded expectations by closing $33,460, solidifying the fact that the cel was “no ordinary apple.” Also, a museum-worthy storyboard sequence from Song of the South appeared and its 23 pages of concept art from the “Tar Baby” scene by illustrator Ken Anderson sold for $15,535. Concept art from the classic by Mary Blair featuring Br'er Bear and Br'er Fox Concept Art (Walt Disney, 1946) sold for $10,157.

A lavish selection of Lady and the Tramp original artwork was offered, and some of the highlights included an alluring Production Cel Setup and Master Background that realized $14,340, a Production Cel Setup from the memorable “Bella Notte” scene received $11,950 and a Concept Art/Background Color Key by Eyvind Earle was auctioned for $6,572.50.

Additional animation and collectibles highlights included, but were not limited to:

·         Mary Blair’s The Adventures of Ichabod and Mr. Toad Concept Painting: realized $14,937

·         Mary Blair’s It’s a Small World Concept Painting: realized $14,340

·         Robin Hood Daffy Original Painting by Chuck Jones: realized $14,340

·         A bound Mickey Mouse Magazine Giveaway V1 #1: realized $13,145

Classics and Saturday Morning Cartoons

A gem from the Saturday morning cartoon arsenal of artwork Filmation’s The Adventures of Batman Publicity Cel and Painted Coconut came out on top, realizing $6,572. This cel was special because it was actually displayed in Filmation Studios’ offices for many years.

A rare, Rocky and His Friends Production Cel and Key Master Background realized $16,730.

An extraordinarily rare Dr. Seuss' How the Grinch Stole Christmas Production Cel Setup and Master Background (MGM, 1966) - depicting the dastardly Grinch speeding away from Whoville on a sled packed with presents - sold for nearly three times its estimate to end at $6,572.

One of the first depictions of Mighty Mouse as “Super Mouse”- desired for being the first time art from the early cartoon was ever offered at auction - sold for $5,019. Also bringing $5,019 was a Production Cel and Master Painted Background Setup from the famous Tom and Jerry short “A Mouse in the House.”

Rare Disneyland Poster Art

Fans of Disneyland were treated to The Haunted House/Haunted Mansion Disneyland Notes and Plans group that are straight from the hands of Walt Disney and Ken Anderson, a longtime writer and art director at Walt Disney Animation Studios. These binder-bound notes went for $13,145 after a fierce battle among 13 bidders.

The “Haunted Mansion" Disneyland Entrance Poster Signed by Marc Davis (Walt Disney, 1969) sold for $4,899. The "Matterhorn Bobsled" Disneyland Park Attraction Poster (Walt Disney, 1959) sold for $3,585 as did the "Autopia" Disneyland Park Attraction Poster (Walt Disney, 1955).

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

casa.jpgDALLAS, Texas - A truly special piece from a film widely regarded as one of the greatest ever made, the 1946 Casablanca Italian 4 Fogli with Luigi Martinati Artwork is expected to sell for as much as $180,000 July 29-30 in Dallas. This 55.5-by-78.25-inch work of art is the first of its kind to surface in recent history; the poster, and many more, will hit the block on July 29-30 at Heritage Auctions’ Movie Posters Signature Auction.

“This Casablanca rarity is one of the finest in the entire hobby,” said Grey Smith, Director of Vintage Posters at Heritage Auctions. “To own this poster is on par with owning the pinnacle of poster art.”

Also on offer is a Frankenstein (Universal, 1931) One Sheet (est. $80,000), which is one out of six copies known to exist. The sequel to Frankenstein also makes an appearance at auction. A French Grande (46.5-by-62-inch) of The Bride of Frankenstein from 1935 is expected to bring in $40,000.

Other momentous Horror posters consist of a Supernatural One Sheet from 1933 (est. $45,000) and a never-before-offered Italian 4 Fogli from Horror of Dracula, a Universal production (est. $10,000).

From the depths of imagination came Metropolis, and with it came the revolutionary genre of science fiction. Two Australian pre-war daybills will cross the block and each is the only known copy of its kind. The two styles being presented are the Robotrix Style Daybill (est. $30,000) and the Flood Style Daybill (est. $20,000) which are genre-defining classics and must-haves for any serious collector. 

The Day the Earth Stood Still (est. $10,000) by 20th Century Fox in 1951 is arguably one of the best science fiction movies ever made, and Heritage is offering a classic Standee with retro imagery similar to the artwork found on the half sheets and title cards.

Additional highlights include, but are not limited to:

·         Casablanca Half Sheet (Warner Brothers, 1942): est. $50,000

·         Cavalcade One Sheet (Fox, 1933): est. $25,000

·         Morocco Double Grande (Paramount, 1931): est. $20,000

·         Spitfire One Sheet (RKO, 1934): est. $15,000

·         Moon Over Miami One Sheet (20th Century Fox, 1941): est. $12,000

Heritage Auctions’ Signature Movie Poster Auction takes place July 29-30 in Dallas and online at HA.com.

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos.

PBS presenters 1.pngThe lineup for the 3rd annual Picture Book Summit online writing conference, set to take place Saturday, October 7, has been announced. Early Bird registration is now open. 

Headlining the event is Tomie dePaola, author of Strega Nona and more than 200 additional children's books. The 2011 recipient of the Laura Ingalls Wilder Award for lifetime contribution to American children's literature will appear live to provide the opening keynote address. 

The live online writing conference, reaching working and aspiring picture book writers across the globe, will feature a full day of keynotes, workshops and panels featuring top authors, editors and agents. 

Also providing keynote addresses will be superstar picture book authors Carole Boston Weatherford (multiple Caldecott honoree, author of Freedom in Congo Square, Moses: When Harriet Tubman Led Her People to Freedom and more than 50 additional books for children) and Adam Rex (New York Times bestsellers Frankenstein Makes a Sandwich and School’s First Day of School). 

Attendees will also enjoy workshops from author Steve Swinburne (Sea Turtle Scientist and Safe in a Storm), Julie Hedlund (My Love for You is the Sun), Greenburger Associates Literary Agent Brenda Bowen and Laura Backes, publisher and founder of Children's Book Insider, the Children's Writing Monthly. 

Panel discussions will include a selection of children's publishing's top editors and agents. There will also be networking and submission opportunities for attendees. 

The full day's lineup, along with registration information, can be found at http://PictureBookSummit.com 

Librarian of Congress Carla Hayden announced today that Denis Johnson, author of the critically acclaimed collection of short stories “Jesus’ Son” and the novel “Tree of Smoke,” will posthumously receive the Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction during the 2017 Library of Congress National Book Festival, Sept. 2.

The National Book Festival and the prize ceremony will take place at the Walter E. Washington Convention Center in Washington, D.C. The author’s widow, Cindy Johnson, will accept the prize.

Hayden chose Johnson based on the recommendation of a jury of distinguished authors and prominent literary critics from around the world.

“Denis Johnson was a writer for our times,” Hayden said. “In prose that fused grace with grit, he spun tale after tale about our walking wounded, the demons that haunt, the salvation we seek. We emerge from his imagined world with profound empathy, a different perspective—a little changed.”

In March the Librarian offered the prize to Johnson, and he enthusiastically accepted. He wrote, “The list of past awardees is daunting, and I'm honored to be in such company. My head's spinning from such great news!” After a long struggle with cancer, Denis Johnson died on May 24.

The annual Library of Congress Prize for American Fiction honors an American literary writer whose body of work is distinguished not only for its mastery of the art but also for its originality of thought and imagination. The award seeks to commend strong, unique, enduring voices that—throughout long, consistently accomplished careers—have told us something revealing about the American experience.

Previous winners of the prize are Marilynne Robinson (2016), Louise Erdrich (2015), E. L. Doctorow (2014) and Don DeLillo (2013). Under its previous name, the Library of Congress Creative Achievement Award for fiction, the awardees were Philip Roth (2012), Toni Morrison (2011), Isabel Allende (2010), and John Grisham (2009). In 2008, the Library presented Pulitzer-Prize winner Herman Wouk with a lifetime achievement award for fiction writing.

Johnson was born in Munich, West Germany, the son of an American diplomat, and spent his childhood in the Philippines and Japan before returning to spend the rest of his youth in the suburbs of Washington, D.C. He is the author of nine novels, as well as numerous plays, poetry collections, a short-story collection and a novella. Johnson won the National Book Award for his resonant Vietnam novel “Tree of Smoke” (2007), which was a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize.

His short novel “Train Dreams” (2012) was also a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize. His most recent work, “The Laughing Monsters,” was published in 2014. Johnson’s many other honors include fellowships from the Guggenheim and Lannan Foundations and a Whiting Award.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on-site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov; access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov; and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

141-Flagg copy.jpgNew York—On August 2, Swann Galleries will close their spring-summer season with an extravaganza of Vintage Posters that span the last 150 years.

Marking the centennial anniversary of the U.S.’s entry into World War I, the sale will feature the largest number of posters from the conflict the house has ever offered. James Montgomery Flagg’s iconic I Want You for U.S. Army, 1917, estimated at $7,000 to $10,000, leads a group of galvanizing images from both sides of the Atlantic. Flagg is well represented in the sale, with several of his famous works promoting Wake Up America Day, as well as various factions of the military. Also available are patriotic works by Howard Chandler Christy, Joseph C. Leyendecker, William Dodge Stevens and Lucy Kemp-Welch.

A prodigious selection World War II propaganda brings the total number of war posters in the sale to nearly 250. Leading the way is the iconic Keep Calm & Carry On, published in 1939 by the British Ministry of Information and never officially distributed ($12,000 to $18,000). Similarly, 1941’s Join the ATS by Abram Games, valued at $3,000 to $4,000, was never released publicly because it was considered too suggestive. Additional highlights include popular works by Victor Ancona, E.B. Greenhaw, Leo Lionni and Karl Koehler.

From the nineteenth century comes a parade of Art Nouveau masterworks that includes Eugène Grasset’s Abricotine, circa 1905, and Babylone d’Allemagne, 1894, by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec ($7,000 to $10,000 and $20,000 to $30,000, respectively). The charming A la Bodiniére, 1894, by Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen, valued at $6,000 to $9,000, joins sensuous works by Jane Atché, Leonetto Cappiello, Ludwig Hohlwein and Alphonse Mucha.

A selection of circus and magic posters features highlights from Barnum & Bailey’s and the Ringling Brothers. A promotional poster for magician Harry Jansen displays his stage name and catch phrase: Danté / Sim - Sala - Bim! mysteriously bears the signature of Ted Henty, a policeman turned ghost-hunter ($12,000 to $18,000). A more modern assortment of entertainment images includes French music hall, theatrical and movie posters, including the renowned advertisement by Robert McGinnis for Breakfast at Tiffany’s, 1961, starring Audrey Hepburn as Holly Golightly, valued between $4,000 and $6,000.

Two colorful works by Roger Broders will be available: Menton, circa 1923, depicts a French seaside while La Côte d’Azur ses Montagnes, circa 1930, shows a vertiginous mountain valley ($1,500 to $2,000 each). Beach scenes by Maurice Lauro, Fortunino Matania and Alberto Vargas demonstrate the newfound popularity of coastal tourism in the first half of the twentieth century.

The auction will be held Wednesday, August 2, beginning at 10:30 a.m. and continuing at 2:30 p.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Thursday, July 27, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Friday, July 28, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; and Monday, July 31, through Tuesday, August 1, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

An illustrated auction catalogue is available for $35 at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information and to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Nicholas D. Lowry at 212-254-4710, extension 57, or via e-mail at posters@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 141 James Montgomery Flagg, I Want You For U.S. Army, 1917. Estimate $7,000 to $10,000.

 

Margaret Mitchell, Gone with the Wind, poem inscription copy.jpgHollywood icon and incandescent star of one of the most beloved films of all time, Vivien Leigh (1913-1967) captured hearts and minds with her fiery, luminous performance as Scarlett O’Hara in Gone with the Wind in 1939. Her legendary status in the pantheon of all-time greats was assured when she secured what perhaps remains to this day the most coveted role in cinema history. Our perception of such legends is often imperceptibly entwined with the myths they come to embody. This September, a spotlight will reveal the inner person few people really knew, in effect Vivien’s private life, when Sotheby’s London brings to auction The Vivien Leigh Collection.

Passed down through Vivien’s family, the collection comprises paintings, jewellery, couture, books, furniture, porcelain, objets d’art and further items celebrating all aspects of her life, from the pre-war years in London, to Hollywood and beyond, up to her death in 1967. Myriad pieces drawn from the city and country homes Vivien shared with her husband Laurence Olivier will give a new perspective on Vivien, from her appreciation of art and patronage of Modern British artists, to her passion for books and fondness for entertaining and interior design.

Vivien Leigh’s family commented: “We hope people take as much pleasure from this collection as our grandparents, parents and families have done.”

Harry Dalmeny, Sotheby’s UK Chairman, commented: “This is our chance to discover the real, and unexpected, Vivien Leigh. We’re all guilty of confusing our favourite actresses with the heroines they portray, of blurring Vivien’s identity with that of Scarlett O’Hara or Blanche DuBois. But, behind the guise of the most glamorous and talked-about woman of her age we find a fine art collector, patron, even a book worm, who was the intellectual equal of the literati, artists and aesthetes she counted among her coterie. Her private collection does not disappoint. Vivien approached the decoration of her homes as if she were designing a set, incorporating influences and inspiration from a life spent on screen and on stage. These houses were an extension of the theatrical space, with medieval Notley Abbey looking positively Shakespearean. Fifty years on from her death, this sale opens the door into Vivien’s private world, allowing us a privileged and fascinating glimpse into a world that otherwise only her closest friends could ever have known.”

Vivien Leigh’s Personal Copy of Gone With The Wind

Given to her by the author Margaret Mitchell 

£5,000-7,000

The quest to find an actress to play Scarlett O’Hara is one of the most enduring stories enshrined in the annals of Hollywood. Margaret Mitchell’s novel, winner of the 1937 Pulitzer Prize, was a best-seller in every sense, not only selling in staggering numbers, but striking a chord with female readers who fancied themselves as Scarlett. Among these fans was Vivien, one of the book’s earliest readers: “From the moment I read [it], I was fascinated by the lovely wayward, tempestuous Scarlett. I felt that I loved and understood her, almost as though I had known her in the flesh. When I heard that the book was to filmed in Hollywood early in 1939, I longed to play the part.”

A dedicated reader of the book, Vivien kept a copy close at hand during filming and deeply resented any divergence from Margaret Mitchell’s text. On the final day of shooting, Olivia de Havilland (‘Melanie Hamilton’) walked past Vivien, failing to recognise her. “She looked so diminished by over work... Her whole atmosphere had changed. She gave something to that film that I don’t think she ever got back.” Vivien went on to win her first Oscar for her performance in 1939. She was just 26 years old at the time.

Her copy of Gone with the Wind is inscribed by Margaret Mitchell with a hand-written poem: “Life’s pattern pricked with a scarlet thread / where once we were with a gray / To remind us all how we played our parts / In the shock of an epic day”.

 

Lot 82 - Jane Austen - autograph letter, written in third person to her niece Anna Lefroy (nee Austen) copy.jpgSotheby’s London, July 2017-Almost exactly 200 years to the day of Jane Austen’s death in 1817, a masterly comic letter written by the author to her favourite niece will come to sale for the very first time at Sotheby’s London on 11th July with an estimate of £80,000-100,000. The celebrated novelist, whose own literature has remained the subject of critique for over two centuries, is here seen exercising her own critical opinion of another writer’s work in a light-hearted jeu d’espirit which exudes not only Austen’s supreme intellect, but also her comic charm.

Dating from 29-30 October 1812, a critical time in Austen’s career - immediately after the publication of Sense and Sensibility and around the time that the manuscript of Pride and Prejudice was sent for publication - this unique correspondence provides a rare insight into how Austen thought about fiction. The object of her censure is a “most tiresome and prosy” Gothic novel titled Lady Maclairn, the Victim of Villainy, published by her contemporary Rachel Hunter. 

Both Austen and her niece Anna Lefroy, the eldest daughter of Rev. James Austen, Jane’s eldest brother, had thoroughly enjoyed reading the novel together. And this letter, addressed as if to the author Rachel Hunter herself, brims with the shared pleasure the two women had taken in this over-plotted melodrama, relishing its clichés and absurdities,from the heroine’s relentless tears to the verbose repetitions of character and plot.

Mrs Hunter’s novel cannot, of course, survive the mock-enthusiasm of perhaps the wittiest pen in the language, but it is at least clear that Austen had found the novel to be enjoyable nonsense. 

Indeed, this satirical exposure of the clichés of the Gothic novel is strikingly reminiscent of Northanger Abbey, in which Austen gleeful parodied the conventions of Gothic novels. The link to Austen’s own oeuvre is furthered when the novelist turns the attention toward her personal style of writing, pleading for ‘at least 4 vols more about the Flint family’ and demanding a more extensive examination of the lover’s courtship, which Hunter ‘handled too briefly’. Referring to herself in the third person, she asserts:‘it is certainly not hard to imagine that Austen could have made much of an episode’ of ‘the arrival of a handsome young curate’. Indeed, her comments mock the iconic style for which Austen’s novels are famed, alluding to the lengthy passages of characterisation and courtship which perpetually preside.

The letter is significant then, not only because it is littered with a delightfully light-hearted irony shared exclusively between close family members, but because it illuminates the remarkable relationship which existed between the author, her novels, and the novels of her contemporaries, at the very peak of her literary career.

For full details click here

Two Further Fragments of Correspondence between Jane Austen and her Favoured Niece Anna Lefroy 

Sotheby’s sale will also include two fragments of handwritten letters addressed to Lefroy, which disclose the intricacies of Austen’s family life and leisure.

The first of these fragments (lot 83) was written during Austen’s ten day visit to London in November 1814, the main object of which was to meet with her publisher to discuss a second edition of Mansfield Park, following a sell-out first run. The letter recounts the lively family gossip circulating in the weeks following Anna’s marriage to Benjamin Lefroy, and discusses the family trip to the theatre to see David Garrick’s popular production of Isabella, or the Fatal Marriage.It is hardly surprising that Jane would take the opportunity that the visit to London gave her to visit her "literary niece" for the first time since her marriage, and this engaging letter expresses her pleasure in Anna's new life. 

Perhaps most importantly however, this fragment exemplifies the emphasis which Austen placed on a close-knit extended network of family, a theme that bears out in many of her most-loved novels. As with many of Jane Austen's letters, it gives a powerful sense of her life within an extensive familial network of immediate family and cousins: ‘I like first Cousins to be first Cousins, & interested about each other’. 

Lot 84 comprises the second fragment of this same letter. Here, the importance with which Austen regards family is again the foremost theme, as she describes a visit to her nieces whose mother had recently passed away; Charles Austen’s wife had tragically died following childbirth in 1814, and the baby was lost two weeks later. The fragment recalls the ‘thousand questions’ put forth by her young inquisitive nieces, aged five, four, and two, and by Francis Austen’s daughter, aged seven. Together, these letters have a combined estimate of £118,000 -162,000. 

Newspaper copy.jpgOn the weekend of October 7-8, 1871, fire ripped through downtown Chicago, Illinois, destroying thousands of blocks, killing upwards of 300 people and leaving nearly 100,000 residents homeless.  Artifacts from the fire are incredibly rare, especially printed materials. On Saturday, July 8, Potter and Potter Auctions will be offering two of the rarest items to survive from the fire, specifically a near fine copy of the only newspaper printed in Chicago during the fire and a rare broadside, issued by mayor Roswell B. Mason, turning over control of the city to General Sheridan.

The Chicago Post Extra! newspaper page, dated October 9, 1871, bears headlines such as “Chicago on Fire!”, “The Fire Fiend Rampant”, and “An Area of 700 Acres Completely Devastated!”. Only two copies are known, one at the Newberry Library and the other at the Chicago History Museum. The broadside is even rarer, with only one copy located at the Newberry Library. Together, they are expected to sell over $10,000. Two large wall maps showing real estate from the turn of the century round out the Chicago offerings.

The items are among an impressive collection of rare books, autographs and historic ephemera being offered for sale on Saturday, including Walter Gibson’s own full run of The Shadow, a strong session of beat literature, a copy of Andy Warhol’s Index Book signed five times, a number of presidential signed items, numerous French exhibition posters from the 1950s-60s and a rare engraving of The Declaration of Independence.

For more information, contact Potter & Potter Auctions, Inc., at 773-472-1442 or info@potterauctions.com. The sale will take place live at 10am on Saturday, July 8, at 3759 N Ravenswood Ave, Chicago. Bidding is also available online on Live Auctioneers, Bidsquare and Invaluable.

Titanic letter.jpgLYNBROOK, N.Y. - Ocean liner memorabilia took top lot honors at Weiss Auctions’ June 22 sale, as a letter handwritten aboard the ill-fated RMS Titanic on April 13, 1912 sold for $22,600, an original life ring from the SS Andrea Doria brought $8,050 and a glass clock presented to first class passengers on the maiden voyage of the SS Normandie in 1935 changed hands for $4,560.

Those three items were top achievers in an auction that was packed with hundreds of lots of antique advertising, rare books, historical memorabilia, autographs and more. Along with the ocean liner items was the lifetime coffee advertising collection of Lowell and Barbara Schindler, featuring not just coffee items but also syrup dispensers, talcum tins, signs and other rare pieces.

“It was a great auction across all categories, with internet and floor bidding very strong,” said Philip Weiss of Weiss Auctions, adding the final gross was around $220,000. Online bidding was by Proxibid.com and LiveAuctioneers.com. Phone and absentee bids were also accepted. The Thursday auction was held in Weiss Auctions’ gallery, at 74 Merrick Road in Lynbrook.

The 2 ½-page letter penned aboard the Titanic was on Titanic stationery, with the raised White Star Line and proper watermarks on the paper, which was water-stained in areas. The letter was unsigned, but was consigned by descendants of the author, a member of the Holverson family. They were en route to New York at the time. The letter was hand-addressed, “My Dear Mother.”

Oscar Alexander Holverson and Mary Aline Holverson were passengers aboard that fateful maiden voyage. Mrs. Holverson, 35, was rescued in lifeboat #8, but Oscar, 42, wasn’t so lucky. He perished in the disaster. It’s assumed, since the unposted letter was written aboard the ship, that the couple’s intent was to mail it, along with some postcards, after arriving in New York. 

The SS Andrea Doria, of the Italian Line, was approaching the coast of Nantucket, Mass., on its way to New York City on July 25, 1956 when it collided with the Swedish vessel MS Stockholm, resulting in one of history’s most famous maritime disasters. The original life preserver ring was recovered the following day by Alan Ades, a Naval officer aboard a rescuing Coast Guard cutter. 

The pale blue, tinted glass clock presented to just a handful of first class passengers aboard the SS Normandie’s maiden voyage was produced as a collaboration between the renowned French designer Lalique and Leon Hatot of the ATO clock company. The letters NORMANDIE spelled out nine of the clock’s twelve face numbers. The hands were made of tin and showed light wear.

Following are additional highlights from the auction. All prices quoted include an 18 percent buyer’s premium.

Albert Einstein and Abraham Lincoln both made guest appearances. A six-cent U.S. air mail stamp signed in pen by Einstein and dated (“4.1.39”) flew off for $1,860. The stamp was a Scott Catalogue C23 example. Einstein’s signature was bold and clear. A lock of Abraham Lincoln’s hair finished at $1,680. Also, a collection of cigar labels and salesman samples fetched $3,680.

A folio from 1976 titled Nudes by the noted British artist Henry Spencer Moore, copy #2 in a limited press run of 50, consisting of 10 chromolithos, each one signed and numbered in pencil, sold for $3,565. Also, a mixed media on canvas artwork by Kevin Red Star (Am., b. 1943) titled Mr. and Mrs. Choke Cheeries, 33 inches by 44 inches, signed upper left, topped out at $2,300.

A Disney Melody Time animation production set-up cel trimmed to image size and presented on a beautiful Courvoisier background, depicting a teary-eyed Little Toot tugboat sailing past a mile marker, realized $2,530. Also, a crisp and clear Confederate 1/9th scroll pattern ambrotype in a thermoplastic case, identified as Matthew McCauley (Danville, Va.) changed hands for $2,100.

An 1865 lithographed sanitary map of New York City, titled Sanitary and Topographical Map of the City and Island of New York (Egbert L. Viele, Robert Craighead), hand-colored and printed on two joined sheets, brought $2,530. Also, a derby hat worn by then-President William Howard Taft on a visit to El Paso, Texas on Oct. 16, 1909, to meet the President of Mexico, made $1,840.

Weiss Auctions’ next big sale is fast approaching. It will be held on Wednesday, July 19th, also online and in the Lynbrook, NY gallery. Headlining will be Part 1 of the Jerry and Nina Greene collection of toys, trains, soldiers and toy castles, as well as European trains and accessories from the Finger Lakes collection, toy soldiers and accessories from all makers, Lionel trains and more.

Also offered will be a Steiff collection (including larger pieces), dolls (including French fashion dolls, German bisque, vintage Barbie dolls and more), die-cast vehicles (including mint-in-box Matchbox and Dinkys), and pressed steel (including boxed Tonka, Structo, Buddy L railroad pieces, NyLint, Doepke and Smith Miller). There will be something for every taste and budget. 

Weiss Auctions is always accepting quality consignments for future auctions. To consign an item, estate or a collection, you may call them at (516) 594-0731; or, you can send an e-mail to Philip Weiss at Phil@WeissAuctions.com. For more information about Weiss Auctions and the big auction planned for Wednesday, July 19, visit www.WeissAuctions.com. Updates are posted often.

Image: Handwritten letter, penned on actual RMS Titanic stationery and written aboard the ship by a member of the Holverson family, en route to New York ($22,600).

Auction Guide