March 2017 Archives

The international auction house Bonhams has appointed Laura Paterson as Head of Photographs in New York.

A graduate in History of Art from Edinburgh University, Laura joins Bonhams with more than 20 years’ experience as a photographs specialist at Christie’s New York, where she was Senior Specialist. She has also worked as the US Cultural and Print Sales Director at Magnum Photos New York, and as Photography Department Co-Head and Senior Specialist for online auctioneers Paddle 8. 

Bonhams Global CEO, Matthew Girling, said, “Photographs are an important part of Bonhams Fine Arts stable, and so we are delighted that someone as highly respected as Laura Paterson has arrived to lead the department. Laura will build on our strong track record of achievement in this area.”  

Laura Paterson commented, “I am excited at the prospect of joining a company with such a strong commitment to the world of photographs. I look forward to contributing my enthusiasm and experience to its future success.”  

Bullitt full.jpegDALLAS, Texas (March 21, 2017) -  The personally-owned collection of movie star Steve McQueen brought $280,618 across 30 lots in Heritage Auctions’ spring Entertainment & Music Memorabilia auction March 18 in Dallas. The $1 million sale offered private collections by Bruce Willis and Farah Fawcett, as well as a stellar collection of never-before-seen concert posters. 

“Strong bidding across the spectrum drove this auction past expectations,” said Margaret Barrett, Director of Entertainment Memorabilia at Heritage Auctions.

The auction offered 18 annotated shooting scripts from some of McQueen’s greatest movies. His leather-bound, annotated script for the 1968 film Bullitt and his script for Le Mans each sold for $55,000. The script for the 1963 classic The Great Escape - which detailed McQueen’s own requests for the classic motorcycle jump scene - sold for $50,000.

The auction offered a special selection of personal rarities from Marilyn Monroe, including an original marker from Marilyn Monroe’s grave, which sold for $35,000; a circa 1953 Marilyn Monroe signed black and white photograph, which ended at $13,750; and a circa 1954 dollar bill autographed by both Monroe and Joe DiMaggio, which brought $5,750.

A one-owner collection of rarely-seen music concert posters sold for a combined $255,843 led by a poster for a 1964 performance by Roy Orbison. The window card, showing a classic image of Orbison wearing horn-rimmed glasses, saw interest from five bidders who pushed the sale price to $16,250. A Batman/Young Rascals concert poster from 1966 sold for $13,750 and a colorful, 1956 poster advertising performances by Little Richard, Big Joe Turner and Etta James closed at $12,500.

Two rare pieces of memorabilia relating to Otis Redding surpassed estimates as a RIAA Gold Record sales award for his smash hit (Sittin’ On) The Dock of the Bay sold for $12,500 and a scarce, 1965 record promotional poster sold for $11,250.

Additional highlights include, but are not limited to:

The mauve silk chiffon dress worn by Elizabeth Taylor in the film Cleopatra sold for $10,000.

Hollywood memorabilia personally-consigned by stage and screen actor Bruce Willis featured his French movie poster from Forbidden Planet, which sold for $7,500, and his Hollywood Walk of Fame Award from 2006, sold for $5,000.

Memorabilia from The Beatles saw four signatures from a 1963 autograph album sell for $10,625 and a signed copy of the group’s LP Help! saw $7,500.  

Items from the collection of David Gest Memorabilia Archive includes a Michael Jackson signed color photograph from 1998 and busts of Louis Armstrong and W.C. Handy, which both sold for $4,750.

Lot-293-Steinlen copy.jpgNew York—On Thursday, March 16, Swann Galleries offered Vintage Posters, featuring dynamic selections of graphic art from the end of the nineteenth century through the middle of the twentieth century. The sale represented the myriad functions of the poster as a means of communication and advertising, with sections devoted to Soviet propaganda and beachside vacations alike.

The top lot of the sale was the iconic Tournée du Chat Noir by Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen. The 1896 large-format poster was purchased after a neck-and-neck race by two phone bidders for $30,000*, a record for the work. Art Nouveau pieces performed well overall, most notably a run of works by Alphonse Mucha led by the rare complete 1902 portfolio Documents Décoratifs, purchased by a collector for $22,500. Further highlights by the master included a four-panel folding screen featuring women as the allegories of Times of the Day, 1899, and the deluxe edition of Salon des Cent, 1896 ($13,750 and $16,900, respectively). Nicholas D. Lowry, director of Vintage Posters,  noted “a refreshing resurgence of interest in works by Jules Chéret,” with highlights being Musée Grévin / Théâtre Les Fantoches de John Hewelt, 1900, with and without text ($3,750 and $1,188, respectively).

The sale featured an enormous run of ski and winter posters, with nearly three quarters of the 91 offered lots finding buyers. The breathtaking St. Moritz, 1924, by Carl Moos, topped the section with $11,250, followed by the action-packed Chamonix Mt. Blanc, 1930, by Roger Broders at $9,100. Four of the top ten ski posters advertised American resorts with sweeping scenes showing a single skier. Dwight Clark Shepler’s Sun Valley / Ketchum, Idaho, circa 1940, reached $8,750, while his 1940 Sun Valley / “Round House” on Baldy Mountain sold for $5,500. All but one of the posters featuring the Idaho resort town found buyers: Mr. Lowry was pleased, saying, “As usual, ski posters performed very well, and there was in particular a renewed enthusiasm for Sun Valley.”

In addition to directing the Vintage Posters department at Swann Galleries, Mr. Lowry is also house’s President and Principal Auctioneer, as well as the third generation of his family to run the company since its inception 75 years ago. Swann Galleries is the oldest continually operating specialist auction house in New York, and the world’s largest auctioneer of Works on Paper. This month, the house celebrates the diamond anniversary of its first sale, an auction of books and literary properties, held March 27, 1942.

The next sale of Vintage Posters at Swann Galleries will be Graphic Design on May 25, 2017. For more information, or to consign works to future auctions, contact Nicholas D. Lowry at posters@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 293 Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen, Tournée du Chat Noir, 1896. Sold March 16, 2017 for $30,000.

The Library of Congress today announced the acquisition of the archives of Bob Adelman, one of the best-known photographers of the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s. The collection, containing 575,000 high-quality images, was given to the Library as a gift from an anonymous donor.

The materials, which represent a wide range of images covering the latter half of the 20th century, will be housed in the Library’s Prints and Photographs Division. Of the 575,000 images, 50,000 are prints and the rest, negatives and slides.

Adelman (1930-2016) photographed many of the important leaders and events of the Civil Rights Movement, including Martin Luther King and the March on Washington. He also photographed people, events and other social issues of the day (1960-2000), including pop artists Andy Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein and short-story writer and poet Raymond Carver.

Adelman said, “My life’s work, in addition to being about race relations, is about the many and diverse social concerns in the great tradition of American documentary photography:  poverty, mental illness, alcoholism, inadequate housing, the immigrant experience, prostitution, delinquency, illiteracy and on and on.”

Born in New York City in 1930, Adelman grew up on Long Island.  He earned a bachelor’s degree from Rutgers University and a master’s in philosophy from Columbia University and studied law at Harvard.

Adelman studied photography under Alexey Brodovitch, the famed art director of Harper’s Bazaar magazine.  As a working photographer and producer of photographic books, Adelman pursued an avid interest in social and political events.  This interest began with coverage of events related to civil rights, such as sit-ins by students across the American South and demonstrations by the Congress of Racial Equality (C.O.R.E.) in the early 1960s.  His engagement with issues of social justice continued until his death.

His mentor, Ralph Ellison, once said, “Adelman has moved beyond the familiar clichés of most documentary photography into that rare sphere wherein technical ability and social vision combine to create a work of art.”

Adelman, in an interview several years ago, said, “When I photographed, I was intent on telling the truth as best I saw it and then to help in doing something about it.  It was a constant effort not only to document in as honest a way as I could, and to make what I was seeing vivid, but to figure out how to change things.”

Adelman received many honors in recognition of his work, including a Guggenheim fellowship, Art Directors Club awards (New York, Washington and San Francisco), American Institute of Graphic Arts 50 Books awards and the University of Missouri’s School of Journalism Award.  He has taught at the International Center for Photography, the New School, the School of Visual Arts, Columbia University, Stanford University, Union College, the University of Minnesota, Ohio State University, the Museum of Fine Arts (Boston) and the Steamboat Falls Workshop.

The Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division preserves and provides access to nearly 16 million photographs, drawings and prints from the 15th century to the present day.  International in scope, these visual collections represent a uniquely rich array of human experience, knowledge, creativity and achievement, touching on almost every realm of endeavor: science, art, invention, government and political struggle, and the recording of history. For more information, visit loc.gov/rr/print/.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov, and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

 

2D20F25D-0B4D-495E-BD4E-117B8872FF3F copy.jpgShapero Modern is delighted to present a solo exhibition of new works by the Scottish artist and musician Lilias Buchanan. The show is directly inspired by American writer Richard Brautigan’s 1976 cult classic, Sombrero Fallout: A Japanese Novel, and is comprised of nine small scale paintings exquisitely rendered in pencil, watercolour and collage. 

The assembled works, which have been created over a two year period, channel the book’s two parallel narrative threads. The first focuses on a heartbroken American writer who has recently been left by his Japanese lover. His obsessive thoughts about her prevent him from concentrating on a story he is writing, in which a sombrero falls from the sky in a sleepy town in the American southwest. Eventually, and despairingly, the author throws what he has written into the wastepaper basket, but the discarded story continues to write itself, so beginning the second narrative, which recounts a bizarre tale in which the sombrero becomes an object of fascination, attracting enormous crowds and fierce debate before ultimately provoking a civil war. 

Buchanan’s intention with the paintings riffs on the duality of the book that inspired them, in that each work reflects both the subtlety of Brautigan’s writing and the merged use of graphite and watercolour at the heart of her practice, which sees her juxtapose the saturated, stark monochrome of the writer sitting alone in his apartment with the psychedelic palette of the sombrero in the wastepaper basket. 

The artist admits the creation of this body of work and her interest in Brautigan’s novel has bordered on the obsessional, leading her to approach strangers in the street who bore a resemblance to Brautigan’s characters, and asking them to pose for her. She even bought up all the sombrero postcards she could find on eBay to fuel her passion. 

For Buchanan the exhibition is both a celebration of Brautigan - Jarvis Cocker has described him as the Hemingway of the 1960’s - and a campaign to introduce his writing to new audiences. To this end, the exhibition will include a first edition of Sombrero Fallout: A Japanese Novel and other historical artefacts courtesy of Dr. John F. Barber, founder, curator and archivist of the Richard Brautigan Archives. The exhibition will also house the launch of ‘Seeing Richard’ for the first time in the UK, a book of previously unpublished and rare images of Richard Brautigan taken by the photographer Erik Weber and published by Tangerine Press. There will be a limited number of signed, limited edition books on sale, which include a foreword by Jarvis Cocker and introduction by William Hjortsberg (author of Falling Angel and Jubilee Hitchhiker). 

Says gallery director Tabitha Philpotte Kent: ‘Lilias Buchanan is a refreshing new talent, and It is a great honour to be showing this compelling series of work at Shapero Modern. We are also delighted that Lilias has chosen to curate within her exhibition a presentation of Richard Brautigan’s work, adding a further dimension to an already compelling show.’ 

 

OXFORD, 16 March 2017 - The creative genius of JRR Tolkien will be the focus of a major new exhibition opening at the University of Oxford’s Bodleian Libraries in 2018. Tolkien: Maker of Middle-earth will explore the full breadth of Tolkien’s unique literary imagination from his creation of Middle-earth, the imagined world where The Lord of the Rings, The Hobbit and his other works are set, to his life and work as an artist, poet, medievalist and scholar of languages.

For the first time since the 1950s, an unprecedented array of Tolkien materials from the UK and the USA will be reunited in Oxford and displayed together in this seminal exhibition. Tolkien: Maker of Middle-earth will feature manuscripts, artwork, maps, letters and artefacts from the Bodleian’s extensive Tolkien Archive, the Tolkien Collection at Marquette University in the USA and from private collections.

The exhibition will take visitors beyond what they may already know about this extraordinary author and will delight both Tolkien fans as well as scholars, families and visitors of all ages. It will examine the scholarly, literary, creative and domestic worlds that influenced Tolkien as an author and artist, allowing visitors to engage with his works as never before. Tolkien may be best known today as the author of The Lord of the Rings but during his lifetime he was chiefly known as a scholar of Old and Middle English and a philologist intimately concerned with the creation of language. He was also a devoted husband and father of four children for whom he created stories for pleasure. 

Visitors will also be introduced to the vast spectrum of Tolkien’s creative and scholarly output ranging from his early abstract paintings in The Book of Ishness to the metrical brilliance of his poem Errantry and the touching tales he wrote for his children. The spectacular range of objects on display will include original manuscripts of his popular classics as well as lesser-known and posthumous works and materials, some of which will be on public display for the very first time.

Exhibition highlights include:

Draft manuscripts of The Hobbit showing the evolution of the story displayed alongside striking watercolours, dust jacket designs, line drawings and maps drawn for the publication

Original manuscripts of The Lord of The Rings along with dust jacket designs and beautiful watercolours

Original manuscripts of The Silmarillion, Tolkien’s very earliest work on the legends of the elves, which was unfinished during his lifetime and was published posthumously by his son and literary executor, Christopher Tolkien

Photos and letters from Tolkien’s childhood and student days exploring themes of love, loss and war

Letters of appreciation from a wide range of admirers including poet WH Auden, singer Joni Mitchell and author Iris Murdoch

Personal objects that belonged to Tolkien including his art materials (boxes of paints, coloured pencils and sealing wax) and his personal library

A selection of Middle-earth maps including a rare map annotated by Tolkien, which was acquired by the Bodleian in 2016

A specially-commissioned 3-D map of Middle-earth 

The exhibition will be accompanied by a richly illustrated book, Tolkien: Maker of Middle-earth to be published by Bodleian Library Publishing on 25 May 2018. This new publication will celebrate Tolkien as a scholar, artist and author, using his own words, drawings and designs to introduce readers to the huge creative endeavour which lies behind his enduring success. Featuring stunning images of his manuscripts, drawings, maps and letters, the book will trace the creative process behind Tolkien’s well-known literary works while also exploring the surprising range of his creative imagination.

The Bodleian Libraries houses the largest collection of original Tolkien manuscripts and drawings in the world. The Tolkien Archive has been kept at the Bodleian since 1979. The latest addition to the archive is a rare map of Middle-earth annotated by JRR Tolkien, which was acquired in May 2016. Tolkien spent almost the whole of his adult life in Oxford and it is the city where studied, taught, researched and wrote his most famous works.

Tolkien: Maker of Middle-earth

The Weston Library, Bodleian Libraries, Oxford

1 June - 28 October 2018

Free admission

 

StevenSpielberginSharkJaws.pngCLEARWATER, Fla. - The most important piece of Jaws history to hit the market since the blockbuster film’s 1975 release will be sold on March 18 when Blackwell Auctions of Clearwater, Florida, offers the personal Jaws movie scrapbook of the late actor Alfred Wilde. Known for his small but memorable role as Harry Wiseman (a k a “Bad Hat Harry”) in Jaws, and “Select Man #1” in Jaws 2, Wilde carefully documented his time on both movie sets by amassing a unique collection of memorabilia - a virtual time capsule of Jaws’ actors and crew.

This fresh-to-the-market collection includes nearly three dozen pages of photographs and autographs - including handwritten sentiments by Steven Spielberg, Roy Scheider, Richard Dreyfuss and Robert Shaw (and signatures of nearly the entire cast and crew), as well as Peter Benchley, the author of Jaws, who visited the set.

Also included are an original shooting call page, original script pages, tickets from the movie’s premiere in Martha’s Vineyard and more. None of the 100 original candid snapshots has ever been published or broadcast.

Click here to view Google Photos album of the entire scrapbook: https://goo.gl/photos/9qEayDvG4KEidnEJA

Of the many noteworthy aspects of this collection, these stand out:

1 - Steven Spielberg wrote a personal note to Wilde, signed it “Steve Spielberg” and, under his name, in parentheses, wrote “Director of JAWS.”

“It’s like looking at Steven Spielberg’s rookie card,” said Blackwell Auctions’ co-owner and auctioneer Edwin Bailey. “He identified himself as the director because back then, very few people would have had a clue who ‘Steve Spielberg’ was.”

2 - Unlike many movie memorabilia items, which may change hands many times, this collection has never been offered for sale or displayed publicly. 

3 - Establishing an opening bid was a challenge, as only one “comp” could be found: In 2014, a Los Angeles-based auction sold an unnamed movie technician’s photo album and four lifejackets used by Spielberg and three Jaws actors. There were no autographs. That collection sold for $50,000.

Blackwell Auctions has set the opening bid for Alfred Wilde’s scrapbook at $25,000, with a pre-auction estimate of $50,000-$75,000.

“There isn’t a movie memorabilia collector out there who wouldn’t want to own something like this,” Bailey said. “It’s an item that utterly transcends a signed poster or a screen-used prop. The scrapbook represents the very spirit of Jaws, a cinematic masterpiece that made Steven Spielberg a household name.”

Internet live or absentee bidding will be available through LiveAuctioneers. For more information, please call or text Edwin Bailey of Blackwell Auctions at 727-644-0457. Email info@blackwellauctions.com. 

Image: Steven Speilberg in Shark Jaws - Candid photos including Steven Spielberg posing in the gaping shark jaws. Courtesy of Blackwell Auctions. 

13 March 2017: Over the past few months, ILAB has developed a new International Mentoring Programme which aims to help young or recently launched booksellers throughout the world by offering support and counsel on a one to one basis. The ILAB International Mentoring Programme gives experienced booksellers the opportunity to lend a hand in the early days of a bookseller’s career, when help is likely most needed. 

In this day and age communication between dealers across the world is easy and inexpensive. This has created an opportunity for the antiquarian trade to work together helping less experienced booksellers, wherever they may be located, to develop their businesses and become more confident and effective members of our trade, within a much shorter time than they might otherwise be able to without a mentor. 

“We can now envisage such situations as a Dutch mentor supporting a young American bookseller, an American mentor helping a young Russian bookseller or an Australian mentor chatting regularly with their mentee in Malaysia. It is also just as likely that the mentor and mentee might be within the same country or city - there are far fewer limitations than there have ever been. This programme harnesses the enormous good will of our members worldwide to offer a truly extraordinary range of expertise in, as this is written, no less than 9 languages, to support less experienced booksellers where ever they may be.” says ILAB Vice-President and Mentoring Programme Coordinator Sally Burdon. 

A comprehensive listing of mentors has been published on the Education section on the ILAB website, a diverse and impressive group of booksellers who reflect just some of the many different types of successful booksellers who comprise our trade. Prospective mentees are invited to visit the site. 

All of the mentors involved in the ILAB International Mentor Program are drawn from ILAB ranks and are acting in a voluntary capacity. The mentees will not be required to make any payment for mentoring. The booksellers who are being mentored will not be named on the ILAB site. The mentees may or may not be current ILAB members although we do expect those seeking to be mentored to be serious about pursuing a career in the trade. 

For information please contact the coordinators of the ILAB International Mentoring Programme: Sally Burdon (ILAB Vice President)
Stuart Bennett (ILAB Executive Committee)
Email: editor@ilab.org 

Website Link: https://www.ilab.org/eng/education/Mentor_Programme.html

 

343-Malcolm-X copy.jpgNew York— On Thursday, March 30, Swann Galleries will hold an auction of Printed & Manuscript African Americana, featuring powerful ephemera both painful and uplifting from oft-overlooked chapters of American history.

The earliest material in this annual sale relates to slavery and abolition, including an annotated early nineteenth-century bible belonging to an enslaved family ($800 to $1,200), and several letters concerning George Washington’s slaves on Mount Vernon (each $10,000 to $15,000). A copper slave badge made by Charleston silversmith John Joseph Lafar, 1824, is estimated at $8,000 to $12,000, while a vellum certificate of emancipation for a Maryland woman named Margaret Tillison, 1831, is valued at $600 to $900. Also available is the scarce 1795 edition of Bannaker’s Almanac, expected to sell between $30,000 and $40,000. There is a run of first-hand accounts of slavery written by people who had been freed, including the first edition of Solomon Northup’s Twelve Years a Slave, published in Auburn, New York in 1853 ($1,000 to $1,500).

A highlight of the sale is a previously unrecorded photograph of abolitionist hero Harriet Tubman, part of a carte-de-visite album compiled in the 1860s. The album features 48 photographs of contemporary political and abolitionist figures, one being the only known photograph of the first African American elected to Congress, John Willis Menard ($20,000 to $30,000).

Frederick Douglass is also represented in the sale with rare offerings, including a typed copy of the last speech he made before an audience, titled A Defense of the Negro Race, 1895, just four months before his death ($3,500 to $5,000). In an emotional 1885 Autograph Letter Signed to Civil War journalist George Alfred Townsend, Douglass wrote, “You are wrong in saying I bought my liberty, a few friends in England bought me and made me a present of myself;” the two-page letter is estimated at $40,000 to $60,000.

Making its auction debut is the printed culmination of The Proceedings of National Negro Conference, 1909, which became the NAACP the following year. The scarce book included two pieces by W.E.B. Du Bois: Politics and Industry and Evolution of the Race Problem; and one by Ida B. Wells, titled Lynching, Our National Crime ($2,500 to $3,500).

The strongest selection of Civil Rights material Swann has ever offered is led by typed manuscripts for Malcolm X’s Los Angeles Herald Dispatch column, God’s Angry Men, 1957, heavily edited and signed in the activist’s own hand ($200,000 to $300,000). Also available is a rare working draft of Martin Luther King, Jr.’s Letter from Birmingham Jail, 1963, in which he addresses seven religious leaders in defense of his methods of peaceful and passive resistance. King wrote the letter on scraps of paper that had been smuggled to him in prison, and then typed and returned for him to edit. The draft, which already includes the iconic line, “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere,” is estimated at $10,000 to $15,000.

Further examples of King’s work can be found in an archive of more than 500 documents relating to the foundation of the Montgomery Improvement Association, in the wake of Rosa Parks’s momentous defiance. The material includes the original by-laws and constitution of the organization, checks signed by King, and details on expenses relating to a fleet of station wagons and a voting machine. The archive, held in two contemporary binders, is valued at $20,000 to $30,000.

Also in the sale is material related to the Black Panthers and the Nation of Islam, as well as various protest signs used in marches throughout the 1960s and ‘70s. Outstanding items include two iconic placards used in strikes: I Am A Man!, 1970, and Honor King: End Racism!, 1968, are valued at $10,000 to $15,000 and $20,000 to $30,000, respectively.

Materials commemorating the achievements of African Americans in the arts include a silver sequined cape presented to James Brown by Michael Jackson at the 2003 BET Awards, along with a pair of Brown’s platform shoes ($25,000 to $35,000 and $1,500 to $2,500, respectively). An archive of material related to The Ink Spots, including photographs signed by Ella Fitzgerald and Peal Bailey and maintained by band member Charlie Fuqua, is valued at $4,000 to $6,000.

The auction will be held Thursday, March 30, beginning at 10:30 a.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Saturday, March 25 from noon to 5 p.m.; and Monday, March 27 through Wednesday, March 29 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

An illustrated auction catalogue is available for $35 at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information or to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Wyatt Houston Day at 212-254-4710, extension 300 or wyatthday@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 343 Malcolm X, typed manuscripts for the Los Angeles Herald Dispatch column God's Angry Men, edited and signed, 1957. Estimate $200,000 to $300,000.

Screen Shot 2017-03-13 at 10.27.15 AM.pngLONDON, 13 March 2017-This Spring, Sotheby’s will offer at auction a masterpiece of Spanish printmaking recently discovered in a library in France. La Tauromaquia, the complete set of thirty-three prints by Goya celebrating the artist’s unique understanding of the art of bullfighting, comes to sale from the collection of a French ducal family, having remained undisturbed for decades in a nineteenth-century ledger. Estimated at £300,000-500,000, the prints are virtually flawless examples of the first and only contemporary edition that was printed for Goya from large copperplates etched and aquatinted by him in 1815-1816. Having made the journey from the court of Madrid around the time of their publication, to the château de Montigny in France in 1831 where they remained -eventually forgotten by succeeding generations of the original owner -these exceptional works by an inspired master printmaker will headline Sotheby’s sale of Prints & Multiples in London on 4 April 2017. 

Séverine Nackers, Head of Prints, Sotheby’s Europe, said: “To find a complete set of Goya’s bullfighting prints with such historically significant provenance is a once-in-a-lifetime discovery. With La Tauromaquia currently holding the auction record for a series of prints by Goya, we’re expecting an enthusiastic response from collectors.”

The prints were discovered when new heirs inspecting the family property pulled a large nondescript volume from the back of a library shelf, full of splendid bindings. On first inspection, the nineteenth-century ledger revealed 90 lithographs bearing the signature H. Bellangé pasted onto its pages, showing brightly watercoloured prints of uniformed French military personnel. A glance beyond the two blank facing pages that followed, in what appeared to be a ‘scrapbook’ volume of prints, revealed a surprising discovery --another series of prints, this time in monochrome, a warm, dark umber ink on freshly textured, handmade paper. They were immediately recognisable as masterpieces by the hand of Goya, from the quality of the materials and the fresh and perfect condition of their technique. These prints have evidently lain undisturbed within the album, ever since each one was carefully tipped, with touches of glue to the four corners, sideways on the pages, an operation that appears to have been carried out in the 1840s, following the death of the original owner in 1837.The ledger, with printed columns and headings, was perhaps chosen because its format fitted the uncut sheets so well.

The original owner of this set of Goya’s Tauromaquia was Anne Adrien Pierre de Montmorency Laval (1768-1837), whose inheritance of the family title of marquis de Laval led him to attend the court at Versailles. He joined the French army, but fled to England as an émigré during the French Revolution. Back in France after 1800, he came to prominence following the defeat of Napoleon and the return of the Bourbon monarchy. The reign of Louis XVIII coincided with the return to Spain of Ferdinand VII: both Bourbon kings were re-established on their thrones in May 1814, and in August, Anne Adrien, now known as prince de Montmorency Laval, was appointed ambassador to the Court of Madrid, where he would have arrived while Goya was still working on his heroic paintings of the Second and Third of May 1808, commemorating the Spanish resistance during Napoleon’s occupation and intended for the royal palace. The situation was initially complicated by Napoleon’s return to Paris from Elba, but the French ambassador decided to remain in Madrid during this difficult period, and in February 1816 he was richly rewarded by Ferdinand VII who conferred on him the title of duque de San Fernando Luis with the rank of Spanish grandee, and the Order of the Golden Fleece.

Though cleared of collaboration with the Bonaparte régime, Goya was forced to abandon all hope of publishing his etchings of the horrors of the recent war. He embarked instead on a new and publicly acceptable project to illustrate the origins, development and contemporary state of the art of bullfighting-in effect, ‘popular’ subject matter. The set of thirty-three prints was advertised for sale in October and December 1816, by which time the French ambassador had been resident in Madrid for two years. The new duque de San Fernando Luis may have purchased this fine, early set of the bullfight prints or received them as a gift from the crown. He remained in place in Spain until 1823 and went on to other ambassadorial posts in Rome and Austria, and at the Court of St James in London. His career ended with the revolution of July 1830, and his refusal to swear allegiance to Louis-Philippe d’Orléans who succeeded as king of France. In 1831 he acquired the château de Montigny, where he built a major extension for the display and enjoyment of the many acquisitions made in the course of his diplomatic career. On his death in 1837, all his properties were inherited by his daughter and her husband, Athanase de Lévis, marquis de Mirepoix, who assumed the family titles including that of second duque de San Fernando Luis. It is his name and Paris address that are inscribed in the register, probably in connection with the mounting of the Bellangé and Goya prints in the volume which was placed in the library at Montigny.

[ITHACA, NY] National Book Auctions, located in Ithaca, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog.  

This catalog features rare, antique and decorative books as well as select additions of artwork and ephemera. We will offer another session of books and ephemera from a large estate Civil War collection being sold through National Book Auctions and Worth Auctions over the coming months.          

Antique and rare books in this catalog include numerous titles. Among the earliest examples are a paired binding of works by Lycosthenes and Wolffhart, "Apophthegmata ex Probatis Graecae Latinae'que Linguae Scriptoribus" and "Parabolarum siue Smiiltudinum," produced in 1602, the 1693 printing of Temple's "Observations upon the United Provinces of the Netherlands," and the 1762 first edition of Rousseau's "Emile ou de l'Education," Additional rare pieces include Cibot and Guignes' "Lettre de Pekin sur le Genie de la Langue Chinoise," comparing Egyptian hieroglyphics to Chinese characters, published in 1773 with plates, the 1610 printing of David's "Duodecim Specula Deum," and Basnage's "Annales des Provinces Unies," printed in two folio volumes in 1726.                      

Several pleasing collections will also be showcased. Highlighted is a substantial collection of volumes relating to the use of emblems, dating from the 17th century and led by examples such as Reinzer's "Meteorologia Philosophico-Politica," published in 1709, and the 1631 printing of Hugo and Bolswert's "Pia Desideria Lib III ad Urbanum VIII." Civil War-related works include the 1864 printing of "The Fort Pillow Massacre," and Cooper's "In and out of Rebel Prisons." Vintage and antique tomes also include subject areas such as travel & exploration, the American West, the American Revolution, Native American Indians, music & art, history of New York City & State, and medicine.   

Found throughout this catalog are interesting art and ephemera offerings. Ephemera includes a fine selection of Civil War-related items such as a signed carte-de-visite of General Philip H. Sheridan, an original 1864 ferrotype Lincoln campaign pin, Confederate state loan certificates with coupons and original signatures, and much more. Additional ephemera and art lots include original works, photographs, stereoviews, original Life magazine issues (including the first issue from 1936 with the Margaret Bourke-White front cover), rare prints of photogravure works by Yousuf Karsh, original issues of "Derriere le Miroir" with the original lithographs retained, maps, antique magazines, and other items.   

National Book Auctions is a public auction service specializing in books, ephemera, and art. National Book Auctions is a targeted service offering experience and expertise unique to marketing antique and modern books and ephemera for consignors and collectors alike. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of collectible, signed, and first edition books. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-269-0101 or email mail@nationalbookauctions.com.

 

 

124-Oraciones copy.jpgNew York— On Thursday, March 9, Swann Galleries offered a morning auction of Early Printed, Medical, Scientific & Travel Books, with examples from each section of the sale represented in the top 20 lots.

A leaf of the Gutenberg Bible, 1455, topped the sale. The remnant of the first book ever printed was hinged in a 1921 folio of A Noble Fragment; being, A Leaf of the Gutenberg Bible by A. Edward Newton. The leaf contains the text of Ecclesiasticus 16:14-18-29; it was purchased by a collector for $52,500*. Tobias Abeloff, the Senior Specialist for Early Printed Books at Swann, noted “While individual leaves from the Gutenberg Bible come to auction with some regularity, they are still sought after, considering the unlikelihood of a complete or even fragmentary copy coming on the market."

Nearly all of the offered bibles sold, including the first edition of the Geneva Bible, the most popular bible in Elizabethan England, which was printed in 1560; it sold for $22,500. The first English-language edition of Hans Holbein’s The Images of the Old Testament, 1549, with 94 woodcut illustrations by the artist, sold for $11,875.

Premier examples of English printing included a run of first editions by David Hume, led by Philosophical Essays Concerning Human Understanding, 1748, which brought $4,500, and the 1751 An Enquiry Concerning the Principles of Morals, which was purchased for $4,000, double its high estimate.

From the Medical and Scientific sections of the sale came an archive of 21 letters from Harvey Cushing to Agnes Willard Bartlett, the great-niece of Elisha Bartlett, which was purchased for $13,750. Expositio super Antidotario Mesue, 1488, by Christophorus Georgius de Honestis, the second edition of a late 14th-century commentary on the Antidotarium ascribed to the Baghdad court physician Mesuë the Younger, tripled its high estimate to sell for $15,000.

The sale featured a strong selection of travel books, led by Jan Nieuhoff et al’s narratives of the Dutch East India Company’s missions to China, titled An Embassy from the East-India Company of the United Provinces, to the Grand Tartar Cham, Emperour of China, 1671, which sold for $7,500.

Each of the eight offered manuscripts found buyers, with the highlight being a collection of 15 illustrated prayers by Charles V of Spain, titled Oraciones de los SS. Mysterios Gloriosos y Dolorosos de la Santissima Virgen Maria, 1676, which was purchased for $9,375.

The next sale of Early Printed Books at Swann Galleries will be held in Fall 2017. For more information, contact Tobias Abeloff at tabeloff@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 124 Oraciones de los SS. Mysterios Gloriosos, manuscript in Spanish on vellum, with 15 engravings of gospel scenes, Brussels, 1676. Sold March 9, 2017 for $9,375. (Pre-sale estimate: $3,000 to $5,000)

merian-book-shapero-stand-TEFAF-web.jpgShapero Rare Books has announced their first major sale at TEFAF Maastricht prior to the official opening on 10 March 2017. One of the highlights on their stand is a lavishly illustrated folio Metamorphosis insectorum Surinamensium (Metamorphosis of the Insects of Surinam) by Maria Sibylla Merian (1647-1717) which has been sold to a European collector. Priced by Shapero at £125,000, this hand-coloured copy of the 1726 edition is a masterpiece of both art and science; the German born naturalist was the first to record the full life cycle of many species of butterflies and moths. 

A Study of Metamorphosis: More Than 300 Years Ago

At the age of 52, Merian, who settled in Amsterdam in 1691, set out for the Dutch colony now known as Surinam in South America. She spent two years studying and drawing the indigenous flora and fauna until forced to return after contracting malaria. Despite her illness, Merian published her Magnus Opus, Metamorphosis Insectorum Surinamensium, three years later, filled with paintings of Suriname's plants and animals, especially of moths and butterflies, as well as spiders, and even snakes and lizards. Many of these tropical species were unknown to Europeans at the time.


The exceptional group of her works in the Royal Collection formed the basis of the exhibition held last year at the Queen's Gallery at Buckingham Palace that travels to Holyrood Palace in Edinburgh. Exactly 300 years after her death, the Frankfurt-born botanist, zoologist and painter is finally being recognised as a pioneering woman of science at an international symposium in the Dutch capital this June.

Shapero Rare Books has exhibited at TEFAF for over 20 years. Other notable natural history books on stand 231 include a first edition folio of the Wunderkammer by Dutchman Albertus Seba. 

About Shapero Rare Books:

Shapero Rare Books is an internationally renowned dealer in rare books and works on paper. Its experts have over 100 years’ experience in the book world with particular expertise in fine illustrated books from the 15th to the 20th Century, particularly natural history, travel, guidebooks and Russian works. In 2014 it launched Shapero Modern, a modern and contemporary prints department.

BOSTON - March 09, 2017 - Boston Public Library honors William Shakespeare’s lasting legacy with its Shakespeare Unauthorized exhibition, on view through the end of the month in the McKim Exhibition Hall at the Central Library in Copley Square. The exhibition, with 54,735 visitors to date, is presented in conjunction with the ongoing BPL citywide initiative All the City’s a Stage: A Season of Shakespeare at the Boston Public Library, commemorating the 400th anniversary of Shakespeare’s death in 2016 and connecting audiences to theater and the dramatic arts with programs throughout the library system.  Shakespeare programming continues through June, with upcoming performances by Seven Times Salt, “Sonnets and Soliloquies” by Carey and Gibson, a Lowell Lecture Series talk by Marjorie Garber, Shakespeare to Hip Hop, and more.

Boston Public Library holds one of the largest and most comprehensive publicly-held collections of Shakespeare, including the first four folios of his collected works, 45 early quarto editions of individual plays, and thousands of volumes of early source material, commentaries, translations, manuscripts, and more. Visit www.bpl.org/shakespeare to view the complete offerings of the initiative.

Shakespeare Unauthorized: Experience the original works of “The Bard”

Shakespeare Unauthorized, a major gallery exhibition on view from October 14, 2016 through March 31, 2017, includes extraordinarily rare first and early editions of familiar and beloved plays like A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Hamlet, and The Merchant of Venice, as well as all four Shakespearean folios, most notably the BPL’s own copy of the world-famous First Folio. Through the pages of these precious books, visitors can experience Shakespeare in his original language and spelling, just as he would have been read by book lovers and theater-goers hundreds of years ago.

Shakespeare Unauthorized is made possible through the financial support of Iron Mountain Incorporated (NYSE: IRM), the global leader in storage and information management services. Based in Boston, Iron Mountain provides charitable grants of funding and in-kind services to cultural and historical preservation projects like Shakespeare Unauthorized through its Living Legacy Initiative.

Shakespeare Unauthorized contains far more than just books of plays: this exhibition features surprising rarities and mysterious objects; scandalous forgeries made by con men and accomplished scholars; books from the luxurious private libraries of early English aristocrats; and memorabilia from four centuries of acting and stagecraft.

C&G Partners created the engaging exhibition design that showcases the extraordinary historic material on display in Shakespeare Unauthorized.

McM.jpegNEW YORK (March 9, 2017) — Collectors pounced on a pair of historic typewriters author Larry McMurtry used to write Lonesome Dove for $37,500 Wednesday, March 8, 2017 at a $1.8+ million public auction of rare books held by Heritage Auctions. The novel was a genre-defining opus and reinvigorated the western literature scene.

The Swiss-made Hermes 3000 is one of the world's finest typewriter models and the instrument of choice for thousands of writers. It was introduced in 1958 and was noted for its simplicity and ease of maintenance. The pair on offer is dated between 1963 and 1970 with pale green bodies and keys. Each has its original case and exhibits only light scuffs and handling marks. McMurtry stationed one at his home in Archer City, Texas, and the other in Washington, D.C., while writing Lonesome Dove. McMurtry still uses a Hermes 3000, writing five pages every day to avoid "the empty well."

Lonesome Dove follows a pair of Texas Rangers in a 1,500-mile cattle drive in the Old West. The 843-page epic was an instant success, earning McMurtry the 1986 Pulitzer Prize for Fiction. CBS adapted the story into a miniseries starring Robert Duvall three years later. More than 28 million people watched the miniseries, which won seven Emmys. 

The auction rounded out with Neal Cassady's THE JOAN ANDERSON LETTER to Jack Kerouac selling for $206,250; Kerouac's original typescript for The Dharma Bums selling for $137,500; and Thomas Jefferson's own copy of The Laws of the United States of America, which sold for $156,250.

Screen Shot 2017-03-09 at 8.48.24 AM.pngWinner of multiple awards, including the Hugo and the Nebula, American Gods is Neil Gaiman’s sweeping exploration of story, myth and the shifting nature of belief itself. According to Mr Wednesday, gods travelled to the new world with their immigrant worshippers only to flounder in a land both too strange and too modern to nurture them. Although the story is rooted in the familiar - Gaiman gives us Egyptian deities who run funeral parlours, and gods who drive cabs to make a living - it tears back the veil to reveal the pulsing supernatural heart of America. Crammed with unconventional yet wholly engaging characters, this story of coin tricks, cons and misdirection is considered by many to be Gaiman’s masterpiece. 

For this special collector’s edition, the only colour illustrated hardback volume currently available, award-winning artist and illustrator, and Gaiman’s longtime creative partner, Dave McKean has created 12 extraordinary illustrations, including three double-page spread and a frontispiece, as well as designs for the binding and slipcase that complement and mirror each other. Like Gaiman’s stories, McKean’s multimedia pieces, with their layered meanings and half-monstrous creatures, capture the uneasy relationship between the real and the unreal. 

The text is the author’s preferred version and includes new revisions approved by the author. This edition also features both Gaiman’s original introduction and an afterword titled ‘How Dare You?’ on the particular challenges faced by an Englishman writing a novel about America. McKean has provided a revealing introduction on his approach to illustration - an essay exclusive to this edition - making this an essential volume for any enthusiast of the work of this legendary creative team. 

Product information

Bound in cloth blocked with a design by the artist. Set in Maxime with Wicked Grit display. 560 pages. 12 colour illustrations, including 3 double-page spreads.

Printed slipcase. 10" x 63⁄4".

UK £75.00 US $120.00 Can $155.00 Aus $160.00

RANKLIN, Mass. - A pair of drawings on white paper by the renowned Russian-born French artist Marc Chagall (1887-1985) combined for over $25,000 in an online-only fine art auction held February 22nd by The Woodshed Gallery, based in Franklin. The sale featured nearly 200 prints and drawings by Old and Modern Masters representing four centuries of artwork on paper.

The Chagalls were the top two selling lots of the auction. Village Berger Descending (aka Dream of the Dance), a sanguine figural drawing on white Arches paper, sold for $16,250, while another drawing, titled Violinist and Family, unframed and on white paper, finished at $9,600. Both were done in the poetic and figurative style that made Chagall one of the most popular modern artists.

Both drawings were previously owned by the Ashkenazy Gallery in Los Angeles. A flood in 1990 resulted in a large portion of the gallery’s inventory to be compensated by its insurer and subsequently sold on the secondary market. The drawings were never appraised by a third party but the gallery was paid for the damaged inventory. Neither Chagall suffered any flood damage.

Nearly 700 registered bidders participated in the auction via the platforms LiveAuctioneers.com and Invaluable.com. Bidding traffic was also driven through The Woodshed Gallery website, at www.woodshedgallery.com. “The Chagalls marked an increase in the quality of our offerings and in our ability to attract better consignments,” said Bruce Wood of The Woodshed Gallery. 

Following are additional highlights from the auction. All prices quoted include a 25 percent buyer’s premium.

An ink drawing on toned paper by Man Ray (Am., 1890-1976, born Emmanuel Radnitzky), titled Female Nude on a Bridge, signed and dated 1917, gaveled for $1,800; while a much later Man Ray work, an ink drawing on tan paper with abstract watercolor underpainting titled Female Figure, signed and dated 1951, brought $9,375. Both had identical estimates of $8,000-$12,000.

A blue ink drawing with water wash on heavy art paper, signed by Jean Cocteau (Fr., 1889-1963), and titled Mermaids, with just a few light handling marks its only flaw, went for $720. Also, an ink drawing on heavy-weight tan art paper by Fernand Leger (Fr., 1881-1955), titled Group of Women, signed (“F.L.”) and dated (1951), went to a determined bidder for $1,875.

A pair of male nude sculptures, unsigned but by a follower of Auguste Rodin, each one 11 ¼ inches tall, sold as one lot for $1,750. They might not have brought nearly as much without the connection to Rodin (Fr., 1840-1917), widely regarded as the progenitor of modern sculpture. His iconic work The Thinker remains one of the most recognizable works of art ever produced.

An ink on white bond paper drawing by the one and only Dr.Seuss (Am., born Theodor Seuss Geisel, 1904-1991), depicting a scene from his classic children’s book Green Eggs and Ham, signed by the artist, realized $480. The same amount was the winning bid for a drawing by Dr. Seuss of the classic book character The Cat in the Hat, signed, with “Best wishes, Dr. Seuss.”

A signed drawing by Hans Erni (Swiss, 1909-2015), titled Minotaur, newly matted and housed in a 33 inch by 23 inch frame, in good condition, rose to $500; while a mixed media work by Cy Twombly (1928-2011), titled Abstract Floral, signed, hit $2,250. Also, a personal note of thanks written in blue ink on buff paper by President John F. Kennedy, unframed, topped out at $375.

The Woodshed’s next big online-only auction is scheduled for Wednesday, March 29th. Already consigned are an original drawing by Vincent Van Gogh, with a minimum bid of $20,000; several interesting pieces by South American artists; two circa 1930s French posters from Noveltex; a Rodolfo Morales collage; and three portraits by Chicago’s very own Lee Godie.

The Woodshed Gallery is a family-owned art gallery specializing in oil painting restoration, art auctions and custom picture framing. The firm holds online and live auctions and is always accepting quality artworks for future auctions. To inquire about consigning a single piece or a collection, call Bruce Wood at (508) 533-6277; or, e-mail him at bruce@woodshedgallery.com

To learn more about The Woodshed Gallery and the online-only auction on March 29th, please visit www.woodshedgallery.com. Updates are posted often.

d70911ea-b2e5-4b8b-b20c-72836bf3918e.jpgAmerican photographer Todd Webb (1905-2000) was born and raised in Detroit, Michigan. After losing all his money in the Stock Market Crash of 1929, he embarked on a seven-year adventure prospecting for gold and working as a fire ranger but had little success. After returning to Detroit in 1938, Webb bought his first camera and joined the Chrysler Camera Club where he met photographer Harry Callahan. In 1940 he and Callahan completed a 10-day workshop with Ansel Adams and Webb's fascination with the medium flourished. 

After honing his skills as a Navy photographer in the South Pacific during World War II, Webb moved to New York in 1946 where he dedicated himself to photographing the everyday life and architecture of a city that captivated him. He enjoyed significant support from the New York photo community including luminaries Alfred Stieglitz, Georgia O'Keeffe, Walker Evans and Berenice Abbott, to name a few.  Stieglitz introduced him to Beaumont Newhall who helped arrange his first major solo exhibition of his New York City photographs curated by Grace Mayer. I See A City opened at the Museum of the City of New York in September 1946 to glowing notices.

This spring, over seventy years later, the Museum of the City of New York will present its second solo exhibition with Webb entitled A City Seen: Todd Webb's Postwar New York, 1945-1960 which will open on Thursday, April 20 and remain on view through September 4, 2017. Curated by Sean Corcoran, Curator of Prints and Photography at the Museum, the show features more than 100 vintage prints as well as excerpts from Webb's journal writings. 

On Thursday, April 20, an exhibition curated by former LIFE magazine editor-in-chief Bill Shapiro, entitled Down Any Street: Todd Webb's NYC Photographs 1946-1960 will open at The Curator Gallery, a commercial gallery space located in the heart of New York's Chelsea art district. The gallery show will include vintage prints as well as modern prints made by John Hill who printed some of Walker Evans' negatives. 

Both shows reveal Todd Webb's intimate and wonderfully rich exploration of New York while providing an expansive document of the city in the years following World War II. Armed with a large format camera and tripod, Webb walked around New York engaging with the people and the landscape surrounding him. He captured in his candid and inimitable way a city of contrasts -- Midtown skyscrapers, the elevated tracks along Third Avenue, signs and storefronts, food vendors and open air markets, and the bustling street life in the Bowery, Harlem near 125th Street, and old ethnic enclaves in Lower Manhattan. The museum show also features Webb's portraits of his intimate circle of friends, including Alfred Stieglitz, Harry Callahan, Berenice Abbott, Helen Levitt, and Lisette Model.  

In the press release for the 1946 exhibition, Newhall wrote: "[Todd Webb] has seen our city not as a glittering megalopolis, but as a community. He has chosen to focus mainly upon Third Avenue and those blocks where the shops are small and living quarters crowded. He works with swift precision, directly and honestly recording what he sees. His straightforward, un-manipulated contact prints convey a maximum sense of authenticity and are historical records of obvious documentary value. More than this, they are personal interpretations, through which he has imparted to us warmth of appreciation and the excitement of visual discovery. He brings out the human quality even when the people are absence."

About the Artist: 

Todd Webb is best known for his photographs of New York, Paris and the American West. His Paris series earned him comparisons to the French photographer Eugene Atget. In the 1940s and 50s, Webb worked for Roy Stryker and Standard Oil and Fortune magazine while simultaneously pursuing his personal projects. In 1955 and 1956, he was awarded a John Simon Guggenheim fellowship to document the emigrant trails that the early settlers followed to Oregon and California. He spent these years walking across the country not unlike his contemporary, Robert Frank. From 1961-1971, Webb and his wife Lucille lived in New Mexico where they became an integral part of the local arts community and Webb made a series of portraits of Georgia O'Keeffe at her home there. In 1970, Webb moved to the South of France where he continued to photograph regularly, and in 1975 he retired in Maine where he would live until his passing at age 94.

Over a period of more than fifty years, Todd Webb produced a unique body of work which attained an important place in the annals of American photographic history. Webb's humanistic approach to documentary photography infuses his images with a sense of intimacy and a curiosity in the relationship between history, place, and people. His life was like his photographs; at first they seem very simple, without obvious tricks or manipulation, but on closer examination, they are increasingly complex and marvelously subtle. For more information about the artist, visit www.toddwebbarchive.com.

A comprehensive monograph of Webb's New York photographs will be published by Thames & Hudson in the early fall of 2017. (Details coming soon.) Webb's portraits of O'Keeffe taken in New Mexico between 1961-1971 are currently on view in George O'Keeffe: Living Modern at the Brooklyn Museum through July 23, 2017. 

Image: "LaSalle at Amsterdam" 1946 / © Todd Webb Archive

IMG_5213 copy.jpgSymposium will feature leading scholars in the field and an inaugural exhibit of antique books of Mesoamerica and Colonial Mexico

What: 

Cal State LA’s Art History Society, in partnership with the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, presents the 2017 Mesoamerican Symposium titled  “The Foundation of Heaven: The Great Temple of the Aztecs. The symposium will feature leading scholars in the field, as well as an inaugural exhibit of antique books of Mesoamerica and Colonial Mexico.

Who: 

The symposium is dedicated to the life and work of Eduardo Matos Moctezuma, a prominent Mexican archaeologist. Matos Moctezuma is recognized for his work directing the massive, multidisciplinary Templo Mayor Project (1978-2001). The project was to excavate the Great Aztec Temple of the island capital of Tenochtitlan, next to the Metropolitan Cathedral and the Zócalo, Mexico City’s famous central plaza. He also conducted field work in such revered places as Tula, Comalcalco, Cholula, Teotihuacan, and Tlatelolco. Matos Moctezuma has published more than 500 articles, exhibition catalogues, and monographs.

When:  

Friday, April 21, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m., at Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Bing Theater.

Saturday, April 22, 8:30 a.m. to 7 p.m., at Cal State LA, Golden Eagle Ballroom.  

Where:

Cal State LA is located at the Eastern Avenue exit, San Bernardino Freeway, at the interchange of the 10 and 710 Freeways. The address is 5151 State University Drive, Los Angeles, 90032. Public (permit dispensers) parking is available on the top level of Parking Structure C. Click here for a campus map and directions.

More: 

The symposium will culminate on April 22 at 5 p.m. in the University Library with a special exhibit of antique books, entitled “Transcultural Dialogues: The Books of Mesoamerica and Colonial Mexico. This exhibit will showcase the  Ruwet, Glass and Nicholson collections of Cal State LA that are an integral part of a proposed center for the advancement of Mesoamerican Studies. The collections of books from the 17th to the 21st Centuries, include most of the facsimiles of Mesoamerican Codices and historical chronicles of Colonial Mexico. This makes Cal State LA’s library one of the top repositories in the world in the fields of Pre-Columbian and Colonial History of the American Continent.  The exhibit is curated by Cal State LA’s Art History Professor Manuel Aguilar-Moreno, along with Azalea Camacho and Angelene Campuzano.  

Symposium speakers include Elizabeth Boone, of Tulane University; David Carrasco, of the Harvard Divinity School; John D. Pohl, of the Anthropology Department at Cal State LA; Karl Taube, of the University of California, Riverside; and more. For a listing of speakers, refer to the program online.

Info: 

General admission to the symposium is $25, $15 for college students with ID, and $10 for Cal State LA students with ID. To register, please email ahscsula@gmail.com. For additional symposium information, call (818) 926-7635 or visit http://www.calstatela.edu/arthistorysociety/events.

551-Chagall copy.jpgNew York— On Thursday, March 2, Swann Galleries’ sale of 19th & 20th Century Prints & Drawings exceeded $3M and broke ten auction records. The house, which is celebrating it diamond anniversary this year, has enjoyed several record-breaking sales already in their spring 2017 season.

The rare deluxe edition of Marc Chagall’s 1948 portfolio Four Tales from the Arabian Nights, of which only 11 were printed, topped the sale. The set belonged to the publisher of Pantheon Books, Kurt Wolff. The vibrant color lithographs include the 13th plate denoting the deluxe edition; still in the original case, the set sold to a collector for $269,000*.

Early twentieth-century American prints saw competitive bidding and high prices. Edward Hopper’s rare 1921 etching Evening Wind sold for $149,000, nearly doubling its high estimate of $80,000. The American master was also represented in the sale by the 1921 etching Night Shadows, which went for $33,800. A premiere selection of prints by Hopper’s mentor Martin Lewis was led by the extremely rare aquatint Which Way?, 1932, which was purchased for $42,500, a record for the work. Further highlights by Lewis included the 1929 drypoint Bay Windows and 1916’s etching The Orator, Madison Square, each of which went for $27,500. 

Another highlight of the sale was Männlicher Akt (Selbstbildnis I), 1912, Egon Schiele’s first attempt at a printed self-portrait; the work brought $30,000. A 1914 drypoint by the artist, Kümmernis, was purchased for $15,000.

Orologi Molli, a watercolor by Salvador Dalí featuring one of his famous melting clocks, surpassed its high estimate to sell for $112,500. Another original, a pen and ink drawing by Paul Klee of prancing bulls, titled Drama in der Kuhwelt, 1915, reached $25,000. 

All four offered works by Mary Cassatt found buyers, including the rare circa-1902 drypoint Crocheting Lessons, which sold for $27,500. Another Cassatt, the color drypoint and soft-ground etching The Coiffure, circa 1891, broke its previous auction record to sell for $81,250.

Etchings made by James A.M. Whistler during a 1879-80 trip to Venice performed well, including the luminous Upright Venice, at $70,000. Two further prints from the same period each broke their previous auction records: The Garden reached $70,000, while San Biagio sold for $62,500.

The complete set of 14 lithographs in Henri Toulouse-Lautrec’s Mélodies de Désiré Dihau, 1895, was sold for $30,000, a record for the work. The set was previously in the collection of Eric Carlson.

Todd Weyman, Director of Prints & Drawings, said of the sale, “This has been one of our strongest sales to date in terms of bidder registration. We are pleased with the continued growth in our dynamic market.”

The next sale of Prints & Drawings at Swann Galleries will be Old Master Through Modern Prints on May 2, 2017. For more information, contact Todd Weyman at tweyman@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 551 Marc Chagall, Four Tales from the Arabian Nights, complete deluxe portfolio with 13 color lithographs, 1948. Sold March 2, 2017 for $269,000. (Pre-sale estimate: $250,000 to $350,000)

 

Dingwall Library.jpgThe Library of the Late Hubert Dingwall, featuring rare and historic books collected by Hubert Dingwall over 70 years, will be the first collection to go under the hammer at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions’ new London premises which will open in Pall Mall this April.  The Library includes over 1,500 books and ranges in estimate from £100 - £15,000.  The auction takes place on Thursday, 27 April 2017 with a preview brunch on Sunday, 23 April, timed to coincide with the anniversary of the death of two literary legends: Miguel de Cervantes and William Shakespeare. 

Hubert Dingwall’s (1912 - 2001) passion for serious book collecting started when he was in his early 20s, soon after he graduated from Oxford.  From the early 1930s he enjoyed trawling the many booksellers’ barrows in the Charing Cross Road for bargains, although later he established a close relationship with the revered bookseller Maggs Bros. Ltd, whose professionalism he always admired. 

Through his sister Winifred, he met Patricia (Patsy) Harrison on holiday in Donegal; they married in 1946.  The couple lived first in Finchley, north London, and then, from 1951, in Wimbledon. Here, they had books in every room, except the kitchen and bathroom, and the house also boasted two large cellar rooms that were soon fitted up with library-style shelves, lighting and background heating to accommodate Hubert’s ever-growing collection.

Hubert Dingwall commented, “I well remember the first book I bought once the bug had bitten me: It was in 1935, a vellum-bound copy of the Second Part of Don Quixote printed in Spanish in Antwerp in 1697. It cost me 1s 6d! This was, of course, far from being contemporaneous with Cervantes, who died in 1616, but at least it was the right century. You will realise how green a collector I was ... that I felt confident I should come across the First Part in next to no time”. 

Hubert Dingwall’s continued interest in Cervantes and the tale of the illustrious and victorious knight Don Quixote is the subject of one of the key highlights of the auction. Cervantes Saavedra (Miguel de) El Ingenioso Hidalgo Don Quixote de la Mancha, 1780 is the first Spanish Royal Academy edition, 4 vol. and is estimated at £10,000 - £15,000 (pictured). The four volumes are handsomely bound in Spanish paneled calf probably by the contemporary Madrid binder Antonio de Sancha. 

The collection also contains an important section of 'emblemata', books pictorially depicting morals, axioms and fables, including a copy of Horatius Flaccus Emblemata (pictured) printed in 1612 and translated by the Dutch poet Jan van der Veen (1578-1659). The book features 103 engraved plates of emblems and is estimated at £350 - £450. Spiegel van den Ouden ende Nieuwen Tijdt, 1633 or Mirror of the Old and the New Times is by the Dutch poet, humourist and politician, Jacob Cats (1577-1660). This emblem book is one of his most famous and is presented as 4 parts in one with 79 engraved emblems (est. £500 - £700). Cats also acted as a political envoy and in 1627 came to England on a mission with Charles I, who later made him a knight. His home, situated near The Hague, is now the official residence of the Dutch Prime Minister named ‘Catshuis.’ 

The Emblamata Amatoria, 1682 by Vaenius or Otto van Veen (c.1556-1629) comprises 44 full-page engraved emblems and is expected to realise between £600 - £800 (pictured). Vaenius was primarily active in Antwerp from c. 1594-1598 and a teacher of Rubens. He was renowned for featuring putti that enacted the mottoes and quotations from lyricists, philosophers and ancient writers on the power of love. 

Charles Dickens is represented by a deluxe and illustrated edition of A Christmas Carol, 1915. Illustrated by Arthur Rackham this version is one of 500 signed deluxe editions and features many of Rackham’s best known illustrations. The work is estimated at £800 - £1,200. 

The 20th century is represented by a volume of Aesop’s fables published in 1932 by the Gregynog Press - a philanthropic venture started by two sisters in the early 1900s. The book is illustrated with engravings on wood by engraver and illustrator Agnes Miller Parker (1895-1980). Titled, The Fables of Esope, 1932, the bound book is one of 25 specially bound copies (est. £2,000 - £3,000). 

“I have remained to a great extent an accumulator. I think this is because I derive pleasure from so many different aspects of books. It is my hope that [I] give those of you who have not been bitten by the bibliomania bug an inkling of what interest is inherent in books above and beyond the reading matter they contain”. Hubert Dingwall. 

The auction will take place in St James’s, London. Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions and the prestigious, long standing dealers Mallett will open new premises in Pall Mall creating a bespoke dual purpose auction and retail space. Situated over two floors, the building is not only in the heart of London’s celebrated Club land, but is flanked by the National Gallery and St James’s Palace and joins several well-established galleries. 

Auction location: 16-17 Pall Mall, St James’s, London SW1Y 5LU 

Image: L-R: Rackham (Arthur).-Dickens (Charles) A Christmas Carol, 1915, One of 500 signed deluxe copies, est.£800-1,200, Hubert Dingwall, Gregynog Press.-Aesop. The Fables of Esope, 1932, One of 25 specially bound copies, est. £2,000-3,000

 

AUSTIN, Texas — The Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin has acquired the papers of actors, and husband and wife, Eli Wallach (1915-2014) and Anne Jackson (1925-2016). Known as method actors and early members of the Actors Studio in New York, Wallach and Jackson had extensive and independent careers on stage and screen while also performing together in several productions.

The 40 boxes of the papers of Eli Wallach, a 1936 graduate of The University of Texas, and Anne Jackson cover the span of their lives and careers. The method actors’ collection of heavily annotated scripts — including theater premieres of Tennessee Williams’ “Summer and Smoke” (1948), “The Rose Tattoo” (1951), and “Camino Real” (1953) and film scripts of Arthur Miller’s “The Misfits” (1961) and the classic Spaghetti Western “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly” (1966) — document their unique approaches to developing a character. The collection also includes playbills, awards, clippings, posters, professional and candid photographs, correspondence, scrapbooks, home movies and interviews.

“Few actors documented their process like Anne Jackson and Eli Wallach did,” says Dr. Eric Colleary, Cline Curator of Theatre and Performing Arts at the Ransom Center. “They were absolute masters of their craft. Throughout their scripts you can find complex character sketches and marginal notes detailing why their characters behave the way they do. They bring an entirely new dimension to some of the most important plays and films of the 20th century.”

The papers have connections to several collections in the Ransom Center’s film and performing arts holdings, including those of Stella Adler, Robert De Niro, Arthur Miller, Tennessee Williams and others.

“The collection will prove to be a rich and rewarding one for students and scholars as it also highlights one of the great strengths of the Ransom Center’s collections, the connections between artists — from Tennessee Williams to Arthur Miller to Norman Mailer to Magnum Photos,” says Ransom Center Curator of Film Steve Wilson. “We are proud to become the custodians of Wallach and Jackson’s remarkable legacy.”

Married for 66 years, Wallach and Jackson’s partnership mirrors similar relationships between actors Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne, Jessica Tandy and Hume Cronyn and Anne Bancroft and Mel Brooks. Wallach and Jackson, who met while performing in a 1946 production of Tennessee Williams’ “This Property is Condemned,” appeared multiple times together on Broadway and off Broadway.

Jackson, who was nominated for a Tony Award for “Middle of the Night” (1956) and won an Obie award for her performances in “The Tiger” and “The Typists” (1963), made her Broadway debut in “The New Moon” (1944). Jackson had film credits in Stanley Kubrick’s “The Shining” (1980), “How to Save a Marriage and Ruin Your Life” (1968) and “So Young, So Bad” (1950) while numerous roles in television series included “General Electric Theater” (1956-1962), “The Untouchables” (1962), “Gunsmoke” (1972), “Law & Order” (1997) and “ER” (2003).

Jackson’s memoir, “Early Stages” (1979), noted that she and Wallach had much in common: “Neither of us could sing; both of us loved to act; we were both ambitious and idealistic; and we endowed each other with the most extraordinary virtues.”

Wallach also penned a memoir, “The Good, the Bad, and Me” (2006), sharing his experiences on stage and his performances in more than 90 films, including “Baby Doll” (1956), “The Magnificent Seven” (1960), “The Misfits” (1961), “Lord Jim” (1965), “How to Steal a Million” (1966), “The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly” (1966), “The Godfather: Part III” (1990) and “The Holiday” (2006).

Upon Wallach’s receipt of an honorary Academy Award for Lifetime Achievement, actor Robert De Niro said, “I’ve heard Eli referred to as a character actor, and I think that’s meant to describe an actor who customarily plays supporting roles. But really we’re all character actors — or at least striving to be one. It makes no difference whether his character is the lead or supporting. Eli brings the same craft, dedication and artistry to the challenge.”  

While attending The University of Texas, Wallach was a member of the university’s Curtain Club and performed alongside Walter Cronkite and Zachary Scott.

The papers will be accessible once processed and cataloged.

 

Screen Shot 2017-03-06 at 8.49.28 AM.pngMARCH 2017 - Collectors will have the opportunity to acquire their own piece of political and cultural history in April, when over 130 drawings by the foremost caricaturist and cartoonist of our age, Gerald Scarfe (b. 1936), will be offered for sale at Sotheby’s in London.

Continuing a tradition of uncompromising satire dating back to Hogarth and Gillray, Scarfe has pushed the boundaries of caricature for more than five decades, delivering provocative portraits of the foremost politicians and statesmen of our age, from Winston Churchill to Theresa May. Together, they tell the history of over half a century of political intrigue and seismic change.

Scarfe’s no-holds-barred approach in his contributions for Private Eye and The New Yorker, and as The Sunday Times’ political cartoonist for more than 50 years, has secured him a place on the list of the most 40 important newspaper journalists of the modern era. 

While many of the drawings included in the auction have been published, a number of works included in the sale are unseen, revealing the most private views of the artist.

Gerald Scarfe said: “I feel it’s the duty of an artist to re-interpret the world and to freshen our stale vision, making us see what we hadn’t realised was there. What I’m trying to do is simply to bring out their essential characteristics. I find a particular delight in taking the caricature as far as I can.

I have always drawn, ever since I could hold a pencil. As a young child I was a chronic asthmatic and spent long periods bedridden either at home or in hospital and I drew. Drawing became my way of communicating. It became my way of exorcising my fears, and that still applies today.

My drawings are of course very personal acts made in the privacy of my own home, but when they leave my hands they escape into hundreds of thousands of copies and may be seen by millions of people. I don’t think about that when I make the drawing - it’s just between my imagination and that piece of paper - but if a drawing is particularly ferocious or overtly sexual and someone looks at it in my presence I have to admit to sometimes feeling shy; I feel so personally about it it’s almost like undressing in public. To me these are not only drawings, they are memories, and mark particular moments in my life.”

The royal family and countless celebrities have not escaped Scarfe’s pen, with portraits of the Queen, the Duke and Duchess of Cambridge, David Beckham and Mick Jagger accompanying over 70 political caricatures in this sale.

The star lot is a historic drawing of Winston Churchill showing the elderly statesman’s final appearance in the House of Commons in 1964. Scarfe had been commissioned by The Times to record the occasion, but his image was deemed too controversial to publish. In the artist’s own words ‘ ...T h e Times refused to print my drawing, saying that Churchill’s wife, Clementine, would be upset when the paper dropped through the letter-box in the morning.’ Less than six months later Churchill was dead, and the image appeared on Private Eye’s cover. Until recently, the drawing has been on exhibition at Portcullis House, House of Commons.

There are also examples of Gerald Scarfe’s film work for Disney’s Hercules, for which he was the external design consultant, and for Pink Floyd the Wall - a project that Scarfe happened upon by chance when members of the band saw his work on television and decided “We’ve got to work with this guy, he’s f***ing mad”. Their long-term, highly-acclaimed collaboration on stage shows, album and subsequent film continues to the present day. 

Finally, the sale also reveals Scarfe’s theatre work. A serendipitous meeting with director Sir Peter Hall led to an invitation for him to work on a musical, two West End farces and a production of The Magic Flute for Los Angeles opera. Works showing illustrations for The Nutcracker, Fantastic Mr Fox and The Magic Flute are all included in the sale.

Dr Philip W. Errington, Sotheby’s Specialist in Books and Manuscripts said: “Over the past months, spent working alongside Gerald preparing for this sale, I’ve been struck by his consummate skill and artistry. Sometimes he treats his subjects with gentle amusement, at other times he presents a full-blown, biting critique. These drawingspack a significant punch. The works selected range from Disney to Pink Floyd, from Thatcher to May, Reagan to Obama, and Yes Minister to The Magic Flute. There is truly an eclectic mix, spanning his entire half-century career. The sharp, steel-nib of our greatest living caricaturist demonstrates time and time again his pedigree with Hogarth, Cruikshank and Gillray.”

Kestenbaum & Company will be featuring Isidor Kaufmann’s painting entitled “A Young Jewish Bride” (lot 1) in their upcoming auction of Fine Judaica to be held on Thursday, March 16th. The subject of a Jewish woman is one that was seldom created by Kaufmann, making this particular artwork most desirable. The painting has been exhibited over the years at both The Israel Museum and at the Tel Aviv Museum of Art. It was acquired decades ago directly from Philipp Kaufmann, son of the artist, and has now been consigned to Kestenbaum for auction by descendants of the original owner. 

Estimated at $200,000-300,000, the painting is accompanied by a detailed letter of provenance written by Philipp Kaufmann (London, 1964). Another Isidor Kaufmann painting, “Hasid at Prayer” is offered as lot 2. This fine portrait has never before appeared at auction, nor has it ever been publicly exhibited. The pre-auction estimate is $60,000-80,000.

Further Fine Art offerings in the auction include works by such noted artists as Samuel Hirszenberg, Mane-Katz, Lajos Kolozsvary, Artur Markowicz, Leopold Pilichowski, Ze’ev Raban, Issachar Ber Ryback, Hermann Struck and Roman Vishniac.

The Printed Books section of the sale commences with a selection of American Judaica:

  • A rare, complete set of Isaac Leeser’s Discourses on the Jewish Religion, collected sermons of this pioneer of American Orthodoxy, Philadelphia, 1856-67 Estimate: $10,000-15,000 (Lot 35)
  • Seder HaTephiloth, the first Hebrew prayer-book printed in America, New York, 1826. Estimate: $6,000-9,000 (Lot 31)
  • A Historical Souvenir Journal for Yeshiva College Building Fund, Madison Square Garden, NY, 1926. Estimate: $600-900 (Lot 42)

Important Hebrew Printed Book highlights include:

  • A complete, wide-margined copy of Solomon ibn Gabirol’s Mivchar HaPeninim, Soncino, 1484. Estimate: $50,000-60,000 (Lot 139)
  • Schneur Zalman of Liadi’s Sepher Likutei Amarim [“Tanya”], Shklov, 1806. Estimate: $15,000-18,000 (Lot 76)
  • The first edition of Isaiah ben Abraham Halevi Horowitz’s Shnei Luchoth HaBrith, Amsterdam, 1648-49. Estimate: $10,000-15,000 (Lot 134)
  • The first edition of the Kabbalistic Sepher Yetzirah, Mantua, 1562. Estimate: $18,000-22,000 (Lot 153)
  • The very first Hebrew prayer-book printed in Switzerland, Seder Tefilloth MiKol HaShanah KeMinhag Kehiloth Ashkenazim, Basle, 1579. Estimate: $15,000-25,000 (Lot 168)

Further noteworthy Printed Books in other languages:

  • An uncut and unopened copy of the Polyglot Psalter, the second book printed in Arabic and the only book printed in Genoa, Italy, in the first quarter of the 16th century. Estimate: $12,000-18,000 (Lot 64)
  • Isaac Cardoso’s Las Excelencias de los Hebreos, the first edition of this masterpiece of Jewish apologetics, Amsterdam, 1679. Estimate: $6,000-9,000 (Lot 75)
  • The first edition of Joseph Gikatilla’s Portae Lucia, the work that opened the portal of Kabbalah to Christian Hebraists, Augsburg, 1516. Estimate: $4,000-6,000 (Lot 154)
  • The first Hebrew edition of the Koran, Leipzig, 1857. Estimate: $2,000-3,000 (Lot 142)

Prominent among Holocaust-related lots:

  • An original Safe Conduct Pass issued and signed by Japanese diplomat Chiune Sugihara and Dutch diplomat Jan Zwartendijk bearing visas for a Jew to escape from Lithuania during World War II, Kaunas, 1940. Estimate: $10,000-15,000 (Lot 118)
  • A Swedish Protective Passport issued to a Hungarian Jew by Raoul Wallenberg, Budapest, 1944. Estimate $6,000-9,000 (Lot 123)
  • Four scarce Bank of England counterfeit Sterling bills forged by Jewish concentration camp prisoners, under Operation Bernhard, Germany, 1943. Estimate: $4,000-6,000 (Lot 119)

Autograph Letters Highlights:

  • An extraordinary and voluminous world-wide study on anti-Semitism, created by the Holocaust survivor and prominent Argentinean reparation lawyer, José Moskovits. Included are circa 1,000 autograph letters signed by noted religious authorities, politicians, academics, artists, corporate leaders, writers, journalists and other notables from around the globe who answered Mr. Moskovits’ survey concerning anti-Semitism, 1974-78. Estimate: $20,000-25,000 (Lot 226)
  • A collection of c. 63 autograph letters signed by the Lubavitcher Rebbe, R. Yosef Yitzchak Schneerson and his sons-in-law, Brooklyn, NY 1943-51. Estimate: $20,000-25,000 (Lot 261)
  • A collection of 19 fascinating autograph letters signed relating to the bitter divisions which arose within the ultra-Orthodox world surrounding the marriage of Rabbi Amram Blau, leader of the Neturei Karta sect, and Ruth Ben-David, the divorced, French covert to Judaism, 1965-66. Estimate: 8,000-12,000 (Lot 234)
  • An autograph letter by R. Mordechai Banet, a responsa concerning milk sold to a Gentile on Passover, Nikolsburg, 1794. Estimate: $8,000-10,000 (Lot 228)
  • A letter signed by R. Yechezkel Shraga Halberstam of Shinova (The Shinaver Rav), 1896. Estimate: $10,000-15,000 (Lot 244)
  • A group of 11 autograph letters signed by Marc Chagall, all written in Yiddish to David Giladi, Vence, 1970’s. Estimate: $4,000-6,000 (Lot 235)
  • A presentation copy of Torath HaNazir warmly inscribed and signed by the author, R. Yitzchak Hutner, Kovno, 1932. Estimate $1,000-1,500 (Lot 136)
  • A Western Union Telegram containing a New Years greeting sent by Prime Minister Menachem Begin to Rabbi Moshe Feinstein, 1981. Estimate: $3,000-5,000 (Lot 63)

Manuscripts of interest include:

  • Regulations of the Frankfurt Bikur Cholim Society, Hebrew manuscript on vellum, with more than 250 autograph signatures of several generations of society members, Frankfurt, 1760. Estimate: $8,000-12,000 (Lot 240)
  • An illuminated marriage contract on vellum from Split, Croatia, 1836. Estimate: $4,000-6,000 (Lot 251)
  • An illuminated marriage contract from Calcutta, 1892, linking three exotic communities: India, Burma and Java (Indonesia). Estimate: $4,000-6,000 (Lot 252)
  • A finely composed 18th century Ethiopic Psalter, written in Ge’ez on vellum, and housed in an early leather carrying-case. Estimate: $1,000-2,000 (Lot 239)

Rounding out the auction are Holy Land Maps mostly from the Collection of Nathan Lewin, Esq., including:

  • Ptolemy’s Tabula Terre Sanctae, Lyon, 1535. Estimate: $5,000-7,000 (Lot 268)
  • Joann Simonis’s renowned “Grapevine Map” of the Holy Land, a hand-colored copy, Halle, 1741. Estimate: 6,000-9,000 (Lot 144)
  • Heinrich Buenting’s celebrated “Clover Leaf Map”, Magdeburg, 1581. Estimate: $4,000-6,000 (Lot 271)

The auction will take place on Thursday, March 16th at 3:00 pm in our gallery located at 242 West 30th Street in New York City. The exhibition will be held from Monday, March 13th through Wednesday, March 15th. For further information, to request images, or for any other queries please contact Ms. Jackie Insel: (Tel) 212.366.1197 or at jackie@kestenbaum.net

efb95a3ecb12d1d9488348b9dc6db1696d3c3c9a.jpegBOSTON, MA - (March 1, 17)  A fragment from Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s manuscript for the third movement, ‘Allegro,’ of his Serenade in D Major will be auctioned by Boston-based RR Auction. 

The one-page handwritten musical manuscript, on both sides, is unsigned, no date but circa 1773. 

Also known as ‘Antretter,’ the manuscript contains thirteen precisely penned measures in an eight-staff system, scored for an orchestra of two oboes, two horns, strings, and solo violin. 

The music contained herein constitutes an ebullient rondo designed to show off the virtuosity of the solo violinist, and was likely played by Mozart himself. 

The sheet bears pagination number “34” and foliation number “79” in pencil, both possibly in the hand of Leopold Mozart. Catalogued as K185, Mozart’s manuscript for the score of this serenade was originally 58 leaves, of which the present leaf was 34.

The complete manuscript was offered at auction in 1975 by J. A. Stargardt and subsequently split up; the location of many of its leaves are today unknown, although some are preserved at the Mozart Foundation in Salzburg.

It is believed that the 17-year-old Mozart composed this serenade in August 1773 as a congratulatory piece to celebrate the graduation of a family friend, Thadda Simon Antretter, from the University of Salzburg with a degree in logic. He invokes the pompous effects of academic ceremonies infused with jubilation to drive the music, concluding with a marvelous finale ending in a gigue. It is an important symphonic movement in sonata form characteristic of Mozart’s great works, weaving together brilliant modulations and refined phrases which he, as always, brings to a perfect resolution. Mozart, employed as a concert violinist in Salzburg at the time he composed the ‘Antretter Serenade,’ included three flowing violin solos which demonstrate his mastery of the instrument. 

“From the hand of the young prodigy Wolfgang Amadeus, this is an exceedingly desirable piece and represents a cornerstone of any collection,” said Robert Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction.

Also featured; a rare Nicolo Paganini letter from April 26, 1831, during his first Paris tour, a significant moment in Paganini's legendary career.

The Fine Autographs and Artifacts Auction from RR Auction began on February 17 and will conclude on March 8. More details can be found online at www.rrauction.com

spider copy.jpgDALLAS, Texas (March 1, 2017) -  Iconic and rare comic books and original art sold for $6,332,633 at Heritage Auctions Feb. 23-25, with the first appearance of Spider-Man and art by Frank Frazetta and Robert Crumb selling for $155,350 each.

“The auction exceeded our estimates by more than $1.2 million,” said Barry Sandoval, Director of Comics Operations at Heritage Auctions. “The market is red hot.”

A high-grade copy of Amazing Fantasy #15 (Marvel, 1962), CGC VF+ 8.5, sold for $155,350 during the first day of the sale. It was followed by Frank Frazetta’s oil painting Thor’s Flight, published on the cover of the paperback edition of Thongor in the City of Magicians by Lin Carter, which also sold for $155,350. Likewise a four-page complete story of original art by Underground Comix master Robert Crumb, closed at $155,350.                                  

Batman fans had much to choose from as the first edition of Batman, CGC VG- 3.5, sold for $143,400 and a copy of Detective Comics #35, CGC VF- 7.5, sold for $119,500.

Several important collections performed well, as the Ethan Roberts Estate Collection of comics and comic art sold for a combined $1.2 million, as artist Alex Raymond’s original art for a Flash Gordon comic strip dated Oct. 27, 1935 sold for $131,450. The collection featured two important examples of original cover art by genre masters Bernie Wrightson, as his cover art for Swamp Thing #6 sold for $58,555 and the original cover art for The Amazing Spider-Man #259 sold for $33,460.

A small selection from the landmark collection of American cartoonist Richard Felton Outcault - considered by historians as the father of the American comic strip - realized more than $100,000 led by a Buster Brown Sunday comic strip original art dated Oct. 29, 1916, which sold for $35,850.

 Additional highlights include, but are not limited to:

From the Roberts Estate Collection, Alex Raymond Flash Gordon with Jungle Jim Topper Sunday Comic Strip Original Art dated Nov. 12, 1939: realized $95,600.

Ken Bald (attributed) Captain America Comics #68 Cover Original Art (Timely, 1948): realized $77,675.

Bill Watterson Calvin and Hobbes Daily Comic Strip Original Art dated April, 28, 1986 (Universal Press Syndicate, 1986): realized $71,700.

Hit Comics #5, Mile High Pedigree (Quality, 1940), CGC NM+ 9.6,: realized $59,750.

Heritage Auctions is the largest fine art and collectibles auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer. Heritage maintains offices in New York, Dallas, Beverly Hills, San Francisco, Chicago, Palm Beach, Paris, Geneva, Amsterdam and Hong Kong.

The Internet’s most popular auction-house website, HA.com, has over one million registered bidder-members, and searchable free archives of four million past auction records with prices realized, descriptions and enlargeable photos. Reproduction rights routinely granted to media for photo credit.

For breaking stories follow us: HA.com/Facebook and HA.com/Twitter. For prior press releases: HA.com/PR. Link to this release on your blog or website.

LOS ANGELES/WASHINGTON - The J. Paul Getty Museum and the National Gallery of Art, Washington, announced today major gifts of photographs from the collection of Daniel Greenberg and Susan Steinhauser. The Getty’s gift includes 386 works of art by 17 different photographers, including works by some of the most influential American practitioners of the 20th century, and 23 additional photographs as future gifts. The Gallery’s gift includes 143 gelatin silver prints by Dorothea Lange, with 10 additional photographs by Lange promised. These two gifts are the key elements of a broader initiative by Greenberg and Steinhauser that involved donations to a total of 13 leading art institutions. 

Greenberg and Steinhauser have been collecting photographs for over 20 years, largely by 20th-century American masters, but also by Latin American and Japanese makers. In keeping with their belief in sharing their collection with the public, they have previously donated very significant bodies of photographs, ceramics, turned wood, and contemporary studio glass to a number of institutions over the years.

“While collecting is a mysterious endeavor, and living with the art is profound, the act of gifting is a joyous and wonderful moment in time,” says Daniel Greenberg. “As Susan and I begin a new chapter in our lives, and after decades of acting as temporary stewards for these photographs, we are excited that now is the time that we can share some of the best works we have owned with the public.”

“These gifts, which are the largest we have made to date, are part of a larger personal commitment through which we are supporting many leading art museums around the country with gifts primarily from our photography collection,” says Susan Steinhauser. “Each photo reminds us of the circumstances under which we searched for, found, experienced and shared it with others. These photographs helped shape our lives and led to many long-lasting friendships. It is our hope that the public will embrace them as enthusiastically as we have.” 

The Getty acquisition:

Highlights of the Getty acquisition include the first works by Ruth Bernhard and Eudora Welty to enter the Museum’s collection. Best known for her studies of the female nude, the German-born Bernhard became one of the leading photographers on the West Coast. While Welty is better known as an American novelist, she also had a serious interest in photography, and her work conveys a similar connection with her subjects that can be seen in her books. The donation of 27 works by Imogen Cunningham complements the 66 prints already in the Getty’s collection, and sets the stage for a possible monographic exhibition of her work. The donation of Chris Killip’s Isle of Man portfolio of 12 prints comes as the Getty prepares for a major exhibition of the artist’s work opening May 23, 2017.

“This incredibly generous donation will complement and strengthen the Getty’s holdings of several major photographers, and provide a rich trove of images from which to organize future exhibitions,” says Timothy Potts, director of the J. Paul Getty Museum. “The gift to the Getty includes both individual prints and portfolios, with the latter giving us the opportunity to represent specific bodies of a photographer’s work in depth. We are extremely grateful to Dan and Susan for their generosity and continued support of the Getty’s Department of Photographs.”

The Getty Museum holds one of the world’s preeminent collections of photographs, and Los Angeles has become an important center for the study of the history and art of photography. Greenberg and Steinhauser are founding members of the Getty Museum Photographs Council, of which Greenberg is the current chairman and Steinhauser is a past chair. Since 2000, they have donated over 500 photographs to the Getty, including significant groups of works by Manuel Álvaraz Bravo, Graciela Iturbide, Abelardo Morell, Eliot Porter, and Minor White, all of which inspired exhibitions organized at the Getty Museum in recent years.

The Getty gift includes:

     12 works by Berenice Abbott (American, 1898-1991)

     29 works by Ruth Bernhard (American, born Germany, 1905-2006)

     18 works by Wynn Bullock (1902-1975)

     27 works by Imogen Cunningham (American, 1883-1976)

     57 works by Bruce Davidson (American, born 1933)

     14 works by William Eggleston (American, born 1939)

     1 work by Andreas Feininger (American, born France, 1906-1999)

     96 works by Mario Giacomelli (Italian, 1925-2000)

     5 works by André Kertész (American, born Hungary, 1894-1985)

     12 works by Chris Killip (British, born 1946)

     1 work by Dorothea Lange (American, 1895-1965)

     15 works by Mary Ellen Mark (American, 1940-2015)

     26 works by Richard Misrach (American, born 1949)

     18 works by Abelardo Morell (American, born Cuba, born 1948)

     9 works by Arnold Newman (American, 1918-2006)

     8 works by Milton Rogovin (American, 1909-2011)

     38 works by Eudora Welty (American, 1909-2011)

National Gallery of Art acquisition:

The Greenberg and Steinhauser gift establishes the National Gallery of Art as one of the major repositories of Lange’s work in the world, powerfully revealing why she remains one of the country's most acclaimed documentary photographers. An excellent and comprehensive holding of Lange’s photographs, this gift represents her entire career from the late 1920s to the early 1960s.

“With only two photographs by Lange previously in the Gallery’s collection, Dan and Susan’s donation is a truly transformative gift," said Earl A. Powell III, director of the National Gallery of Art, Washington. “The exceptional depth and breadth of this group of photographs will allow the Gallery to beautifully illustrate the full range of Lange’s art, from her early studio portraits and her profoundly moving documents of the impact of the Great Depression on the American people, to her later pictures featuring people and cultures she engaged with while traveling around the world.”

One of the best known American photographers working in the 1930s, Dorothea Lange was made famous by her 1936 portrait of an impoverished migrant farm worker and her children in Nipomo, California, called Migrant Mother. However, Lange began her career as a studio portraitist working in San Francisco with a mostly upper-class clientele. Between 1929 and 1933, the years bookended by the Stock Market crash and the start of the New Deal, Lange struggled to redefine her professional identity. Yet in 1933 as she looked for subjects outside her studio—from breadlines and homelessness to labor demonstrations and workers’ strikes—she found her voice, responding directly to what she saw and helping to define what would become known as social documentary photography.

Lange was a committed photographer whose works have been consistently received as compelling records of the human condition. But her carefully composed pictures, often closely cropped to increase their emotional intensity, also reveal her remarkable talent for marrying eye-catching formal compositions with captivating, socially charged subject matter. Of particular note, this collection contains multiple prints made over several years of some of Lange’s most celebrated photographs—such as Death in the Doorway, Migrant Mother, and Migratory Cotton Picker—which will help the Gallery elucidate to students and scholars alike the evolving nature of her practice.

Founded in 1990, the National Gallery of Art’s collection of photographs and its program for photography have become one of the most celebrated in the world, with large, in-depth holdings of work by such celebrated photographers as Eadweard Muybridge, Alfred Stieglitz, Walker Evans, Ilse Bing, Robert Frank, Harry Callahan, and Robert Adams, among others, and numerous award-winning exhibitions and publications. 

The first donation to the National Gallery by Greenberg and Steinhauser, this gift is a major addition to the Gallery’s large holdings of works by such social documentary photographers as Gordon Parks and Jim Goldberg. Several of the pictures donated by Greenberg and Steinhauser will be featured in The New Woman Behind the Camera (2019), as well as other forthcoming exhibitions. 

In addition to their generous gifts to the Getty and the National Gallery of Art,  Greenberg and  Steinhauser have recently made gifts to 13 other American art museums, including the Chrysler Museum of Art in Norfolk, Virginia; the Hammer Museum at UCLA; High Museum of Art, Atlanta; Los Angeles County Museum of Art; Minneapolis Institute of Art; Museum of Modern Art, New York; The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City; New Mexico Museum of Art, Santa Fe; and Peabody-Essex Museum, Salem, MA.

Screen Shot 2017-03-01 at 10.45.35 AM.pngIntroduced and illustrated by John Vernon Lord With introductory essays by editors Danis Rose & John O’Hanlon, and Stacey Herbert 

‘For seven years I have been working at this book - blast it!’ wrote James Joyce in a letter in 1920. What had started out as a short story entitled ‘Ulysses in Dublin’, intended as a rounding-o for Dubliners, had taken him over. Homer’s Odyssey had become the epic model for an epic journey - not this time from Troy to Ithaca, but, in the course of a single day, into the heart of Ireland’s capital. By the end of his journey, Joyce had created one of the greatest novels of the 20th century. 

Ulysses is an immense and overwhelming book, the sheer scale of it apparent even in such a brief summing up. Eighteen di erent episodes, each told in a di erent way, packed with learning, zzing with life, exciting, challenging, moving, but never solemn. It may be a single day in a single city, but it teems with zestful humanity. 

For this landmark edition - only available from The Folio Society - Joyce scholars Danis Rose and John O’Hanlon have returned to the original 1922 edition to create the most authoritative text to date. Included is an essay by the editors detailing their methodology, while Joyce expert Stacey Herbert has written a short history of the publication of this most notorious work. 

Multi-award-winning artist and Joyce devotee John Vernon Lord has provided a series of extraordinary illustrations, as well as an iconic binding design. Describing the process as ‘a humbling experience’, Lord has also written a revealing introductory essay that places the images in context, illuminating the myriad meanings, symbols, events and inspirations behind each piece. Lord acts almost as a guide to the labyrinthine narrative. The praedella strip of images at the bottom of each illustration references the Linati ‘schema’, a way of navigating through the text created by Joyce for his friend Carlo Linati. 

Product information 

Printed on Natural Evolution Ivory paper. Bound in cloth, printed and blocked with a design by the by the artist. Blocked leather spine label. Set in Dante. 752 pages. 19 colour illustrations. Printed endpapers. Blocked slipcase. 111⁄2 ̋ x 8 ̋.
UK £125.00 US $195.00 Can $250.00 Aus $250.00 

 

258-Addams copy.jpgNew York— On Tuesday, March 21, Swann Galleries will hold an auction of Illustration Art, featuring original works of art intended for publication.

A run of original illustrations for the popular Babar series includes the top lot of the sale—the ink and watercolor design for the cover for the third book, Le Roi Babar, 1933, by Jean de Brunhoff, is estimated to sell between $20,000 and $30,000. Further beloved children’s characters include an illustration for Ludwig Bemelmans’s 1956 Madeline and the Bad Hat, titled “He said - ‘Let’s play a game of tag’ and let a cat out of the bag,” valued at $7,000 to $10,000. The sale will also offer works by Maurice Sendak, as well as several storyboard illustrations from Walt Disney Studios, including Ben Ali Gator and Hyacinth Hippo waltzing the Dance of the Hours for the 1940 classic Fantasia, estimated at $800 to $1,200.

Also available are several original drawings by Dr. Seuss (aka Theodore Geisel), led by A Gentle Sport, Forsooth, a charming ink, watercolor and wash dragon first published in Judge Magazine’s April 1929 issue, and a 1930s cartoon for Life magazine titled The Skier and the Walrus (each $8,000 to $12,000).

The largest selection of works by Edward Gorey ever to come to market showcases 12 works by the beloved master of the macabre. The cover for a circa-1950 unrealized work titled The Worsted Monster is valued between $8,000 and $12,000. Additionally, there are costume and set designs, as well as numerous sketches and published illustrations for book covers, which include Chance, a Novel by Joseph Conrad and Cobweb Castle ($3,500 to $5,000 and $6,000 to $9,000, respectively).

Two Peanuts strips by Charles M. Schulz include an early work, titled Here comes the big Polar Bear stalking across the snow!, 1957, featuring Snoopy and Charlie Brown, as well as Mister Sensitive, 1974, depicting Snoopy and Lucy (each $6,000 to $9,000).

One staple of Swann Galleries’ Illustration Art auctions is a robust section of cartoons and covers for The New Yorker. This spring’s selection includes original works by Peter Arno, Charles Barsotti, Ilonka Karasz, Saul Steinberg, Tom Toro and Gahan Wilson, from as early as 1933 to as recently as 2016. Charles Addams is represented by Z Line Subway, a 1979 cartoon into which he snuck Uncle Fester, Wednesday and Grandmama from The Addams Family ($6,000 to $9,000).

In addition to the previously mentioned work by Charles Addams, the sale boasts new-to-market works consigned by the Tee & Charles Addams Foundation, including a cartoon depicting the entire Addams Family ($6,000 to $9,000), and a 1957 cover for The New Yorker titled Scuba Galleon, estimated at $8,000 to $12,000.

Early magazine covers by Erté include Sports d’Hiver, which graced the Harper’s Bazaar February 1933 issue, valued here at $8,000 to $12,000. Erté is also represented by several of his original set designs and costumes. There are additional early covers by McLelland Barclay, Umberto Brunelleschi and Georges Lepape.

A raucous selection of pulp is led by Harold von Schmidt’s oil painting to accompany a 1935 story in Cosmopolitan, captioned “But my husband—” Cleone gasped. “He’d kill you!” ($10,000 to $15,000). Further selections include Earl Moran’s pastel A Sweet Job, circa 1940, estimated at $6,000 to $9,000, and the oil on canvas Over My Dead Body, 1932, by Remington Schuyler, which was the cover illustration for West magazine ($3,000 to $4,000).

There is a strong run of original works by Al Hirschfeld featuring three iconic pen and ink caricatures depicting Holly Golightly (Audrey Hepburn) from Breakfast at Tiffany’s, commissioned in 1997 and each valued at $7,000 to $10,000. Hirschfeld is additionally represented by Queen Wilhelmina of the Netherlands, a gouache painting that was used as the cover for The American Mercury magazine in 1946 ($3,000 to $4,000).

From the nineteenth century come two floral ornaments by Aubrey Beardsley for Le Morte d’Arthur, 1893-94, are led by Spiky Leaves on a Stem ($6,000 to $9,000). A rare pen and ink drawing by the master, Squatting Devil Fishing, for the title page of The Bon-Mots of Sydney Smith and Richard Brinsley Sheridan, 1893, is estimated at $4,000 to $6,000.

The auction will be held Tuesday, March 21, beginning at 1:30 p.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Friday, March 17 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Saturday, March 18 from noon to 5 p.m.; Monday, March 20 through Tuesday, March 21, from 10 a.m. to noon.

An illustrated auction catalogue is available for $35 at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information or to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Illustration Art Specialist Christine von der Linn at 212-254-4710, extension 20 or cv@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 258 Charles Addams, Scuba Galleon, watercolor and gouache, cover illustration for The New Yorker, September 1957. Estimate $8,000 to $12,000.

Atglen, PA— Schiffer Publishing, Ltd., is pleased to announce the release of World War II Posters, a look into the vitage collection of propaganda used by both sides and how it impacted the war efforts.

This book is a visual survey of posters printed by the United States, the Allies, and the Axis, and offers an overview of the various categories of propaganda posters created in support of the war effort: recruiting, conservation, careless talk/anti-espionage, bond/fundraising, morale, and more. With posters from all combatants, here is a look at propaganda used as a tool used by all parties in the conflict and how similar themes crossed national borders.

Size: 9" x 12" | 548 color & b/w photos | 352 pp

ISBN13: 9780764352461 | Binding: hard cover | $50.00

About the Author

David Pollack, owner of David Pollack Vintage Posters, has been a dealer exclusively in original posters for over 20 years. As past-President of the IVPDA (International Vintage Poster Dealers Association) and co-owner of the International Vintage Poster Fair, David’s involvement in the field of vintage posters is extensive. Specializing in war, propaganda, and protest posters, his knowledge of historical posters of the twentieth century is vast. He has studied and amassed posters from both World Wars, the Korean conflict, the Vietnam War, and the Chinese Cultural Revolution, in addition to political and protest posters. David and his wife Lucy live in Wilmington, Delaware. They have two children, Katie and James.

About the Publisher

Schiffer Publishing, Ltd. is a family-owned, independent publisher of high-quality books. Since 1974, Schiffer has published thousands of titles on the diverse subjects that fuel our readers' passions. From our traditional subjects of antiques and collectibles, arts and crafts, and military history, Schiffer has expanded its catalog to publish books on contemporary art and artists; architecture and design; food and entertaining; the metaphysical, paranormal and folklore; and pop and fringe culture, as well as books for children. Visit www.schifferbooks.com to explore our backlist of 5,500+ titles.

For more information, please contact Harrison Lutz at 610-593-1777 or harrisonl@schifferbooks.com. To receive regular announcements about new releases from Schiffer Publishing, sign up for our e-newsletter.

 

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