February 2017 Archives

10309a82-88c0-4762-9261-aafa92e17b63.jpg[ITHACA, NY] Worth Auctions, located in Dryden, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog.  

Worth Auctions is pleased to present an extensive and carefully selected group of fine and decorative prints, paintings, and drawings.          

Central to this specialist art sale is a fine array of antique natural history prints by such masters as Audubon, Wolf, Thornton, Smit, Ettingshausen, Redoute, Catesby, and Gould. These include scores of classic ornithological and botanical images as well as compelling renderings of rarer subjects like tigers and buffalo.                     

Modern and contemporary pieces will also be featured, including an early Jim Dine masterpiece; several pastel portraits by Howard L. Munns; and distinctive paintings by First Nation artists Gerda Christofferson, James Allen, and James Marshall Speck that are ex-collection of a major Canadian museum.

Automotive enthusiasts will take great interest in the unique vintage concept drawings by noted designers like Alex Tremulis, Richard Arbib, and William A. Moore, as well as the series of pochoir prints of early race cars by Gamy-Montaut.   

Likewise, sporting fans will enjoy Marco Ceri's oil on copper scenes of Edwardian golfers and polo players.

Also worthy of special mention are a quintet of hand-colored aquatints after Karl Bodmer depicting American Indians; a series of lithographs by David Roberts showing monuments of the Near East; a majestic color lithograph of the Grand Canyon after Thomas Moran; a pair of Western etchings by Edward Borein; and an excellent example of Eugene Delacroix's famous 1865 etching "Juive d'Alger."   

Worth Auctions is a public auction service specializing in estate work and collections.  The company conducts fully cataloged auctions with global bidding activity over three platforms. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of items, from pencils to airplanes. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-330-0358 or email mail@worthauctions.com.

 

 

14487f58-80b2-4b8f-ba86-59e69a0a02d9.jpg[ITHACA, NY] National Book Auctions, located in Ithaca, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog.  

This catalog features rare, antique and decorative books as well as select additions of ephemera. We will offer a second session of books from a large estate library concentrated in Civil War history.  Modern first editions will also be sold, along with an array of early American histories.          

Antique and rare books in this catalog include numerous titles.  Among the earliest examples are the 1676 first English edition of "The Art of Speaking," the 1701 printing of Heynes' "Treatise of Trigonometry," containing folding plates and charts, and Mahon's "Principles of Electricity," produced in 1779.  Additional rare pieces include the 1831 printing of "A Narrative of Military Actions of Colonel Marinus Willett," the decorative 1897 first edition of Mark Twain's "Following the Equator," and the American history staple, "The Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant," produced in two volumes in 1892.                     

Several pleasing collections will also be showcased.  Highlighted is a substantial array of Civil War history volumes from a large private estate library.  We are offering this collection in multiple session and this group includes desirable writings such as the 1863 printing of "The Regulations for the Army of the Confederate States," "Cavalry Tactics," printed in 1864 with folding plates and tactical diagrams, and the two-volume 1862 printing of Gross' "System of Surgery."  An array of important modern first and early printings includes works by Ernest Hemingway, James Joyce and others. Vintage and antique tomes from estate collections also include titles from subject areas such as travel & exploration, history of the American West, colonial and border wars, the American Revolution, Native American Indians, Irish history, slavery, philosophy, music & art, history of New York City & State, and medicine, to name a few.   

Found throughout this catalog are interesting group offerings and ephemera lots. Ephemera offered includes Civil War-related items, antique photographs, maps, antique magazines, rare prints of photogravure works by Yousuf Karsh, and other items.    

National Book Auctions is a public auction service specializing in books, ephemera, and art. National Book Auctions is a targeted service offering experience and expertise unique to marketing antique and modern books and ephemera for consignors and collectors alike. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of collectible, signed, and first edition books. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-269-0101 or email mail@nationalbookauctions.com.

 

 

Screen Shot 2017-02-28 at 10.27.07 AM.pngDALLAS, Texas (Feb. 28, 2017) - Perhaps one of the most impressive of all of the great Universal Studios horror posters, a terrifying, 1933 one sheet teaser poster for The Invisible Man could sell for as much as $80,000 in Heritage Auctions’ Vintage Posters Auction March 25-26 in Dallas.

“Even the most advanced collectors have never seen this poster in person,” said Grey Smith, Director of Vintage Posters at Heritage Auctions. “(Artist) Karoly Grosz does a hauntingly wonderful job capturing the insanity that slowly takes hold of the film’s mad scientist. In only a few instances did, the studio produce a teaser for their horror greats but when they did they were often outstanding.”

Additional posters from Universal Studios’ greatest monsters include a title lobby card for The Bride of Frankenstein (est. $30,000) and a lobby card for the 1935 film Werewolf of London (est. $10,000). 

A rare and stunning Italian four-fogli from the 1953 re-release of Casablanca (est. $30,000) - considered by many collectors to be one of the most beautiful ever made for the film - depicts an elegant, wind-swept Ingrid Bergman set against the backdrop in French Morocco. Likewise, a poster for Columbia’s 1946 film Gilda (est. $20,000) sets heroine Rita Hayworth center stage on this classic film noir Style B one sheet.

Very rare, half sheet posters from classic films such as a Style A depicting five major cast members and two important scenes from the 1939 MGM classic The Wizard of Oz (est. $30,000) is on offer, as is the elusive Style B for The Maltese Falcon, which shows a double-fisted, gun-slinging Humphrey Bogart and the sultry Mary Astor (est. $8,000).

Large-size international paper for La Dolce Vita (est. $18,000); Warner Brothers’ 1935 poster for Bordertown ($12,000) with art by Luigi Martinati; and the 1928 film The Passion of Joan of Arc (est. $12,000) would be at home in the most advanced collections.

Posters from silent films include rarities from 1926’s The Black Pirate, starring Douglas Fairbanks (est. $10,000), and the never before seen large-format poster from The Perils of Pauline from 1914 (est. $10,000).

Additional highlights include, but are not limited to:

The Day the Earth Stood Still (20th Century Fox, 1951): est. $10,000 

This Gun For Hire (Paramount, 1942): est. $10,000.

The Raven (Universal, 1935) Window Card: est. $8,000.

Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (RKO, 1937) One Sheet Style B: est. $8,000.

Ham Cat Group copy.jpgNew York - A unique collection of original letters, documents and imprints relating to the life and times of Alexander Hamilton—the orphan immigrant founding father who fought for independence, founded our financial system, and fostered a government capable of surviving internal factions and foreign foes—will be unveiled at the New York Antiquarian Book Fair, March 9-12, at the Park Avenue Armory, booths E 33-35.

The Alexander Hamilton Collection contains hundreds of documents from leaders, soldiers, citizens and the press, written when the Revolutionary War and Founding were current events. The Collection includes powerful letters and documents of Hamilton, George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, Benjamin Franklin, and Aaron Burr, among many others.

Highlights include:

  • Hamilton’s documents relating to several duel threats, a habit that did not end well;
  • Hamilton’s greatest love letter to Eliza, laced with sexual innuendo;
  • Hamilton’s letter rallying to defeat Jefferson after Washington declined a third term (his tune changed four years later when his more dangerous nemesis Burr was on the stage);
  • a lock of Hamilton’s hair, preserved in his family for generations

The collection was assembled by two leading historic document experts, John Reznikoff of University Archives (Westport, CT) and Seth Kaller of Seth Kaller, Inc. (White Plains, NY).

According to Kaller, “Our aim was to bring together important documents that were part of the struggle to form a new nation, warts and all. The immense success of Lin-Manuel Miranda’s HAMILTON demonstrates how inspiring this story still is. It is comforting to look back, through the quills and presses of Hamilton and his contemporaries, to see upstart America overcoming challenges as great as any we face today.” Kaller added, “Now we look forward to finding a good home to preserve this museum-worthy collection.”

Arkham House Archive for Sale

Screen Shot 2017-02-27 at 11.11.20 AM.pngLloyd Currey and John Knott are pleased to offer the David H. Rajchel Arkham House Archive, one of the most impressive and important collections of material related to fantastic fiction to ever appear on the market.  Consisting of over 4,000 individual items, the archive is a virtual who’s who in fantasy, horror, and science fiction.

August Derleth’s contributions to the field of weird fiction as an editor and publisher are well known.  Derleth and his business partner, Donald Wandrei, established Arkham House to preserve the legacy of H. P. Lovecraft with the publication of The Outsider and Others in 1939. In addition to publishing the first collections of short fiction by such luminaries as Ray Bradbury, Robert Bloch, Fritz Leiber, Ramsey Campbell and others Arkham House also brought the work of William Hope Hodgson to an American audience with the publication of The House on the Borderland and Other Novels in 1945. The press also preserved the memory of Robert E. Howard with the publication of SKULL FACE AND OTHERS (1946). Derleth’s practice of introducing writers of weird fiction from the UK to a broader audience continued throughout his career and included Marjorie Bowen, J. S. Le Fanu, Margery Lawrence, M. P. Shiel, and H. R. Wakefield.

The David H. Rajchel Arkham House Archive illustrates how Derleth’s influence extended well beyond Arkham House.  Derleth’s landmark science fiction and fantasy anthologies of the 1940s and 1950s, many published by Pellgrini and Cudhay, brought Derleth into contact with most of the major authors of fantastic fiction of his day, such as Charles Beaumont, Robert Bloch, Robert Heinlein, Henry Kuttner, Frederik Pohl, Clifford Simak, Clark Ashton Smith, Theodore Sturgeon and many others.

The archive gives insight into Derleth as editor, publisher and writer and is a remarkable collection of materials of one of the most important twentieth century small publisher's archives offered for sale in the last several decades. The core of the archive is correspondence, often extensive, from several hundred authors whose work Derleth published under his own imprints or in his highly important non-Arkham House anthologies published in the 1940s and 1950s, as well as manuscripts, mostly typewritten (including fair copies and carbons), submitted by Arkham House authors.

For more details contact L.W. Currey, Inc. or John W. Knott, Jr., Bookseller.

spillane.jpegNEW YORK - The Original Typescript for Mickey Spillane’s I, the Jury (New York: E.P. Dutton & Company, 1947) is expected to headline a large and important collection of items relating to the 20th-century American novelist and actor at Heritage Auctions’ 2017 Rare Books Auction March 8 in New York.

Known best for his detective novels featuring the “Mike Hammer” character, Spillane sold more than 225 million copies of his books internationally; he wrote 46 novels - 13 of which were finished by mystery writer Max Allan Collins after Spillane’s death in 2006 - and 14 short stories. His acting credits included an appearance in the Mike Hammer role, as well as the 1954 movie Ring of Fear in which he played himself.

The typescript for I, the Jury, which carries a pre-auction estimate of $50,000, is Spillane’s copy with pencil marks and editing notations throughout in graphite and red pencil. The first 190 pages have three holes punched on the left margin with reinforcement labels around the holes.

Another Spillane script, the Original Typescript Manuscript and Long Galley of The Big Kill (est. $15,000), was published in New York in 1951, also by E.P. Dutton & Company. The manuscript was for what turned out to be one of four books Spillane published in a single year, preceded by My Gun is Quick, Vengeance is Mine! and One Lonely Night.

Tony Varady’s Original Painting for I, the Jury (est. $7,500), circa 1947, matted to 8-by-10 inches in a frame that measures 15-by-18.75 inches, is accompanied by the first Signet edition hardback and paperback copies of I, the Jury and comes from Spillane’s estate.

Collectors will have a chance to bid on Mickey Spillane’s Royal Manual Typewriter (est. $5,000), circa 1930, is old enough that it is believed possible that he used it when working as a comic book writer for Funnies, Inc. Spillane used a typewriter for his entire career, never making the transition to a computer.

A Group of Spillane’s World War II Relics (est. $3,000), circa 1941-45, includes an array of the author’s possessions from his time as a fighter pilot, including his dog tags, military records, photographs, buttons and pins, patches and three Bibles - one of which is signed by Spillane.

A collection of Mickey Spillane WWII Original Photographs and Army Air Force Uniforms (est. $2,000) includes roughly 100 original images of Spillane with comrades, women and several kinds of aircraft. Of particular interest are the pictures of the author with a woman believed by some to be the inspiration of the character “Velda,” the secretary in the Mike Hammer novels. The lot also includes his 1943 Greenwood Army Air Field yearbook and two tan, wool, summer-weight officer service dress tunics, trousers and two tan cotton shirts.

Other top lots include but are not limited to:

The Original Typescript Manuscript of the Second Chapter for I, the Jury Sequel: Est. $5,000

A copy of I, the Jury that Spillane inscribed to his parents: Est. $5,000

A Sterling Silver WWII Army Air Force Pilot’s Wing Bracelet: Est. $1,500

A 2011 South Carolina Senate Resolution 821 Renaming a Portion of U.S. Highway 17 the “Mickey Spillane Waterfront 17 Highway” with the accompanying sign: Est. $1,500

A Colt Government Model Semi-Automatic Pistol: Est. $1,000

 

record copy.jpgDALLAS, Texas - A 45 rpm copy of the second single released in the United Kingdom by all four members of the Beatles is expected to earn top lot honors at Heritage Auctions’ Entertainment & Music Memorabilia Signature Auction March 18 in Dallas. 

The record includes recordings of Ask Me Why and Please Please Me (est. $40,000). John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Ringo Starr all signed the Ask Me Why B-side of the record; McCartney and Harrison also signed the reverse side, which features an A-side recording of Please Please Me. Given to its original owner at the Cavern Club in Liverpool, the single was released Jan. 11, 1963, 13 days before a signing session at the NEMS record shop, where the signatures likely were acquired.

photo of the Fab Four signed by all four members of the band (est. $18,000) also is expected to draw heavy interest at the auction. The 8-by-10 glossy black-and-white picture, taken in early 1965 in the Bahamas, is signed with a felt-tip pen and includes a certificate of authenticity from Heritage Auctions and Tracks LTD.

An original pressing of the Help! Album Signed by John Lennon, Paul McCartney and George Harrison of the Beatles (Capitol MAS 2386, 1965), (est. $12,000) will be available to collectors in the auction. The Gatefold Mono LP was the band’s eighth album for Capitol and the soundtrack for the band’s second major motion picture. It contains seven Beatles songs from the film with six instrumental pieces interspersed.

Savvy collectors and Beatles fans alike are expected to clamor for an extremely rare piece of memorabilia: a Postcard Signed by John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison and Substitute Drummer Jimmie Nicol (est. $10,000). In addition to the band members’ signatures, this 3.5-by-5.5-inch postcard includes the inscription: “To Judy / Best Wishes / Jimmie Nicol” that was written by Nicol, who was filling in on the band’s Australian tour for regular drummer Ringo Starr, who was ill with tonsillitis and stayed home during much of the tour. According to the accompanying letter of provenance, the signatures were acquired by a 24-year-old steward who remembers serving Lennon two boiled eggs for breakfast aboard the plane to Sydney.

Other Beatles-related items include, but are not limited to:

group of images used to market Mötley Crüe’s 1987 “Girls, Girls, Girls” World Tour (est. $16,000) includes three pieces showing hand-painted airbrush work applied to a matte board and mounted on one-inch Styrofoam; two of the images are of a “stripper girl” and the third depicts a “rebel rocker” who strongly resembles Crüe bassist Nikki Sixx. Each piece is autographed by the artist (“Tyler”) in the lower right corner and was used for tour merchandise for one of the most successful heavy metal bands of all time.

Signatures from Davie Jones (David Bowie) and the King Bees / The Animals on a 1964 Album Page (est. $7,000) commemorate Bowie’s short-lived second band, the King Bees, which produced one single - Liza Jane / Louie Louie Go home - in June 1964. Jones left the band shortly thereafter, eventually changed his name to David Bowie, and became an iconic singer, songwriter and actor who was revered for his innovative creativity. The back of the album page features the signatures of the members of The Animals: Eric Burdon, Alan Price, Chas Chandler, Hilton Valentine and John Steel.

Pair of Sunglasses Michael Jackson Wore On Stage ($6,500) during a Victory Tour performance Sept. 8, 1984 in Denver were given by the late “King of Pop” to the Los Angeles Daily News, and subsequently to a fan in a newspaper contest. This pair of black, metal-rimmed aviator shares are identical to those Jackson wore at the 1984 Grammy Awards and are almost universally identified with his look during that era. Also included are a non-original black satin bag and a black hard case, as well as a portion of the Los Angeles Daily News from Nov. 23, 1984, featuring Jackson and the contest.

A collection of memorabilia from the estate of entertainer/producer/television personality David Gest also is expected to draw attention from numerous collectors. Among the top Gest items are:

Reel-to-Reel Prince Demo Tape with a Tracklist Handwritten by the Artist, circa 1976/77, (est. $6,000) was recorded at Sound 80 Recording Studio in Prince’s hometown of Minneapolis prior to the recording of his landmark debut LP. The tape included three tracks: Just As Long As We’re TogetherMy Love Is Forever and Jelly Jam. The first two tracks were rerecorded on Prince’s first album, with Jelly Jam being modified and added as a coda to Just As Long As We’re Together.

Other top lots include, but are not limited to:

1528-003.jpgYORK, Pa. - Looking back on the year 1967, some might say that it was, paradoxically, a time of peace, love and war. Lyndon B. Johnson was president, 475,000 US troops were fighting in Vietnam, the Beatles unveiled their immortal Sgt. Pepper’s LP, and the Chiefs and Packers squared off at the first Super Bowl. Today, collectors clamor for mementos related to those historical people and events, and fortunately they’re able to find them because of another highlight of 1967. It was during that year, half a century ago, that visionary political ephemera collector Ted Hake founded his pop-culture collectibles business. Dubbed “Hake’s Americana,” the company has since become a globally renowned auction house whose sales embrace over 200 popular collecting categories.

To celebrate its 2017 golden jubilee year, Hake’s Americana will conduct three major online auctions, the first slated for March 14-16. As a nod to Hake’s roots, Auction #220 will feature 500+ lots of important political memorabilia. Two of the top items are a framed 36-star Grant and Colfax campaign parade flag from 1868, estimate $5,000-$10,000; and an exceedingly rare 1896 William McKinley poster publicizing a “Republican Barbecue at Greenfield, Ind.” One of only two examples known to Hake’s, the huge (26.5 x 39.5in) tri-color poster lists among its enticements “Ten Oxen, Twenty Sheep, 500 Chickens and 20,000 Free Buns!” along with brass bands and fireworks. Estimate: $2,000-$5,000.

A diverse selection of certified and authenticated autographs runs the celebrity gamut from historical to sports and entertainment figures. There’s a 1901 Thomas Edison-signed stock certificate, $1,000-$2,000; a signed and inscribed 8 by 10-inch photo of Humphrey Bogart, $1,000-$2,000; a framed Disney Song of the South color print signed by Walt Disney, $1,000-$5,000; and a glossy photo on cardboard of Beatle John Lennon in a stylish cane rocker. Inscribed and signed by Lennon with the addition of “XXX,” it is expected to make $2,000-$5,000.

A remarkable 1884 studio photo of the integrated Bellaire Globes baseball team includes among its members the Negro League pioneer Sol White. It is the earliest known photographic depiction of White, who was not only a pro baseball infielder, but later a manager and influential executive in the Negro Leagues. He also authored the important Sol White’s Official Base Ball Guide, a seminal manuscript chronicling the formative years of black baseball. Estimate: $10,000-$20,000

The centerpiece of the sale is Norman Mingo’s (1896-1980) spectacular original, signed artwork for the cover of Mad Magazine’s September 1968 issue. The mixed-media painting spoofs the days of flower power with its depiction of Alfred E. Neuman as a spiritual guru held aloft by the Beatles, Mia Farrow and the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi. 

“When Mad magazine first started, it was satirical and goofy, but in the early to mid-1960s, its focus turned increasingly toward parodies of current events. That’s when pop culture became its fodder,” said Hake’s Americana President Alex Winter. “Mad art, especially anything by Norman Mingo, has been very strong, but his paintings for front covers will always attract a premium price because they simply aren’t available. This painting is a rare find that collectors of Mad art are going to want.” Estimate: $35,000-$50,000

More than 1,000 comic books from Platinum Age to Modern period will be offered, with the vast majority certified by CGC or CBCS. The sale boasts key issues from all eras, including coveted first issues, first appearances of characters, pedigree comics and numerous books that represent the highest-graded examples of their type. A premier entry is DC’s More Fun Comics #72, from October 1941. The cover’s action-filled World War II imagery depicts superhero Dr. Fate fighting off Nazi soldiers on a U-24 submarine, as a torpedo explodes in the background. Graded 9.6 NM+, the highest of all known examples, it is estimated at $10,000-$20,000.

Another comic book for the advanced collector is Top-Notch Comics #2, from January 1940. It, too, has a wartime theme on its lavishly illustrated, brightly hued cover showing a Nazi bomber plane going down in flames. The only known copy in 9.6 NM+ condition, and with no others known in a higher condition, it carries a pre-sale estimate of $5,000-$10,000.

A category that has gone from strength to strength with each successive Hake’s auction is posters, whether they advertise concerts or movies, solicit military enlistments, or entice prospective travelers with scenes of idyllic vacation spots. Auction #220 has a fantastic assortment to offer, starting with pop-music classics. 

The only known example of a 1958 Jerry Lee Lewis Rock & Roll Jamboree poster, with a photo-image of “The Killer” standing at his piano, is expected to sell for a minimum of $2,000-$5,000; while a 1965 poster promoting Little Richard’s Allentown (Pa.) Fairgrounds concert carries a similar estimate. A psychedelic pink/yellow/black stiff paper poster touting the Jimi Hendrix Experience’s May 10, 1968 gig at Bill Graham’s Fillmore East depicts all three members of the legendary band. It is a desirable first printing and therefore should easily command $2,000-$5,000 at auction.

With its extraordinary scene of a daredevil named M. Pernelet seated amongst dozens of crocodiles, hand-feeding them chunks of meat, a 1903 Circus Busch poster is from a succession of graphic, if not startling, advertisements the company published over several decades to promote its unusual entertainers. “This poster is so rare, you won’t even see it in even the most advanced collections,” said Winter. Estimate: $1,000-$5,000

Hake’s Americana Auction #220 has opened for bidding by phone, mail or online at www.hakes.com. The first session will close on March 14, 2017, while the second session will conclude on March 16. March 15 is an interim day in which bidders can peruse the catalog and prepare for further bidding. To request a free printed catalog or for information on any item in the sale, call toll-free: (866) 404-9800 or (717) 434-1600. Email: hakes@hakes.com. Visit the auction catalog online at www.hakes.com.

Image: Norman Mingo (1896-1980) original cover art for Mad magazine #121 (Sept. 1968) featuring Alfred E. Neuman being held aloft by the Beatles, Mia Farrow and the Maharishi Mahesh Yogi, 23.75 x 31.75 inches, est. $35,000-$50,000. Courtesy of Hake’s Americana.

 

orwell.pngAn important, inscribed, first edition presentation copy of George Orwell’s 1936 novel Keep the Aspidistra Flying, is to be offered at Bonhams Fine Books and Manuscripts Sale in London on Wednesday 1 March.

Keep the Aspidistra Flying was largely written while Orwell was employed as an assistant at Booklovers Corner, a secondhand bookshop in Hampstead. He took up the position in October 1934, having spent the preceding nine months living at his parents’ house in Southwold, Suffolk, pining for metropolitan life and the company of fellow writers. The job was secured for him by his aunt, Nellie Limouzin, who was a friend of the owners, Francis and Myfanwy Westrope, through their shared involvement in the Esperanto Movement. The copy for sale is dedicated to Francis Westrope, the inscription reading, "To, F.G. Westrope, with very best wishes, from, 'George Orwell'". (The quotation marks round “George Orwell” are a reminder of his literary identity, his real name being Eric Blair).

Orwell worked in the bookshop during the afternoons in return for board and lodging. The mornings he devoted to writing; the evenings to socialising. His view of the Booklovers Corner’s clientele was not always flattering. As he wrote in Bookshop Memoirs, “….in a town like London there are always plenty of not quite certifiable lunatics walking the streets, and they tend to gravitate towards bookshops".  Some of this attitude finds its way into Keep the Aspidistra Flying, in which the protagonist, Gordon Comstock, also works in a bookshop while trying to pursue a literary career.

Orwell was undoubtedly grateful to the Westropes, but he owed them more than the chance to write in peace. Francis had been a founding member of the international Labour Party (ILP), an offshoot of the established Labour Party, which espoused left-wing egalitarianism and non-Communist Marxism. Orwell soon joined the ILP, becoming a prominent member, and its beliefs influenced his writing for the rest of his life.   

Orwell was, however, less enthusiastic about the Esperanto Movement. Unlike those who supported it as a plank of the proletarian revolution, he saw the imposition of a shared common language as a step on the road to totalitarianism. Some of this disquiet may have found its way into Newspeak, the means by which the rulers of Oceania in Nineteen Eighty-Four attempt to exercise control over the population.

Bonhams Head of Fine Books and Manuscripts Matthew Haley said, “Anyone who has ever worked in a bookshop would recognise the eccentric customers that Orwell discovered while working for the Westropes. His experiences in their shop inspired Keep the Aspidistra Flying, the novel which formed an important bridge between his earlier novels like Burmese Days, and the masterworks of Animal Farm and Nineteen Eighty-Four.”

Fine Books and Manuscripts

Bonhams, Knightsbridge, London, SW7

1 March 2017, 1.00 pm

Specialist: Matthew Haley, Bonhams Head of Fine Books and Manuscripts

Screen Shot 2017-02-24 at 8.55.30 AM.pngThe Folio Society and House of Illustration are thrilled to announce Darya Shnykina as the winner of the seventh annual Book Illustration Competition - a unique partnership between The Folio Society and House of Illustration. Darya was presented with her prize, a prestigious commission worth £5,000 to illustrate Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park by eminent historian Lucy Worsley, at an exclusive ceremony held at House of Illustration on Thursday, 23 February. 

Shnykina’s winning entry was selected from hundreds of other entries and her illustrations won high praise from the judging panel. Darya is a student of the Moscow State University of Printing Arts. The shortlisted artists, who each receive £500, are Natasa Ilincic (Italy), Katie Ponder (UK), Meizhen Xu (Germany), Alexandru Savescu (Romania) and Pedro Silmon (UK). 

At the ceremony, Lucy Worsley said ‘Darya did the perfect cover: fitting in beautifully with the rest of the series, charming to look at, clever with the layering, and bold. But we were equally charmed by her illustrations for inside which managed to suggest character and some of the powerful feelings in the novel, like anger and disappointment.’ 

Folio Society Art Director, Sheri Gee commented: ‘The winner was a hands down unanimous decision. Taking all things into account we found the binding design exquisite and were all very taken with the illustration style. It has a delightful palette without any saccharine overtones. The scenes are both original and forthright in their composition. I look forward to working with Darya on the rest of the commission.’ 

Colin McKenzie, Director of House of illustration, said: ‘Darya is a very worthy winner - the binding she produced had immediate impact, supported by extremely strong page illustrations. It is particularly exciting to have a student as the winner this year and I know that she has a really great career ahead of her’. 

2016 BIC winner and member of the 2017 judging panel, Alan Marks said: ‘As an entrant in last year’s competition I was really interested to be among this year’s judges and I enjoyed looking at and discussing the work of other illustrators. Darya’s elegant binding works beautifully with the series. She has a terrific technique and her illustrations evoke the period and the characters well; she also picked up on the caustic humour in the novel.‘ 

Colin also announced the winner of the first ever Visitors’ Choice Award, Katie Ponder. Selected by members of the public from the longlisted entries, she will receive books worth £100 from The Folio Society and a year’s membership to House of Illustration. 

The illustrations by all 23 longlisted entrants are exhibited at House of Illustration, King’s Cross, London until 12 March 2017. 

Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park, illustrated by Darya Shnykina, will be available from The Folio Society (www.foliosociety.com/austen) in October 2017. 

 

Lot-39-Moos copy.jpgNew York—On Thursday, March 16, Swann Galleries will hold an auction of Vintage Posters, featuring the house’s strongest selection of ski posters to date.

Many fine early examples of ski and winter resort posters for France, Germany and Switzerland include the dramatic St. Moritz, 1924, by Carl Moos, expected to fetch $12,000 to $18,000, and Elsa Moeschlin’s jaunty Arosa / XIII. Grosses Skirennen der Schweiz, 1918 ($4,000 to $6,000). There are also exceptional American images, including Dwight Clark Shepler’s Sun Valley / Ketchum, Idaho, circa 1940, and the exceedingly rare Sun Valley Lodge / Union Pacific Railroad, circa 1940 ($8,000 to $12,000 and $1,200 to $1,8000, respectively), of which the only other known copy is in the collection of the Boston Public Library. There is an assortment of strong art deco ski posters, as well as iconic works by the masters Erich Hermès, Ludwig Hohlwein, Franz Lenhart, Sascha Maurer and Mario Puppo.

A run of Art Nouveau work by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec includes Jane Avril, 1893 ($50,000 to $75,000) and P. Sescau / Photographe, 1894, estimated between $30,000 and $40,000. Also available is the rare deluxe edition on vellum of Alphonse Mucha’s Salon des Cent, 1896, valued at $20,000 to $30,000. The cover lot for the sale, Le Frou Frou by the artist Weiluc, was used in 1900 for a naughty humor magazine of the same name, and is here expected to sell between $12,000 and $18,000. Other artists represented in this section include Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen with the iconic Tournée du Chat Noir, 1896 ($12,000 to $18,000), as well as Paul Berthon, Jules Chéret, Privat-Livemont and Édouard Vuillard.

A strong selection of Work Incentive posters is led by Teamworkers Are in Demand / You Win When All Win, 1927, and Winners Never Pass the Buck! / Face the Music and Go Ahead, 1927, each valued at $4,000 to $6,000. There are also propaganda posters from World War I and II from both sides of the front, as well as Soviet posters as early as 1920. Jim Crow and Civil Rights posters include Symeon Shimin’s poignant Jim Crow Is His Enemy - America’s Enemy - My Enemy, circa 1948 ($4,000 to $6,000).

Literary posters feature a selection of Scribner’s advertisements by Howard Chandler Christy, James Montgomery Flagg and Robert J. Wildhack, whose design for Scribner’s March, 1907, is estimated at $1,500 to $2,000. Also available is a rare version in green of Aubrey Beardley’s The Yellow Book, 1894 ($1,000 to $1,500), and several fine examples of The Chap Book by William H. Bradley.

Circus, magic show and theatrical advertisements abound, showcasing such amusements as Airplane Rides / Inman Bros. Flying Circus, circa 1929, which boasted a “long high ride” for $1, but here is expected to fetch $4,000 to $6,000.

Domestic and international travel posters feature favorites by master Roger Broders, including Lac D’Annecy, 1930, and Dunkerque, circa 1930 ($3,000 to $4,000 and $8,000 to $12,000, respectively). Several posters depicting bathing beauties by Jean-Gabriel Domergue are also available, led by L’Été á Monte - Carlo, 37, estimated at $2,000 to $3,000. There are also stunning works by Adolphe Mouron Cassandre and Jupp Wiertz, and American images by Joseph Binder, Leslie Ragan and Don Perceval.

The sale will include a selection of early movie posters, led by the 1917 release of Adventures of Buffalo Bill, which is estimated at $8,000 to $12,000.

The auction will be held Thursday, March 16, beginning at 10:30 a.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Saturday, March 11 from noon to 5 p.m. and Monday, March 13 through Wednesday, March 15 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

A printed auction catalogue is available for $35 via www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information or to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Swann President and Director of Vintage Posters, Nicholas D. Lowry at 212-254-4710, extension 57 or posters@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 39 Carl Moos, St. Moritz, 1924. Estimate $12,000 to $18,000.

Asemic writing is a wordless semantic form that often has the appearance of abstract calligraphy. It allows writers to present visual narratives that move beyond language and are open to interpretation, relying on the viewer for context and meaning. Beyond works on paper, asemic writing enjoys a growing presence online and continues to evolve with new performance-based explorations and animated films.

Asemic Writing: Offline & In the Gallery, curated by Michael Jacobson, is the first large-scale exhibition of asemic art in the United States, featuring the work of over 50 international artists who together create an eclectic assemblage of inventing, designing, and dreaming.  Artists on display include Luigi Serafini, Brion Gysin, Henri Michaux, Xu Bing, Max Ernst, Raymond Queneau, Jose Parlá, and Nuno De Matos.

Join us on March 25 from 7-9pm for a special reading by various asemic artists and scholars, and music by Ghostband. This event is sponsored by Rain Taxi, and is free and open to the public. 

Opening reception: Friday, March 10; 6-9pm; Free and open to the public.

For more information, visit mnbookarts.org/asemic

sheaff 1.jpgMark your calendar for what will undoubtedly be the finest celebration of all things ephemera in North America this year! The Ephemera Fair will be held at the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Old Greenwich, CT on Saturday, March 18th and Sunday, March 19th. Ephemera are items made from paper that were not made to stand the test of time, and have since become collectible. Popular categories include correspondence, advertising materials, historical documents, posters, tickets, scores and scripts, cards, and many others.   

The Ephemera Fair, the highest quality show of its type in the country, features 77 dealers from 12 states selling an amazing selection of historically significant ephemera.

The Ephemera Fair, open to the public, Saturday and Sunday features an international group of sellers who specialize in items ranging from A to Z. Care to learn more about Valentine cards or documents signed by presidents? Or perhaps posters or vintage advertising call to you. Attendees interested in entertainment will enjoy the fair's selections of original movie scripts, manuscripts, and music scores. Photographers will appreciate the daguerreotypes, stereo-views, cabinet cards, and photos on offer. Other areas include broadsides, maps, catalogs, and design related materials, among practically countless others.   

According to Marvin Getman, producer of The Ephemera Fair, "Even people who don’t "officially" collect ephemera will love this event. And odds are, they will leave with at least one item that catches their fancy! Walking through this fair is walk through history. Visitors get to see how people lived before the digital age—long before our smartphones and computers shaped the way today people define friends, correspondence, and communication."

The Ephemera Fair will be held at the Hyatt Regency Greenwich, located at 1800 East Putnam Avenue, Old Greenwich, CT, and is open to the public on Saturday, March 18th from 10am-5pm and Sunday, March 19th from 11am-4pm. The hotel offers free parking. Tickets at the door for the two-day show are $15 for adults; college students with ID and children under 18 are free with an adult admission. Sunday admission is only $8. Discounted online tickets are available on the website http://www.bookandpaperfairs.com. This event is held in conjunction with the Ephemera Society of America's annual conference, Ephemera37. Collectors and museum curators travel from all points of the country to attend this conference. The theme for this year’s conference is American Ingenuity-What’s The Big Idea?  Speakers at the conference, which include museum curators as well as independent collector and scholars will present images of inventors and invention, focusing on innovative ideas and how they were disseminated for good (the freedom of bicycle travel) or ill (the chicanery of patent medicine). For more information on the conference programs see www.ephemerasociety.org.

Image: 1870s book Harpel’s Typograph, the groundbreaking 19th century book on printing, presented by R. Dana Sheaff & Co. Bethel VT.

Martin_Luther_King_the_Trumpet_of_Conscience_Corrected_Gallery_Sheets_52811c_lg.jpegLOS ANGELES, February 21, 2017 - Galley proofs for Dr. Martin Luther King’s last book, “The Trumpet of Conscience,” which featured a collection of his speeches will be auctioned by  by Nate D. Sanders Auctions on February 23, 2017.

The galley proofs features five speeches Dr. King delivered in November and December 1967 for the Canadian Broadcasting System (CBC). The speeches were ''Impasse in Race Relations,” “Conscience and the Vietnam War,” ''Youth and Social Action,” ''Nonviolence and Social Change'' and ''A Christmas Sermon on Peace.''

The galley proofs contains drafts all 28 slides, except for slide 4, which features Coretta Scott King’s introduction. The slides have corrections including typos and formatting errors.

New York-based Harper & Row released “The Trumpet of Conscience” in 1968 after Dr. King’s assassination.

Bidding for the galley proofs begins at $7,500.

Additional information on the galley proofs can be found at http://natedsanders.com/Galley_Proofs_for_Martin_Luther_King_Jr__s_Last_Bo-LOT45910.aspx

About Nate D. Sanders Auctions

An industry leader in documents and autographs, Nate D. Sanders Auctions has conducted auctions in Los Angeles since 1990 and now holds major auctions on a monthly basis. Owner Nate Sanders is recognized for his knowledge of sports, historical and Hollywood memorabilia. To learn more visit natedsanders.com

Screen Shot 2017-02-16 at 3.50.16 PM.pngMichaan’s is pleased to announce the sale of a prominent San Francisco Library consisting of over 14,000 hardcover books that have been accumulated over a period of fifty years by one family and kept in their Pacific Heights Estate since the 1920’s.

The collection is strong in history with great emphasis on American Presidential and Constitutional history but also a strong gathering of British and French including major collections of Napoleon, Abraham Lincoln, World War I and II.  A lovingly assembled collection of all aspects of Irish History including many 19th Century Works.  

There are over 50 sets of high quality leather-bound books.  As well as over 100 sets of cloth and lesser beauty.  

The family stopped buying books circa 1965 and one seldom sees so many vintage titles that have been aged and preserved so well.

In addition there are large quantities of books on Catholicism, Communism, Russian and California History with a strong emphasis on the history of the missions.

Do not miss the opportunity to preview and inspect this massive private collection - only once or twice in a generation does one see an accumulation of this size and content.

Image: The Savoy Cocktail Book, Original Edition, circa 1930 with Brilliant Art Deco Cover. Estimate: $200 / 300

NEW YORK — The first of Bonhams' Kennedy offerings, is a section titled the "Kennedy Years" in the Fine Books & Manuscripts sale in New York 10:30 am on March 9. From several consigners, items up for sale tell the story of JFK's days as a young senator arriving in Washington D.C. with his beautiful young bride, his rise to seize the Democratic ticket, and his presidential campaign and presidency. 

Leading the sale is the original plaster maquette from the bust of John Fitzgerald Kennedy, modeled by renowned sculptor Felix De Weldon, most known for his Marines Corps Memorial, in the mid to late 1963, estimated at $150,000-200,000. After the president was assassinated on November 22, 1963, Jackie worked closely with the sculptor to ensure the truest depiction of the fallen president. Most notably she re-shaped the mouth so the bust portrayed him smiling. Completed in 1964, the bronze cast of this bust stood nobly in the cabinet room in the North East corner of the White House, before Jackie moved it in 1979 to the new John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum in Boston.

Prominently featured in the sale, are groups of photos shot by Orlando Suero from Three Lions pictures, which offer a rare glimpse into JFK and Jackie's first year of marriage in 1954, a junior senator from Massachusetts and a political history student at Georgetown University. From a five-day shoot with the couple in and around their first home in Georgetown, the first group shows Jackie in class and around the campus of Georgetown (estimate $3,000-5,000). The second presents JFK relaxing at home discussing a senate bill with Jackie and playing a friendly game of football with brother Robert while his wife and sister-in-law watch (estimate $4,000-6,000).

Additional highlights include items from Jackie's personal assistant, Mary Gallagher, who served JFK when he was a young senator before working for his wife. Gallagher met Jackie in her bedroom at 9:30 am each morning, and liaised between her, designers, artists, and the president, whom she reported Jackie's personal expenses. Jackie's famed relationship with Paris-born designer Oleg Cassini comes to life in a collection of notes to be delivered to her exclusive couturier, estimated at $3,000-5,000, including her hand drawn sketches of dresses on White House stationary. Up for sale, jewelry and a goodbye note from Jackie at the end of Gallagher's employment reads "please accept this with memories of so many happy days", estimated at $3,000-5,000. 

The friendship of JFK and British Ambassador David Ormsby Gore is conveyed through personal possessions at Bonhams London sale of Glyn Cywarch on March 29.

Bonhams London is to sell the contents of Glyn Cywarch, the Welsh seat of Jasset Ormsby Gore, the 7th Lord Harlech. The Contents of Glyn Cywarch - the property of Lord Harlech sale will take place at Bonhams, New Bond Street, London on 29 March 2017. Some of the most fascinating objects tell the story of the close friendship between Lord Harlech's grandfather, David Ormsby Gore (5th Lord Harlech), and President Kennedy.

In 1961, David Ormsby Gore was appointed by the British Prime Minister, Harold Macmillan, as the UK's Ambassador to the United States. He served until 1965, the year after he assumed the title on the death of his father. David Ormsby Gore played a key role as adviser to Kennedy during the Cuban Missile Crisis of 1962 and was once referred to by the President as one of the two brightest men he ever knew. Ormsby Gore and his wife Sissy formed a particularly close personal bond with President Kennedy and his wife Jackie.

Up for sale, gifts from the Kennedys to the Harlechs include:

• A copy of JFK's copy of The Poetical Works of Shelley from Jackie Kennedy to David Ormsby Gore on his birthday accompanied by a handwritten note from Jackie, estimated at £1,000-2,000.

• A copy of Inaugural Addresses of the Presidents of the United States... to John F. Kennedy 1961 given to Ormsby Gore in 1963 by Jackie Kennedy a few weeks after the President's assassination with inscription in her handwriting, estimated at £3,000-5,000.

• An American Sterling Silver Cigar Box given by Jackie Kennedy in 1965 to Lord and Lady Harlech engraved and inscribed to David and Sissy (Harlech), estimated at £800-1,200. 

butler_working-draft.jpgSAN MARINO, Calif.—A new exhibition opening this spring at The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens examines the life and work of celebrated author Octavia E. Butler (1947-2006), the first science fiction writer to receive a prestigious MacArthur “genius” award and the first African-American woman to win widespread recognition writing in that genre. “Octavia E. Butler: Telling My Stories” opens April 8, 2017, in the West Hall of the Library and continues through Aug. 7. Butler’s literary archive resides at The Huntington.

“Octavia E. Butler: Telling My Stories” On view April 8-Aug. 7, 2017
Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens
Library, West Hall

“She was a pioneer—a master storyteller who brought her voice, the voice of a woman of color, to science fiction,” said Natalie Russell, assistant curator of literary manuscripts at The Huntington and curator of the exhibition. “Tired of stories featuring white, male heroes, she developed an alternative narrative from a very personal point of view.”

A Pasadena, Calif., native, Butler told the New York Times in a 2000 interview: "When I began writing science fiction, when I began reading, heck, I wasn't in any of this stuff I read. The only black people you found were occasional characters or characters who were so feeble-witted that they couldn't manage anything, anyway. I wrote myself in, since I'm me and I'm here and I'm writing."

Butler would have been 70 in 2017; she died an untimely death at age 58, apparently of a stroke at her home in Seattle.

“Octavia E. Butler: Telling My Stories” follows a roughly chronological thread and includes approximately 100 items that reveal the writer’s early years and influences, as well as highlight specific themes that repeatedly commanded her attention.

After Butler’s death, The Huntington became the recipient of her papers, which arrived in 2008 in two four-drawer file cabinets and 35 large cartons. “She kept nearly everything,” said Russell, “from her very first short stories, written at age 12, to book contracts and programs from speaking engagements. The body of materials includes 8,000 individual items and more than 80 boxes of additional items: extensive drafts, notes, and research materials for more than a dozen novels, numerous shorts stories and essays, as well as correspondence and other materials. By the time the collection had been processed and catalogued, more than 40 scholars were asking to get access to it. In the past two years, it has been used nearly 1,300 times—or roughly 15 times per week, said Russell, making it one of the most actively researched archives at The Huntington.

Butler was born June 22, 1947, to a maid and a shoeshine man. Her father died when she was quite young; an only child, she was raised primarily by her mother. “She discovered writing very early, in large part because, she said, it suited her shy nature, and it was permitted in her strict Baptist household,” said Russell. The exhibition will feature samples of her first stories.

But, says Russell, it was a 1954 science fiction film called Devil Girl from Mars that inspired Butler to take on science fiction. “She was convinced she could write a better story than the one unfolding on the screen,” Russell said.

Butler enrolled in every creative writing course she could find and was active in the Afro-relations club at Pasadena City College, an early indication of her interest in current events and Civil Rights issues. In the early 1970s, at a workshop for minority writers, she met the science fiction author Harlan Ellison, who introduced her to the Clarion Science Fiction Workshop, where Butler learned to hone her craft among other like-minded writers; it was then that she sold her first story. Following Clarion, she took odd jobs to support herself—even trying to establish her own laminating business, documents show; she wrote in the early morning hours before work.

But the road to success was long and slow. "In fact,” she once said, “I had five more years of rejection slips and horrible little jobs ahead of me before I sold another word.”

On display in the exhibition will be a page of motivational notes in which she writes, “I am a Bestselling Writer. I write Bestselling Books . . . . Every day in every way I am researching and writing my award winning Bestselling Books and short stories . . . . Every one of my books reaches and remains for two or more months at the top of the bestseller lists . . . So Be It! See To It.”

In 1975, she sold her first novel, Patternmaster, to Doubleday, quickly followed by Mind of My Mind and Survivor; the trio comprise part of her “Patternist” series, depicting the evolution of humanity into three distinct genetic groups. A review on display in the exhibition lauds Patternmaster for its especially well-constructed plot and progressive heroine, who is “a refreshing change of pace from the old days.”

And her following continued to grow.

By the late 1970s, Butler was able to make a living on her writing alone. She won her first Hugo award in 1985 for the short story “Speech Sounds,” followed by other awards, including a Locus and Nebula.

“Octavia E. Butler: Telling My Stories” will include examples of journal entries, photographs, and first editions of her books, including Kindred, arguably her best-known work. The book is less science fiction and more fantasy, involving an African-American woman who travels back in time to the horrors of plantation life in pre-Civil War Maryland. “I wanted to reach people emotionally in a way that history tends not to,” Butler said about the book. Published in 1979, Kindred continues to command widespread appeal and is regularly taught in high schools and at the university level, as well as chosen for community-wide reading programs and book clubs.

Beyond race, Butler explored tensions between the sexes and worked to develop strong female characters, a hallmark of her writing. “Being a woman in a male-dominated genre lent Butler’s stories a unique voice,” said Russell. “She would, for instance, depict women as resolving their problems through means other than violence—using flexibility, nurturing, and sensitivity instead.”

Butler once remarked, “Girls become women by giving life, and boys become men by taking it.” But she also challenged traditional gender identity, said Russell. Bloodchild, for example, is a story about a pregnant man, and in Wild Seed, the plot develops around two shape-shifting—and sex-changing—characters, Doro and Anyanwu. The exhibition will include notes Butler made about the two characters as she worked to develop them.

Butler sought to meticulously research the science in her fiction, traveling to the Amazon to get a firsthand look at extreme biological diversity in an effort to better incorporate biology, genetics, and medicine in her work. On display will be photographs from that research trip, as well as a small notebook of plant sketches. Climate change concerned her, as did politics, the pharmaceutical industry, and a variety of social issues, and as a result, she wove them all into her writing. “What’s striking,” said Russell, “is her ability to tease out and focus on issues that have had and likely will have currency for decades. She was amazingly prescient and given that, her stories resonate in very powerful ways today. Perhaps even more so than when they were first published.”

Related Programs

To complement “Octavia E. Butler: Telling My Stories,” The Huntington will present curator tours as well as “Octavia E. Butler Studies: Convergence of an Expanding Field,” a conference on June 23 with scholars Ayana Jamieson and Moya Bailey.

Image: Octavia E. Butler, working draft of Kindred (formerly titled To Keep thee in All Thy Ways) with handwritten notes by Butler, ca. 1977. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

 

13-Muybridge copy.jpgNew York—On Tuesday, February 14, Swann Galleries offered Icons & Images: Photographs & Photobooks, an auction featuring masterworks spanning the lifetime of the medium. The Valentine’s Day auction was well-timed, precisely 65 years to the day after Swann held the first U.S. auction dedicated to photographs, The Marshall Sale, on February 14, 1952.

The auction house, which is also celebrating its diamond anniversary this year, has continued to honor that historical pedigree with such innovations as the first auction dedicated to vernacular photography, a field that Vice President and Director of Photographs & Photobooks Daile Kaplan has helped to bring into the main stream. Tuesday’s sale offered premier examples of both vernacular and fine art photography, earning more than $1.5M in an auction that lasted nearly five hours.

The sale featured a run of lots related to the moon landing and space exploration in the second half of the twentieth century. There was heated bidding for a group of 22 large cibachrome prints from NASA missions, 1965-84, leading to a final price of $43,750*, above a high estimate of $25,000. A related archive of approximately 280 photographs of various Apollo missions, 1969-72, earned $5,460, while a set of ten contemporary assemblages depicting the moon was sold for $6,250.

Though twentieth century works commanded most of the highest prices, the top lot of the sale was a collection of 50 plates from Eadweard Muybridge’s Animal Locomotion, 1887, which sold to a private collector for $62,500. All five offered lots by Muybridge sold.

One highlight of the sale was a rare sixth-plate tintype of Edgar Allan Poe, taken after a daguerreotype captured just three weeks before this death, which more than doubled its high estimate of $15,000 to sell to a collector after competitive bidding for $37,500.

A run of nine works by Edward S. Curtis all found buyers, led by Chief of the Desert, Navajo, a 1904 orotone portrait in its original frame, which sold for $23,750. Bidding moved swiftly, especially for rare scenes such as The Rush Gatherer, a 1910 orotone also in its original frame ($20,000).

Both offered lots by Roy DeCarava sold above their estimates, with the 1956 silver print Dancers earning $40,000, above a high estimate of $25,000, and setting a new auction record for the image. Empire State Building, circa 1930, a dramatic silver print by Lewis W. Hine, sold for $37,500, above a high estimate of $18,000.

An album of approximately 265 photographs depicting the 1906 San Francisco earthquake was purchased by an institution for $13,750, more than twice its high estimate of $6,000.

The sale closed with a selection of photobooks. A maquette by Lucien Clergue for his unpublished book Picasso en Provence, featuring 150 candid, intimate and rarely seen photographs of Pablo Picasso, was purchased for $15,000. An early travelogue by Scottish photographer John Thomson, titled Illustrations of China and its People, Volumes I and II, 1873, went to a collector for $15,000. Several editions of Camera Work, the photograph magazine published by Alfred Sieglitz at the dawn of the twentieth century, were offered with a 100% sell-through rate.

Swann Galleries Vice President and Director of Photographs & Photobooks Daile Kaplan said, “Our Valentine's Day auction was a sweet success, with an impressive roster of new buyers actively bidding.  The relationship between science and art told a fascinating story, given the success of the Muybridge and NASA sets. Overall, the sale featured a selection of fine art and vernacular photographs that offered choice opportunities to better understand photography's growing role in visual culture."

The next photographs sale at Swann Galleries will be held April 20, 2017. For more information, contact Daile Kaplan at dkaplan@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 13 Eadweard Muybridge, 50 plates from Animal Locomotion, collotypes, 1887. Sold February 14, 2017 for $62,500. (Pre-sale estimate: $30,000 to $45,000)

399845v_0001.jpgNew York, NY, February 15, 2017 — The Morgan Library & Museum announced today the acquisition of three major drawings by David Hockney, Martin Puryear, and Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot. Each is a valuable addition to a drawings collection at the Morgan that is considered one of the greatest in the world.

“We are delighted to announce the acquisition of these outstanding works,” said Colin B. Bailey, director of the museum. “The Hockney is a superb and iconic example of his precise, delicate style of the 1960s and depicts one of his muses, fabric designer Celia Birtwell. The Martin Puryear comes on the heels of the successful exhibition of his drawings we held in 2015, while the Corot is characteristic of the artist’s best portrait drawings of the 1830s. We are deeply grateful to the donors whose generous support made these acquisitions possible."

David Hockney (British, b. 1937) Celia, Paris, 1969, pen and ink on paper. The Morgan Library & Museum. Purchased as the gift of the Katherine J. Rayner Fund of the Anne Cox Chambers Foundation

One of the most popular British artists of the twentieth century, David Hockney has been a versatile and prolific painter since the 1960s. It is his talent as a draughtsman, however, that is at the core of his reputation, especially the drawings from life that he began making in the late 1960s. Celia, Paris is a superb example of such a drawing. Frequently reproduced in the literature on Hockney, it is particularly important on two counts: first, as an early and very refined example of the precise, delicate line drawing—indebted to Ingres and Picasso— that Hockney developed in the late 1960s, notably in portraits of friends and family; and second, as a portrait of Celia Birtwell, a British fabric designer who was Hockney’s most constant muse from 1968 on. (Celia and her husband, fashion designer Ossie Clark, are the subject of one of Hockney’s most famous paintings, Mr. and Mrs. Clark and Percy of 1970-71, in the Tate’s collection). Hockney depicted Celia in many colored pencil drawings in the early1970s. The present drawing, in which Celia’s relaxed pose conveys the intimacy between artist and sitter, is one of his earliest of her. 

Martin Puryear (American, b. 1941), Drawing for Untitled, 1990, black Conté crayon, with smudging, on ivory paper. The Morgan Library & Museum, Purchased with funds provided by Agnes Gund, The Ronald & Jo Carole Lauder Foundation, and Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin M. Rosen. 

American sculptor Martin Puryear is known for the elegance and refinement of his abstract, hand-made constructions, primarily in wood.  Drawing has always been essential to his practice, as the exhibition, Martin Puryear: Multiple Dimensions, shown at the Morgan in 2015, demonstrated. Drawing for Untitled—which was included in the exhibition—depicts a classic image in Martin Puryear’s repertoire, harking back to the heads he drew while in Sierra Leone in the 1960s and anticipating sculptures such as VesselFace Down, and the Getty’s That Profile of the late 1990s and 2000s. The sense of touch suggested by the blurry contours, smudges, and fingerprints on the sheet, conjures up Puryear’s hands-on approach to his sculpture as well as his prints and drawings. This  is the first work by Martin Puryear to enter the Morgan, where it joins many drawings by sculptors from the Renaissance to the present.  

Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot (French, 1796-1875), Seated Camaldolese Monk, 1834, graphite on paper. The Morgan Library & Museum. Gift of Jill Newhouse.                                                   

This finely observed, precisely rendered study of a seated monk in profile is characteristic of Corot’s best portrait drawings of the 1830s, and most probably dates from Corot’s second trip to Italy.  This was a relatively short, six-month trip in which the artist focused on picturesque sites, views and figures that would serve him in composing Salon paintings, and included Corot’s only visit to Tuscany and Florence.  The sitter’s white habit, leather belt (as opposed to a cord) and long beard confirm the inscription which identifies him as a member of the Camaldolese branch of the Benedictines.  An ascetic order founded by San Romualdo in 1046, their name derives from their 11th century hermitage in the Camaldoli mountains, located in the Casentino valley in Tuscany.  The setting of the hilltop convent and the magnificent views surrounding it would have been attractive to Corot, who may have spent the night there, as the hermitage offered free lodging to male visitors during this period. 

Image: Jean-Baptiste-Camille Corot (French, 1796-1875), Seated Camaldolese Monk, 1834, graphite on paper. The Morgan Library & Museum. Gift of Jill Newhouse.         

A diverse range of fine art and antiques was featured at Worth Auctions' February 12, 2017 sale in Freeville, New York. A cadre of devoted collectors were undeterred by a lake effect snowstorm, and further enthusiastic bidding activity took place on three online bidding platforms: Invaluable, LiveAuctioners, and eBay.

Among the fine art offerings were numerous natural history plates by John James Audubon and John Gould, signed lithographs by twentieth-century black-and-white masters Stow Wengenroth and John McClellan, and plein air paintings by William R. Davis. A quintet of canvases by the versatile painter George Rhoads exceeded their high estimates, with one sunset image bringing $2,000 and setting an auction record for the artist. A suite of complete issues of the deluxe French periodical "Derriere le Miroir" fetched $4,000.

In the antiques department, a pleasing group of artifacts collected along the Sepik River in Papua New Guinea brought $1,100; a collection of vintage dolls sold for $1,900.00; and a set of Capodimonte porcelain figurines realized $2,000. A handsomely restored Ithaca Calendar Clock fetched $875. An Austrian gold and opal bracelet sold for $900.00.

The cataloging staff at Worth Auctions is already busy preparing for its March sales, which will showcase rare and desirable Civil War firearms and edged weapons, fine and costume jewelry, modern and contemporary art, and more.

For more information about bidding or consigning, contact evan@worthauctions.com.

[2] copy.jpgNEW YORK —Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s 1835-1837 notebook containing drafts for every poem featured in her first significant collection of poetry The Seraphim and Other Poems (1838) leads Bonhams’ Fine Books & Manuscripts sale (10:30 am on March 9). Revealing her journey from Romantic poet to Progressive political voice, the notebook is estimated at $400,000-600,000.

Barrett Browning was a prominent English poet of the Victorian era whose liberal stances on slavery and child labor resonated with readers throughout Britain and the United States.

This significant collection of drafts includes extensive additions, deletions, and emendations, reflecting her search and discovery of the incipient strength of her developing voice. Often referring to the Greek tragedies, this first collection of poems, speaks to her early Christian sentiments which she described as “not the deep persuasion of the mild Christian but the wild visions of an enthusiast.”

Born in Coxoe Hall, Durham, England in 1806, Barrett taught herself Hebrew, Greek, and Latin, while still a young girl, read Mary Wollstonecraft's A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, and later paired her love for the classics with activities at the Bible and Missionary Societies of her church. 

In her later works, Barrett reveals her long held political beliefs, speaking against slavery—her father owned a slave-run plantation in Jamaica—, child labor, and the paternal bidding to control women. Also up for auction, is an autographed manuscript and working draft of Poems Before Congress, estimated at $180,000-250,000. In the last and most controversial of Barrett Browning’s published works, seven of the poems discuss local politics and call for the independence of Italy, where she was a longtime resident. The eighth poem, "A Curse for a Nation," is an attack on American slavery, was largely seen as anti-British. A rarity in her time as an outspoken female political poet, Barrett Browning prefaces this collection: "What I have written has simply been written because I love truth and justice quand meme 'more than Plato' and Plato's country.”

Other highlights include:

  • An autographed manuscript and draft of her revised translation the Aeschylus play Prometheus Bound, which was included in her lauded 1850 book Poems, is estimated at $200,000-300,000.
  • An early autographed Barret Browning manuscript from early English poets, including Geoffrey Chaucer, Edmund Spencer, John Fletcher, estimated at $40,000-60,000.

Bonhams’ Business Development Director of the Books & Manuscripts, Tom Lamb, said, “Rarely seen on the market, these Barrett Browning notebooks and manuscripts would be an excellent addition to any literary collection. Her layered edits and re-edits reveal nuances of her working methods and influences, and further illuminate her dexterity as a shining female voice of early 19th century Europe.”

Image: Elizabeth Barrett Browning 1806-1861 autograph manuscript, a working draft of Poems Before Congress is estimated at $180,000-250,000

73-Gutenberg-leaf copy.jpgNew York— On Thursday, March 9, Swann Galleries will hold an auction of Early Printed, Medical, Scientific & Travel Books, featuring a premier selection of early English material.

The top lot of the sale is a leaf from the Gutenberg Bible, Mainz, 1455, with the text of Ecclesiasticus 16:14-18:29, estimated at $40,000 to $60,000. Further doctrinal material includes the fourth edition of the first volume of Petrus Berchorius's Liber Bibliae moralis, Cologne, 1477, a thirteenth century encyclopedia of the Bible and the natural world ($10,000 to $15,000) and the first edition in English of Hans Holbein’s The Images of the Old Testament, 1549, featuring 94 woodcuts by the artist and valued at $10,000 to $15,000. A 1560 first edition of the Geneva Bible, the predominant bible in Elizabethan England, is expected to bring $10,000 to $15,000. The 1674 third edition of Baruch Spinoza’s Tractatus Theologico-Politicus, which includes the 1666 Philosophia S. Scripturae interpres by Spinoza’s friend and editor Lodewijk Meijer, a controversial work arguing for the philosophical interpretation of scripture, estimated at $2,000 to $3,000, also makes an appearance.

Early English books featured in this sale include Antonio de Guevara's manual of statecraft The Dial of Princes, 1568 ($3,000 to $5,000); the first English edition of Niccolò Machiavelli's The Florentine Historie, 1595 ($3,000 to $5,000); Michel de Montaigne's The Essayes, the precursor of the modern essay form, 1603 ($8,000 to $12,000); and Sir Philip Sidney's influential prose romance The Countess of Pembrokes Arcadia, 1598 ($3,000 to $5,000). Also available is the third edition of the English translation by Sir Thomas North of Plutarch’s The Lives of the Noble Grecians and Romaines, London, 1603, from Jacques Amyot’s French version of the original Greek, as well as the first edition of Samuel Johnson’s 1755 Dictionary of the English Language, ($1,500 to $2,000 and $6,000 to $9,000, respectively).

From the travel section comes An Embassy from the East-India Company of the United Provinces, to the Grand Tartar Cham, Emperour of China, 1673, written by Jan Nieuhoff et al and originally published as part of John Ogilby’s series of travel atlases ($4,000 to $6,000). Several tomes recount exploration into the Middle East, including the first edition of Jean de la Roque’s Voyage de l’Arabie Heureuse, 1716-22, with three engraved folding plates of coffee plants, valued at $1,500 to $2,500.

A thirteenth-century noted ferial psalter and hymnal in Latin, with Western and Low German Saints’ Days ($3,000 to $5,000) is one of several rare manuscripts in the sale. Also available is a collection of 15 prayers composed by Charles V of Spain with engraved illustrations of gospel scenes, written in Spanish in Brussels in 1676; this volume, in an embellished red cloth binding, is expected to fetch $3,000 to $5,000.

Further highlights include the Italian translation by Leonardo Cernoti of Claudius Ptolemaeus's Geografia, Venice, 1598-97, with notes by the astronomer Giovanni Antonio Magini. This edition includes a double-hemisphere world map after Rumold Mercator, as well as 63 half-page maps; it is valued between $3,000 and $5,000. The second edition of Christophorus Georgius de Honestis’s Expositio super Antidotario Mesue, printed in Bologna in 1488, is also present. This late fourteenth-century commentary is based on the Antidotarium ascribed to the Baghdad court physician Mesuë the Younger, a popular pharmacopeia based on Muslim knowledge ($3,000 to $5,000).

In addition to a first edition of Paradise Lost by John Milton, 1668 ($6,000 to $9,000), there is also an extensive selection of philosophical works by important figures of the Enlightenment, including René Descartes, John Evelyn, Thomas Hobbes, David Hume, John Locke and François-Marie Arouet de Voltaire.

In the medical section is an archive of letters from Harvey Cushing to the great-niece of Elisha Bartlett, regarding the collection of Bartlett material he assembled with her help, estimated at $5,000 to $10,000.  A sizable offering of seventeenth- to early twentieth-century works from the philosophy library of Professor Jan Ludwig features first editions by David Hume and Immanuel Kant, including Kant’s Critik der reinen Vernunft, printed in Riga in 1781 ($8,000 to $12,000).

The auction will be held Thursday, March 9, beginning at 10:30 a.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Saturday, March 4 from noon to 5 p.m.; Monday, March 6 through Wednesday, March 8, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

An illustrated auction catalogue is available for $35 from Swann Galleries, Inc., 104 East 25th Street, New York, NY 10010, or online at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information or to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Early Printed Books Specialist Tobias Abeloff at 212-254-4710, extension 18 or tabeloff@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 73 Single leaf from a paper copy of the Gutenberg Bible, Mainz, 1455, in a copy of Newton's A Noble Fragment. Estimate $40,000 to $60,000.

Screen Shot 2017-02-13 at 8.38.25 AM.pngThe Van Gogh Museum is devoting itself this spring to Prints in Paris 1900: From Elite to the Street - a major exhibition of work from its own fin-de-siècle print collection, which is one of the finest of its kind in the world. Over 250 prints of the highest quality, including colourful works by Bonnard, Chéret, Steinlen and Toulouse-Lautrec will be on show, among them world-famous posters like Le Chat Noir and Le Moulin Rouge. The prints will be shown alongside paintings, historical photographs, furniture for collectors and decorative objects, and will take visitors on a sensual journey through the cosmopolitan life of the French fin-de-siècle (1890-1905). The exhibition has been designed by Maarten Spruyt.

The Van Gogh Museum manages one of the finest collections of fin-de-siècle printmaking in the world. As a centre of knowledge and expertise, the museum has been collecting prints intensively for sixteen years and has also carried out five years of in-depth research so that it can now present its print collection in magnificent fashion. Prints that, because of their sensitivity to light, are kept in storage and only displayed sporadically and on a small scale can now be seen in all their glory and in large numbers in the museum’s exhibition wing.

The most beautiful of all the graphic work produced by artists like Henri de Toulouse- Lautrec (1864-1901), Pierre Bonnard (1867-1947), Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen (1859-1923), Edgar Degas (1834-1917) and Jules Chéret (1836-1832) will be on show at the exhibition, which will feature the finest print series and the rarest impressions. Over 250 prints will be shown alongside paintings, historical photographs, furniture for collectors and decorative objects. There are little jewels like the dark lithographs of Odilon Redon (1840-1916), evoking nightmarish fantasies, and the still series of woodcuts by Félix Vallotton (1865-1925), showing musicians playing in shadowy interiors.

The overarching story of the world of printmaking in Paris - from elite (the private collector) to the street (the mass of the people) - has never previously been told in an exhibition. Prints in Paris 1900 takes visitors on a journey beginning with prints from fashionable art circles, which were kept and viewed in the intimacy of richly decorated interiors. They will see the imposing Bibliothèque - rarely loaned for exhibitions - designed by François-Rupert Carabin (1890, Musée d’Orsay), an exuberantly decorated bookcase several metres tall with carvings of nude women, in which costly books and prints were stored by a private collector.

We then enter an entirely different world - that of popular prints for the masses. Here we find the fleeting impressions of the visual spectacle of modern life in the public sphere, full of colour, light and pleasure. Artistic posters, sheet music and magazine illustrations with their bright colours, large letters and powerful silhouettes, vie for attention. The highlight is Steinlen’s poster The Street, which, with an area of no less than 7.5 m2, is a genuine ‘fresco for the masses’. The prints also tempt visitors into the magical world of Parisian nightlife.

We then see how the elite took public printmaking and pulled it back into their interiors, where posters were now also hung on the walls as decorations. The exhibition concludes by showing a variety of printing techniques, with the original lithography press of the printer Auguste Clot (1858-1936) as the main attraction. A selection of trial proofs and videos explains the techniques of etching, woodcuts and lithography.

Parisian fin-de-siècle

The fin-de-siècle (1890-1905) was the heyday of French printmaking. It was the time where avant-garde art blended with everyday life in cosmopolitan Paris. Artists no longer put their talent to work exclusively on the creation of ‘high’ art, but also threw themselves into what were considered ‘lower’ art forms, such as decorative designs, prints, posters and magazine illustrations, with the common theme of modern cosmopolitan life in Paris. Artists experimented intensively with different print techniques and decorated the whole of Paris with their provocative artworks.

Catalogue

The exhibition Prints in Paris 1900: From Elite to the Street is accompanied by a richly illustrated, large-format catalogue written by curator Fleur Roos Rosa de Carvalho and based on years of intensive research into the worlds of printmaking during the French fin-de-siècle: the closed circles of decadent print collectors, the sparkling poster art of the street and magazines on news-stands, and large prints as colourful decoration for the interiors of the beau monde. 194 pages, hardcover. Publisher: Mercatorfonds, Brussels. The book is available in Dutch, English, French and German editions, and will be distributed worldwide.

Prints in Paris 1900: From Elite to the Street

3 March - 11 June 2017

10 February 2017 - The Bodleian Libraries have launched an innovative web-based resource that brings together the complete works of British photographic pioneer William Henry Fox Talbot, available to the public at foxtalbot.bodleian.ox.ac.uk. For the first time ever, users can discover and search through annotated digitized images of Talbot’s photographs gathered from collections around the world. The fascinating images show the emergence and development of photography while capturing moments of early Victorian life.  

SirWalterScottsMonument-BL+-+300dpi copy.jpgThis comprehensive online Talbot Catalogue Raisonné is an important new resource for scholars, educators, curators, conservators, photographers and historians in many fields, as well as anyone interested in photography. Catalogues raisonné encompass the entire corpus of an artist’s work and while they are common in art history, nothing of this scale has been attempted for photography - it is a record of both the invention of an art and of the art of invention. 

William Henry Fox Talbot (1800-1877), among the greatest polymaths of the Victorian age, is regarded as the British ‘father of photography’. He created some of the first photographs ever made. He also recognised that negatives, with their ability to make multiple prints on paper, would define the central path of photography right through to the digital age. During his career Talbot and his collaborators created more than 4,500 unique or distinct images; approximately 25,000 of his original negatives and multiple prints from them are known to survive worldwide and are held across a range of international institutions and private collections. These are now brought together for the first time in one place - the Talbot Catalogue Raisonné. 

‘There has been nothing like this before in the history of photography,’ said Professor Larry J Schaaf, Project Director for the Talbot Catalogue Raisonné and Visiting Professor of Art at the University of Oxford. ‘This catalogue raisonné of Talbot's work will help unlock the enormous artistic, documentary and technical information embodied in these images and allow researchers to find out even more about these works.’ Working closely with the Talbot family, Schaaf has been researching Talbot for more than four decades and has examined nearly all of Talbot’s originals held in collections worldwide.  

Talbot was a scientist who then became an artist. Unlike the case with most of his peers, much of his archive survives; in addition to the 25,000 photographs there are more than 10,000 letters, hundreds of notebooks and many related physical objects. In the early 1980s, before digital projects in the humanities were common, Professor Schaaf developed the pioneering databases of Talbot's work on which the new online catalogue is based. 

The Bodleian Libraries have spent the last two years translating these images into a modern online form. The catalogue integrates the holdings of more than 100 international public and private collections including items from the British Library, the National Media Museum, New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art, the J. Paul Getty Museum and the Smithsonian Institution, as well as smaller but significant holdings in Russia, Estonia, South Africa, Canada, France and others worldwide.

Launching with more than 1,000 images, these will be added to weekly until the entire 25,000 negatives and prints known worldwide have been published. They include: 

  • • Beautiful early cityscapes of Oxford, London and Paris and others, 
  • • Numerous images taken on and around the grounds of Lacock Abbey, Talbot’s family home in Wiltshire,  
  • • Some of Talbot’s best known images such as ‘The Open Door’ and ‘The Haystack’,
  • • Photographs by Talbot’s close circle of family and colleagues, with whom he collaborated - Nicolaas Henneman, Calvert R Jones, George Bridges and Henry Collen, along with Talbot’s wife Constance and his mother Lady Elisabeth Feilding.

In this new catalogue raisonné, images of prints and negatives are accompanied by notes, annotations and essays, with links to relevant publications and websites. Users can search images by photographer, title, collection, provenance, date, genre, geographic location and keywords then tag, save or compare images and create, annotate and store their own collections or search results, all free of charge. Since many of these primordial images survive in a faded state, they can be enhanced for study onscreen by simple tools that magnify the images and adjust the contrast and density. Negatives lacking a print will be accompanied by a digital positive. 

Importantly users can view surviving negatives alongside the prints that were made from them, making this the first online catalogue to make the connection between corresponding Talbot prints/images no matter where in the world the original print is held. This is critical since each negative and print was made by hand and each is unique. For example, users to the site can see an image of a negative held in the Smithsonian alongside salt prints made from it that are held in the J. Paul Getty Museum, the British Library and other private collections. 

The images are accompanied by extensive cross-referencing to other sources, such as Talbot’s notebooks held in the British Library and the 10,000 Talbot letters available online at foxtalbot.dmu.ac.uk, a project at De Montfort University also directed by Professor Schaaf. In 2014, the Bodleian acquired the personal archive of Talbot, which includes original manuscripts, correspondence, family diaries and scientific instruments. The archive is also rich in physical objects depicted in Talbot’s photographs, for example the actual glassware depicted in his famous ‘Articles of Glass’ published in The Pencil of Nature.

Richard Ovenden, Bodley’s Librarian said ‘The Talbot Catalogue Raisonné exemplifies the important role of the Bodleian Libraries and cultural institutions in creating digital resources that allow unprecedented virtual access to collections. This project also demonstrates the value of working in partnership, bringing together items now dispersed from across numerous collections. We are extremely grateful to the many institutions who contributed to this exciting new research tool, without whom this project would not have been possible.’

The Talbot Catalogue Raisonné has been developed with the support of the William Talbott Hillman Foundation, The Polonsky Foundation, the Charina Endowment Fund as well as numerous private donors.

Image: This photo of the Scott Monument, a monument to the Scottish author Sir Walter Scott (1771-1832) and the largest monument to a writer in the world, was taken in mid-October 1844. Talbot travelled north to look for subjects for his second book of photography, Sun Pictures in Scotland. Talbot took several shots of the monument under construction. Salted paper print. Credit: The British Library. 

The Art & Antiques Fair Olympia is set to return to London this summer in what will be its historic 45th year.  The prestigious Fair, which offers more choice than any other top European fair, has prices ranging from £100 to hundreds of thousands of pounds.  An audience of art and antique enthusiasts from across the globe are anticipated to descend on Kensington Olympia in search of one of a kind, rare and beautiful pieces.

Opening with an exclusive Preview day on Monday 26 June and closing on Sunday 2 July, the Fair is the definitive place for home owners, interior designers and collectors looking for inspiration.  The Fair is expected to attract around 25,000 visitors with more than 55,000 pieces for sale.  Each object will be individually vetted by independent experts, providing peace of mind for any buyer - whether a first-time visitor or a regular returnee.

Known for its diverse offering, the Fair features over 120 dealers, some of whom exclusively choose Olympia to display their pieces for sale in a  seven day only equivalent of a ‘pop up shop’.  

From diamond rings to dining tables, from antiquity to the modern day, the Fair will have works of art to cater to all tastes.

As well as the large variety of dealers present, the Art & Antiques Fair Olympia will boast an impressive line-up of speakers giving insight into current trends, interiors, history as well as exhibitions taking place across Europe today. 

Mary Claire Boyd, Fair Director says: “Olympia in June is the place to buy that elusive piece that so many of us dream of owning; the essential destination for interiors pieces. The 45th edition of this flagship fair includes exhibitors who can only be seen at this UK show, while others save and restore their best pieces for this seven day, keenly anticipated event.

“There is also an opportunity to learn a tremendous amount from the combined knowledge of some of the world's leading experts in their fields who are always happy to share their expertise with interested visitors and via the free talks programme.”

After a successful opening year in 2016, SOFA London will be making a welcome return in the Fair.  A version of the critically acclaimed Chicago-based show, The Sculptural Objects Functional Art and Design Fair (SOFA), it is an area dedicated to celebrating contemporary three-dimensional art and design - sure to make a big impact.

Located in the elegant National Hall in London Olympia means that the Fair is extremely easy to get to and there will be a free shuttle bus during the Fair between London Olympia and Sloane Square. 

A Preview held on Monday 26 June, late openings, champagne bar and a specially created menu at Mosimann’s restaurant all combine to make the Fair a prestigious and must-attend event in London’s summer calendar.

Tickets are priced at £15 in advance and £20 on the door and £60 on Preview day*. 

The Art & Antiques Fair Olympia takes place at the Olympia National, London, W14 8UX. 

For more information and to purchase tickets please visit www.olympia-art-antiques.com.

isabeau-de-croix-boh-177v-178r copy.jpgLes Enluminures is celebrating its 24th year exhibiting at TEFAF Maastricht!

For this prestigious event, the leading specialists in medieval manuscripts will be presenting an array of important acquisitions. Notable highlights include a glittering unseen Book of Hours with 69 miniatures, an exceptional illuminated leaf by Sano di Pietro representing the Adoration of the Magi and a leaf from the illustrious Chester Beatty Hours.

Of the upmost importance, the Hours of Isabeau de Croix is one of the finest Books of Hours to have ever entered the Tefaf Maastricht fair. Dr. Sandra Hindman, CEO and President of Les Enluminures, claims “This is by far one of the best Books of Hours I have ever handled as a dealer, and it is certainly the most extensively illuminated with page after page of dazzling miniatures in perfect condition”. It is of exceptional size, in flawless condition, illustrated with nearly seventy large and astonishing pictures, by all three of the great-est artists working in Parisian the second quarter of the fifteenth century. Dr. Christopher de Hamel, Senior Vice-President, comments “It is only when one is familiar with routine Books of Hours that the supreme mas-terpieces stand out as being utterly exceptional. The Hours of Isabeau de Croix is one of those manuscripts which almost defies belief”.

Equally to be exhibited for the first time is a fine miniature by Sano di Pietro, one of the most influential and prolific artists in Siena in the middle of the fifteenth century. Thought to have been trained by Sassetta and to have been active in the workshop of the Master of the Osservanza, Sano inherited the gift for storytelling from his masters. His engaging narrative style was rich in decorative effects. Representing the scene of the Adoration of the Magi, his leaf is likely from the series of opulent choir books for the Hospital of Santa Maria della Scala, Siena.

The third highlight comes in the form of a leaf from the Chester Beatty Hours, one of the most important manuscripts associated with the Boucicaut Master Group. Contemporary with the Limbourg Brothers, the Boucicaut Master and his workshop were active in Paris and worked for some of the greatest patrons of the age, including Jean, Duke of Berry. Les Enluminures will present a leaf depicting St John the Baptist, in remarkable condition and with distinguished provenance.

March 10th to 19th
Preview: Thursday March 9th STAND 276

Image: THE HOURS OF ISABEAU DE CROIX France, Paris, circa 1425-50. In Latin and French, illuminated manuscript on parchment. With sixty-nine large miniatures by the Master of the Harvard Han- nibal (active circa 1415-1430), the Master of the Munich Golden Legend (active circa 1420-1460), and the Dunois Master (active circa 1435-1450’s).

Screen Shot 2017-02-10 at 10.06.12 AM.pngHeartfelt personal letters from Jackie Kennedy to David Ormsby Gore (the 5th Lord Harlech), Britain's Ambassador in the USA during the Kennedy Presidency are to be sold at The Contents of Glyn Cywarch - the Property of Lord Harlech Sale at Bonhams in London on Wednesday 29 March on behalf of Jasset, 7th Lord Harlech. They reveal for the first time that Ormsby Gore proposed marriage to Jackie Kennedy, why she turned him down and why, shortly afterwards, she married Aristotle Onassis.

The letters form part of a cache of papers that have been locked away unseen in two despatch boxes at Glyn Cywarch, the Harlech family house, since Lord Harlech's death in 1985, including personal correspondence from President Kennedy and from British Prime Ministers, Harold Macmillan, Sir Alec Douglas-Home and Harold Wilson. The archive is estimated at £100,000-150,000.

Bonhams Head of Fine Books and Manuscripts in the UK, Matthew Haley said, "For decades, biographers have speculated on the precise relationship between Jackie Kennedy and David Ormsby Gore. These letters now show without doubt how close they came to marriage and why Jackie decided to marry Onassis instead. The correspondence has been sitting in two official red Government despatch boxes for more than 40 years. The keys were nowhere to be found and in the end we had to call a locksmith to slice through the locks. It was one of those astonishing moments when you can't quite believe what you're seeing."

The 18 handwritten and one typed letters from Jackie Kennedy to David Ormsby Gore, 5th Lord Harlech, cover her days as First Lady from the assassination of President Kennedy until her marriage to Onassis in October 1968. They show a warm and very close relationship which deepened during 1967 after the tragic death in a car accident of Lord Harlech's wife, Sissy, in May of that year. At the time, Jackie Kennedy wrote to him movingly, "Your last letter was such a cri de coeur of loneliness - I would do anything to take that anguish from you - You want to patch the wounds & match the loose pairs - but you can't because your life won't turn out that way."

During the following months, the two spent an increasing amount of time together, often on private holidays, and in February 1968 Harlech proposed marriage. Among the newly discovered documents is a draft of his wounded response to her rejection of the proposal.

"All the pathetic plans I had brought with me for visits to Cyrenaica, holidays near one another and a whole variety of solutions to our marriage problem, including one for a secret marriage this summer - plans which I saw us eagerly discussing, calmly and with complete frankness as we did at the Cape and in Cambodia for the next wonderful ten days - all had become irrelevant trash to be thrown away within a few hours of my landing in New York. As for your photograph I weep when I look at it. Why do such agonizing things have to happen? Where was the need for it? I have tried for hours and hours to understand your explanation and I suppose I do in a way, without agreeing with it; but what I find unbearable and in a way, dearest Jackie, untrue is that you could come to such a categorical conclusion..."

Her reply to him, is tender and soothing. "We have known so much & shared & lost so much together - Even if it isn't the way you wish now - I hope that bond of love and pain will never be cut... You are like my beloved beloved brother - and mentor - and the only original spirit I know - as you were to Jack."

In June of that year Robert Kennedy was assassinated while seeking the Democratic Party nomination for the Presidency. Harlech was one of the pall bearers at the funeral. Shortly after the suppression of the Prague Spring by Soviet Forces in August, Jackie wrote to Harlech lamenting the state of the world, "I thought your speech about Czechoslovakia so beautiful - it brought tears to my eyes - Reading it you cant believe that the same things are being said - or rather done - all over again - and that as before, it is England who is the bravest... Ones private despair is so trivial now - because wherever you look there is nothing to not despair over - I keep thinking of what Jack used to say - 'that every man can make a difference & that every man should try."

In the final letter written from Aristotle Onassis's yacht Christina, Jackie tries to explain why she had married the billionaire Greek shipping magnate, "You and I have shared so many lives and deaths and hopes and pain - we will share them forever and be forever bound together by them... If ever I can find some healing and some comfort - it has to be with someone who is not a part of all my world of past and pain - I can find that now - if the world will let us."

Jasset, Lord Harlech, the grandson of David Ormsby Gore, said "Though he sadly passed away before I was born, I knew even from an early age that my grandfather had been British Ambassador to the United States. There is much history that binds the Kennedys and the Ormsby Gores together. The more I read or was told about David by other relatives, the more I wanted to know. He seems to have been a most insightful and intelligent man. He had a career spanning military service, politics and diplomacy; he set up his own television station and was chairman of the British Board of Film Classification; all impressive in their own right, but I am told his greatest attributes were his thoughtfulness, charm, and sense of morality."

Political letters revealed for first time in the Ormsby Gore despatch box

The strong personal and family links between John Kennedy and David Ormsby Gore influenced the decision of British Prime Minister Harold Macmillan to appoint the latter, a non-career diplomat, as Ambassador to Washington in 1960. (Ormsby Gore assumed the title of Lord Harlech in 1964 on the death of his father, a year before he ceased to be ambassador). Robert Kennedy described Ormsby Gore as being "almost a part of the government", recalling that his brother the President "would rather have his judgment than that of almost anybody else... He'd rather have... his ideas, his suggestions and recommendations than even anybody in our own government." This became especially important during the Cuban Missile Crisis in 1962.

A handwritten letter from Kennedy to Ormsby Gore in the cache attests to this closeness. "...I appreciate as you know, in all these critical matters your judgment - which I have found to be uniformly good and true. The P.M was excellent this week - I do not like these stories which have as their object a disparagement of the real value of our alliance. I am sure Your government knows better"

Harold Macmillan had equal faith in Ormsby Gore's abilities, writing to him after his first year as Ambassador, ""I think your position is really something unique in the annals of the British Embassy in Washington and we are all really grateful for what you are doing".

Other letters in the archive include:

• a note from Prince Philip's uncle Lord Mountbatten promoting a film he wanted to be shown at the White House;

• a letter from Sir Alec Douglas-Home shortly after he succeeded MacMillan as Prime Minister in September 1963, "This is an unexpected responsibility, but I shall do my best. You know what a great help you are in Washington."

• and a note from the private secretary to UK Prime Minister Harold Wilson who came to power in 1964, passing on Wilson's request to prevent his notoriously erratic Foreign Secretary, George Brown, from meeting President Lyndon B. Johnson (who succeeded John Kennedy at US President in 1963).

Harvey Cammell, Deputy Chairman of Bonhams UK said, "Of all the many discoveries we have made in this wonderful collection, the Kennedy Harlech papers are surely the most remarkable.  I am expecting unprecedented interest in this unique auction, the contents of which has kept our team enthralled since our first visit to this incredibly beautiful and historic house.  It is, without doubt, one of the most fascinating private collections to come on the market in recent times."

David Ormsby Gore, 5th Baron Harlech

David Ormsby Gore was born in 1918. Educated at Eton and New College Oxford, he was elected to Parliament in 1950. He held a number of Government Ministerial positions in the Foreign Office, but resigned in 1961 in order to take up the post of British Ambassador to the United States. He became the 5th Lord Harlech on the death of his father in 1964. After his return to the UK in 1965, he had a successful career in television, founding the independent TV company, HTV. Lord Harlech died from injuries sustained in a car accident in 1985. Senator Edward Kennedy, Jacqueline Onassis and other Kennedy family members attended his funeral.

551-Chagall copy.jpgNew York—On Thursday, March 2, Swann Galleries will hold an auction of 19th & 20th Century Prints & Drawings, offering rare portfolios by masters of the last two centuries.

The sale is led by two vibrant lithograph sets, each with additional and complementary works. The publisher’s own set of the rare deluxe edition of Marc Chagall’s Arabian Nights, 1948, boasts an additional thirteenth lithograph showing the King and Scheherazade under the guardianship of a glowing bird; it is expected to sell between $250,000 and $350,000. Also available is the complete set of Édouard Vuillard’s 1899 Paysages et Intérieurs. Already scarce, this portfolio of 13 color lithographs is enhanced by additional impressions of two of the plates, bringing the total number of works to 15. The set in its entirety is estimated at $150,000 to $200,000.

There is an excellent selection of vibrant works by nineteenth-century masters led by Pierre Bonnard’s rare color lithograph, La Petite Blanchisseuse, 1896, and Mary Cassatt’s The Coiffure, circa 1891, a color drypoint and soft-ground etching ($50,000 to $80,000 and $40,000 to $60,000, respectively). A color lithograph by Pierre-Auguste Renoir titled Enfants Jouant à la Balle, circa 1900, is valued between $40,000 and $60,000. Also available is the fourth state of Edgar Degas’s lithograph, Femme nue debout à sa toilette, 1891-92, estimated at $50,000 to $80,000. The sale opens with 50 highlights from the collection of Eric Carlson, with works by masters including Eugène Delacroix, Paul Gauguin, Paul Signac and Félix Vallotton, as well as the complete set of Mélodies de Désiré Dihau, 1895, by Henri Toulouse-Lautrec ($30,000 to $50,000).

Of particular note is Egon Schiele’s first lithograph, the nude self-portrait Männlicher Akt (Selbstbildnis I), 1912, which is expected to fetch $20,000 to $30,000. Early twentieth century highlights continue with a charming pen and ink drawing by Paul Klee of bulls, titled Drama in der Kuhwelt, 1915, estimated at $25,000 to $35,000, and the rare woodcut Hafen Teufelsbrücke, 1911, by Kurt Schmidt-Rottluff, which has appeared at auction only three times in the last 30 years ($40,000 to $60,000).

A premiere selection of works by Pablo Picasso will be crossing the block: examples include the 1934 etching Femme torero, I, and the 1948 lithograph Femme au fauteuil, No. 1 ($50,000 to $80,000 and $40,000 to $60,000, respectively). These are joined by an original watercolor by Salvador Dalí titled Orologi Molli, 1960, previously in the Albaretto Collection in Turin and estimated at $70,000 to $100,000. Further highlights include the color aquatint La Permissionaire, 1974, by Joan Miró ($40,000 to $60,000), and one of 30 artist’s proofs of the deluxe portfolio with text of Le Corbusier’s Unité, 1953; there has been just one other complete set of 37 lithographs at auction in the last 30 years ($35,000 to $50,000). Also available are prints by Georges Braque, Giorgio de Chirico, René Magritte and Giorgio Morandi, bronze sculptures by Jean Arp, Brassaï, Dalí and Man Ray, and a wool tapestry designed by Henri Matisse titled Mimosa, 1951 ($7,000 to $10,000).

From the Americas comes a selection of early prints and artists’ proofs by James A.M. Whistler, led by the etching and drypoint Speke Hall: The Avenue, 1870-78, estimated at $50,000 to $80,000, as well as Evening Wind, 1921, an etching by Edward Hopper ($50,000 to $80,000). Martin Lewis’s 1932 aquatint Which Way? has appeared at auction only four times in the last 30 years; here it carries an estimate of $30,000 to $50,000.

The auction will be held Thursday, March 2, beginning at 10:30 a.m. and continuing at 1:30 p.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Saturday, February 25 from noon to 5 p.m.; Monday, February 27 through Wednesday, March 1, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.

An illustrated auction catalogue is available for $40 from Swann Galleries, Inc., 104 East 25th Street, New York, NY 10010, or online at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information and to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Todd Weyman at 212-254-4710, extension 32, or via e-mail at tweyman@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 551 Marc Chagall, Four Tales from the Arabian Nights, portfolio with complete text and 13 color lithographs, 1948. Estimate $250,000 to $350,000.

Kornblum1 copy.jpgMinnesota Center for Book Arts will formally rename its typesetting library in memory of Allan Kornblum, MCBA's first printer-in-residence, and a trailblazer in Minnesota's literary community and the publishing industry at large. In the early 1980s, Kornblum moved his Toothpaste Press to the Twin Cities from Iowa City, rechristening it as Coffee House Press. Kornblum continued to be a close friend and collaborator with MCBA throughout the years, donating a press and wood and metal type for use in MCBA’s studios.

A leading light in the literary community, Allan built his world, and ours, around the penned and printed word. His joy of literature, his skill at the press, and his passion for writers and readers was unmatched. -- Jeff Rathermel, MCBA Executive Director

MCBA Type Library Dedication

Saturday, February 25; 3-5pm

MCBA's Lower Print Studio

Join us as we honor Allan Kornblum’s legacy with commemorative broadsides printed on Kornblum's press, along with light refreshments. Remarks at 4pm.

About the Type Library

From Garamond to Goudy Light, the Type Library at Minnesota Center for Book Arts is filled with resources for writers, poets, artists, and printers to tell stories, one letter at a time. The tens of thousands of pounds of antique type, and over 500 unique typefaces support printers and artists of all disciplines in their creative work.

About Allan Kornblum

In 1973, Kornblum founded a small mimeograph periodical in Iowa City, Iowa that evolved into Toothpaste Press, a publishing house specializing in the production of high-quality poetry and short fiction letterpress chapbooks. Kornblum’s affiliation with the vibrant Minnesota publishing scene began in the mid-1980s, when he transferred operations from Iowa to Minneapolis. In addition to the change of venue, Kornblum renamed and reincorporated the organization as a non-profit, Coffee House Press. At a time when loose editing and production standards were the norm, Kornblum made strides toward the professionalism that typifies the industry today. That included shifting from letterpress to offset printing, using computerized typesetting, and improving the marketing and distribution of new titles. Those changes allowed Coffee House to reach a wider audience, which in turn allowed showcased authors - who may not have gained traction in the larger New York world of publishing - the opportunity to find the readers they deserved.

About Minnesota Center for Book Arts

A respected and dedicated champion of the field, Minnesota Center for Book Arts is the largest and most comprehensive center of its kind. We celebrate the book as a vibrant contemporary art form that takes many shapes. Our mission is clear: to lead the advancement of the book as an evolving art form.

MCBA is committed to book art, artists and appreciators. Our mission is achieved through quality programs that support a broad continuum of creators, learners and admirers. We lead the field by promoting innovation, sustaining traditions, educating new enthusiasts, inspiring creative expression and honoring artistic excellence. From the traditional crafts of papermaking, letterpress printing and bookbinding to new methods of art-making and communication, MCBA supports the limitless creative development of book arts.

Minnesota Center for Book Arts at Open Book, 1011 Washington Ave S, First Floor, Minneapolis MN 55415.

Phone 612.215.2520 . Fax 612.215.2545 . mcba@mnbookarts.org

Oxford, 9 February 2017—A striking new book featuring historic views of London unearthed from the Bodleian Library’s collections presents a captivating panorama of the City during the eighteenth century.

This stunning large-format book reproduces over one hundred images from the Gough collection in the Bodleian Libraries, many of which are published here for the first time. By 1800 London was the second largest city in the world, its relentless growth fuelled by Britain’s expanding empire. However, compared to today, the built-up area was still comparatively small. Depicting the present Greater London area, this title offers images of town and countryside from more than two centuries ago which contrast graphically with what we see as the metropolis today.

The Gough collection of British topography is one of the most important collections of British topography. With houses in Enfield and the City, gentleman and antiquary Richard Gough (1735-1809) commissioned works and assembled a comprehensive collection of maps, drawings and engravings that provide unrivalled insight into his era. The London illustrations capture the range of activity in the sprawling city, and are accompanied by eye- witness accounts which range from descriptions of local crime and street scenes to the results of extreme weather and significant events.

Prints made of London before and after the Great Fire show how artists and engravers responded to contemporary events such as executions, riots, fires and the effects of a tornado. They also recorded public spectacles, creating beautiful images of firework displays and frost fairs on the river Thames. Panoramas of the river Thames were popular illustrations of the day, and the extraordinarily detailed engravings made by the Buck brothers are reproduced here. The construction and destruction of landmark bridges across the river are also shown in contemporary engravings.

Before the age of photography, the most widely used means of creating a visual record of the changing capital was through engravings and drawings, and those that survive today are invaluable in showing us what the capital was like in the century leading up to the Industrial Revolution.

With accompanying text detailing its history, this title offers a unique pictorial history of Georgian London that is visually rich, historically fascinating and of interest to Londoners and visitors alike.

  • London: Prints and Drawings before 1800 by Bernard Nurse
  • Published in association with The London Topographical Society
  • Format: 232 pp, 238 x 278 mm, 123 colour illustrations.
  • ISBN: 978 1 85124 412 6
  • Hardback, £30.00
  • Publication: 17 March 2017 

Screen Shot 2017-02-09 at 9.32.56 AM.pngA first edition of Gulliver's Travels from a world-class collection of 17th, 18th and 19th century fantasy and scientific literature is one of the leading lots at Bonhams Fine Books and Manuscripts sale in London on Wednesday 1 March. It is estimated at £20,000-30,000.

Jonathan Swift's Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World ... by Lemuel Gulliver, commonly known as Gulliver's Travels, was published on 28 October 1726, selling out within two weeks. It has been popular ever since and is the most widely read work of 18th century English literature. Adapted many times for film, television and radio - and even opera - the stories of Gulliver's travels to fantastical lands, including Lilliput and Brobdingnag, are famous throughout the world.

The collection was assembled during the 20th century by a French bibliophile. It has a strong emphasis on works which would now be classified as science fiction, although important scientific and philosophical writers such as Galileo and Descartes are also represented. Other highlights include:

• A first edition of Johannes Kepler's very rare imaginary tale of a voyage to the moon - Somnium, seu opus posthumum de astronomia lunari. Divulgatum (A Dream: or, a Posthumous Work of Lunar Astronomy) - published posthumously in 1634, and estimated at £20,000-30,000. The book features an astonishingly accurate description of how the rest of the celestial system would look as seen from the moon.

La découverte australe par un homme-volant, ou le Dédale francais by Restif de la Bretonne estimated at £4,000-6,000. This proto-science fiction Utopian novel is the account of the voyages to mythical lands by the hero, Victorin, in his flying machine made of cape-like wings of silk and a head-worn umbrella-device. It is illustrated with plates depicting the flying machine and the exotic tribes encountered by Victorin on his journey, including men-asses, men-frogs, men-snakes, men-elephants and men-lions.

De la terre à la lune, trajet direct en 97 heures, by Jules Verne estimated at £800-1,000. A second edition of Verne's classic From the Earth to the Moon of 1865 which drew on the latest scientific and technological knowledge to envisage a manned flight to the moon more than 100 years before it actually happened.

The scientific works in the sale include:

• A first edition of The Discovery of a World in the Moone. Or, a Discourse Tending to Prove 'tis Probable There May Be Another Habitable World in That Planet, by John Wilkins published in 1638. It is estimated at £2,000-3,000. Wilkins' book argued that the world was not unique and defended the emerging model of the universe developed by Galileo and Copernicus. A priest at Christ Church Cathedral Oxford at the time he wrote the work, Wilkins (1614-1672) was later a founder member of the Royal Society.

• René Descartes' Principia Philosophiae, in first edition published in 1544. Estimated at £2,500-3,500, the work developed Descartes' theory of vortices, and attempted to reconcile Copernican astronomy with Biblical teachings. The final part includes the first scientific theory of magnetism.

• A first edition of Lana Terzi's Prodromo overo saggio di alcune inventioni nuove premesso all'arte maestra... per mostrare li piu reconditi pricipii della naturale filosofia estimated at £2,500-3,500. This important work in the history of aeronautics described several technological innovations including a "flying boat" which was to be made airborne by the use of four large metallic globes from which all the air had been expelled. Other inventions included an apparatus for speaking at a long distance, telescopes, microscopes and a sewing machine.

Bonhams Head of Fine Books and Manuscripts, Matthew Haley, said, "This is a first-class collection of works by European writers and thinkers using their imagination to speculate on the existence of other worlds and to cast light on their own. Sometimes satirically, as in the case of Swift, and sometimes with scientific and philosophical purpose, as with Wilkins and Descartes, the authors in this collection are united in their need to make sense of the universe and the time in which they lived."

An important collection of books and documents about the early days of hot air ballooning, put together over many years by a French bibliophile, is to be offered at Bonhams Fine Books and Manuscripts sale in London on Wednesday 1 March.

French engineers and inventors played a crucial role in the development of the hot air balloon, led by the Montgolfier brothers - Joseph-Michel and Jacques Étienne - who invented the globe aérostatique in which Etienne made the first piloted ascent in history in October 1783.

The Montgolfiers' success unleashed a torrent of activity. Other inventors were quick to build on the brothers' influential work, and the sale reflects this outpouring of ideas. The most important of these include:

A handwritten copy by Marché Fils of his letter of November 1784 to the Permanent Secretary of the Académie des Sciences, with his ideas for a dirigible and on how to keep Montgolfiers' balloons traveling in a straight line during flight. It is estimated at £1,000-2,000.

An account by one of the Montgolfiers' rivals, Jacques Charles, about the first manned ascent in a hydrogen-filled balloon in December 1783 which he undertook with his fellow inventor Nicholas-Louis Robert. Estimate £500-700.

A guide to making hot air balloons based on the work of the Montgolfiers and Jacques Charles and Nicholas-Louis Robert, which includes a dramatic account of the Montgolfier Brothers' ascent in Lyon in January 1874. Watched by a crowd of more than 100,000 people, the balloon reached a height of 3,000 ft before a tear developed in the fabric and it returned rapidly to earth. Estimate £500-700.

Despite the dizzying pace of change, writers soon began capturing the history of the development of the hot air balloon. Faujas de Saint-Fond wrote what is seen as the first serious work on hot air ballooning, including a detailed technical description of the Mongolfier brothers' achievements (£500-800). A later 19th century work, Histoire des ballons et des aéronautes célèbres, by Gaston Tissandier is estimated at £400-600.

Bonhams Head of Books and Manuscripts, Matthew Haley, said, "The first manned balloon ascent in 1783 - just six years before the outbreak of the French Revolution - was a hugely significant moment in the history of powered flight. Natural as it seems today, in the eighteenth century the idea of ascending in a balloon was as extraordinary a technological leap as a self-driving car is in the 21st century.

"As the books in this exceptional collection show, it was the catalyst for an explosion of invention. Balloon flights also became great public spectacles - hundreds of thousands of people turned out to marvel at this new phenomenon."

A very scarce, privately printed work by Mark Twain fetched over $4,000 at National Book Auctions's February 4, 2017 sale. Only four other copies of this volume have sold at auction over the last four decades.

The volume was number five of one hundred copies of Twain's "1601" published by the Derrydale Press in New York in 1926. Bearing the long-winded subtitle "Being a Fireside Conversation in ye Tyme of ye Goode Queene Bess in Which Divers Persons of Reknown Hold Converse on Concerns Personal and Intimate," this satirical squib purported to be an extract from the diary from one of Queen Elizabeth's ladies-in-waiting. Due to its scatological and sexual content, "1601" was considered unprintable by mainstream publishers prior to the 1960s and was circulated clandestinely in privately printed limited editions such as this.

The sale, held at the auction house's Freeville, New York saleroom and simulcast via Invaluable, also featured a sizeable private library of decorative antique leather bindings; sets of note included "Naturalis Historiae Libri XXXVII" by Pliny the Elder (1685), "The Posthumous Works of Frederic II King of Prussia" translated by Thomas Holcroft (1789), and "Novels of George Eliot" collected by William Blackwood (c. 1890). Other lots included antique billheads, magazine compilations, and books and correspondence from the estate of a colleague and purported muse and mistress of "Lolita" author Vladimir Nabokov.

National Book Auctions is a specialist auction house focusing almost exclusively on rare and collectible books and ephemera since the 1990s. Its sister company, Worth Auctions, handles a broad variety of personal property including fine and decorative art, furnishings, jewelry, coins, antique arms and armor, and more. For more information, contact mail@nationalbookauctions.com or mail@worthauctions.com.

099_LR copy.jpgFebruary 2017--CHICAGO--A rare poster depicting Harry Houdini performing his famous Water Torture Cell escape has sold for a world record price of $114,000.00 at Potter & Potter Auctions in Chicago. That price now stands as the most expensive magic poster ever sold at public auction.

The anonymous winning bidder participated by phone.

Printed in London in 1912, the poster depicts Houdini locked upside down and underwater in the Torture Cell, perhaps the most famous escape the magician ever invented and performed. The poster was produced one year after the trick’s invention.

“Advance buzz for the auction was high, and especially for the Houdini posters,” said Gabe Fajuri, President of Potter & Potter. “Chatter on social media included considerable speculation about just how high the price would go,” he added. “Several outlets wondered if we’d set a new world record. We’re glad they were right!”

Another Houdini poster, Houdini - King of Cards also set a record in the auction, bringing in $24,000.00. The poster was printed in 1898 in Chicago, several years before Houdini became a star. The previous record for the image was $20,400.00.

The posters were two of some 1000 vintage lithographs from the collection of professional magician Norm Nielsen. Offered for sale on February 4th, 2017 as part of an auction entitled The Golden Age of Magic Posters, Part II, the posters were collected of the course of 25 years. The first sale from Nielsen’s collection was conducted in June of 2016. In all, the two auctions from Nielsen’s collection totaled of over $1,400,000.00.

Headquartered on the North side of Chicago, Potter & Potter is a full-service auction firm specializing in the sale of collectibles, rare books, and magic memorabilia.

For additional information, images, and details, contact:

Potter & Potter Auctions, Inc.

3759 N. Ravenswood. Ave. Suite 121 Chicago, IL 60613 www.potterauctions.com
Phone: 773-472-1442, Email: info@potterauctions.com

 

AUSTIN, Texas — Stories of inspiration, adaptation, innovation, confrontation, collaboration and even frustration can be found within the Harry Ransom Center’s extensive cultural collections.

From Feb. 6 to July 16, the exhibition “Stories to Tell: Selections from the Harry Ransom Center” features more than 250 items from the collections. Exclusively drawn from the Center’s holdings, the exhibition provides insight into the creative process while also establishing meaningful, personal connections between the past and the present.

“The Ransom Center’s rich holdings highlight the struggles, the complexity and the rewards of creative work in literature, art, photography, film and the performing arts,” said Cathy Henderson, associate director for education and exhibitions at the Ransom Center. “Through telling these stories, this exhibition unlocks and illuminates the profoundly human reach of archives.”

Visitors will discover:

What ties Homer’s “The Odyssey” to James Joyce’s “Ulysses”?

What made Nigerian author Amos Tutuola finally start writing books in his native language?

What forced famed painter and sculptor Henri Matisse to turn to collage for his art book “Jazz”?

Why was a “sugar coffin” sent to one of Hollywood’s biggest stars of the early 20th century?

What can a dance costume from the Ballets Russes production of “Narcisse” reveal?

How did Robert De Niro prepare for his performance in “Taxi Driver”?

What made the 1968 Democratic and Republican national conventions such great subjects for photographer David Douglas Duncan?

How did staffers from The Washington Post humanize figures involved in the Watergate scandal?

What social issues concerned artist Elizabeth Olds, the first woman to receive a Guggenheim fellowship?

How did author David Foster Wallace approach drafting and editing his work?

What did Harry Houdini and Sir Arthur Conan Doyle think about the afterlife?

The exhibition makes clear the interconnections between seemingly unrelated collections and illuminates how the Ransom Center acquires, preserves and makes these resources available to all. It also documents the creative process across different mediums and divulges the steps and efforts of artistic works, reminding us how the humanities enrich us.

“Stories to Tell” will be on view in the University of Texas at Austin’s Ransom Center Galleries on Mondays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with extended Thursday hours until 7 p.m. On Saturdays and Sundays the galleries are open from noon to 5 p.m. The exhibition is free and open to the public. Daily docent-led tours are offered at noon, Thursdays at 6 p.m., and Saturdays and Sundays at 2 p.m.

NEW YORK, Feb 3, 2017 - In its 38th year, the Greenwich Village Antiquarian Book Fair is a West Village neighborhood tradition that brings together some of the world’s best known dealers, collectors, and community members to benefit PS3 The Charrette School. This year’s event will take place on Feb. 18-19 at the historic school. 

Those with a keen eye for rare and vintage books, first editions, ephemera, posters, art books, unique children’s books, manuscripts, and hard-to-find collections are sure to uncover something coveted. Collectors will be on hand to help everyone navigate the items for sale, and no previous knowledge is necessary.

“We’re thrilled to gather some of the world’s preeminent dealers under one roof for a fair that has become a touchstone of this tightknit community,” said Marvin Getman, founder of Book and Paper Fairs, who is managing this year’s event. “While the fair has its roots in this neighborhood, it’s an opportunity for anyone with an interest in starting or growing a collection, or finding a one-of-a-kind gift.”

The Greenwich Village Antiquarian Book Fair is one of many fundraisers that help to provide exceptional academic and extracurricular activities for students in grades pre-k through 5.

“We’re thrilled to have ‘Russian Avant-Garde’ by Rare-Paper, a first time dealer at the Fair, as well as a Book Making Workshop for kids Sunday 1-2pm by Esther K. Smith, author of making books with kids” said Aari Ludvigsen, a PS3 parent who is organizing this year’s fair. 

The public is welcome to visit the fair on Saturday, Feb. 18, from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m., and on Sunday, Feb. 19, from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is $10 per person on Saturday, and $5 on Sunday. Children under 16 are free. The school is located at 490 Hudson St.

ABOUT BOOK AND PAPER FAIRS

Lexington, Mass.-based Book and Paper Fairs specializes in the production  of rare book and ephemera fairs in the Northeast United States. The company organizes notable events such as the New York City Book and Ephemera Fair, the Ephemera 37 Fair in Greenwich, Conn., the Boston West Book Print and Ephemera Fair, the Granite State Book and Ephemera Fair in Concord, N.H., the Brooklyn Antiquarian Book Fair with the new Works on Paper Gallery, and the Boston Book Print and Ephemera Fair.

Dealers interested in participating in the 38th Annual Greenwich Village Antiquarian Book Fair may contact Marvin Getman at info@bookandpaperfairs.com

ABOUT PS3

The first public school known as PS3 was established in the 1820s, when the visiting Marquis de Lafayette toured this model of progressive American education. The current PS3, also known as the John Melser Charrette School, was founded in 1971 as a progressive and experimental school. The PS3 of today came into being through a community workshop process known as a charrette, at which parents and other community members, teachers, administrators, public officials, social planners, and educational consultants arrived at a vision of child-centered learning in open multi-age classrooms, with a nonhierarchical structure, active parent involvement, and an emphasis on the arts. 

For more information about PS3 The Charrette School, please visit http://www.ps3nyc.org/

For more information about the book fair, please visit The website is www.gvabf.com

London, 1 February 2017: Today, The Folio Society and House of Illustration are thrilled to announce the longlist for the annual Book Illustration Competition (#BIC2017).

Now in its seventh year, The Book Illustration Competition is a partnership between The Folio Society and House of Illustration. To date, the competition has distributed nearly £45,000 worth of prizes and has received thousands of entries.

From hundreds of excellent entries, 23 have been selected for the longlist for 2017. The winner will receive a prestigious £5,000 commission from The Folio Society to illustrate their new edition of Jane Austen’s Mansfield Park, and the five other entrants who complete the shortlist will each receive £500. As part of the Book Illustration Competition’s committment to nurturing new talent, the judging panel ensures that students form part of the shortlist.

The difficult task of selecting the longlist fell to Sheri Gee, Art Director at The Folio Society, and Colin McKenzie, Director of House of Illustration.

Sheri Gee noted the skill of this year’s entrants in fitting with Folio’s other Austen titles: ‘The entrants did a fantastic job of working with our existing series style, producing binding designs that would work seamlessly in our Jane Austen series. It’s no mean feat to adapt to a 2-colour, graphic style for a binding, particularly when the illustration style is more fluid or painterly. Well done, all.’

‘The process of judging the longlist was, as ever, a fascinating one,’ said Colin McKenzie. ‘We particularly enjoyed the wide range of different approaches taken and have a very strong longlist.’

Entries were received from 26 countries including the USA, Malaysia, Latvia and India, and 30% of them were from students. All 23 of the longlisted entries will be on display at House of Illustration, Kings Cross, London, alongside an exhibition of ten artists’ work already published by The Folio Society from 11 February to 12 March 2017.

This year also sees the introduction of a stand alone Visitors’ Choice award, voted for both at the exhibition and online (www.houseofillustration.org.uk/BIC-visitors-choice-award). The Visitors’ Choice can be selected from any of the longlisted entries.The winning artist and one member of the public who voted for them will select £100 worth of books from The Folio Society and a one-year membership to House of Illustration.

The winner and shortlist will be selected from the longlist by eminent historian and authority on all things Austen, Lucy Worsley; Sheri Gee, Art Director and Tom Walker, Editorial Director both from The Folio Society; Colin McKenzie, Director and Olivia Ahmad, Curator both from House of Illustration and Alan Marks, winner of the 2016 Book Illustration Competition. The awards will be announced and presented by Lucy Worsley at an exclusive ceremony at House of illustration on 23 February 2017.

1. Radegund_Life and Office_Poitiers_1496-1500_f.8_Feast copy.jpegThis year at TEFAF Maastricht, Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books will exhibit four exquisite examples of royal manuscripts made in the 15th and 16th centuries, including the entire Book of Joshua from the first edition of the Gutenberg Bible, the largest fragment of the ‘Book of Books’ still on the market.

The importance of the Gutenberg Bible lies in its revolutionary use of printing with moveable type. This technique was developed around 1455 by the goldsmith John Gensfleisch from Gutenberg, and his discovery changed the world in ways that even Gutenberg’s contemporaries (judging from their remarks and statements) hardly comprehended.

The other three notable manuscripts brought to TEFAF by Dr. Jörn Günther Rare Books come from the royal collections of two bibliophile French Kings: Charles VIII (1470-98) and King Louis XII (1462-1515). These books were commissioned at a time when menacing forecasts like disturbing sky phenomena, monstrously malformed animals, and other evil omens strengthened the belief that doomsday was imminent.

The first of these three, Life of St. Redgund including her Office, Mass, and Miracles and accompanied by dedicatory poems, is a manuscript in French and Latin, illuminated by the Master of St. Radegund and made for King Charles VIII and his wife Anne de Bretagne. The manuscript was made in Poitiers, France, presumably between 1496-98.

Illuminated by the Poitevin miniaturist dubbed the Master of Radegund, the manuscript is richly illustrated with eleven large miniatures in a crisp and accurate style recalling the works of the renowned illuminator Robinet Testard. The miniature illustrated above alludes especially to Radegund’s charity and humanitarianism. During a profuse banquet the king is served at the table while Radegund stands at the castle gate, feeding the poor and the lepers. Radegund was consecrated as a saint in the 9th century. This manuscript is of prime importance to the history of France.

Heraldry and emblems suggest that this manuscript was made for Charles VIII and later adjusted for Anne of Brittany. Shortly before the creation of this book, the heir to the throne, Charles Orlando, died from measles at the age of three. It is in this context that the author expresses the particularly touching wish that the queen might give birth to a “beautiful crown prince”.

The next manuscript, from the personal library of Louis XII, is a gorgeous Book of Hours with extraordinary illustrations. Created in France, c. 1500-1505. The royal coat of arms and two monograms with a double L, and the roman numbers X and II point to the royal owner. This book boasts fifteen full-page compositions, with small scenes in the borders marking the most important texts. Fifteen smaller miniatures illustrate the Gospel lectures and the suffrages of the saints. Pictured here is a painting showing the betrayal of Judas. The main scene shows the traitor, who is garbed in bright yellow as a symbol of his evil spirit, receiving the thirty pieces of silver. The outer border depicts him embracing Christ and the bas-de-page portrays the soldiers falling down scared and paralysed when Christ answers them: “I am he”.

Finally, Dr. Günther Rare Books is delighted to present Complaintes de la Foy, a manuscript written in French, on vellum, by ‘Nachier’, an otherwise unrecorded poet and

illuminated by the Master of the Entry of François I. Like the St. Radegonde manuscript, the text of this beautiful manuscript is very rare and unusual. In the text, the personification of Faith summons all “good Christians” to take part in a crusade against the Ottomans. Created in Lyon (c. 1504-1506), the manuscript’s one large introductory miniature shows Faith dressed in a black habit like a nun, kneeling and pleading before the apparition of God. In her hands, she holds a chalice with the host. A group of sophisticated and elaborately garbed noblemen observing the scene. King Louis XII is portrayed as the group’s leader, as indicated by his banner and his caparison.

Image: Jean Bouchet (?), Life of St. Radegund, illuminated by the Master of St. Radegund. France, Poitiers, presumably made in 1496-98. 260 x 180, vellum, 66 leaves (complete), 1 full-page and 10 almost full-page miniatures.

 

LCC17_870.jpgSAN MARINO, Calif.—The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens announced today that it has acquired a unique 10-volume edition of The Life and Writings of John Muir (1916-1924) that incorporates 260 original photographs—most by Herbert W. Gleason (1855-1937), a nature photographer who inspired the work of Ansel Adams. The items were purchased at The Huntington’s 20th annual Library Collectors’ Council meeting held last month.

The Council also purchased A Monograph on the Genus Camellia (1819), an outsize volume containing sumptuous hand-colored aquatint plates after watercolors by Clara Maria Pope (d. 1838), one of a small number of women in England who pursued an artistic career in the late 18th and early 19th centuries.

Additional purchases included manuscripts by a close member of Galileo’s circle and by a U.S. Revolutionary War officer, as well as a genealogical roll of arms from the Elizabethan era.

“During the past two decades, the Library Collectors’ Council has helped us acquire more than 100 significant items—including rare books, individual manuscripts, archival collections, and photographs—and spent nearly $3.9 million doing so,” said David Zeidberg, Avery Director of the Library at The Huntington. “We are enormously grateful to the Council for their generous support over the years.”

The Library Collectors’ Council is a group of 43 families who assist in the development of the collections by supporting the purchase of important works that the Library would not otherwise be able to afford.

Highlights of the newly purchased materials:

John Muir, Herbert W. Gleason, and the portrayal of American landscapes

William F. Badé (1871-1936), extra illustrated 10-volume edition of The Life and Writings of John Muir (1916-1924), incorporating 10 color frontispieces, 10 handwritten manuscripts and 260 original photographs by Herbert W. Gleason (1855-1937). New York: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1916-1924. 

The Huntington’s deluxe, one-of-a-kind edition of The Life and Writings of John Muir includes an original Muir manuscript and a color frontispiece in each of the set’s 10 volumes, as well as 260 original photographs, most of them by Gleason. It is an important addition to The Huntington’s extensive collections in early environmentalism and in early California photography, which include works by Carleton E. Watkins, Edward Weston, and Ansel Adams, and sets the stage for the role of fine art photography in service to the preservationist cause.

Throughout his life, Scottish-born naturalist and philosopher John Muir possessed an unquenchable passion for nature. By the time of his death in 1914, many Americans sympathized with his vision of the everlasting unity of all living things and endorsed the necessity of preserving wild spaces. Muir’s tireless championing of the Yosemite Valley and California’s Sierra Nevada contributed to securing them as part of the Golden State’s legacy of natural wonders.

“Muir was an assiduous student of all things living and poet laureate of California’s forests, lakes, and mountains—as well as an unswerving advocate of wilderness,” said Peter J. Blodgett, H. Russell Smith Foundation Curator of Western American History. “He exemplified a radical transformation in the perspective through which humans envisioned the natural world.”

Herbert W. Gleason (1855-1937) A Snow-Banner, ca. 1911, platinum print in William Frederic Badè’s The Writings of John Muir, The Mountains of California, pt. 1, vol. 4. New York: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1916-1924.

Following Muir’s death, his daughters asked his good friend William F. Badé, a faculty member at the University of California, to prepare an edition of their father’s principal literary works. Published by Houghton Mifflin between 1916 and 1924, the 10-volume set involved the collaboration of Gleason, another close friend of Muir’s. 

Gleason was based in Massachusetts but spent much of his adult life traveling around North America with a camera and notebook. An extended visit to California and the High Sierra in the summer of 1907 brought him into contact with Muir, and a meaningful association was born. Gleason went on to become one of the most capable and prolific nature photographers of the early 20th century.

“While this unique assemblage of The Life and Writings of John Muir was perhaps created at the behest of a subscriber, research suggests that its inspiration came from Gleason himself,” said Jennifer Watts, curator of photography and visual culture. “The photographer’s imagery influenced a range of early practitioners, including a young Ansel Adams, and its eloquence is on powerful display.”

The grandest of camellia books 

Samuel Curtis (1779-1860), A Monograph on the Genus Camellia, with illustrations by Clara Maria Pope (d. 1838). London: John and Arthur Arch, 1819. 

A Monograph on the Genus Camellia is a landmark work of horticultural literature that contains what are probably Clara Maria Pope’s best-known botanical illustrations.

Pope’s first husband, Francis Wheatley (1747-1801), was a portrait, landscape, and genre painter, and his debts prompted Pope herself to turn to art to support their family. She taught drawing and sold her own art as well, sending her first painting to the Royal Academy in 1796 and continuing to exhibit there until the year of her death. After 1812, she devoted herself almost exclusively to flower painting and botanical art, in which she excelled.

Pope’s vivid watercolors of camellias were engraved for A Monograph on the Genus Camellia, with text by Samuel Curtis (1779-1860), the son-in-law of William Curtis (1746-1799), founding editor of Botanical Magazine. The plant had been cultivated in England since before 1739, and the monograph lists the 29 camellias known there at the time of publication. Curtis discusses in full the 11 varieties of Japan Rose illustrated in Pope’s five flamboyant yet scientifically informative plates, as well as the propagation and culture of camellias. Sitwell and Blunt’s Great Flower Books, 1700-1900 calls the publication “one of the earliest and probably the best of all the great camellia books.”

“Curtis and Pope’s splendid volume exemplifies The Huntington’s trinity of books, art, and gardens,” said Claudia Funke, chief curator and associate director of library collections.

The Huntington has one of the most comprehensive collections of camellia plants in the world, including nearly 80 species and 1,200 cultivars. Extensive library holdings enhance the plant’s study, most notably more than 100 rare camellia books.

Pope’s achievements are also in context with The Huntington’s outstanding British art collection, which holds more than a dozen works by her first husband, Francis Wheatley, including a pair of group portraits on display in the dining room of the Huntington Art Gallery.

Scientific manuscript by a close member of Galileo’s circle

Philosophia Naturalis, manuscript consisting of lectures delivered by Carlo Rinaldini (1615-1698) at the University of Padua, ca. 1680. 

Philosophia Naturalis (ca. 1680) consists of the texts of lectures given by Galileo’s friend and colleague Carlo Rinaldini (1615-1698) at the University of Padua. The manuscript contains discussions of Galileo’s work as well as an account of Rinaldini’s own important discoveries, including that of the convection of heat.

“Rinaldini is an important transitional figure, presenting Aristotelian ideas alongside those of the ‘new science’ of Galileo and his supporters,” said Daniel Lewis, Dibner Senior Curator of Science, Medicine, and Technology. “He was intellectually bold—no easy task in the political climate of the era in Italy, which just a few decades earlier had seen Galileo placed under house arrest.”

The manuscript, Lewis added, provides deep and rich content for scholars studying the 17th century, astronomy, experimentation, the social and cultural ramifications of the Copernican revolution, Italian science, lecture notes, and watermarks.

The text covers scientific experiments, the nature of the heavens, and an analysis of other competing worldviews. Among the authors Rinaldini cites and discusses are Brahe, Barrow, Borelli, Boyle, Copernicus, Descartes, Gassendi, Kepler, Riccioli, and Torricelli.

16th-century Palmer family genealogical roll of arms

Palmer Family Genealogical Roll of Arms signed by Robert Cooke, Clarenceaux King of Arms, ca.1575-1584, parchment, 8.5 feet in length. 

This parchment roll—composed of four membranes pasted together to form a document 8.5 feet long—claims to display the ancestry of the Palmer family from the 11th or 12th century into the Elizabethan period.

“While English families liked to take heraldic sources as gospel, scholars are far less trusting, understanding these pedigrees were frequently inventions of the imagination,” said Vanessa Wilkie, William A. Moffett Curator of Medieval Manuscripts and British History. “Historians are taking new interest in heraldic documents, family pedigrees, and family archives to better understand the complex relationship between family honor, family image, and political authority.”

In 1555, Queen Elizabeth re-established the College of Arms by royal charter. She appointed three kings of arms and six heralds empowered to verify the ancestral claims of aristocratic families and their rights to display arms. Heraldic shields were the symbols of elite power, and in the second half of the 16th century, rising gentry families were eager to prove that they, too, had these rights.

In the 1570s, the Palmer family of Gloucestershire were the model rising gentry family. William Palmer served as the Gentleman Pensioner to King Henry VIII, and by 1575, his nephew, 25-year-old Edward Palmer, was the patriarch of the family. Edward was a wealthy landowner and is likely the person who commissioned his family’s heraldic roll in the 1570s, but it was given elevated status when the controversial Clarenceaux King of Arms Robert Cooke signed the bottom of it, thus giving Palmer the documentation he needed to solidify his family’s place in the social order.

“Perhaps not surprisingly, families were willing to forge pedigrees, and many kings of arms and heralds were all too easily bribed to lend their endorsements to fabricated rolls,” said Wilkie.

In 2005, the Library Collectors’ Council purchased another one of Robert Cooke’s heraldic manuscripts—the pedigree book of the Earls of Leicester, which celebrates an established nobleman, Robert Dudley. In contrast, the Palmer family roll demonstrates Cooke’s validation of a rising country family. When combined, these two manuscripts expand scholarly understanding of the work of one of the most notorious heralds of the 16th century.

The Huntington has one of the most important collections of English heraldic sources, both print and manuscript, outside of the United Kingdom.

18th-century American manuscript regarding the divinity of Jesus

Lewis Nicola (1717-1804), Divinity of Jesus Christ, ca. 1794-1795. 

Divinity of Jesus Christ (ca. 1794-95) is an unpublished and previously unknown manuscript by Lewis Nicola (1717-1807), the founder of the Continental Army’s Corps of Invalids. In 1781, Nicola became beset by religious doubts. At the time, he was stationed at West Point, which he described as “a small country town,” and had with him only his copy of the Bible; having read it twice, he came to doubt the divinity of Jesus Christ.

“This manuscript, an extremely rare example of a theological study penned by an American man of the Enlightenment, is a new and untapped source for the studies of the rich religious and intellectual life of the Early Republic,” said Olga Tsapina, Norris Foundation Curator of American History. “It adds a new dimension to the history of American 18th-century religiosity, which mostly relies on the writings of ministers or religious testimony generated by religious revivals. The manuscript capped an important if largely unknown debate that involved Joseph Priestly, the world-famous scientist and founder of the Unitarian Church. It is a rational examination of scripture predating another example of such an endeavor, Thomas Jefferson’s Bible.”

During the Revolutionary War, Nicola served as the commander of Philadelphia’s garrison and published military manuals “calculated for the use of Americans.” After Congress accepted his proposal to establish a corps that would employ veterans unfit for active duty, Nicola spent the next five years as the commander of the Corps of Invalids in charge of guarding hospitals and military stores and collecting intelligence.

Nicola’s claim to fame stems from his controversial letter to George Washington on May 22, 1781, suggesting that because the Continental Congress was so dysfunctional, veterans should be governed by a British-style “mixed government.” The letter, which received a sharply worded rebuke from Washington, was the first episode in the wave of discontent that culminated in the Newburgh conspiracy in March 1783. It also overshadowed the rest of Nicola’s remarkable career.

“Amazingly, there is no known body of Nicola’s papers, apart from his Revolutionary War correspondence in the George Washington papers at the Library of Congress and some military papers left with the War Department,” said Tsapina. “Divinity of Jesus Christ is the only manuscript of Nicola’s that has come to light since he died, destitute, in August 1807.”

Image: From L-R: Herbert W. Gleason (1855-1937) A Snow-Banner, ca. 1911, platinum print in William Frederic Badè’s The Writings of John Muir, The Mountains of California, pt. 1, vol. 4. New York: Houghton Mifflin Co., 1916-1924; Samuel Curtis (1779-1860), A Monograph on the Genus Camellia, with illustrations by Clara Maria Pope (d. 1838). London: John and Arthur Arch, 1819. The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens.

A charming exhibit of animals pictured in law books opens February 1, courtesy of the Yale Law Library's Rare Book Collection. Titled "Woof, Moo & Grr: A Carnival of Animals in Law Books," the exhibit is narrated from the perspective of the animals themselves and is aimed at animal lovers of all ages.

Twenty books from around the world will be on display, more than half of them printed before the nineteenth century and the earliest published in 1529. They feature illustrations of a wide variety of animals that visitors may be surprised to find in the pages of serious legal literature.

The exhibition is curated by Mark S. Weiner, a writer, filmmaker, and professor on leave from Rutgers Law School. Weiner holds a J.D. from Yale Law School and a Ph.D. in American Studies from Yale University.

"Law is a serious business," said Weiner, "which is why it's important to find a chance to laugh. The exhibit looks at the different roles that animals play in legal literature, and it quietly explores the relation between law and the imagination."

"Woof, Moo & Grr" is on display from February 1 through May 31, 2017, in the Rare Book Exhibition Gallery, Level L2, in the Lillian Goldman Law Library, Yale Law School, at 127 Wall Street in New Haven. It is open to the general public 10am-6pm, seven days a week, and open to Yale affiliates until 10pm.

The images and text from the exhibit are also available online, in the Rare Book Collection's Flickr site, at  <https://www.flickr.com/photos/yalelawlibrary/albums/72157676683194536>.

The Rare Book Collection at Yale Law Library is one of the outstanding collections of historical law books and manuscripts in North America. The growing collection stands at more than 50,000 volumes and hosts an active exhibition program.

633c1204f0a1cd6f1e0567d439689785b9633252.pngA postcard sent by Alan Turing to a psychiatrist friend in Manchester will be auctioned by Boston-based RR Auction.

Addressed to Dr. Franz Greenbaum and his children, it was sent by Turing from his Club Mediterranee holiday on Corfu, in July 23, 1953.

Reads in full: "I hope you are all enjoying your selves as well as I am here at Corfu. It is tremendously hot and one wears bathing things all day."

The front of the rare color postcard depicts an illuminated manuscript from Flavius Josephus' Antiquities of the Jews.

The first-century Romano-Jewish scholar Flavius Josephus, who commanded the Jewish forces at the Siege of Yodfat, is the namesake of the ‘Josephus Problem’ in computer science. Josephus describes a ‘counting-out game’ by which he and his soldiers, facing inevitable defeat, agreed upon an unusual suicide pact rather than surrender.

Standing in a circle, the first soldier killed the man to his left. The next surviving soldier then killed the man to his left, and this pattern continued until Josephus was the lone survivor.

The problem is thus: faced with the same situation, how could you determine where to position yourself in order to be the last man standing?

“Turing, who was fascinated by these types of algorithmic puzzles, surely knew of the ‘Josephus Problem’ and it is likely the reason he chose this specific postcard,” said Robert Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction.

Turing became a patient of the Jungian psychologist Dr. Franz Greenbaum in 1952, and became a friend of the family; in a letter from July 10th, he had written to the doctor's daughter, Maria Greenbaum, about solving a solitaire puzzle.  

In Sara Turing's pioneering 1959 biography of her son she noted that he 'normally shirked letter-writing,' and his autograph is indeed incredibly scarce in any form.

Among other items featured in the auction:

Thomas Edison signed document selling the rights to his very first successful invention—the electro-magnetic printing telegraph.

Striking 1934 Albert Einstein etching signed by subject and artist.

Robert Fulton original diagram drawing of a cross-section of a torpedo flintlock detonator in ink and watercolor. 

Albert Einstein letter where he laments his inability to help create “a special teaching post for atomic mechanics.”

The Fine Autographs And Artifacts from RR Auction began on January 20 and will conclude on February 8. More details can be found online at www.rrauction.com

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