January 2017 Archives

[ITHACA, NY] National Book Auctions, located in Ithaca, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog.  

This catalog features rare, antique and decorative books as well as select additions of ephemera. We will offer a rare copy of Mark Twain's "1601" along with a sizeable private library of decorative antique leather bindings. Special printings and important signed items will also be presented.          

Antique and rare books in this catalog include numerous titles. Leading the group is one of the elusive copies of the Derrydale Press publishing of Mark Twain's "1601, Being a Fireside Conversation in Ye Time of Ye Goode Queene Bess," produced in 1926 and limited to 100 copies. Among the other early offerings, examples include the 1676 printing of Cave's "Antiquitates Apostolicae," featuring engraved plates, Pliny the Elder's "Naturalis Historiae Libri XXXVII," published in five volumes in 1685, and the works of Jonathan Swift with supplement, printed in fourteen volumes over the years 1755 through 1779. Additional rare pieces include signed examples of Berkeley Breathed titles from the celebrated "Bloom County" series, and the 1878 printing of Hamerton's "Etching and Etchers," containing original drawings and a signature by Charles Jay Taylor.                       

Several pleasing collections will also be showcased. Highlighted is a substantial array of decorative antique bindings, including many signed bindings. Fancy leather sets such as works by Thackeray, Cooper and Dickens will be sold along with many privately-bound tomes containing classic literature and poetry, history, books-on-books, theology and other genres. Vintage and antique titles from estate collections also include works from subject areas such as travel & exploration, history of the American West, philosophy, music & art, history of New York City and State, medicine, the Far East, and natural history, to name a few.   

Found throughout this catalog are interesting group offerings and ephemera lots. Ephemera offered includes antique billheads and correspondence, antique magazines (individual issues and bound compilations), along with a private collection of books and items reportedly belonging to a former mistress of Vladimir Nabokov.    

National Book Auctions is a public auction service specializing in books, ephemera, and art. National Book Auctions is a targeted service offering experience and expertise unique to marketing antique and modern books and ephemera for consignors and collectors alike. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of collectible, signed, and first edition books. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-269-0101 or email mail@nationalbookauctions.com.

Lot-16 copy.jpgNew York—On Thursday, January 26, Swann Galleries opened their 2017 season with a landmark sale of Alphonse Mucha & Masters of Art Nouveau: The Harry C. Meyerhoff Collection, the largest private collection of works by the artist and his circle ever to come to auction. Of the over 200 posters, sketches and ephemera, more than half of which were by Mucha; many of the pieces were unique, previously unrecorded, or had never before appeared at auction.

Swann President and Principal Auctioneer Nicholas D. Lowry, who is also the director of the Vintage Posters department, sold works to a packed room, with all bidding phones occupied. All but one of 136 offered works by Mucha found new homes, leading to a 93% sell-through rate for the entire sale. Mr. Lowry noted, “By all metrics the auction was a huge success. It was the highest sell-through rate of any major posters sale anywhere in the world since 1999.”

The top lot of the sale was the complete set of five volumes of Les Maîtres de l’Affiche, which was published periodically in Paris from 1896 to 1900. The art critic Roger Marx compiled what he believed to be the best Art Nouveau posters of the time from Europe and the U.S., with full-color lithographs of works Jules Chéret, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, Théophile Alexandre Steinlen, Mucha and others. This set, in its original binding designed by Paul Berthon, was purchased by an institution for $47,500*.

The highest-value lot by Mucha was a rare set of silk panels depicting allegories of The Seasons, 1900. The designs mark a shift in the artist’s style away from pastels and towards realism. The set garnered $35,000. Other examples of Mucha’s work printed on fabric were two red panels, one on satin and one on velveteen. The satin example more than doubled its high estimate to sell for $7,500.

Many posters made their auction debut, including the ethereal Parfumerie Gellé Frères / Sylvanis Essence, 1899, in its scarce pre-text format ($27,500), and Krinogen, an unusual circular advertisement, circa 1928, which was purchased by a collector for $2,500.

One outstanding section of the sale was a run of original sketches for Documents Décoratifs and Figures Décoratifs, two books of guides by Mucha for people to decorate their homes in an Art Nouveau style. Each of the eight sketches by Mucha sold for several times their high estimates, with the highlight being a single circa 1902 pencil sketch that sold for $15,000, above a high estimate of $2,000.

All seven of the offered posters Mucha designed for the actress Sarah Bernhardt performed well, led by the dramatic life-size depiction of Medee / Sarah Bernhardt, 1898, which sold to a collector for $23,750. Bernhardt helped to launch the artist’s career when she commissioned him to create a poster for her 1894 production of Gismonda, which was so successful she reused the design in her 1896 Sarah Bernhardt / American Tour ($6,000). Another Bernhardt highlight was the 1908 Leslie Carter, which fetched $18,750, a record for the work, above a high estimate of $7,500.

Several works in the sale broke previous auction records, including a La Vague, 1897, by Privat-Livemont. The previous record for the well-known work, which was heavily inspired by Japanese Ukiyo-e prints, was $5,760, set in 2012; the new record is $9,375.

“With 93% of lots sold, this proved to be our most successful poster sale by lot and our third best by value,” said Mr. Lowry later that day. “We had the highest attendance we’ve ever had at a preview, a standing-room only special event, a full auction room and active bidding on almost all of the lots. As an auctioneer I can only say that every aspect of the auction was a pleasure, and that our diligent work was validated by such strong numbers is an extra pleasure.” He added, “It was a real event, in the old-fashioned sense of an auction being an event.”

Harry C. Meyerhoff was the owner of champion racehorse “Spectacular Bid” and a vintage poster collector based in Easton, Maryland. He began collecting fin de siècle posters in the 1970s with his wife and soon turned his focus to Alphonse Mucha. His main advisor for the collection was William J. Tomlinson, the highly regarded Baltimore art dealer and appraiser. Harry C. Meyerhoff died on February 11, 2016 at the age of 86.

The next auction of Vintage Posters at Swann Galleries will be held on March 16, 2017. For more information, or to consign materials to future sales, contact Nicholas D. Lowry at posters@swanngalleries.com or via phone (212) 254-4710, ext. 57.

Image: Lot 16 Les Maîtres de l'Affiche, complete set of five volumes, in Paul Berthon binding, Paris, 1896-1900. Sold January 26, 2017 for $47,500. (Pre-sale estimate: $35,000 to $50,000)

55a Foringer Abundan#8724A3 copy.jpgThe paper money we handle every day depicts familiar portraits of presidents and statesmen, but how many people know that a woman's portrait was once a standard likeness on federal currency?  Or that a notorious showgirl's portrait was engraved for bond coupons?  Or that a portrait of one of Queen Victoria's daughters was turned into "Young America" for use on stock certificates?  The exhibition Images of Value: The Artwork Behind U.S. Security Engraving 1830s-1980s, on public view at the Grolier Club from February 22 to April 29, 2017, presents a rare look behind the images that appeared on bank notes and securities produced in the United States for over 150 years. 

For the first time visitors can see a remarkable range of original wash drawings and paintings, period photographs and prints used to engrave the images on documents of value for the United States and countries ranging from Argentina to China to Spain, along with the documents on which the resulting engravings appeared.  The exhibition is primarily from the holdings of Mark D. Tomasko, a private collector, scholar, and researcher who documents the engravers, artists, designers, and bank note firms.  

Much news has been made in recent months about portraits of women coming to U.S. federal paper money, but in reality it’s a case of women coming back to federal paper money. Martha Washington’s portrait was a constant presence on US Silver Certificates from 1886 to the turn-of-the-century, and possible sources for the image used are on display along with the Silver Certificates on which she appeared.

Before the Civil War banks were chartered by the states, and most local banks issued their own bank notes. This created a large demand for quality paper money and gave rise to a thriving group of bank note engraving firms, effectively making the U.S. the world leader in security engraving by the late 1850s.  

Exquisite miniature drawings by Asher B. Durand, George W. Hatch, Henry Inman, and Thomas Birch illustrate the era when artwork needed to be drawn in a very small size to be engraved.  Photography later liberated the artwork from the miniature size (the art could be photo-reduced to the size to be engraved).  The result was the golden age of wash drawings, 1850s-1870s, with marvelous allegorical and genre drawings by American artists including the outstanding F. O. C. Darley, whose drawings of the American scene set a high standard.  Featured in the exhibition are Darley's drawings of Union Civil War soldiers, and some of his genre subjects.  Other noted artists shown for this era include James D. Smillie and Walter Shirlaw. 

American and European prints of the mid- and late-nineteenth century include several remarkable mid-century French chromolithographs of female heads, an art engraving of one of Queen Victoria’s daughters (turned into a security engraving entitled “Young America”!), a large theater poster, and a large print of Rosa Bonheur’s Horse Fair (one of the largest paintings in the Metropolitan Museum of Art, at 8’ x 16’).  Horse Fair became an engraving 1 ½” x 3 ½” and was used on documents as diverse as an 1870s Bolivian bank note and an 1880s New York City street railway bond.

By the twentieth century photographs became more commonly used as the artwork source for bank note picture engravings.  On view are photographs of Chinese subjects turned into engravings on bank notes for China but produced by American bank note firms.  Other period photos used for engravings include a large panorama of Lower Manhattan in 1904 and a portrait of Evelyn Nesbit, the “girl in the red velvet swing” who became a decorative engraving for coupon bonds.

Alonzo E. Foringer, a muralist who had worked for Edwin Blashfield, is a star of the show, with his large oil paintings of allegorical females produced from the 1910s to the 1940s.  The finest picture engravers created the best allegorical engravings of the twentieth century from Foringer’s work, a marriage of engraving and art that has never been equaled.  Known today primarily for a World War I Red Cross poster, Foringer’s real achievement is his bank note art, which graced the stocks and bonds of hundreds of U.S. companies and at least 50 bank notes of foreign banks and governments. 

Robert Lavin followed Foringer and became the second greatest security engraving artist of the twentieth century, working in the 1960s-1980s.  His allegorical paintings, and paintings of working people (perhaps best described as “Capitalist Realism”), became the leading picture engravings for stocks and bonds in the later twentieth century.  Some examples of other artists’ work of the 1950s and 1960s are also shown in the exhibition.

CATALOGUE:

The exhibition Images of Value: the Artwork Behind U.S. Security Engraving 1830s-1980s, sponsored by the Grolier Club’s Committee on Prints, Drawings, and Photographs, is accompanied by a full-color catalogue with a preface by William H. Gerdts. 

PUBLIC EVENTS:

Free Lunchtime Exhibition Tours led by curator Mark Tomasko: February 22, March 1, 8, 15, 22, and 29, 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm. 

Illustrated Talk by the curator followed by a Panel Discussion on the Artwork Behind U.S. Security Engraving: Tuesday, March 7, 2017, 3:00 pm - 5:00 pm. 

ABOUT THE GROLIER CLUB: 

Founded in 1884, the Grolier Club of New York is America’s oldest and largest society for bibliophiles and enthusiasts in the graphic arts.  Named for Jean Grolier, the Renaissance collector renowned for sharing his library with friends, the Grolier Club’s objective is to foster the study, collecting, and appreciation of books and works on paper.

VISITING THE GROLIER CLUB: 

47 E. 60th Street, New York, NY  10022

212-838-6690

Hours: Monday-Saturday, 10 AM to 5 PM

Admission: Open to the public free of charge

www.grolierclub.org 

Image: Alonzo E. Foringer. [Standing female with wheat and scythe]. Oil on canvas, 30 x 30.” For American Bank Note Company, 1927. Collection of Mark D. Tomasko.

f98fcc62-8473-4ad2-9939-84c2007dfd15.jpgTaking as its focus one of The Met's most captivating masterpieces, this thematic exhibition affords a unique context for appreciating the heritage and allure of Circus Sideshow (Parade de cirque), painted in 1887-88, by Georges Seurat (1859-91). Anchored by a remarkable group of related works by Seurat that fully illuminates the lineage of the motif in his inimitable conté crayon drawings, the presentation explores the fascination the sideshow subject held for other artists in the 19th century, ranging from the great caricaturist Honoré Daumier at mid-century to the young Pablo Picasso at the fin de siècle. This rich visual narrative unfolds in a provocative display of more than 100 paintings, drawings, prints, period posters, and illustrated journals, supplemented by musical instruments and an array of documentary material intended to give a vivid sense of the seasonal fairs and traveling circuses of the day. Among the highlights is Fernand Pelez's epic Grimaces and Misery—The Saltimbanques (Petit Palais, Paris), of exactly the same date as Seurat's magisterial work and, with its life-size performers aligned in friezelike formation across a 20-foot stage, a match for his ambition. Seurat's Circus Sideshow will be on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, from February 17 to May 29, 2017.

The exhibition is made possible by the Janice H. Levin Fund, the Gail and Parker Gilbert Fund, and an Anonymous Foundation.

Circus Sideshow is one of only a half-dozen major figure compositions that date to Seurat's short career. More compact in scale and more evocative in expression than his other scenes of modern life—which he regarded as "toiles de lutte" (canvases of combat)—the painting effectively announced the Neo-Impressionist's next line of attack on old guard turf, signaling a shift in focus away from the sunlit banks of the Seine to the heart of urban Paris. Circus Sideshow initiated a final trio of works devoted to popular entertainment and led the fray as the first to tackle a nighttime setting with the benefit of his innovative technique, alternatively called pointillism or divisionism (the former term emphasizing the dotted brushwork, the latter, the theory behind separating, or dividing, color into discrete touches that would retain their integrity and brilliance). It was his singular experiment in painting outdoor, artificial illumination. The result is disarming. In relying on his finely tuned approach to evoke the effects of ethereal, penumbral light in this evening fairground scene of the Corvi Circus troupe and their public at the Gingerbread Fair in Paris, Seurat produced his most mysterious painting. From the time it debuted at the Salon des Indépendants in Paris in 1888, it has unfailingly intrigued, perplexed, and mesmerized its viewers. Seurat's closest associates, seemingly dumbstruck, largely confined their spare remarks to its novelty as a "nocturnal effect." The laconic artist never mentioned the picture.

Circus Sideshow depicts the free, teaser entertainment set up outside the circus tent to entice passersby to purchase tickets—known in French as a parade and loosely translated as the "come-on" or sideshow. At far right, customers queue up on the stairs to the box office. On the makeshift stage, under the misty glow of nine twinkling gaslights, five musicians, a ringmaster, and clown play to the assembled crowd of onlookers whose assorted hats add a wry and rhythmic note to the foreground of this austere and rigorously geometric composition. As viewers, we observe the show—as if from the rear of the audience, a part of the crowd. 

Seurat took a raucous spectacle that depended on direct appeal, the banter of barkers and rousing music, jostling crowds, and makeshift structures, and he silenced the noise, rendered the staging taut and ordered, hieratic and symmetrical, exquisitely measured and classically calm. Enveloped by the hazy gloom of night, the players and public are presented with the solemnity of an ancient ritual.

For all its uncommon beauty and striking invention, Circus Sideshow courts conventions and associations that were commonplace in representations of the parade. Throughout the 19th century it had been a stock motif in popular print culture, notably for social and political caricature, where it became an acute device for parodying politicians, who like saltimbanques, are trying to sell something. During the 1880s, the parade subject gained ground: it was given a contemporary edge by popular illustrators; it was painted with riveting descriptive detail by artists who sought success at the annual Paris Salon with works that had broad appeal; and it was mined, with spirited stylistic rivalry, by artists who jockeyed for position in the avant-garde. In the 1890s, the great era of the poster, the subject attracted a new wave of creative talents eager to establish their reputations through success in the commercial world. The poster was modern printing technology's extension of the time-honored parade; both functioned to pull the public into the show. The presentation brings this rich illustrated history to bear on Seurat's Circus Sideshow in a context designed to elucidate the genesis of his composition and to puzzle out the sources and parallels for his haunting and enigmatic work.

The exhibition is organized chronologically, with Circus Sideshow at center stage. It will be displayed in tandem with 17 works by Seurat that exceptionally reunite the painting with the conté crayon drawings most closely related to his conception, including preparatory studies, independent sheets that trace his exploration of the motif, and the glorious café-concert drawings that were shown alongside the picture at the Salon des Indépendants in 1888. The same venue featured Seurat's Models (Poseuses), now in The Barnes Foundation (and precluded from travel), which will be represented in the exhibition by the gemlike small version (private collection). This core group of works is seen with relation to contemporaneous images of the Corvi Circus and the Gingerbread Fair, offering a keen sense of time and place.

As the exhibition will highlight, through loans from nearly 50 public and private collections, Seurat's choice of subject attracted a steady stream of artists in the 19th century—from caricaturists, popular illustrators, and poster designers to painters of like ambition—determined to make their mark on the Paris art scene. Daumier, who set a powerful precedent at mid-century, is handsomely represented by satirical lithographs, as well as pithy paintings and watercolors that chart the saga of itinerant circus performers dependent on the fickle whims of the public. His pace-setting imagery and initiatives find a recurrent echo throughout the exhibition, which is punctuated by a veritable encore performance in the cast of players showcased in graphic works by Henri-Gabriel Ibels dating to the early 1890s. 

The appeal the parade motif held for Seurat's Parisian contemporaries will be seen to great effect.In addition to works by other vanguard artists, such as Louis Anquetin, Emile Bernard, Pierre Bonnard, Jules Chéret, Louis Hayet, Lucien Pissarro, and Paul Signac, or those on the cusp, such as Jean-Louis Forain and Jean-François Raffaëlli, the presentation features recently rediscovered pictures shown in the Paris Salons of 1884 and 1885, long lost from sight by artists little-known today, as well as the unprecedented showing in the United States of Fernand Pelez's monumental Grimaces and Misery—The Saltimbanques (Petit Palais, Paris), which was on view at the Salon of 1888, the same spring as Seurat's brooding masterpiece debuted at the Salon des Indépendants.

As a reminder that the "show goes on," the exhibition ends with early works by two artists who continued to explore the parade and its timeless portrayal of the pathos of comic spectacle well into the 20th century: Picasso's moody nighttime scene, Fairground Stall (Museu Picasso, Barcelona), painted on his first visit to Paris in 1900, and Georges Rouault's bravura Sideshow (Parade) of ca. 1907-10 (Centre Pompidou, Musée National d'Art Moderne, Paris).

Seurat's Circus Sideshow may be seen as the natural successor to exhibitions that have had as their focus other great paintings by the Neo-Impressionist artist: Seurat and The Bathers in 1997 at the National Gallery, London, and Seurat and the Making of La Grande Jatte at The Art Institute of Chicago in 2004. The scale and scope of The Met's presentation have been tailored to vivify a painting that is smaller in size and highly evocative in subject. The current one-venue show may also be appreciated with relation to other recent projects, such as Cézanne's Card Players (2011), Madame Cézanne (2014-15), and Van Gogh: Irises and Roses (2015) that have likewise furnished a fresh context for appreciating the heritage of best-known and loved 19th-century paintings in The Met's collection. 

Image: Georges Seurat (French, 1859-1891). Circus Sideshow (Parade de cirque), 1887-88. Oil on canvas. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Bequest of Stephen C. Clark, 1960.

1 ambrotype copy.jpgCONCORD, MA--(January 2017) -The Concord Museum today announced a year-long celebration of the Bicentennial of Henry David Thoreau’s birth. One of the world’s most original writers and thinkers (1817-1862), Thoreau is best remembered for living in a 10 x 15 foot house near Walden Pond, where he wrote Walden. In addition to being a great American author, Thoreau is renowned as a Transcendentalist, an abolitionist, a naturalist, a pioneer of ecological awareness and climate change, and an innovator of civil disobedience.

While the Bicentennial of Thoreau’s birth will be recognized world-wide and in his hometown of Concord, it is of special significance to the Concord Museum, which holds the world’s largest and most comprehensive collection of artifacts related to Henry Thoreau, including the simple green desk on which he wrote Walden.

David F. Wood, Concord Museum’s Curator and author of An Observant Eye: The Thoreau Collection at the Concord Museum, stated, “Thoreau’s Bicentennial is something of a family affair for the Concord Museum. Henry David Thoreau knew the Museum’s founder, and called the collection he had formed ‘our museum’. Thoreau should perhaps be considered the most sophisticated material cultural historian at work in the mid-nineteenth century.”

Margaret Burke, Executive Director of the Concord Museum, explained, “Two centuries after his birth, we believe that much can be learned from Thoreau and his perception of the world. Thoreau’s insistence on thinking, observing, and living deliberately continues to suggest frameworks for both understanding the past and navigating the present.”

To celebrate the Thoreau Bicentennial year, the Concord Museum has created a year-long initiative titled “BE THOREAU”, which includes a series of special exhibitions and public programming such as workshops, gallery talks, and children’s activities. Margaret Burke explained, “The series encourages us to explore Thoreau’s writings from historical and contemporary perspectives and we sincerely hope will inspire new generations.”

Beginning on February 10, 2017, the Concord Museum will launch the Thoreau Bicentennial celebration with a deeply personal exhibition by photographer Abelardo Morell. Walden: Four Views | Abelardo Morell will be on exhibit in the Concord Museum’s Wallace Kane Gallery through August 20, 2017. The exhibition will also be accompanied by a broad range of special programs. 

In collaboration with The Morgan Library & Museum, New York, and the Concord Museum, on September 29, 2017, This Ever New Self: Thoreau and His Journal, the most comprehensive exhibition ever devoted to the life of one of America’s most influential writers and thinkers, will open at the Concord Museum.

The newly-created exhibition, This Ever New Self: Thoreau and His Journal brings the remarkable holdings from the world’s two most significant Thoreau collections: journals, manuscripts, letters, and books, and field notes from The Morgan Library & Museum; and from the Concord Museum, unique personal items that have never before left Thoreau’s hometown, including the very desk on which he wrote his journal.

Every private journal tells the story of self. For his entire adult life, Thoreau filled notebook after notebook with his observations and reflections, strong in the belief that a closely examined life would yield infinite riches. His journal was his everyday companion, an essential tool for a mindful existence, and grist for Walden, one of the world’s most influential books. The exhibition takes Thoreau’s manuscript journal as a point of departure to introduce the many facets of this extraordinary man - the student, reader, writer, worker, thinker, Concord neighbor, and, above all, keen observer of the inner and outer world. It reveals how Thoreau used his journal as a place to cultivate - and constantly renew - his very own self. 

The Morgan Library & Museum, June 2- September 10, 2017

Concord Museum, September 29, 2017 - January 21, 2018           

About the Concord Museum: The Concord Museum is where all of Concord’s remarkable past is brought to life through an inspiring collection of historical, literary, and decorative arts treasures. Renowned for the 1775 Revere lantern and Henry Thoreau’s Walden desk, the Concord Museum is home to a nationally significant collection of American decorative arts, including clocks, furniture, and silver. Founded in 1886, the Museum is a gateway to historic Concord for visitors from around the world and a vital cultural resource for the town and region. www.concordmuseum.org

Image: 

Henry D. Thoreau, 1862

Edward Sidney (E.S.) Dunshee (1823-1907), New Bedford, Massachusetts

Ambrotype, leather, glass, velvet

3¾ x 3¼ x ¾, closed case; 2¾ x 2¼, oval image

Gift of Mr. Walton Ricketson and Miss Anna Ricketson (1929) Th33b

Objects from the Concord Museum Thoreau Collection

Photographs by David Bohl, courtesy Concord Museum

Kansas City, MO. Jan 26, 2017-Contemporary English photographer Richard Learoyd, using a large camera obscura in his East London studio, creates figure studies, portraits and still lifes that are neither glamorous nor retouched, yet they exude serene power along with mesmerizing detail. Richard Learoyd: In the Studio, an exhibition organized by the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles and curated by Arpad Kovacs, Assistant Curator in the Department of Photographs at the Getty, opens at The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City Feb. 10. Learoyd will be in Kansas City and in conversation with Photography Curator April M. Watson in Atkins Auditorium on Friday, Feb. 17 at 6 p.m., sponsored by The Photography Society. Tickets are free and can be reserved at www.nelson-atkins.org.

The exhibition includes 18 large-scale color photographs and two artist’s books.

“Richard Learoyd is internationally recognized as one of the most compelling contemporary photographers of our time,” said Julián Zugazagoitia, Menefee D. and Mary Louise Blackwell CEO & Director of the Nelson-Atkins. “His images convey both a psychological depth and a physical weight. We find in them the timeless qualities that make us human: strength, vulnerability, boredom, determination, confidence and shame.”

Learoyd’s process is as singular as the artist himself. Using a room-sized camera obscura, which is a dark chamber fitted with a lens, he creates an upside-down image and exposes it on a large sheet of light-sensitive paper. He then feeds the paper into a color-processing machine attached to the camera. Since the resulting print is not enlarged from a negative, each photograph is unique and exceptionally sharp. He admits his process is restrictive and labor-intensive.

“Learoyd creates visually seductive images that invite viewers to slow down and engage with the art,” said Watson. “His works inspire thoughtful consideration of the many beautiful complexities that make us human.”

Richards’s still lifes are unconventional. In one piece, two cuttlefish have been trussed in thread as ink dribbles down the silvery flesh, hanging in midair. Recalling the still life paintings of Francis Bacon, the photograph becomes an abstract study in the tension between organic and geometric forms. Another photograph, both beautiful and disturbing, features the lifeless, contorted body of a flamingo perched on a piece of glass against a plain studio backdrop.

Richard Learoyd: In the Studio runs through June 11.

This exhibition has been organized by the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles and curated by Arpad Kovacs, Assistant Curator in the Department of Photographs at the Getty. In Kansas City, the show is supported by the Hall Family Foundation.

The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art

The Nelson-Atkins in Kansas City is recognized nationally and internationally as one of America’s finest art museums. The Nelson-Atkins serves the community by providing access and insight into its renowned collection of nearly 40,000 art objects and is best known for its Asian art, European and American paintings, photography, modern sculpture, and new American Indian and Egyptian galleries. Housing a major art research library and the Ford Learning Center, the Museum is a key educational resource for the region. The institution-wide transformation of the Nelson-Atkins has included the 165,000-square-foot Bloch Building expansion and renovation of the original 1933 Nelson-Atkins Building.

The Nelson-Atkins is located at 45th and Oak Streets, Kansas City, MO. Hours are Wednesday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Thursday/Friday, 10 a.m.-9 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sunday, 10 a.m.-5 p.m. Admission to the museum is free to everyone. For museum information, phone 816.751.1ART (1278) or visit nelson-atkins.org.

Appointment in Smara.jpgNEW YORK, NY - MARCH 11, 2017: Who Knows The Best Book Fairs In New York City? The Shadow Show Knows! Flamingo Eventz and Lamont Cranston step out of the shadows to celebrate Rare Book Week in New York City by announcing the return of The Manhattan Vintage Book & Ephemera Fair and The Fine Press Book Fair! Known as The Shadow Show because it is held in conjunction with the well-known New York Antiquarian Book Fair at the Park Avenue Armory, this year it will be held on Saturday March 11, 2017.

A couple years ago we moved the show uptown, directly across the street from the Park Avenue Armory to The Church of St. Vincent Ferrer, 869 Lexington Avenue at 66th Street, and everyone agreed; this was the smart move! We are pleased to be returning to St. Vincent’s again this year with another exciting field of exceptional Exhibitors.

This show has grown steadily since its inception in 2009 to present some of the finest Vintage & Antiquarian Book and Ephemera Dealers in America, Canada and Europe - many of whom are members of ABAA, ILAB, ESA, PADA, MARIAB, MABA, LIABDA and other professional groups - all gathered together for one fabulous weekend to offer an incredible Vintage Book & Ephemera adventure! The inclusion of The Fine Press Book Fair in 2014 added an exciting new dimension to the show and brought it to a new level of prominence. Now, with this move to the doorstep of the Armory and the New York Antiquarian Book Fair, we bring an unprecedented opportunity and ease of enjoyment to the Vintage Book World.

As always, the fair will present an outstanding array of fine, rare & unusual old books, as well as poetry, prose, political, social, historical, children's series, maps, postcards, autographs, prints, posters, World’s Fair, and much, much more. A special feature found only at Flamingo Shows will be Antiques Appraisals by John Bruno and guest Appraisers 1-3pm at $5/item!

Exhibitor Specialties include: African American, Americana, Architecture, Art, Art Deco, Auctions, Autographs, Aviation, Baseball, Books, Bibles, Black History, Black Power, Calendars, Calling Cards, Christmas, Circus, Civil War, Cook Books, Charts, Children’s Books, Cocktails, Design, Dogs, Die Cuts, Documents, Engineering, Engraving, Ephemera, Erotica, Esoterica, Fantasy, Fashion, Fishing, Floridiana, Folklore, Folk Music, Foreign Language, Furniture, Games, Gardens & Horticulture, Graphics, Historic Documents, Horses, Hunting, Illustrated Books, Interior Design, Japan, Judaica, Letters, Logbooks, Manuscripts, Maps, Maritime, Medicine, Middle East, Military, Modernism, Music, Native American, Natural History, Nautical, Naval, New York City, New York State, New Jersey, Novelties, Olympic Games, Pacifica, Photographs, Photography, Pochoir, Polar, Pop-Ups & Moveable Books, Poetry, Postcards, Posters, Presentation Copies, Presidential Archives, Press Books, Prints, Pulitzer Prize Winners, Psychedelica, Puppetry, Puzzles, Railroad, Reference, Revolutionary War, Russia, Scholarly, Science, Science Fiction, Sports, Sporting, Technical, Theatre, Theology, Trade Cards, Trade Catalogues, Travel & Exploration, Travel Brochures, Typography, U.S. Coastal History, Vanity Fair Prints, Valentines, Voyages, Watercolors, Whaling, Wine, Yachting. These, and many other specialties, will be found at this event. Be sure to check our website, FlamingoEventz.com, for complete details and easily downloaded Discount Coupons.

Date/Hours: Saturday March 11, 10am-5pm.

Location: The Church of St. Vincent Ferrer, 869 Lexington Avenue at 66th Street, New York, NY 10065

Admission: Adults: $15, Youths 12-21: $7, under 12: free w/Paid Adult.

Appraisals: 2-4pm, $5/item by John Bruno and Guest Appraisers.

Directions: Check our website: FlamingoEventz.com for easily downloaded point-to-point maps.

Miscellaneous: There are parking garages throughout the neighborhood & subway stops nearby.

Screen Shot 2017-01-25 at 10.43.22 AM.pngParis, January 2017—The sale of books and manuscripts on 8 February will open with an extremely fine selection of antique books on Medicine (including the last books from Jean Blondelet's library), Natural Science and Literature. The sale of three remarkable manuscripts in Rimbaud's hand will be a major event.

REMARKABLE COLLECTION OF ARTHUR RIMBAUD WORKS

Plaisirs du jeune âge. Seven autograph manuscript drawings, 1865 (lot 86, estimate: €100,000-150,000).

These are the first known drawings by Arthur Rimbaud, dated from 1865 when he was 10. The notebook containing these drawings belonged to the bibliophile Jacques Guérin; the rest of the book is now one of the treasures in the Rimbaud Museum in Charleville-Mézières, but these exceptional drawings were still in private hands. They are some of the only ones that can be attributed to the poet with certainty. They reflect the world of a young poet already critical of the world around him: for example, we see the enactment of a mass, prefiguring the anticlericalism of the poet's Premières Communions, the literary parody of a Scandinavian legend and the first known self-portrait by Rimbaud.

Les caractères de Théophraste, 1866. Prize book received by Rimbaud in 1870 (lot 87, estimate: €8,000-12,000) 

A brilliant student in his final year, Arthur Rimbaud received this book as a prize at the age of 15 from the principal of his school. "A testimony to the highly satisfactory work of the pupil Rimbaud (Rhetoric class)," wrote the headmaster. Later, as indicated by an ex-libris, this book belonged to Paul Eluard: never mentioned as regards this copy, this provenance is important knowing Rimbaud's considerable influence on the Surrealists. 

La rivière de Cassis, June or July 1872 (lot 88, estimate: €200,000-300,000)

This poem’s manuscript, one of considerable modernity and freedom, is the one Rimbaud copied for Paul Verlaine. We know another version, now in the Bibliothèque Nnationale de France, but Verlaine's version is the most accomplished and stands out for three reasons: it has no date, no title and no punctuation. The extremely modern poems of this period are among Rimbaud's last verses.

Receipt from Harar made out to Armand Savouré, on behalf of Menelik II, in June 1889 (lot 89, estimate: €30,000-40,000) 

While Rimbaud's years in Harar largely contributed to his legend, we know little about them. This receipt sums up two months of the poet's activity in Harar while he was an arms dealer, as it recapitulates the last arms transactions he organised for Menelik II, between 23 May and 22 June 1889. This receipt is one of the longest listed (112 words), one of the few to be signed twice by Rimbaud and one of the only ones to mention Emperor Menelik, although he ordered the weapons. It is all the more exceptional as it is still only partially unpublished.

ANTIQUE BOOKS

From the library of Jean Blondelet While the selection of books from this exceptional library, successfully sold on 31 May last year, focused on the great discoveries of medicine, the books coming up for auction on 8 February contain treatises on the consequences of these discoveries and the progress they enabled. This final selection will be a new opportunity for book collectors to admire copies of rare editions in original bindings from prestigious provenances, illustrating the high standards the great collector Jean Blondelet always applied when choosing his books.

Two copies of Jérôme Cardan's Subtilités will appeal to collectors. One of them is in a remarkable ornate original binding in gilt vellum: a luxury rarely allowed to books on medicine (lot 10, estimate: €3,000-5,000). The Tabulae anatomicae by Casserio are appropriately bound with the treatises of his pupil Spigelius, in first editions (lot 11, estimate: €5,000-7,000). A pioneer in research on brain pathologies who coined the term "neurologia" or neurology, Thomas Willis is represented by two copies with outstanding provenances, including the first edition of 1664 of Cerebri anatome (lot 60, estimate: €4,000-5,000).

The sale also includes an exceptional compendium of the four greatest treatises by the celebrated anatomist Fabricius ab Acquapendente, in folio editions, bound with a coat of arms by one of his students (lot 18, estimate: €20,000-30,000). These four treatises, magnificently illustrated with fine copper engravings, deal with the valves of the veins, the nutrition of the foetus and the vocal organs of human animals.

Among the books with extraordinary provenances, a precious example by the naturalist Aldrovandi in a morocco binding with the arms of Jacques Auguste de Thou (lot 1, estimate: €6,000 - 9,000), will be opening the sale. There is also a Geometry by Dürer that once belonged to Nostradamus (lot 39, estimate: €12,000-18,000), a copy of the memoirs of Larrey, first surgeon to the Emperor, which he gave to Napoleon's adopted son, Eugène de Beauharnais (lot 28, estimate: €6,000-9,000), and the first collective publication of Paracelsus from the library of the greates of alchemists' patrons, Moritz of Hesse “the Learned” (lot 43, estimate: €20,000-30,000).

Natural science and medicine

A masterpiece of natural science, a very fine coloured copy of Nederlansische Vogelen by Cornelius Nozeman (lot 41, estimate: €10,000-15,000) presented the first overview of Holland's birds and was the most expensive publication ever undertaken in the Netherlands. In this category, it is accompanied by Seligmann's Vogelen with 473 hand-coloured figures (lot 51, estimate: €12,000-18,000), and a beautiful morocco-bound book on hummingbirds by Lesson (lot 30, estimate: €2,000-3,000). Worth noting: a very rare and fine copy of Deux livres de chirurgie (1573) by Ambroise Paré in period vellum (lot 44, estimate: €8,000 -12,000).

Literature and history

A superb copy of Barthélémy's Voyage du jeune Anacharsis en Grèce is one of 18 magnificent published on very large paper (lot 4, estimate: €12,000-18,000). Collectors will undoubtedly be fired up by the very early and unpublished manuscript of Boulainvilliers' Jugements astronomiques sur les nativités (lot 7, estimate: €8,000-12,000). Also noteworthy is the fabulous Coutumier de Normandie, an editio princeps (1483) in period binding (lot 15, estimate: €15,000-20,000), and lastly a splendid copy of the Cours d'hippiatrique by Lafosse (lot 27, estimate: €13,000-18,000), magnificently coloured, also in a period binding.

19TH AND 20TH CENTURY BOOKS

19th century artists' letters

This sale features letters from great artists of the 19th century, including Degas, Ingres, Lucien Pissarro, Odilon Redon (lot 85, estimate: €1,800-2,200), and Paul Signac (lot 92, estimate: €3,000-5,000). We can also mention letters from the inventor of photography, Nicéphore Niépce, on his financial situation with his creditors (lot 82, estimate: €25,000-30,000) and several letters from Hector Berlioz writing about the French revolution of 1830 (lot 66, estimate: €4,000-5,000) or standing up for his new wife (lot 67, estimate: €5,000-7,000).

20th Century books and manuscripts

The section devoted to the 20th century features books by contemporary artists published by the Editions du Solstice, including the rare La Nouvelle chute de l'Amérique (The New Fall of America) by Roy Lichtenstein (lot 119, estimate: €35,000-50,000) and Ode à ma mère by Louise Bourgeois (lot 100, estimate: €15,000-20,000). The illustrated books also include Pomme endormie, one of the few deluxe copies on Japan paper with 16 signed lithographs by Giacometti (lot 114, estimate: €20,000-25,000), together with a rare copy on green paper of 1929, a famous erotic work by Man Ray, here bound by Jean de Gonet (lot 121, estimate: €10,000-15,000), and rare editions of Joan Miro, Gustav Klimt, Nicolas de Staël, also with original contributions by Hans Bellmer, Pablo Picasso, Jacques Prévert and Salvador Dalí.

The catalogue features some major literary manuscripts as well - for example, an autograph letter from Guillaume Apollinaire to Lou containing two long poems (lot 95, estimate: €30,000-50,000). Jean Genet shines with one of his finest texts, Pour un funambule (lot 112, estimate: €9,000-12,000), a tribute to his acrobat lover, and a large collection of letters to his translator and American literary agent, mostly unpublished (lot 113, estimate: €35,000-45,000). Finally, the manuscript of Jean-Paul Sartre's last novel is a genuine literary rediscovery (lot 140, estimate: €14,000-18,000).

Auction: Wednesday 8 February

Exhibition: 3, 4, 6 and 7 February

New Photographic Survey of Walden Pond

What has become of the fabled Walden Pond? In his debut monograph Walden (Kehrer Verlag, May 2017S.B. Walker -- an artist from New England who grew up a few miles from Walden Pond -- surveys the symbolically charged landscape of literary giant Henry David Thoreau in an attempt to find out the answer. The publication of Walker's book marks the bicentennial of Thoreau's birth. Walking tours, lectures and exhibitions are planned throughout the year and around the world. 

Deeply rooted in the American collective conscious, Walden Pond is a mythical place perceived as wild and often considered to be the birthplace of the modern environmental movement. The contemporary Walden depicted in Walker's photographs is perhaps best characterized as a glorified suburban park, nestled amongst the sprawl of metropolitan Boston. As our awareness of the place is largely derived from Thoreau's rhapsodic description some 150 years ago -- writings in which he often drew connections between New England and the pastoral Arcadian landscape portrayed by the Roman poet Virgil -- the state of affairs as shown in Walker's Walden reveals a thought provoking and troubling paradox.

In his essay, Alan Trachtenberg writes: "... [Thoreau's] Walden Pond is a place of still, pristine waters and natural processes of seasonal change, of blossoming and dying, of regeneration into new life ... Walker's pictures, on the other hand, show something gone seriously wrong at this cherished site, a monument to American idealism itself ..."

In Walker's Walden we see a place populated by locals and tourists flocking to the hallowed spot to bird-watch, swim, nap, read, fish, and take a stroll in the woods. Signs of the encroachment of modern life are seen in the presence of wire fences, eroded pathways, chain saw markings, parking lots, a landfill just 1,200 feet from the edge of the pond, and a bulldozer poised to clear the way for a highway expansion project. The last image in Walden captures the liberated waters of the pond following an ice melt -- a scene that would be sublime if it were not for the presence of a Target shopping bag floating on the pond's surface in the foreground. 

An aura of melancholy sweeps through Walker's photographs suggesting the absence of a sense of well-being. Trachtenberg writes: "This seems like a frozen Walden, a freeze too deep to be redeemed by first aid alone ... by claiming 'Walden' for his title, [Walker] offers Thoreau -- and through him the entire tradition of American romanticism -- a formative role in his own extraordinary book. Walker's pictures are layered against each other to reveal an unrelenting vision of disenchantment with what Walden Pond once represented to enthralled Americans."

Walker and Thoreau were both in their late twenties when they began creating their works about Walden Pond. In 1845, Thoreau moved into a cabin in the woods beside Walden where he lived for two years recording his thoughts and feelings that would lay the groundwork for his seminal book. Nearly 170 years later, every day after work for four years (2010-2014), Walker headed down to the pond to walk the 1.7-mile loop with his camera and Thoreau's book to engage with Walden Pond and its cast of denizens. 

Recent articles in the press have addressed how Walden Pond is becoming increasingly polluted at the hands of man and that the ice on the pond is melting earlier due to global warming. It is Walker's hope his book will not only revive interest in the transcendental writings of Thoreau, but also contribute to the dialogue about the need to mitigate climate change and protect our planet's delicate ecological balance.

S.B. Walker is an artist living and working in New England. His works have been exhibited internationally and can be found in public and private collections including the Museum of Fine Arts (Boston), the Smith Museum of Art, the David Winton Bell Gallery at Brown University, and the Prentice and Paul Sack Photographic Trust, among others. He is represented by Janet Borden Inc., New York, NY. For more information, go to: http://www.sbwalker.net

Alan Trachtenberg is the Neil Gray Jr. Professor Emeritus of English and American studies at Yale University, where he taught for thirty-five years. His books include Shades of Hiawatha (H&W, 2004) and The Incorporation of America: Culture and Society in the Gilded Age (Hill & Wang, 2007).

Book Details:                                                                   

ISBN: 978-3-86828-765-3                                     

Hardcover, 8 x 10 inches                                                

124 pages; 58 b&w illustrations                                       

USD $40.00; Euro (D) 35,00

An early 19th century whaling log fetched $3,600 at National Book Auctions' January 21, 2017 sale.

The bound manuscript, featuring 48 leaves and 16 ink drawings, related to the whaling ship "Victory" of New Bedford, Connecticut. Captained by Henry Adams, the ship left New Bedford in July 1823 for the whaling grounds off the coast of the southern tip of South America. The log begins in August at sea; the ship reached the whaling grounds in October. The unnamed officer who kept the log evidently put back to sea as the log recommences in July 1824 on board the ship "New Galen" from Boston, heading toward Mexico.

The sale, held at the auction house's Freeville, New York saleroom and simulcast via Invaluable, also featured rare, antique, and decorative volumes dating back to 1549, as well as a second session from a private collection of collectible modern horror, mystery, and science fiction books. Titles of note included "Astro-Theology" by William Derham; "A Voyage Round The World" by George Anson; "The Box from Japan" by Harry Stephen Keeler; and "Vampire" by Hanns Heinz Ewers.

National Book Auctions is a specialist auction house focusing almost exclusively on rare and collectible books and ephemera since the 1990s. Its sister company, Worth Auctions, handles a broad variety of personal property including fine art, furnishings, jewelry, coins, and more. For more information, contact mail@nationalbookauctions.com or mail@worthauctions.com.

Interior 02.jpegDaniel Crouch Rare Books will mark the opening of their New York Gallery at 24 East 64th Street with a launch party on Burns Night (25 January 2017). A small selection of Celtic cartography will be on display, in keeping with the traditional Scottish celebration, as well as the gallery’s reputation as specialist dealers in fine and rare antique maps, plans, sea charts and voyages.

Daniel Crouch and Nick Trimming, partners in Daniel Crouch Rare Books, have appointed Noah Goldrach and Kate Hunter to manage the New York gallery. Noah studied Medieval History at the Wesleyan University, CT, and has worked both at Sotheby’s, and as a bookseller specializing in Continental, English and American early printed books. Kate graduated from Cambridge Univeristy, and joins Daniel Crouch Rare Books having worked previously for Christies, Maggs Bros, and Graham Arader. The launch is timed to coincide with the Winter Antiques Show (20 - 29 January) and Bibliography Week (23 - 28 January). The gallery is open Monday to Friday, 10am to 6pm.

In keeping with the Burns Night theme, James Dorret's 1750 map of Scotland and Macdonald Gill’s 1928 Agricultural Map of Scotland will be on display during the launch. Dorret’s map has been described as "a landmark map which was used directly or indirectly for nearly all Scottish maps for the next 40 years", (National Library of Scotland). Although little is known about Dorret, he served as the valet to the Duke of Argyll, and was tasked with mapping first Argyll, and then the whole of Scotland.

Macdonald Gill’s agricultural map of Scotland, dated 1928, provides a fascinating and detailed representation of the country’s natural produce. The map is illustrated with livestock such as pigs, sheep and cows which adorn the counties of Roxburgh, Lanark and Dumfries. Drawings of deer are shown in the highlands, with raspberries and strawberries marked in the regions of Ayr and Peebles, fishing fleets off the east coast labelled haddock, cod and lobsters as their bounty, with hake and herrings off the west coast. In the border, a table shows statistics for the local agriculture and fisheries including figures for the annual catch or crop and the value of the produce.

Image: The New York Gallery at 24 East 64th Street. 

 

45638g_lg copy.jpgLOS ANGELES, January 19, 2017 - A rare 1494 Basel edition of Christopher Columbus’ letter to King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella entitled, “Christophorus Columbus, De insulis nuper in mari Indico inventis” will be auctioned by Nate D. Sanders Auctions on January 30, 2017. 

The 56-page book features Columbus’ letter to King Ferdinand and Queen Isabella regarding his discovery of the new world. The March 1493 letter was penned by Columbus on the Nina while sailing back from the “Indian” isles and was addressed to Spain’s king and queen, his patron Luis de Santangel and the Royal Treasurer Raphael Sanxis. Columbus confirmed the new lands he discovered justified the expensive and risky expedition. Leander de Cosco translated the letter into Latin for this 1494 Basel edition.

Six woodcuts designed by famed German artist Albrecht Durer are included in the hardbound book. The woodcuts represent the first depictions of the New World. They show the arrival of the Spanish at the insula hyspana, a quasi-map of the Antilles, the construction of the fort La Navidad on the island of Hispaniola and Columbus' caravel under full sail. The title woodcut of the edition depicts a portrait of Ferdinand of Aragon holding the shields of Castile and Leon and is accompanied by a coat of arms.

The book being auctioned is from Robert Menzies’ collection and contains private library labels from turn-of-the-century philanthropist Elizabeth Wharton Drexel and Pennsylvania Senator Boies Penrose.

Bidding for the book begins at $750,000.

Additional information on the document can be found at 
http://natedsanders.com/The_First_Account_of_the_Discovery_of_the_New_Worl-LOT45638.aspx

About Nate D. Sanders Auctions

An industry leader in documents and autographs, Nate D. Sanders Auctions has conducted auctions in Los Angeles since 1990 and now holds major auctions on a monthly basis. Owner Nate Sanders is recognized for his knowledge of sports, historical and Hollywood memorabilia. To learn more visit natedsanders.com

6-Poe copy.jpgNew York— On Thursday, February 14, Swann Galleries will offer Icons & Images: Photographs & Photobooks, with spectacular examples of the medium representing a range of styles and technological advances, from mid-nineteenth century portraiture to contemporary photocollages.

The sale is led by a selection of 50 plates from Eadweard Muybridge’s groundbreaking series, Animal Locomotion, 1887. This collection of motion studies largely features the human form, as well as a menagerie of exotic animals. This precursor to film is estimated to sell between $30,000 and $45,000.

Among early photographs is a sixth-plate tintype of Edgar Allan Poe, after the “Traylor” daguerreotype, taken in 1849 just three weeks before the author’s death. The original daguerreotype was damaged and then lost; this rare tintype is expected to fetch between $10,000 and $15,000. Further highlights include an albumen print of General George A. Custer, taken in 1872 by J.A. Scholten ($4,000 to $6,000); a portrait of Walt Whitman in Brooklyn, attributed to painter Thomas Eakins in 1887, valued at $4,000 to $6,000; and a selection of stunning landscapes by Carleton E. Watkins and silver print microphotographs of snowflakes by Wilson A. Bentley.

Also featured is a run of rare orotones by Edward S. Curtis, many in their original frames, including The Rush Gatherer, 1910, and Chief of the Desert, Navajo, 1904 ($15,000 to $25,000 and $12,000 to $18,000, respectively). Further selections include portfolio 20 of The North American Indian, 1928, with 35 large-format photogravures of indigenous Alaskans, estimated at $8,000 to $12,000, and the rare portrait of Geronimo, Apache, valued at $5,000 to $7,500.

The sale features a run of lots relating to the space program, the highlight of which is a remarkable gathering of 22 large prints selected from NASA's Archives for a 1985 exhibition at the Smithsonian National Air & Space Museum titled Sightseeing: A Space Panorama. Astronauts approved the images, which had never before been published by NASA ($15,000 to $25,000). Also available is an archive of approximately 280 photographs depicting Apollo missions, estimated at $7,000 to $10,000. Further lots in this section include a series of ten photocollages of the moon, and a collection of 67 photographs documenting the moon landing as seen on national television ($5,000 to $7,500 and $4,000 to $6,000, respectively).

There is a rich selection of works by twentieth-century American photographers, including Alfred Stieglitz’s intimate portrait of his lover and protégée Dorothy Norman, which was previously in Norman’s personal collection. This image, which was not reproduced in Sarah Greenough’s Alfred Stieglitz, The Key Set, may be unique; it is estimated at $20,000 to $30,000. Ansel Adams is well represented in the sale with more than a dozen works, including the breathtaking Clearing Winter Storm, taken in 1944 and printed in the 1970s, expected to sell between $25,000 and $35,000. His 1979 photobook Yosemite and the Range of Light, one of 250 signed copies of the deluxe edition, is estimated at $10,000 to $15,000. Important works by Robert Frank include Hearse, London, 1951 silver print, printed 1973, and Trolley - New Orleans, silver print ($20,000 to $25,000 and $10,000 to $15,000, respectively). Further highlights include images by Berenice Abbott, Margaret Bourke-White, Roy DeCarava, Lewis W. Hine and Dorothea Lange.

A set of 32 silver prints by Leni Riefenstahl relating to the 1936 Berlin Olympics, with action shots and posed portraits of athletes including Jesse Owens, carries an estimate of $25,000 to $35,000.

Contemporary works include a run of images by Nan Goldin from the 1990s, led by Cody in the Dressing Room at the Boy Bar, NYC, 1991, estimated at $7,000 to $10,000, as well as Larry Fink’s complete April, 1999 Portfolio with 20 photographs selected from Fink’s humanist photo essays ($5,000 to $7,500). Works by Steve McCurry and Patrick Demarchelier will also be available.

The section of photobooks includes a unique maquette for Lucien Clergue’s unpublished book, Picasso en Provence, with 150 candid silver prints of Pablo Picasso taken by Clergue in the late 1950s and early ‘60s, estimated at $8,000 to $12,000. Also available is Larry Clark’s complete Tulsa Portfolio, with ten silver prints (each estimated at $15,000 to $25,000). Scottish photographer John Thomson’s magnum opus, Illustrations of China and its People, Volumes I and II, London, 1873, is estimated at $15,000 to $20,000. Also available are works by and about Richard Avedon from a private collection, including the 1969 silver print Willem de Kooning, Painter, Springs, Long Island, printed circa 1975, estimated at $7,000 to $10,000, and a selection of rare photobooks, many of which are signed.

The auction will be held Thursday, February 14, beginning at 1:30 p.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Thursday, February 9 through Saturday, February 11 from noon to 5 p.m.; Monday, February 13 from noon to 5 p.m.; and Thursday, February 14 from 10 a.m. to noon. Also available by appointment.

An illustrated auction catalogue will be available for $35 from Swann Galleries, Inc., 104 East 25th Street, New York, NY 10010, or online at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information and to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Daile Kaplan at 212-254-4710, extension 21, or via e-mail at dkaplan@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 6 Sixth-plate tintype of Edgar Allan Poe, after daguerreotype by William A. Pratt, 1849-late '50s. Estimate $10,000 to $15,000.

READING, Pa. - Berks Community Television (BCTV) is bringing live auctions to television with the debut airing of a new show called Auction Action On BCTV on Monday evening, January 30th, at 6 pm, with the first item up for bid at 7 pm. The program will be hosted by Bill Howze, the owner of The Renaissance Auction Group in Reading, Pa., and host of the popular BCTV show All That Stuff.

In the first hour of the show, Mr. Howze will explain how the auction works and preview featured lots. All bidding is online. Individuals can bid from anywhere in the world on their desktop or mobile devices beginning Monday, January 16th. 

Auction previews will be held at 1251 Chestnut Street on two Saturdays and Sundays - January 21st, 22nd, 28th and 29th, from 9 am to 1 pm each day. Berks County residents who have BCTV as part of their cable package will be able to view the show live. Bidding will be driven through The Renaissance Auction Group website at www.auctionhowze.com. The show will be fast-paced - averaging one item closing per minute.

Starting at 7 pm, the auction will officially kick off. The debut program will feature many items in a broad range of categories, many of them specific to Berks County. These will include a circa 1775 Berks County tall case clocks, a Reading Trolley fare counter, a Philadelphia & Reading Railroad platform sign and original works by artists with ties to the Berks County area.

“The merchandise mix will include multiple categories of antiques collectibles and fine art,” Mr. Howze said. “We expect a strong and enthusiastic viewership in our first show, especially with the many interesting items relating to Berks County. I’m pleased that my auction firm will be conducting this event  in conjunction with BCTV. Part of the proceeds will benefit our public access channel.”

Heather Adams, executive director of BCTV, echoed those words. “Bill Howze’s All That Stuff show consistently ranks in the top ten programs viewed online at bctv.org, so we’re excited to have him host a second show with such a unique auction concept,” she said. “As for the partnership, it’s a win-win. Plus it widens our audience by attracting antiques and collectibles enthusiasts.”

Ms. Adams said BCTV has benefited from fundraiser auctions for 25 years, but not in this way. She added that Auction Action On BCTV is scheduled from 6 pm to 10 pm, but because of the nature of an auction, it may run shorter or longer. The show will be telecast live from the BCTV studio. BCTV is seen in 100,000 homes in Berks County, through Comcast and Service Electric cable.

The regional artists represented in the auction will include Christopher Shearer (1846-1926), Victor Shearer (1872-1951), W. Eugene Burkhardt, Jr., M.B. (Mary) Leisz and Hazel Feltman (1947-2012) among others. All had direct ties to Reading and Berks County. The Christopher Shearer is a 1925 oil on canvas, three Victor Shearer works date from 1935-1941. Two W. Eugene Burkhardt, Jr., works are beautiful cut flower collages.

Christopher Shearer was born in Reading and was best known for his landscape, coastal and wildlife paintings. His father encouraged his artistic side by building him a studio in the back yard of his Shearertown farm. At age 21, he opened a studio in Reading and was quite successful in selling his paintings. Shearer exhibited his works at the Pennsylvania Academy of Fine Arts.

Victor Shearer made a name for himself by becoming a landscape and seascape painter in the traditional style. He often sold his artworks for a few dollars apiece on the streets of Reading. He lived in Reading nearly his entire life and before pursuing art he had a basket making business.

W. Eugene Burkhardt, Jr. was an internationally known dried flower artist and the author of Pressed Flower Art: Tips, Tools and Techniques for Learning the Craft. In September 2015, at Renninger’s Market in Kutztown, an auction of Burkhardt’s work. framed and unframed prints, awards and Philadelphia Flower Show entries - was held. Mr. Howze officiated the sale, in fact. 

Additional items in the auction specific to Pennsylvania will include a Chippendale tall case clock, a period Chippendale side chair, a 1909 photo lithograph showing the Mayor of Reading and members of the Reading Police Department, photos of Civil War soldiers from Fleetwood, Pa. and Reading and a watercolor painting by Jack Coggins (1911-2006), who was born in Great Britain but emigrated to the US and lived in New York and Pennsylvania.

Items in the auction not connected to Reading will include an original work by pop art icon Peter Max (N.Y., b. 1937), a Tiffany sterling silver cake stand weighing 38 troy silver ounces, portrait miniatures of the Emperor Napoleon and his Empress Josephine, and a pair of original oil on canvas studies by Lord Frederick Leighton (Great Britain, 1830-1896).

Leighton received his training in Brussels, Paris and Frankfurt, unlike most major artists of the 19th century, who studied at the Royal Academy of Schools. He was blessed with golden good looks and led a charmed life. He was also the only painter ever to be raised to the English peerage, but it was short-lived; one day after being designated a Lord, Leighton died at age 66.

Berks Community Television can be seen on Comcast Reading channel 15; Comcast-Southern Berks channel 965; and Service Electric channel 19. The Municipal Access Channel (MAC) is Comcast Reading channel 99. BCTV.org is a 501c3 nonprofit corporation committed to providing live programming produced and hosted by members of the community on cable TV and its website.

The Renaissance Auction Group is located at 1404 Friedensburg Road in Reading. The firm assists clients in the liquidation of tangible property, including antiques, collectibles, business inventories and commercial equipment, as well as residential, historic, commercial and agricultural real estate. Benefit auction consultation and production services are also provided.

To learn more about The Renaissance Auction Group, visit www.auctionhowze.com. To learn more about Berks County Television, visit www.BCTV.org.

__Shiftlab_CatalogCover.jpgSeager Gray Gallery, in Mill Valley, California, presents Trace, an exhibition of works by Shift-Lab, a collaborative group of artists working in the print and artist book media.  The artists include Katie Baldwin, Denise Bookwalter, Sarah Bryant, Macy Chadwisk and Tricia Treacy. Trace is a set of maps: a large collaborative map and five smaller maps by each individual artist, that fold into single sheet books. A series of framed prints, printed ephemera, a digitally printed newspaper, and sound file accompany the work. Trace utilizes a range of media including embroidery, letterpress, risograph, processing software, screenprint, and video/audio capture. The exhibition will run from February 1 to February 28 with a reception for the artists on Saturday, February 4 from 5:30 to 7:30. 

The exhibition comes as a celebration of Codex, the Biennial fair beginning the following day at the Craneway Pavilion celebrating the book as a medium for art with exhibitors from around the globe.

A full color catalog of the exhibition is available through the gallery and at Codex: http://bit.ly/Shift_Lab_TraceCatalog.

NEW YORK, 18 January 2017-Today in New York, Sotheby’s auction of Alexander Hamilton: An Important Family Archive of Letters and Manuscripts achieved an outstanding total of $2,645,750, surpassing its pre-sale high estimate of $2.1 million. All 77 lots on offer - representing hundreds of individual documents- found buyers, marking a rare ‘White Glove’ auction. Eleven lots broke the previous auction record for any document handwritten by Hamilton - a record that had held since 2001*.

Viewed by thousands of visitors over the past week at Sotheby’s New York, the collection of letters and manuscripts by and relating to Alexander Hamilton drew a diverse audience: from political-science enthusiasts to theater lovers, newly-impassioned historians, and institutional collections-even the company of Hamilton: An American Musical. This remarkable archive of highly-personal documents had descended through Hamilton’s family for the last two centuries, with many of the manuscripts previously unknown to historians.

Selby Kiffer, Senior International Specialist for Sotheby's Books & Manuscripts, noted: “We have been thrilled to be part of the cultural movement that has re-established this Founding Father's rightful place in history. The results of today’s sale are an indicator not only of the tremendous public interest in Alexander Hamilton, but also of the appetite among both new and established collectors to own historical documents.”

A highlight of today’s auction was the document responsible for Alexander Hamilton’s foray into the public sphere: Alexander Hamilton’s Appointment as Aide-de-Camp to General George Washington from 1777, which sold for $212,500. This appointment jumpstarted Hamilton’s political career, leading to subsequent positions as congressman, founder of the Bank of New York, member of the Constitutional convention and more.

The auction was led by A Previously Unrecorded Autograph Draft of Pacificus Essay No. VI, which achieved $262,500. One of the most important essays written by Alexander Hamilton, under the pen name Pacificus, Pacificus VI is particularly vital to the storyline of Hamilton as no manuscript copies of The Federalist Papers - considered by many to be his most famous work - survive.

FURTHER SALE HIGHLIGHTS

**All Achieving Multiples of Their Estimates**

Lot 1036

Philip Schuyler

A Group of 34 Autograph Letters Signed ("PH. Schuyler"), 1790-1804, to His Daughter Elizabeth Schuyler Hamilton

Estimate $35/50,000

Sold for $125,000

Lot 1007

Alexander Hamilton 

Autograph Letter Signed (“AH”) to Elizabeth Schuyler (“My Dearest Girl”); The Earliest Surviving Love Letter from Alexander Hamilton to His Future Wife

Estimate $40/60,000

Sold for $118,750

Lot 1040

Philip Schuyler

A Group of 17 Letters, 1793-1803, Addressed to His Son-in-Law, Alexander Hamilton

Estimate $30/50,000

Sold for $118,750

Lot 1016

Alexander Hamilton

Autograph Letter Signed (“A Hamilton”) to Elizabeth Hamilton, Announcing that the Army Is Preparing to Engage Cornwallis in Virginia

Estimate $30/50,000

Sold for $106,250

Lot 1043

Alexander Hamilton

Autograph Letter Signed (“AH”) To Angelica Schuyler Church, Sending And Requesting Family News

Estimate $6/8,000

Sold of $62,500

*The previous auction record for an Alexander Hamilton manuscript was $44,650, established at Christie’s New York in May 2001.

 

The National Library of Israel announced today that it has acquired the finest private collection of Hebrew books and manuscripts in the world, the renowned Valmadonna Trust Library, through a private sale arranged by Sotheby’s. The acquisition, made jointly with Archaeology, Books and Judaica collectors Dr. David and Jemima Jeselsohn, will be housed and highlights will go on show in the National Library of Israel’s landmark new building in Jerusalem, designed by award-winning architects Herzog & de Meuron, due to open to the public in 2020.  

Founded in 1892, The National Library of Israel (NLI) is unique among the great libraries of the world. It is the primary institution of national memory of the State of Israel and of Jewish people throughout the world and it is the home of the largest collection of works concerned with Jewish life and Israel, as well as a leading collection for Islamic and Middle Eastern studies.

Tasked with collecting, preserving and providing access to the cultural treasures of both the State of Israel and the international Jewish community, the NLI has recently embarked upon an ambitious initiative to transform itself into a cutting-edge global centre at the forefront of knowledge dissemination and cultural creativity.  This process is being driven by the principle of creating unprecedented public access to its priceless collections. The transition is taking place in the realm of content, with a wide range of cultural, educational, and technological initiatives already underway, as well as in the physical realm, with the construction of its new library building in the heart of Jerusalem adjacent to the Knesset.

The Valmadonna Trust Library was assembled over a period of more than six decades by visionary collector Jack Lunzer. It comprises a wide-ranging group of more than 10,000 works that chart the spread of Hebrew printing and the global dissemination of Jewish culture. Among the highlights of the collection are an incunabula of the Pentateuch, printed in Lisbon in 1491; one of only two surviving copies of a Passover Haggadah printed in Prague in 1556; The Plantin Polyglot or “King’s Bible,” printed in Antwerp between 1568 and 1573; and more than 550 broadsheets dating from the 16th to the 20th centuries. The acquisition is an important and exciting addition to the NLI’s collection. The printed works in the collection are in superb condition and the acquisition has enabled NLI to gain in one acquisition what would have taken decades to collect. The acquisition is made possible by a generous gift from the Haim and Hana Solomon Fund.

Throughout its renewal process, NLI has expanded its collections, while investing significant resources to make them available online. As part of its collection development, NLI has partnered with hundreds of institutions in Israel and across the world to provide access to cultural treasures, including many that are not among the National Library's physical holdings. The new NLI building will address the needs of leading scholars, while also opening access to intellectual and cultural treasures for the general public.

Says David Blumberg, Chairman, National Library of Israel: "The National Library of Israel is currently in the midst of a comprehensive renewal process by which it is fast becoming the most significant cultural institution in Israel and the Jewish world. Its new home, designed by Herzog and de Meuron, is currently being constructed adjacent to the Knesset and will be completed in less than four years' time. In this context, the Library continues to expand its collections tremendously, acquiring cultural and intellectual treasures ranging from ancient Jewish and Islamic manuscripts to contemporary music. The Valmadonna Trust Library represents an historic addition to our leading collection of Jewish manuscripts, prints and books, which reflect and embody the cultures of the Jewish people around the world and across the ages." 

Says Oren Weinberg, Director, National Library of Israel: "The acquisition of the Valmadonna and its arrival in Jerusalem present a tremendous opportunity for the National Library of Israel to further realize the vision of its renewal, as we will open access to these exquisite cultural treasures for researchers and the general public in Israel and across the globe."

Philadelphia, PA - January 17, 2017 - Today, Howell Rosenberg, Esq., Chairman of the Board of Trustees of the Library Company of Philadelphia announced the election of Dr. Michael J. Barsanti as the Edwin Wolf 2nd Director effective February 20, 2017.  Dr. Barsanti succeeds Dr. Richard Newman as the company's Chief Executive Officer. This appointment was made following a national search conducted by a leading executive search firm who worked in conjunction with trustees and staff of the Library Company, who have enthusiastically and unanimously endorsed this appointment.

Mr. Rosenberg stated that, "We are thrilled to have Mike join the Library Company's highly acclaimed staff of scholars, curators, and professional administrators. Mike's business and academic work will be among the keys to success that he will bring to us and we are thankful that we were able to attract such a high level professional. "

Dr. Barsanti holds a bachelor's degree from Williams College, a Master's degree from University of Miami, and a PhD in English Literature from the University of Pennsylvania.  He has led a distinguished career in the Philadelphia cultural community that includes positions at the Rosenbach Museum and Library, the Pew Center for Arts and Heritage, and the Free Library of Philadelphia Foundation. He is also an Adjunct Professor at Drexel University and serves on the Board of Trustees of the Independence Charter School.  His experience has been broad:  in fundraising, program development, membership, marketing, and operations. Additionally, he founded Throwaway Horse, a company devoted to fostering a deeper understanding of literary masterworks by joining the visual aid of graphic novels with the aid of the internet and social media. He has worked closely on its flagship project ULYSSES "SEEN,"  a graphic novel adaptation of James Joyce's ULYSSES that brings the novel's deeper mysteries to a new set of readers.  Dr. Barsanti lives in the Mount Airy section of Philadelphia with his wife, Erin Mooney, and their three children. 

According to Dr. Barsanti, "I am deeply honored to be chosen to be the next Edwin Wolf 2nd Director of the Library Company of Philadelphia.  On Ben Franklin's 311th birthday, we can take pride in how his library has endured, and the idea it is based upon --improving a community through the sharing of knowledge -- has never been more relevant.  I am eager to carry forward Dr. Franklin's great experiment and bring it to new learners from all walks of life, ensuring its continued relevance and its adaptation to a changing world."

About the Library Company of Philadelphia

Founded in 1731 by Benjamin Franklin, the Library Company is America's oldest cultural institution and served as the Library of Congress from the Revolutionary War to 1800. It was the largest public library in America until the Civil War and remains one of North America's most important research repositories. Today, the Library Company of Philadelphia is an independent research library and educational institution specializing in American and global history from the 17th through the early 20th centuries. Open to the public free of charge, the Library Company houses the world's largest holdings of early American collections with approximately one million rare books, manuscripts, broadsides, ephemera, prints, photographs, and works of art. The collections reflect the country's many faces and varied interests including African American history, economic history, women's history, the history of medicine, and visual culture. The Library Company promotes access to these collections through fellowships, exhibitions, programs, and online resources.

The mission of the Library Company is to foster scholarship in and increase public understanding of American history before 1900 by preserving, interpreting, making available, and augmenting the valuable materials in our care, thus providing meaningful stewardship of the legacy of founder Benjamin Franklin. To find out more, please visit www.librarycompany.org

BOSTON, MA, January 17, 2017--ANTIQUES ROADSHOW, PBS's most-watched ongoing series, has released its summer 2017 production tour, including first-time visits to Harrisburg, Pennsylvania and Green Bay, Wisconsin, along with return visits to St. Louis, Missouri; New Orleans, Louisiana and Portland, Oregon. 

Episodes recorded in those cities will be included in the 14-time Emmy® Award nominated production's 22nd broadcast season, to air in 2018.

"ANTIQUES ROADSHOW is so excited to hit the road again in our enduring search for the country's hidden treasures," said ROADSHOW executive producer Marsha Bemko. "This year we travel to two never-before-visited cities: Harrisburg and Green Bay. I can't wait to explore these new areas, and see what local items we uncover in all the cities!"

Admission to ANTIQUES ROADSHOW is free, but tickets are required and must be obtained in advance. Fans can apply for a chance to receive one pair of free tickets per household. The 2017 Tour ticket application process opens Tuesday, January 17 at 3pm ET. To enter the drawing for free tickets to a summer ROADSHOW event and to see complete application rules, go to pbs.org/antiques/tickets For more information you may also call toll-free 888-762-3749.

Deadline for applications is Monday, April 10, 2017 at 11:59 PM PT.

At each appraisal event, approximately 5,000 ticketed guests will receive free valuations of their antiques and collectibles from specialists from the country's leading auction houses and independent dealers. Each guest is invited to bring two items for appraisal. To see FAQs about ANTIQUES ROADSHOW events, go to: pbs.org/wgbh/roadshow/tickets/faq.

From each of the events, three episodes of television per city will be created for inclusion in ANTIQUES ROADSHOW's 22nd season, airing in 2018. 

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW 2017 Summer Tour Dates:

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania                                       June 3

Green Bay, Wisconsin                                            June 17

St. Louis, Missouri                                                 July 8

New Orleans, Louisiana                                         July 22

Portland, Oregon                                                  August 12

ANTIQUES ROADSHOW, produced by WGBH Boston, is seen by an average of 8 million viewers each week. ANTIQUES ROADSHOW's 21st  broadcast season is currently airing Mondays at 8/7c PM on PBS.

Hitler and Mussolini Patching Together Nazi Soldier.jpgBoston, MA — January 17, 2017 — Elizabeth E. Barker, Ph.D., Stanford Calderwood Director of the Boston Athenæum, announced today the donation to the Athenæum of the collection of WWII visual materials of architectural photographer, author, and Athenæum Proprietor Richard W. Cheek. The Richard W. Cheek World War II Graphic Arts Collection contains over 2,000 posters and war maps, 189 linear feet of books, 4,000 magazines, and approximately 6,500 pieces of WWII ephemera, including patriotic envelopes, board games, playing cards, and pin-ups.

“We couldn’t feel more grateful—or more honored—to become the repository of such a discerning collector’s lifelong passion,” stated Barker. “Richard Cheek’s gift provides fresh insight into a critical moment in world history. The value of this archive for scholars—and, indeed, for any curious person—is incalculable. The collection elevates the Athenaeum’s ability to serve as an essential research center for three of our nation’s greatest conflicts. ”

The Cheek collection complements the Athenæum’s existing Civil War and WWI-related holdings: together, these visual records provide a valuable resource for the study of 19th- and 20th-century American society and culture. The acquisition reflects the institution’s mission to serve its members, the broader community, and scholars throughout the world by preserving and augmenting its collections, providing library services and cultural programming, and preserving and enhancing the unique atmosphere of its landmark building.

Of the collection’s remarkable breadth, Catharina Slautterback, the Athenæum’s Curator of Prints and Photographs, explains that “part of its value lies in its sheer numbers,” adding that the collection “conveys, in a way that a smaller collection could not, the pervasiveness of propaganda in American society during the war.” Both Slautterback and collector Richard Cheek emphasize the role of the collection’s graphic and visual elements in communicating persuasive wartime narratives. “To understand why Americans were willing to engage in another global conflict while still suffering from the consequences of the Great War,” Cheek says, “we need to know the pictures and symbols that motivated them.” He adds, “In a society that was becoming increasingly visual in its orientation, images were more important than words in persuading people to fight again.”

The son of a WWII veteran and the grandson of a renowned Civil War historian, Richard Cheek began collecting WWII ephemera as a young boy. Fascinated by the “panoply of war,” he received an early gift of several signal flags, rescued from a U.S. destroyer that sunk off the coast of Okinawa. “Torn, dirty, and redolent of desperate action,” as he describes them, these symbolic objects were the first of what was to become a vast collection.

Cheek, a longtime member and Proprietor of the Boston Athenæum, was inspired to donate his graphic arts collection to the Athenæum after viewing its 2014-2015 exhibition, Over Here: World War I Posters from Around the World and attending a gallery talk led by Slautterback, the exhibition’s curator. An exhibition featuring selections from the Cheek collection is planned for 2020, the 75th anniversary of the war’s conclusion, to be curated jointly by Cheek and Slautterback. A fully illustrated catalog will accompany the exhibition.

About the Boston Athenæum:

The Boston Athenæum, a membership library and fine art museum, first opened its doors in 1807 as a sanctuary of arts and letters for Boston intellectuals. Today, it continues to serve its members and the community with a vast circulating collection, rich and varied special collections, extensive archives, comprehensive electronic resources, handsome reading spaces, and a dynamic programming schedule. The exhibition gallery and many events are open to the public. Membership is open to all. For more information, visit bostonathenaeum.org.

Image: Artist Unknown, [Hitler and Mussolini Patching Together Nazi Soldier], ca. 1943. Silkscreen poster. Richard W. Cheek WWII Graphic Arts Collection. Gift, December 2016.

National Book Auctions has been engaged to sell a trove of important theological and historical texts dating back to the sixteenth century that were rescued from a flooding church in Akron, Ohio in 1969. The volumes were saved from the deluge by the church's minister and have gone unseen by the public for the past past five decades.

Dan Cole, Operations Director for National Book Auctions, arrived in Akron in the company van not knowing what to expect. "All we knew beforehand was that the minister had carried off as much as he could as the church was filling up with water. When I got inside the house, there were close to a hundred boxes along rows and rows of shelves, all basically untouched since the day of the flood. It still wasn't clear what condition the contents were in-whether the water had already gotten to them."

Explains Founder and CEO David Hall, "It wasn't until we got the books back to the auction gallery that the real archaeological work began. We were pleased to discover that the collection was on the whole very well-preserved and contained some very scarce and early titles. It is a real honor to bring this kind of material out of the dark and into the light again after so long. Discoveries like this are what make our jobs so rewarding."

The first session of the consignment, offered at the auction house's Freeville, New York saleroom and simulcast via Invaluable on January 7, 2017 realized over $27,000. The top lot was George Leo Haydock's "The Holy Bible Translated From the Latin Vulgate", published in two illustrated volumes in 1812 and 1815, which fetched $2,250. 

Other titles of note included William Cave's "Antiquitates Apostolicae", published as a full-leather folio in 1676; the complete 24-volume "Encyclopedia Londonensis" dating from the early 19th century and lavishly illustrated with over 1,000 engraved plates; and a scarce first edition of "Le Vite Degli Imperatori Romani"-Antonio Ciccarelli's 1590 biographical history of the Roman Emperors. 

Further religious and secular material from this fascinating collection will be offered on January 22, 2017. They include Hachette's "La Devotion a la Divine Providence"; James Fennimore Cooper's "The Two Admirals"; and Digby's "The Broad Stone of Honour".

National Book Auctions is a specialist auction house focusing almost exclusively on rare and collectible books and ephemera since the 1990s. Its sister company, Worth Auctions, handles a broad variety of personal property including fine art, furnishings, jewelry, coins, and more. For more information, contact mail@nationalbookauctions.com or mail@worthauctions.com.

AntiquarianAuctions.com is an online auction site dedicated to the sale of rare and out-of print books, maps & prints, documents, letters, ephemera and vintage photography.

All pricing is done in US$. No buyer’s premium is charged.

Lot 2

Clouet (Jean Baptiste) Carte d'Afrique divisée en ses principaux Etats...
Published: Mondhare & Jean, Paris & Cadiz, 1785

Estimate: $12,000/13,500

Stunningly beautiful wall map, with historiated border, which also shows Cook's voyages. One of the few of these all maps to survive in good condition. A work of art.

L'abbé Jean Baptiste Louis Clouet (1729 - 1790) was a French cartographer and geographer born 1729 in Rennes. He was a member of the Academy of Science in Rouen. His main work was the Géographie Moderne, which first was issued in 1767. This carte de cabinet (a wall map) is one of a set of four continents and the world (five maps in all), all with historiated borders, published in 1785 by Mondhare & Jean in Paris and Cadiz.

This map of Africa is printed on four sheets which are joined and laid on reinforcing linen. This is a beautiful wall map of Africa, with two title cartouches; the principal one in French and another in Spanish. The main cartouche is elaborate and richly embellished with iconography representing various features of Africa, e.g. Africa is personified by a Ceres like female figure wearing an elephant scalp headdress from Roman iconography - and she is holding a cornucopia; pyramids; and a crocodile representing the Nile River.

Lot 3

2 Photograph Albums with 95 original photos from Gambia

Published: London, 1840 - 1843

Estimate: $1,500/2,000

With stunning pictures of Gambia during the colonisation, among the market in Basse, building of police station at Basse, police forces, Fulas, Fatoto, musicians, building of shops in Kudang, Soudan traders, Governors of Gambia (Sir Edward John Cameron and later Sir Cecil Hamilton Armitage, formerly Chief Commissioner of the Northern Territories of the Gold Coast), Cape St. Mary, views of streets and markets, villages, ports, landscapes, etc. Extremely rare photos of steamers Artimon, Tendaba, Sandu, Duncannon, Swan, Waterwitch, Combo, Mungo Park, Mansa Kila Ba, Vampire, official governor's and ships Kade, Fuladu, Rip, Maypole, Fuladu, Scout, etc.

The earliest photographs show construction and other scenes in the port of Banjul, now the capital, then still called Bathurst, including a flood in 1918. Several show the building of stores in Kudang in 1917. The latest show visits of Governors to Basse, the major city on the Eastern side of the country, in 1922. Especially interesting are the images of the native inhabitants, including Sudan traders, market scenes, washerwomen, musicians, street life, a "wizard" with worshipers, Fulas. Many travel albums have a few interesting subjects among a lot of fillers, but here almost every image is rich in content. All photographs titled in English.

Lot 7

Tyler (Richard Oviet) The Planets (limited to 25 copies)

Published: Uranian Press, New York, 1958 Estimate: $5,000/7,500

Although this spectacular work should be viewed as a cohesive work of art, with Tyler responsible for the design and execution of every part, it is nonetheless also true that each of the beautiful prints are stand-alone pieces which repay close examination, and re-examination. The subjects clearly presage Tyler's subsequent life as the Rev. Relytor of the Uranian Phalanstery.

Richard Oviet Tyler's work is "included in the permanent collections of the Library of Congress, Museum of Modern Art, U.S. Embassies Overseas, New York Public Library, David Rockefeller, and many private collections" (quote from resume published in 1962)

Large 4to. 20 leaves of sekishu paper, printed one side only in colours from woodblocks, by Tyler, each leaf signed, numbered, and titled in pencil by the artist. Unbound as issued within an original cloth portfolio, the cloth hand-printed with images by Tyler, decorative paper endpapers, cloth ties.

Lot 8

Cobb (Irvin S.) Film Script: a 152pp. original holograph manuscript “ ... The Dark Horse or So This is America ..." Published: [Los Angeles?], 1934

Estimate: $5,000/7,500

A 152pp. holograph manuscript , “ ... The Dark Horse or So This is America or Homespun”, being a 1934 early draft of a film script which eventually became a movie titled “Our Leading Citizen” starred Bob Burns, Susan Hayward and Joseph Allen, and was released in August 1939.

The substantial differences between this work and the final movie mean that, in effect, this constitutes an original unpublished work by one of America’s great 20th-century humorists.

“Irvin Shrewsbury Cobb (June 23, 1876 - March 11, 1944) was an American author, humorist, and columnist who lived in New York and authored more than 60 books and 300 short stories. Cobb was the second of four children born to Kentucky natives in Paducah, Kentucky. ... Cobb was raised in Paducah, where the events and people of his childhood became the basis for much of his later works. Later in life, he would acquire the nickname of "Duke of Paducah."

Lot 12

[Ramsey (William)] The Gentlemans Companion: or, a character of true nobility, and gentility: in the way of essay. By a Person of Quality. The health benefits of golf, and a warning about marriage: "'tis a Disease not to be Cured, but by Death".

Published: Thomas Sawbridge, London, 1676

Estimate: $2,000/3,000

A fine copy of the rare second edition of a fascinating and entertaining work, here in a high status binding: includes what is probably the first time in print that a Doctor recommends the health benefits of golf, or 'gauff' as it is spelt here. Slightly earlier, the general idea of golf as healthful recreation appears in the Marquis of Argyle's Instructions to a Son (1661, quoted in The Chronicles of Golf, p. 108 ff.).

This second and final edition of Ramesay's work appears to be scarcer than the first and is properly rare. In a section on outdoor exercise, the author writes that "Exercises and Recreations which are used.. [in the outdoors], that may benefit a Gentleman, and most healthy, are Pilmall, [and] Gauff, these by striking the Ball exercise the whole Man, together with the walk, and may be used moderately without any excess or violence" (p.136). On the other hand, Ramesay did not approve of soccer ('foot-ball'), lumping it with 'hurling' and 'wrastling': all of which he describes as 'rude pastimes better becoming the Vulgar, and Labouring Man'. He relents slightly and allows that watching rather than taking part is acceptable.

The work, first published in 1672, is remarkably wide-ranging and includes an apparently heart-felt section on the importance of thinking long and hard before marrying (" 'tis a Disease not to be Cured, but by Death"): Ramesay, who was married to a 'termagent' according to the Rev. James Grainger, apparently expanded on this theme in his Conjugam Conjurgium or, some serious considerations on marriage (published in 1673, Macclesfield copy sold for 2400 GBP).

Lot 231

Morris (William) Kelmscott Press, A Note By William Morris on His Aims in Founding the Kelmscott Press, Together With A Short Description Of The Press By S.C. Cockerell, & An Annotated List Of The Books Printed Thereat

Published: The Kelmscott Press, London, 1898

Estimate: $1,200/1,300

This is the last book printed at the Kelmscott Press. One of 525 copies. 8vo. Original linen-backed boards, lettered in black on the upper cover. pp. [iv] + 70 + [1] Frontispiece designed by Sir Edward Burne-Jones and engraved on wood by William Morris, woodcut borders to frontispiece and first page of text, 4 large woodcut initials (designed for the Froissart, but never used), text printed in black and red in the Golden type, with 5 pages in the Troy and Chaucer Type.

A very good copy. The linen spine has a couple of small
areas of early mild fraying. There is slight bumping of
two corners with minimal wear at the corners. There is a small leather ex-libris (of a prominent South African) at the top inner side of the front pastedown with some offsetting from this to a few adjacent blank pages. Otherwise the book is internally clean and unmarked and without foxing.

Lot 311

Beckett (Samuel) Waiting for Godot

Published: Faber & Faber, London, 1956

Estimate: $650/850

The first UK Edition of the Nobel prize winner's highspot and arguably the definitive play of the Twentieth Century. In the original yellow cloth with red lettering on the spine. The boards are fine and unmarked. There is a neat ownership name at the top of the front free endpaper and very light offsetting to both free endpapers, otherwise this is a fine crisp unmarked and unfoxed copy in a very good plus price-clipped dustwrapper which has some light rubbing and edge wear with a 1-2mm. sliver of loss at the top of the spine. Publisher's note tipped in as required.

AntiquarianAuctions.com is an online auction site dedicated to the sale of rare and out-of print books, maps & prints, documents, letters, ephemera and vintage photography.

Dealers and collectors worldwide have been selling and bidding on the site since 2010. Only established booksellers who are members of major national trade associations such as ABA, ABAA, PBFA or SABDA or are of good standing in the trade are permitted to sell on the site.

Auctions are held every five weeks and run on the model of a timed auction for one week.

All pricing is done in US$. No buyer’s premium is charged.

Next auction: Auction #57: 2 - 9 March 2017

Contact: Antiquarian Auctions: Paul Mills P.O. Box 186 7848 Constantia, Cape Town South Africa E-mail: support@antiquarianauctions.com Tel: +27 21 794 0600

detail.jpgBOSTON, MA - January 16, 2016 - Skinner, Inc. presents an outstanding two-session auction on Friday, January 27 in its Boston gallery. Fine Prints & Photographs starts at 12PM, followed by  Fine Paintings & Sculpture at 4PM. Previews will be on Wednesday, January 25, 12 to 5PM; Thursday, January 26, 12 to 8PM; and Friday, January 27, 9 to 10AM.

Robin S. R. Starr, Vice President and Director of American & European Works of Art, notes that in addition to a broad selection of pre-20th-century material, the auction offers an especially robust quantity of modern and contemporary work in all categories. A considerable number of items are from private collections and fresh to market, including notable examples that have descended in the families of the artists or original owners. 

Fine Prints & Photographs

The selection of prints is both broad and deep. There are works by traditional masters Rembrandt, Dürer, and Piranesi as well as strong offerings by more modern artists such as Josef Albers, Philip Guston and Alex Katz.

Among the highlights:

  •  David Hockney, Lightning (Lot 78, $7,000-9,000) One of several Hockney prints referencing the phenomenon of lightning, it is strikingly different from the colorful images more commonly associated with this multi-faceted artist.
  • Roy Lichtenstein, The Art Critic (Lot 88, $25,000-35,000) is a late work, at a point when the artist was playing off his own previous works and also looking back at the art of the earlier 20th century. This intentionally Picasso-esque version of an iconic Lichtenstein girl is retrospective in more than one sense.
  • Pablo Picasso himself is richly represented. Lot 100, Femme au char triumphal ($40,000-60,000) and Lot 101, Le joueur de diole ( $35,000-55,000) are unique hand-painted terra cotta tiles. The sale boasts a strong group of his turned ceramics as well.

Additionally there are works by Paul Klee, Helen Frankenthaler, Frank Stella, Robert Rauschenberg and—literally—too many other important artists to list.

In the photographs portion, Skinner is pleased to present work by sought-after masters such as Manuel Álvarez Bravo, Ernst Haas, Edward Weston, Ray K. Metzker, Ilse Bing, and Nan Goldin, and also fine examples by less widely-known but very accomplished photographers. 

73 diverse lots are being offered. Michelle Lamunière, Fine Photographs Specialist, points out that besides 20th-century work, there is a broad selection of 19th-century material, including images of the Middle East by Francis Frith and Auguste Salzmann. 

A major grouping of photographs are from the collection of Harvey Shipley Miller, a leading collector in the 1970s and 80s, at a time when there were few serious collectors of photographs as fine art. Proceeds from the sale of these items will benefit the Philadelphia Museum of Art. 

Of special note are:

  • Alfred Stieglitz, The Two Poplars, Lake George (with The Dying Chestnut Tree) (Lot 162, $8,000-12,000) reflects the photographer’s shift from a Pictorialist to a modernist "straight" aesthetic, while also revealing the subject of trees and nature as sources of personal meditation.
  • Andre Kertesz, Distortion 166 (Lot 161, $5,00-7,000) is one of a series of nudes photographed with mirrors and special lenses to create surreal distorted images.
  • Irving Penn, Marcel Duchamp, New York (Lot 181, $15,000-25,000) This platinum print (made in 1979 from a 1948 negative) is one of Penn’s famous studio wall “corner” series of portraits, important for its size and subject as well as its intrinsic artistic appeal and innovative use of a starkly simplified background.
  • Sally Mann, Untitled (Lot 196, $8,000-12,000) Mann is best known for her photographs of her young children and husband on their family farm in Virginia. This work represents another of Mann’s abiding interests: the Southern landscape haunted by the presence of history.

Fine Paintings & Sculpture

With over 275 lots, the second session of the auction promises a great start to the New Year. Robin Starr notes that Russians and other artists from the former Soviet Republic make an especially strong showing.

  • Ivan Aivazovsky, Along the Coast, Capri (Lot 265, $130,000-190,000). This leading Russian romanticist, influenced by Turner, was especially well known for seascapes and was hugely successful in his own lifetime.
  • Philippe Maliavine, Russian Peasants Singing (Lot 404, $150,000-250,000). Born into a poor peasant family, Maliavine (Malyavin) became a noted portraitist and international success. He combined Russian Impressionism and traditional folk themes in his paintings of colorful large-scale peasant figures.
  • François Angiboult, Cubist Still Life (Lot 442, $10,000-15,000) Behind the French masculine name was Hélène, La Baronne d’Œttingen, a Polish aristocrat married to a Russian officer. Hélène was an important member of Parisian avant-garde culture in the early 20th century.

The offerings are so rich that there will be a special lecture in conjunction with the auction, Across the Chasm of Foreignness: Art from the Russian and Soviet Empires in the West, by Anna Winestein, Executive Director of the Ballets Russes Arts Initiative, on Wednesday, January 25 at 6PM 

Artists from Cuba, Hungary, Belgium and Scotland, as well as many other countries, are represented among the more familiar American and European painters. Diversity of period, style, medium, and subject matter continue as a hallmark of this multi-part auction.

Robin Starr points to a group of French Post-Impressionist works of particular interest. These include Lot 363, Les fumées ($60,000-80,000) and Lot 364, La tour de Collioure ($250,000-350,000) both by Henri Martin. The artist experimented with the pointillist technique most associated with Georges Seurat, used to great effect in the misty atmosphere of Les fumées (meaning “the smoke”) and on a sunlit beach scene in the south of France.

Another significant Post-Impressionist work is by Louis Valtat, Boules de neige et pavot (Lot  396, $15,000-25,000). Valtat was associated with the Fauves and was an important figure in the stylistic transition from Monet to Matisse.

Alexander Calder is exceptionally well represented in this auction by five works in different media.  Three unique pieces are offered in the second session of the auction:

  • Aula Magna (Lot 438, $25,000-30,000), a gouache, pencil, and ink drawing for an installation in the auditorium of the Universidad Central de Venezuela. Working with the architects and sound engineers, Calder designed a system of suspended and fixed large panels that were successful both acoustically and aesthetically.
  • Profils (Lot 439, $70,000-90,000), gouache and ink, is a lively portrayal of a circus act. It re-caps the themes of balance and movement central to all Calder’s work, especially his sculptures and mobiles.
  • Untitled, Standing Mobile (Lot 440, $150,00-250,000) is a moving sculpture that, while less than six inches high, displays the engineering skill, artistic genius and wit for which Calder is renowned.

Image: Ray K. Metzker (American, 1931-2014). Berghoff Annex, Chicago, c. 1958

Old Master Drawings & Prints at Christie's

NEW YORK—Christie’s is pleased to announce the sale of Old Master & British Drawings on January 24 followed by the return of a various owner sale of Old Master Prints on January 25, to take place in New York for the first time in over 15 years. Old Master Paintings will be offered in April 2017, during Classic Week at Christie’s New York.

Christie’s Old Master & British Drawings sale on January 24 is comprised of 131 lots including works from distinguished private collections and institutions. Important works leading the sale are Francisco de Goya’s  Hunter with his dog in a landscape and a lavish design by Peter Paul Rubens inspired by a composition by Renaissance artist Giulio Romano.

The sale features a strong selection of Italian drawings including studies by Giacomo Cavedone, Parmigianino  and Taddeo Zuccaro, together with several works inspired by Michelangelo by Battista Franco, Giulio Clovio and Cesare da Sesto’s early study after the Sistine ceiling. Works by Piazzetta, Giovanni Battista and Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo, Piranesi and Francesco Guardi constitute the highlights of an outstanding selection of Venetian drawings.

Highlights from the British section include A male nude by Henry Fuseli, and works by Gainsborough and Burne-Jones. Charles de la Fosse’s preparatory study for the painting The Virgin’s Coronation with a selection of nineteenth-century works round out the sale.

The sale of Old Master Prints encompasses 220 prints from five centuries, offering an in-depth survey of the printed image in Europe, from Martin Schongauer’s (1450-1491) engravings created in the 1470s to a View of San Francisco by the French Charles Meryon (1821-1868), printed around 1855.

Classic prints by the most celebrated and widely collected artist-printmakers, including Albrecht Dürer (1471-1528), Rembrandt (1606-1669), and Francisco de Goya (1746-1828), stand side by side with extreme rarities, such as an anonymous, hand-coloured woodcut of the Virgin nursing the Child, printed in Northern Italy around 1530; one of a few surviving devotional prints of the period.

The estimates vary as much as the dimensions of the works: the exquisite little engravings by Hans Sebald Beham (1500-1550) are the size of a postage stamp, while the monumental woodcut The Submersion of Pharaoh’s Army (estimate: $200,000-300,000) after a design by Titian leads the sale and fills an entire wall in its scale.

DALLAS — Heritage Auctions announced sales of more than $850 million for 2016, the firm’s third-best year ever, and nearly equal to its 2015 sales of $860 million. The results are a signal of the company’s continuing dominance in the collectibles realm while other major auction houses recorded significantly lower sales volume for the same period. 

Heritage’s fine art category recorded a 28 percent leap in 2016 — in stark contrast to sales at its two largest competitors, both of which saw sales decline by approximately 30 percent.

“Through diversity, transparency and ardent attention to our clients, Heritage solidified and increased its commanding lead as the largest auction house founded in America,” said Heritage Co-Chairman James Halperin. “And we’re anticipating an even better 2017.”

U.S. Coins remains Heritage's largest category, with 2016 auction totals exceeding $192 million, outselling all other numismatic auction houses combined by a wide margin according to the Professional Numismatists Guild annual survey, which shows Heritage maintaining its 56 percent market share.

World & Ancient Coins at Heritage realized about $47 million, while Currency posted over $29 million auction sales. Both categories also showed early signs of increased market strength at major Heritage auctions in Florida and New York which realized almost $70 million during the first 10 days of January 2017.

“Based on late 2016 and early 2017 auction results, the U.S. Coin Market remains upbeat, with prices now already 10 to 12 percent above the previous years’ prices, on average,” Halperin said. “We are already seeing extremely positive results from the first coin auctions of the year. Meanwhile, our plans to expand into other markets and geographic regions are on track.”

Several of Heritage’s other categories set records: 

·         Heritage’s Sports auctions grew from $42 million in 2015 - already more than double any other auction firm’s Sports Collectibles sales - to an incredible $57.4 million in 2016. 

·         Heritage’s already-dominant Comics and Comic & Animation Art Auction category was another juggernaut, with total realized auction prices realized jumping from $34 million to a record $43 million, again outselling all other auction competitors combined. 

·         Fine Jewelry, Timepieces and Luxury Accessories at Heritage combined for a solid year as well, with more than $41.7 million in auction totals (more than $30 million in Jewelry and Watches and more than $10.7 million in Luxury Accessories), versus more than $26 million ($15 million in Jewelry and Watches & $11 million in Luxury Accessories) in 2015.

·         Movie Posters posted sales of $7.95+ million vs. $7.4+ million in 2015.

·         Luxury Real Estate saw sales increase to $19 million vs. $11.2 million for 2014 and 2015 combined. 

·         Wine recorded auction totals of $10.8 million in 2016 vs. $7.55 million in 2015.

Strategic growth continued as:

·         The company expanded its national footprint, opening an office in Palm Beach, Florida, and a full-service showroom in Chicago, Illinois. 

·         For the first time, Heritage's clientele now includes more than 1 million online registered bidder-members, with nearly 90,000 new members added in 2016. 

·         The firm also maintained its online lead, with the total number of unique visitors to HA.com holding steady at nearly twice the combined total number of unique visits the websites of Heritage Auctions’ five closest competing web sites.

·         Online sales (reported in early 2016 for 2015) were $344 million - surpassing all other auction houses; 2016 online sales figures are now being compiled and will be released soon.

Heritage Auctions is the largest auction house founded in the United States and the world’s third largest, with annual sales of more than $850 million, and over one million online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and receive access to a complete record of prices realized, with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com.

Want to get the up-to-the-minute updates and breaking news stories about Heritage Auctions? Follow us on HA.com/Facebook and HA.com/Twitter. To view an archive of Heritage press releases go to: HA.com/PR. To link to this release on your blog or Website: HA.com/PR-3096.

PJS6647_large.jpgAUSTIN, Texas—The archive for the acclaimed drama "Mad Men," one of television's most honored series in history, has been donated to the Harry Ransom Center, a humanities research library and museum at The University of Texas at Austin.

The donation was made by Matthew Weiner, the series creator, executive producer, writer and director; and Lionsgate, which produced the critically acclaimed series. The donated materials include script drafts and notes, props, costumes, digital records and video relating to the creation, production and marketing of the series.

"Mad Men," which followed the professional and personal lives of Madison Avenue advertising men and women during the 1960s, has been praised worldwide as much for its brilliantly drawn characters and artistic originality as for its historical authenticity. "Mad Men" premiered in 2007, going on to join an elite group in 2011 when it became only the fourth drama to be awarded four consecutive Emmy® Awards for Outstanding Drama Series. Additional honors for the series include: three Golden Globe® Awards for Best Television Drama Series; a Peabody Award; three Producers Guild Awards; six Writers Guild Awards; two BAFTA Awards; five Television Critics Association Awards, including Program of the Year; and being named on AFI's Top 10 Outstanding Television Programs for seven consecutive years in addition to receiving a special award at last year's luncheon for the show's final season.

"'Mad Men' is a groundbreaking program, noteworthy for the high quality of its writing, acting and design, as well as for the insightful depiction of American culture through the lens of the past," says Steve Wilson, the Ransom Center's curator of film. "Through the 'Mad Men' holdings, students and scholars will gain new insights into the creative decisions that shaped the series and a greater understanding of the evolution of motion pictures."

The series archive is rich in information about the work of actors, designers, writers, producers and creative direction, which aligns with the strengths of the Ransom Center's film holdings. The archive complements the film collection at the Ransom Center, including its collections of David O. Selznick, Gloria Swanson and Robert De Niro.

"It's our hope that the 'Mad Men' archive can satisfy academic curiosity and also provide creative inspiration," says Weiner. "Both artists and scholars can retrace our steps and see how we became interested in the parts of the story we were interested in, and how the creation of the physical world as well as the characters and storylines in the show were the work of many talented people." Read more from Weiner about the donation (PDF).

Materials from the series' 92 hour-long episodes include inspiration boards and lookbooks of period fashion and home and office design, set and costume drawings, scripts, shooting schedules and call sheets. Production footage includes dailies, screen tests, gag and demo reels, trailers and publicity material.

The donation includes a selection of costumes and small props, including materials for several of the show's fictional ad campaigns and characters' personal effects such as Joan's pen necklace, Betty's medical file and Don's terms of re-employment letter.

"'Mad Men' is more than a great show—it is part of American and television history, a ground-breaking classic worthy of the scholarly research the Ransom Center supports," says Lionsgate Television Group Chairman Kevin Beggs. "From its dramatization of gender roles in the workplace to its attention to historical detail in costume, set design and music, 'Mad Men' set standards that will be emulated for decades to come. We're proud to join with the show's brilliant creator, Matthew Weiner, in making this archive available to students who want to explore a cultural touchstone."

Scholarly and popular interest in "Mad Men" is already strong, and the Ransom Center is confident that there will be enduring research interest in this landmark series. The depth and breadth of the archive allows researchers to see the full scope of the "Mad Men" team's work.

"With this acquisition, the Ransom Center becomes a must for researching television," says Alisa Perren, associate chair and associate professor in UT Austin's Department of Radio-Television-Film. "The Center's acquisition of the 'Mad Men' materials represents an exciting moment for television and media industry scholars. This collection will be vital for those wishing to learn about modern television development, research, writing and production processes, 1960s-era advertising practices and shifting gender roles in American society."

The Ransom Center will conserve and catalog the materials, which will then be made available for exhibition, teaching and research. The Ransom Center also awards fellowships to scholars to conduct on-site research in its collections.

A selection of materials from the archive will be on view in the Ransom Center's lobby through Feb. 1.

Script from "Mad Men." Photo by Pete Smith.

GERMAN SCHOOL_Adoration of the Magi_Germany, Swabia or Franconia, c. 1465-70.jpgSince 1991 Les Enluminures has sold important examples of early drawings both to major public institutions and to private collectors. Today, opportunities to purchase drawings before 1500 are extremely limited, and even drawings before 1600 have become scarce on the art market. Les Enluminures is pleased to present a selling exhibition of 13 exceptional drawings. The drawings presented here include a wide variety of media, and they show notable shifts in technique over two centuries. They fit into three basic categories: copy drawings, sketches for eventual compositions, and fully worked out compositions.

January 20th to 28th, 2017 at Les Enluminures

23 East 73rd Street • 7th Floor

Penthouse • New York, NY 10021

Tel +1 212 717 7273

newyork@lesenluminures.com

www.lesenluminures.com

Click here for PDF version of the catalogue

“There remains much to be learned from early drawings, and because of their increasing rarity, as well as intrinsic artistic interest, every example merits close attention and further study. Here is an uncommon opportunity for private collectors and institutions alike to acquire an Old Master drawing that documents an early moment in the history of drawing.” -----Dr. Sandra Hindman

“My fascination with the history of collecting illuminated manuscript leaves and cuttings in part fueled my interest in early drawings. I noted that many collectors of Old Master drawings often included fragments of illuminated manuscripts - both leaves and cuttings - in their collections. It is worth noting that many museums worldwide house miniatures with drawings in their departments of prints and drawings (this is the practice at the Art Institute of the Chicago and the Musée du Louvre, among many others).” -----Dr. Sandra Hindman

Image: GERMAN SCHOOL. Adoration of the Magi, Germany, Swabia or Franconia, c. 1465-70. 

CA Book Fair_credit JosephDriste copy.jpgOAKLAND, CA - The 50th California International Antiquarian Book Fair recognized as one of the world's largest and most prestigious exhibitions of antiquarian books, returns to Northern California to celebrate its 50th Anniversary, Friday, February 10 through Sunday, February 12, 2017 at the Oakland Marriott City Center. 

Sponsored by the Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association of America (ABAA) and the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers (ILAB) and featuring the collections and rare treasures of nearly 200 booksellers from over 20 countries around the world, the three-day Fair gives visitors the opportunity to see, learn about and purchase the finest in rare and valuable books, manuscripts, maps, autographs, graphics, photographs, fine bindings; children's and illustrated books, and ephemera from many centuries and countries.

This year’s Book Fair will include a special exhibit from The Bancroft Library at the University of California, Berkeley, which has a long history of collecting the literary fiction of California. In more recent years, that scope has expanded to include mystery and detective fiction, fantasy and science fiction, and western fiction. This special exhibit will highlight California authors’ notable contributions in genre fiction and will emphasize recent donations to the library by featuring materials from the extensive collection of influential author, critic, and literary mentor Anthony Boucher, first editions by early members of the Northern California Chapter of Mystery Writers of America, selections by popular western and adventure writer Kenneth Perkins and MWA Grand Master Ross Macdonald, and more. 

The Book Fair will work with local “book art” artists and organizations to create an interactive, informative, and entertaining area at the Fair. Local libraries and universities will be exhibiting one-of-a-kind works from their collections. Calligraphers, bookbinders and a small press operator will once again be creating unique souvenirs for attendees to take home. Fun for all ages!

The Book Fair’s schedule will also include the following events and special exhibits, free with Fair admission:

Saturday, February 11

9:00 am - 10:30 am: California Rare Book School presents: “The Other Book: The Ames Almanack Opens a Window on Colonial America.” Two books were commonly found in eighteenth century households in North America: the Bible and the Other Book, or the Almanach.  Susan M. Allen, who teaches "History of the Book, 200-1820,” at California Rare Book School, will share an illustrated lecture from her course demonstrating how to “read” almanachs, both bibliographically and culturally, and how to decipher their puzzling tables.

11:00 am - 12:30 pm: California Rare Book School presents: Bound for El Dorado: Collecting California and the Far West. Presented by Gary F. Kurutz, Director of the Special Collections Branch, California State Library.

1:00 pm - 2:00 pm: Meet Mr. Blake, An illustrated lecture on the life, work, and influence of William Blake, given by John Windle, ABAA specialist in the literary and artistic output of this English genius. Jointly presented by the ABAA and the Bibliographical Society of America.

3:00 pm - 4:30 pm: California Rare Book School presents: Printers, Collectors, Bibliographers, and the Inquisition: A Brief Introduction to the History of the Book in Hispanic America. Presented by Daniel J. Slive, Head of Special Collections at the Bridwell Library, Perkins School of Theology, Southern Methodist University and David Szewczyk, proprietor, Philadelphia Rare Books & Manuscripts Co. 

Sunday, February 12

12:30 - 1:15 pm: Book Collecting 101, Learn from ABAA member Vic Zoschak, Jr., Tavistock Bookshop to create a strategy for collecting books, as well as how to spot a “first edition,” judge a book’s condition, and learn bookish terms and jargon.  

1:15 - 2:00 pm: What’s This Book Worth? - Vic Zoschak, Jr., Tavistock Books will discuss the primary factors that give books commercial and monetary value, as well as strategies for appraising and selling books.

2:00 - 3:30 pm: Discovery Day is the public’s chance to discover if those old books gathering dust are worth something.  The public will receive free, expert oral appraisals on up to three books. Appraisals are limited to a first come, first served basis - within the scheduled times. 

The Book Fair’s venue in downtown Oakland is an added convenience for bibliophiles. The Oakland Marriott City Center is just steps away from the 12th Street BART Station, making it easily accessible to attendees from San Francisco and all over the East Bay.  Out-of-town visitors will appreciate staying onsite at the Marriott, plus fair visitors arriving at both Oakland and San Francisco airports can take BART directly to the new venue. 

Moreover, downtown Oakland is within easy walking distance to diverse and eclectic cuisine, hip nightspots, historic Old Oakland, museums, Lake Merritt and the waterfront at Jack London Square.  

Sponsors for the Book Fair include: Michals Insurance Agency, Inc. Media sponsors for the book fair include: ABC7, BART, Interiors California, SF Gate and The San Francisco Chronicle. 

Tickets and Information

The 50th California International Antiquarian Book Fair will be held at the Oakland Marriott City Center at 1001 Broadway in downtown Oakland from 3 p.m. - 8 p.m. on Friday, February 10; 11 a.m. - 7 p.m. on Saturday, February 11; and 11 a.m. - 5 p.m. on Sunday, February 12.

Tickets are available online or at the door. Friday admission tickets are $25; Saturday and Sunday tickets are $15 and all tickets allow return admission for the remainder of the fair. For more information about tickets or exhibiting, visit www.cabookfair.com. Pre-sale ($13-$23) and student passes ($10-$20) are available online now.

For more information about the 50th California International Antiquarian Book Fair, please visit the website at www.cabookfair.com or the ABAA website at www.abaa.org; or contact Fair Managers, White Rain Productions at, cafair@whiterainproductions.com, (800) 454-6401. 

Image: Credit Joseph Driste. 

micro.jpegDALLAS - The unprecedented sale of 32 antique microscopes is set to star in Heritage Auctions’ Jan. 19 Gentleman Collector Auction. The instruments come from a prominent West Coast collection and are offered at no reserve. The consignor has assembled a collection over the years that rivals those in many museums. All are offered with period cases and have been meticulously maintained.  

A rare cased 1858 Smith and Beck Binocular Microscope is one of the collection’s finest pieces. Over three dozen pristine accessories accompany the instrument. The microscope was the personal instrument of Thomas Glazebrook Rylands, widely regarded as one of 19th-century Britain’s brightest minds. A collection of his hand-drawn charts, calibrations and botanical specimens are included in the lot.

Microscopes have long been a fascination with gentleman collectors. Microsopists generally attribute the modern microscope to the invention of the compound microscope in the Low Countries in the early 17th century. Since then, the instrument has been a staple of scientists’ desks and laboratories across the globe. The most notable collector was King George III, whose collection filled the halls of Kew Palace.

Of the 32 instruments on offer, five date before the 20th century, including a cased J. Swift & Son Folding Traveling Monocular Microscope. The microscopes display no more than light wear from use. Some maintain full optics - a testament to the collection’s quality.

Additional auction items relating to early microscopy and 20th century science include several rare slides, such as a microscopic picture slide of a basket of flowers, and autographs of Jonas Salk, Linus Pauling, and Albert Sabin.

Heritage Auctions is the largest auction house founded in the United States and the world’s third largest, with annual sales of more than $800 million, and over one million online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and receive access to a complete record of prices realized, with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com.

Want to get the up-to-the-minute updates and breaking news stories about Heritage Auctions? Follow us on HA.com/Facebook and HA.com/Twitter. To view an archive of Heritage press releases go to: HA.com/PR. To link to this release on your blog or Website: HA.com/PR-3092.

Lot-211 copy 2.jpgNew York— On Thursday, January 26, Swann Galleries will open their 2017 auction season with Alphonse Mucha & Masters of Art Nouveau: The Harry C. Meyerhoff Collection, the largest such collection of works by the master and his circle ever to come to auction.

More than half of the over 200 lots in the sale are works by Mucha, tracing the artist’s career from his time in Prague, to Paris and New York. The selection offers rare views into Mucha’s process and personal life with previously unrecorded preparatory sketches for the famous Documents Décoratifs and Figures Décoratifs, as well as an etching of his young son.

One highlight of the sale is the complete set of Les Maîtres de l’Affiche, 1896-1900, a selection of the era’s posters from Europe and the U.S., compiled by Roger Marx. Each of the five volumes features posters by leading artists, including Mucha and others in the sale, in a special green and gold binding designed by Paul Berthon. In all, the set features 240 superlative posters reproduced as full color lithographs, and is expected to sell between $35,000 and $50,000.

Several works by Mucha make their auction debut, including a rare circular advertisement for the hair gel Krinogen, 1928, and a counter-top display screen for Savon Mucha, 1907 ($2,000 to $3,000 and $3,000 to $4,000, respectively). The scarce, smaller format of Nestlé’s Food for Infants, 1898, makes a rare auction appearance with an estimate of $4,000 to $6,000, while Bleuze - Hadancourt Parfumeur, circa 1899, which has been seen at auction only a handful of times in the last 25 years ($15,000 to $20,000).

In addition to posters, promotional ephemera designed by and after Mucha will also be in the sale, including chocolate tins, menus, programs and magazine covers, all of which speak to the artist’s popularity and ubiquity. Also present are several sets of decorative panels, for use as wall coverings in a fashionable fin de siècle home, including Têtes Byzantines (Byzantine Heads), circa 1897 ($15,000 to $20,000); Aurore et Crépuscule (Dawn and Dusk), 1899 ($10,000 to $15,000); and several versions of Les Fleurs (The Flowers), circa 1900.

Classical favorites for which Alphonse Mucha is known include the iconic Zodiac / La Plume, 1896, and Job, 1896 (each $15,000 to $20,000); La Trappistine, 1897, valued at $7,000 to $10,000; and Bières de la Meuse, in the exceedingly rare smaller format, 1897, expected to sell between $6,000 and $9,000. Further seminal works, such as the foreboding Medee / Sarah Bernhardt, 1898 ($12,000 to $18,000), and Monaco - Monte Carlo, 1897 ($12,000 to $18,000), will also be crossing the block.

The sale is filled out with works by artists in Mucha’s circle, most notably Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec’s Confetti, 1894, and Babylone d’Allemange, 1894 ($40,000 to $60,000 and $30,000 to $40,000, respectively). Also available is the iconic Ambassadeurs / Yvette Guilbert, 1894, by Théophile-Alexandre Steinlen ($4,000 to $6,000) and several other works by the artist. Travel posters by Adolfo Hohenstein, including Monaco / Exposition et Councours de Canots Automobiles, 1900, estimated at $10,000 to $15,000, and works by Pierre Bonnard, Eugène Grasset and Privat-Livemont, among others, will also be in the sale.

Harry C. Meyerhoff was a Baltimore entrepreneur in construction with a passion for horse racing, evidenced by a run of equestrian posters that start the sale, topped by Ludwig Hohwein’s Das Goldene Buch / Des Sports, 1910, estimated at $2,000 to $3,000. Meyerhoff assembled the Art Nouveau collection with his wife in the 1970s and ‘80s.

The auction will be held Thursday, January 26, beginning at 1:30 p.m. The auction preview will be open to the public Saturday, January 21 from noon to 5 p.m.; Monday, January 23 through Wednesday, January 25 from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Thursday, January 26 from 10 a.m. to noon.

An illustrated auction catalogue is available for $35 from Swann Galleries, Inc., 104 East 25th Street, New York, NY 10010, or online at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information or to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Swann President and Director of Vintage Posters, Nicholas D. Lowry at 212-254-4710, extension 57 or posters@swanngalleries.com.

Image: Lot 211 Mucha, Princezna Hyacinta, 1911. Estimate $15,000 to $20,000.

1483544578873.jpgWashington, DC—Before venturing west to capture America's frontier in paintings and photographs, 19th-century artists explored the eastern landscape, which served as a powerful source of mythmaking for a nation finding its identity in the nineteenth century. However, with the exception of images from the Civil War, photography of the East during the period has never before been the exclusive focus of an exhibition or catalog. As the first of its kind, East of the Mississippi: Nineteenth-Century American Landscape Photography will explore this fundamental chapter in America's photographic history through 175 photographs, including daguerreotypes, salted paper prints, albumen prints, stereo cards, and albums. On view at the National Gallery of Art, Washington, West Building from March 12 through July 16, 2017, the exhibition showcases photographers who documented the nation's transition over the course of the century, exploring the untouched wilderness, the devastation of the Civil War, and the dramatic transformations of industrialization.

"We are delighted to present the first exhibition devoted to this foundational period in both the history of photography and of our nation," said Earl A. Powell III, director, National Gallery of Art, Washington. "The assembling of such an extraordinary selection of photographs, many of which are rarely displayed, could not have been undertaken without the generous support of the Trellis Fund and Kate and Wes Mitchell."

Exhibition Organization and Support

The exhibition is organized by the National Gallery of Art in association with the New Orleans Museum of Art, where it will be on view from October 5, 2017 through January 7, 2018.

The exhibition is made possible through the generous support of the Trellis Fund. Additional funding is kindly provided by Kate and Wes Mitchell.

Exhibition Highlights

Organized chronologically and thematically, East of the Mississippi begins with some of the earliest American photographs, created shortly after news of the Frenchman Jacques-Louis-Mandé Daguerre's invention reached eastern cities in late 1839. While Niagara Falls was already a favorite subject for paintings and prints, the first extant daguerreotypes of the natural wonder were made by British scientist Hugh Lee Pattinson in April of 1840. Soon after, dentist Samuel Bemis captured New England's White Mountains in an extraordinary series of daguerreotypes.

As areas of the East Coast's picturesque terrain became a popular destination for urban dwellers of Boston, New York, and Philadelphia, photography became a means of marketing sites to tourists. In July of 1845 the Langenheim Brothers adopted the panorama format popular in the nineteenth century by making five daguerreotypes of Niagara Falls and mounting them side-by-side in a single frame. Photographers James Wallace Black and Franklin White journeyed to the White Mountains, making some of the earliest series of salted paper prints of the area, while others such as James McClees, Frederick DeBourg Richards, and Jay Dearborn Edwards trained their cameras on the built environment as urban centers experienced growth and transformation. George Kendall Warren, a pioneer of the college yearbook, photographed landscapes around college campuses including West Point.

The exhibition continues with photographs and paintings from the late 1850s and early 1860s, demonstrating the close ties between the two media as photographers sought to make landscapes more deeply attuned to contemporary aesthetic concern. Influenced by the ideas of painter Thomas Cole, art critic John Ruskin, and transcendentalist philosophers such as Ralph Waldo Emerson and Henry David Thoreau, these photographers worked in close collaboration with painters or were even painters themselves. Photographer John Moran and his brother, the painter Thomas Moran, worked side by side in the environs of Philadelphia and the mountains of Pennsylvania. Samuel Masury photographed the Loring Estate on the coast of Beverly, Massachusetts as John Frederick Kensett painted the same landscape for Coastal Scene (c. 1860-1870). Further north, Charles and Edward Bierstadt collaborated with their brother Albert on a series of albumen prints of the White Mountains before Albert painted a similar scene in 1863, Mountain Brook.

The following section presents a range of photographs that document the impact of the Civil War on the eastern American landscape, showing selections from two of the most significant photographic publications of the 19th century—Alexander Gardner's Gardner's Photographic Sketch Book of the War (1866) and George Barnard's Photographic Views of Sherman's Campaign (1866), both of which revealed the modification and devastation of the land from the war. Also featured are Andrew J. Russell's photographs of the building of military infrastructure in northern Virginia.

Two sections focus on the many ways in which photographers approached landscapes altered by industrialization. Thomas H. Johnson captured the coal mines expanding across northeastern Pennsylvania, while James F. Ryder and William H. Rau were hired by railroad companies, in 1862 and the 1890s respectively, to record newly laid train routes and showcase the scenic views made possible by the new infrastructure. Included are seven of Henry Peter Bosse's cyanotypes created while on a mapmaking survey of the upper Mississippi River. Undertaken to plan improvements to the river aimed at facilitating commerce and industry, the series illustrate photography's role in shaping development.

Finally, the exhibition presents photographers in the last decades of the century who made a living marketing the East's natural beauty while also advocating for its preservation. George Barker produced striking mammoth-plate albumen prints of Niagara Falls and Florida resorts. After finding success selling scenes of the Adirondacks to tourists and industrialists, Seneca Ray Stoddard made photographs such as Drowned Lands (c. 1888) which captured the forest ravaged by the timber industry. Stoddard used his photographs to advocate for the passing of a law to create Adirondack Park. In Wisconsin, Henry Hamilton Bennett began by selling stereographic prints of the Dells to the growing number of the river's steamboat tourists. He later protested plans for a dam that would submerge the sandstone formations he had so beautifully photographed. Finally, works by Alfred Stieglitz and Edward Steichen conclude the exhibition, hinting at the future of American landscape photography in the 20th century.

Curator, Catalog, and Related Activities

The exhibition is organized by Diane Waggoner, curator of nineteenth-century photographs, National Gallery of Art.

The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog copublished by Yale University Press and written by Diane Waggoner; with additional essays by Russell Lord, Freeman Family Curator of Photographs, New Orleans Museum of Art and Jennifer Raab, assistant professor in the history of art, Yale University. Featuring 220 color illustrations, the 288-page hardcover catalog will be available at shop.nga.gov/, or by calling (800) 697-9350 or (202) 842-6002; faxing (202) 789-3047; or e-mailing mailorder@nga.gov.

Image: Henry Peter Bosse, Construction of Rock and Brush Dam, L.W., 1891, cyanotype, National Gallery of Art, Washington, Gift of Mary and Dan Solomon

X_LePaonPainting copy.jpgIn conjunction with the exhibition, “A True Friend of the Cause”: Lafayette and the Antislavery Movement, the Grolier Club and Lafayette College are pleased to offer a roundtable discussion on the role of the Marquis de Lafayette as an international antislavery advocate and his contributions to the abolitionist movement on three continents. A number of the exhibition’s themes will be explored, including the personal and intellectual origins of Lafayette’s interest in the welfare of the enslaved during and immediately following the American Revolution; his involvement in transatlantic antislavery organizations; his experiment in gradual emancipation in French Guiana; and his enduring influence on American abolitionists, both black and white.

The discussion will be moderated by the exhibition’s curators:

Olga Anna Duhl, Oliver Edwin Williams Professor of Languages, Lafayette College and Grolier Club member

Diane Windham Shaw, Director of Special Collections and College Archivist, Lafayette College

Speakers will include:

Laura Auricchio, professor of Art History at Parsons School of Design, a college within The New School. Her writings on Lafayette include The Marquis: Lafayette Reconsidered (2014), winner of the 2015 American Library in Paris Book Award, and “Transplanting Liberty: Lafayette’s American Garden,” in Dan O’Brien, ed., Gardening—Philosophy for Everyone: Cultivating Wisdom (2010). She has also written extensively on French women artists of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries with publications including Adélaïde Labille-Guiard: Artist in the Age of Revolution for the J. Paul Getty Museum (2009).

François Furstenberg, professor of History at Johns Hopkins University. He is the author of In the Name of the Father: Washington’s Legacy, Slavery, and the Making of a Nation (2006) and When the United States Spoke French: Five Refugees who Shaped a Nation (2014). His scholarship on the connections between the U.S. and the French Atlantic world in the 18th-century also includes his prize-winning 2011 article in the William and Mary Quarterly, “Atlantic Slavery, Atlantic Freedom: George Washington’s Library, Slavery, and Trans-Atlantic Abolitionist Networks,” in which Lafayette figures prominently.

John Stauffer, professor of English, American Studies, and African American Studies at Harvard University. He is the author and editor of numerous books on slavery and abolition, including Picturing Frederick Douglass: An Illustrated History of the Nineteenth Century’s Most Photographed American (2015) and Giants: The Parallel Lives of Frederick Douglass and Abraham Lincoln (2008). He has appeared in and served as an advisor to the PBS documentaries, The Abolitionists and The African American Experience: Many Rivers to Cross. In addition to antislavery, his scholarly interests include the Civil War era, social protest movements, and photography.  

January 24, 2017, 2:00-3:30 p.m. with a reception to follow

The Grolier Club, 47 E. 60th Street, New York City

To Register, please email Maev Brennan at mbrennan@grolierclub.org

Image: Jean-Baptiste Le Paon, Lafayette at Yorktown, oil on canvas, 1782. Lafayette College Art Collection

 

662a7558-6d5e-4e61-9530-1dad8b5e35d5.jpg[ITHACA, NY] National Book Auctions, located in Ithaca, NY, announces the launch of their next auction catalog.  

This catalog features rare, antique and decorative books as well as select additions of ephemera. We will offer an array of early titles dating back to 1539, along with a private modern collection of collectible horror and science fiction titles. Special printings and decorative antique fancy leather bindings will also be offered.          

Antique and rare books in this catalog include numerous titles. Among the earliest examples are works chronicling the use of symbols and emblems, such as the 1629 printing of Hoyer's "Flammulae Amoris - S P Augustini Versibus et Iconibus Exornatae."  Additional early titles include Sebastian Franck's "Teutscher Nation Chronic Alt und New Vorbilde," produced in 1539 and housed in a hand-tooled vellum binding with the original hand-forged brass clasps, the 1590 first edition of Ciccarelli's "Le Vite Degli Imperatori Romani," and Ruscelli's "Le Imprese Illustri con Espositioni," printed in 1572.  Among the other scarce volumes are early vellum bindings, rare engraved plates, decorative antique sets, limited editions, author-signed copies, and much more.                   

Several pleasing collections will also be showcased. Highlighted are additional early theological, historical and literary works from the 16th through 18th centuries, including Venegas' "Natural and Civil History of California," produced in two volumes in 1759. Two important early encyclopedias will also be sold including an American printing, Dobson's "Encyclopaedia or a Dictionary of Arts Sciences and Miscellaneous Literature," produced in 21 volumes over the years 1798 to 1803, and an English example, Wilkes' "Encyclopaedia Londinensis," including the full complement of 24 volumes printed between 1810 and 1829, and profusely illustrated with copperplate engravings. The modern estate collection includes thousands of titles from the horror, occult, supernatural, science fiction and fantasy genres. Highlights include works by H. P. Lovecraft and others, and desirable printings from publishers such as Arkham House.  

Found throughout this catalog are interesting group offerings. Important Celtic and Gaelic topics covering the history of Scotland and Ireland are presented alongside many bound magazine compilations dating back to the early 1800's. Early engravings and other plates have been gathered into attractive groups.   

National Book Auctions is a public auction service specializing in books, ephemera, and art. National Book Auctions is a targeted service offering experience and expertise unique to marketing antique and modern books and ephemera for consignors and collectors alike. The upcoming auctions will feature a wide assortment of collectible, signed, and first edition books. For more information, please contact the gallery at 607-269-0101 or email mail@nationalbookauctions.com.

 

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