December 2016 Archives

DALLAS — A remarkable variety of private collections, all carefully curated over decades, comes together in the fifth annual Heritage Auctions’ Gentleman Collector Auction Jan. 19 in Dallas, Texas.

“This sale covers a wide spectrum,” Heritage Vice President of Special Collections Nick Dawes said. “We started the Gentleman Collector Estates Auction five years ago with the collection of Malcolm Forbes, and I think this is the best auction we have had so far.” 

Highlights include a circa 1919 Rare and Important Mitchell 35mm Standard A Motion Picture Film Camera (est. $70,000-100,000) operates as either a hand crank or electric drive. It originally was owned by RKO Radio Pictures, before ultimately being owned and used by a Walt Disney cinematographer. One of the early Mitchell Standard motion picture cameras that shot nearly all of the early movies in Hollywood and around the world, this one retains the original design and is in excellent condition.

A Bach-Auricon 16-mm Motion Picture Newsreel Camera Package (est. $25,000-35,000), circa 1953, retains all of its original components and sits on a factory-correct original wood tripod, the height of which can be adjusted to anywhere from 67-92 inches. The camera, considered a rare find from the golden era of movie newsreel cinematography, has all of its original paint and finishes, and the large, original factory 1,200-foot film magazine. The camera’s movement and sync motor work, and the package includes the lens and sound amplifier.

A Rare American Gilman Joslin Terrestrial Library Globe on a stand (est. $15,000-20,000), circa 1869, (nicknamed the ‘Boston Globe’) highlights a rare cartographic group including maps, some dating to the 16th century.  The globe, in original condition was consigned by an East Coast family and is one of two iterations of this floor model terrestrial globe by Joslin, who was awarded a gold medal for his terrestrial and celestial globes by the American Institute in 1852.

Another lot expected to be among the most coveted in the auction is a Pair of Cantonese Export Silver Gilt Filigree Rosewater Sprinklers and Underplates (est. $12,000-18,000), circa late 18th century, made for the Indian or Middle Eastern market and recently discovered by a Heritage expert in Holland.   

Collectors will have a chance to acquire a Mole Richardson Model 410 2000 Watt Fresnel Studio Light (est. $12,000-18,000), circa 1939. This light, which stands 65-1/2 inches high, has been refreshed with factory-correct instrument pain finish and bead-blasted to expose the original Shelby Steel Tube yoke and the original bronze fittings. It includes the original on/off switch and the original factory cable, but also includes a new wireless remote control on/off switch. The light was owned and used by Paramount Film Studios until it was sold in 1988, has electrical internals that have been cleaned, de-wired and fitted with a socketed 2,700-degree LED lamp, and includes a refinished mid-century factory stand. 

Among the private collections is a group of 31 rare microscopes from a private West Coast collector. A spectacular cased Smith and Beck Binocular Microscope (est. $7,000-10,000), circa 1858, includes two full boxes of rarely seen accessories and bull’s-eye condenser, all in the original cabinetry. The instrument was the personal property of gentleman scientist extraordinaire Thomas Glaebrook Rylands, a descendant of whom sold it to the current seller. The auction also includes a 1959 Cased Ernst Leitz Dialux with an inclined binocular head with calibrated inter-pupillary adjustment and adjustable left eyepiece.

Perhaps the finest collection of vintage British biscuit tins to come to auction includes over 300 tins and most of the rarities, in very fine condition. Collectors are sure to fight over the rare William Crawford & Sons Rolls-Royce Limousine Biscuit Tin (est. $1,200-1,600), circa 1929.

Other lots that are expected to attract intense bidder interest include, but are not limited to: 

·         A rare Spanish Mechanical Rowboat Toy in its Original Box (est. $7,000-9,000), circa 1930 - one of the highest quality toys we have seen at Heritage.

·         An Alligator Leather and Silver-Mounted Violin Case (est. $3,500-5,000) from sometime in the first half of the 20th century.

·         A Mikhail Ovchinnikov Russian Silver Tankard with Wood Grain Motif (est. $3,000-5,000), circa 1908-17, with chased faux bois decoration to body simulating woodgrain, saw tooth texture on the edge of the lid and a geometric handle and heart-shaped thumbrest.

·         A collection of nautical antiques relating to Admiral Horatio Nelson, over 50 antique meerschaum pipes, an exquisite collection of Georgian and Victorian paint boxes collected by a prominent artist, over 50 remarkable alligator leather accessories, mostly of the Edwardian period, a collection of drinking tankards of the highest quality and a fascinating collection of 19th century German nutcrackers round out this delightful sale.

·         Two nine-inch Continental Carved Oak Comical Dwarf-Form Nutcrackers (est. $1,200-1,600), circa late 19th-early 20th century.

·         A 19th-century Fine Meerschaum Pipe of a Tattooed Female Moore in its original case (est. $800-1,200); woman portrayed is semi-topless.

·         Three J. Holland, W.J. Reeves & Son, and J. Newman’s English Regency Watercolor Paint Kits (est. $400-600) from the first half of the 19th century.

Heritage Auctions is the largest auction house founded in the United States and the world’s third largest, with annual sales of more than $800 million, and over one million online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and receive access to a complete record of prices realized, with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com.

Want to get the up-to-the-minute updates and breaking news stories about Heritage Auctions? Follow us on HA.com/Facebook and HA.com/Twitter. To view an archive of Heritage press releases go to: HA.com/PR. To link to this release on your blog or Website: HA.com/PR-3089.

delitium.jpgNew York, NY, December 22, 2016 — Delirium: The Art of the Symbolist Book, opening January 20 at the Morgan Library & Museum, explores creative encounters between Symbolist authors and the artists in their circles.  The movement coalesced during the second half of the nineteenth century as writers in France and Belgium sought a new form of art—one that referenced the visible world as symbols that correlate to ideas and states of mind. The Symbolists celebrated subjectivity, expressed through a nuanced language of reverie, delirium, mysticism, and ecstasy. For these writers, literature suggests meaning rather than defines it.

The Symbolist movement was a revolt against naturalism, with an emphasis on allusion and self-expression that resonated with contemporary painters, who were in turn inspired to translate these ideas to visual art. Collaborations in print with Symbolist writers presented artists with a paradox: to create illustrations for words deliberately detached from explicit meaning or concrete reality. Divergent attempts to meet this challenge helped to liberate illustration from its purely representational role, introducing an unchartered dialogue between text and image. These developments informed the emergence of the concept of the book-as-art, a tradition that continues today. 

“With its renowned collections of printed books, manuscripts, and drawings, the Morgan Library & Museum is an ideal venue for this exhibition,” said Colin B. Bailey, director of the museum. “The works in Delirium, which are drawn primarily from our own holdings, reveal the innovations and all-encompassing aspirations of the Symbolist aesthetic. The movement would have a profound effect on avant-garde literature, artists’ books, and modern theories of art.” 

The exhibition, on through May 14, features works by more than thirty leading figures, including Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867), Stephane Mallarmé (1842-1898), Paul Verlaine (1844-1896), Alfred Jarry (1873-1907), Maurice Maeterlinck (1862-1949), Odilon Redon (1840-1916), Maurice Denis (1870-1943), Pierre Bonnard (1867-1947), Henri Fantin-Latour (1836-1904), Henry van de Velde (1863-1957), and Fernand Khnopff (1858-1921). 

THE EXHIBITION

Delirium opens with an introduction to some of the movement’s literary and artistic precursors: works by Charles Baudelaire (1821-1867) and the painters Eugène Delacroix (1798-1863) and Puvis de Chavannes (1824-1898). Baudelaire’s writings on Delacroix helped shape the foundation of Symbolist poetics. A manuscript of an early poem about Delacroix’s Tasso in the Madhouse (1839) is juxtaposed with a study for one of the many works championed by the poet: The Struggle of Jacob with the Angel (1850). What moved Baudelaire was the painter’s ability to convey his interior life through the suggestive use of color, contour, and movement. These effects provoked memories, involuntary associations, and reverie in each viewer. Baudelaire adapted these ideas to poetry in his ground-breaking works: Fleurs du mal (1857) and Les épaves (1866), illustrated by the Belgian artist Félicien Rops (1833-1898).

There is not a uniform or guiding artistic style connected with the Symbolist movement, which is immediately apparent among the illustrations in the books on view. The writers counted among their friends visual artists associated with many avant-garde groups: Impressionists (Manet), the Decadents (Rops), the Nabis (Vallotton, Rippl-Ronai), post-Impressionists (Denis, Bonnard), Les XX (Khnopff, Minne), and Art nouveau (van de Velde, Rysselberghe). Each artist brought their individual aesthetic styles to the challenge of illustrating Symbolism— a literary movement, which itself lacked coherence.

At the center of the gallery, the first and last artist’s book associated with the movement are presented: Stéphane Mallarmé’s L’après-midi d’un faune (1876), illustrated by Édouard Manet; and Paul Verlaine’s Parallèlement (1900), illustrated by Pierre Bonnard. With its delicate imagery, oscillating typography, and Japanese-inspired book design, L’après-midi d’un faune beautifully conveys Mallarmé’s alternating states of reality, dream, and memory. Like several poets and novelists in the exhibition, Mallarmé expressed ambivalence toward illustration, believing that poetry needed no elaboration. Nevertheless, Mallarmé solicited illustrations from his friends throughout his career.

The variations in Bonnard’s intimate designs for the deluxe edition of Verlaine’s Parallèlement present an entirely different aesthetic. This is the result of the artist’s personal responses to each poem. His visual plays of association are depictions not necessarily of the subject matter but of whatever thoughts and visions emerged as he was reading. Bonnard’s asymmetric and erotic imagery skirts the margins or transgresses the linear order of the book’s classic typography. The artist kept pace with his spontaneous impressions of Verlaine’s text by sketching some designs directly onto typeset pages.

The artwork within the Symbolist books may be understood as a single artist’s interpretation of and reaction to the words on the page. Other artist collaborations on view that exemplify such individual responses to literature include George Minne’s melancholy imagery for Maurice Maeterlinck’s Serres chaudes, Redon’s haunting frontispieces for the poet Iwan Gilkin, and Maurice Denis’s evocative designs for André Gide’s Le voyage d’Urien.

While much of the artwork that corresponds with the Symbolist movement is anti-naturalistic, the legacies of some writers associated with the movement are tied to their public image and well-known portraits that were disseminated in print. Félix Vallotton (1865-1925), ubiquitous in periodicals of the 1890s, is known for his many thumbnail portraits of Symbolist writers. One of his first artistic woodcuts, a portrait of Paul Verlaine, is on view, along with images of Arthur Rimbaud by Fantin-Latour and Carjat, Manet’s engraved portrait of Baudelaire, and Nadar’s photograph of Mallarmé.

Delirium culminates with an examination of cover and title designs. Symbolist publishers, particularly in Belgium, were at the forefront of using cover designs as visual preludes to the literature within. The Pre-Raphaelite influence on Symbolist imagery is apparent in Carlos Schwabe’s (1866-1926) aspirant figure on the cover of Dreams by Olive Schreiner—a rare example of a Symbolist artist illustrating work by a female author. Also represented are the Belgian artists Théo van Rysselberghe and Henry van de Velde, whose book decorations heralded a new form of non-representational ornament. Their works encompass the influence of the Arts and Crafts movement, Seurat’s ideas about the affective qualities of line, and the emergent Art Nouveau. The experimental typography of author and artist Alfred Jarry, whose illegible title design is itself a Symbolist work of art, is also on view.

Translation Feature

Selected translations of poetry associated with objects on view will be made available on a hand-held card in the gallery. For this special feature, the Morgan collaborated with the contemporary poets Ariana Reines, Mark Polizzotti, Barry Schwabsky, Luc Sante, Marcella Durand, and John Godfrey to enrich the public’s experience by providing works by Baudelaire, Mallarmé, Rimbaud, and others in English.

Image: Odilon Redon (1840-1916), Centaure lisant, 19th century, Charcoal on light brown paper. The Morgan Library & Museum, Thaw Collection.

Jean Baptiste Balthazar Sauvan.jpegThe first Interiors auction of 2017 kicks off with an important collection of London Underground posters designed by Clifford (1907-1985) and Rosemary (1910-1998) Ellis. Alongside a selection of the Ellises’ own drawings, prints and paintings will be works by Walter Sickert, Howard Hodgkin, Adrian Heath and Wojciech Fangor. Interiors takes place on 10th and 11th January at Donnington Priory and will also feature Furniture, Carpets, Clocks and Works of Art. 

A fabulous range of Jewellery, Silver, Watches and Pens will be offered on 18th January, with the special online Australia Day Wine auction on 26th January. 

Books and Works on Paper will take place on 23rd February, and features a superb selection of landscape aquatints. Fine Wine, Port and Champagne follows on 24th February and both auctions will be held at Bloomsbury House, London. 

March will see both the sale of Works from the Collection of Jan Krugier, the highly renowned art dealer (8th March) and Autographs & Memorabilia at Bloomsbury House, London on 23rd March. Concluding the March auctions will be Fine Clocks, Barometers and Scientific Instruments (28th March) and Fine Furniture and Works of Art (29th March) with many more to come as the year continues. 

Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions’ Interiors sale at Donnington Priory, Newbury, on 10th & 11th January 2017 will include property from the collection of the late Clifford and Rosemary Ellis. Part of the legacy left by the Ellises includes paintings, drawings and posters by both Clifford and Rosemary either separately or working together. Lots range in estimate from £100 - £2,000.

In 1933, they were commissioned to design a series of posters for the London Underground. They also designed posters together for the Empire Marketing Board, a government Department established in 1926 with the aim of encouraging people to buy Empire products. The poster campaigns were an integral part of the advertising program and Clifford and Rosemary produced a number of designs during the 1930s. They also designed posters for Shell and the General Post Office.

Save the date…in 2017

Jewellery, Silver, Watches & Pens (Donnington Priory, Newbury) |18th January

Books and Works on Paper (Bloomsbury House, London) | 23rd February 

Australia Day Wine (online auction) | 26th January 

Jewellery, Silver & Watches (Donnington Priory, Newbury) | 15th February 

Wine: Timed Online auction | 20th February & 23rd March 

Interiors (Donnington Priory, Newbury) | 21st & 22nd February 

Books and Works on Paper (Bloomsbury House, London) | 23rd February 

Fine Wine, Port, Champagne (Bloomsbury House, London) | 24th February 

Works from the Collection of Jan Krugier (Donnington Priory, Newbury) | 8th March 

Fine Jewellery, Watches & Silver (Donnington Priory, Newbury) | 15th March 

20thc. Books and Works on Paper & Early Prints (Bloomsbury House, London) | 16th March 

Autographs & Memorabilia (Bloomsbury House, London) | 23rd March 

Fine Clocks, Barometers & Scientific Insts (Donnington Priory, Newbury) | 28th March 

Fine Furniture & Works of Art (Donnington Priory, Newbury) | 29th March

Image: Jean Baptiste Balthazar Sauvan, Picturesque Tour of the Seine, from Paris to the Sea, 25 hand- coloured aquatint plates with hand-coloured vignette at the end, 1821. Est. £1,800 - £2,200.

 

A new selection of 28 posters, prints, drawings and photographs is now on display in the ongoing Library of Congress exhibition “World War I: American Artists View the Great War.” 

The exhibition opened in May 2016 and is on view through Saturday, Aug. 19, 2017 in the Graphic Arts Galleries on the ground floor of the Library’s Thomas Jefferson Building, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C.  It is free and open to the public Monday through Saturday, 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.  Tickets are not needed.

In the new rotation of art, notable themes include the vilification of the German enemy; trench warfare and the use of poison gas; the service of Red Cross nurses and volunteers; and the aftermath of the war and recovery.  Artists represented include George Bellows, Kerr Eby, Charles Dana Gibson, Gordon Grant, Edwin Howland Blashfield and Samuel J. Woolf; poster artists Frances Adams Halsted, James Montgomery Flagg and John Norton; cartoonists McKee Barclay and Otakar Valasek; and photographer Lewis Hine. 

The works of art are drawn from the Library’s Prints and Photographs Division collections.  In addition to the 28 new items on display, a monitor slideshow highlights another 60 items.

The exhibition examines the use of wartime art for patriotic and propaganda messages—by government-supported as well as independent and commercial artists.  Many of the artists worked for the federal government’s Division of Pictorial Publicity, a unit of the Committee on Public Information.  Led by Charles Dana Gibson, a pre-eminent illustrator, the division focused on promoting recruitment, bond drives, home-front service, troop support and camp libraries.  In less than two years, the division’s 300 artists produced more than 1,400 designs, including some 700 posters.

Heeding the call from Gibson to “Draw ‘til it hurts,” hundreds of leading American artists created works about the Great War (1914-1918).  Although the United States participated as a direct combatant in World War I from 1917 to 1918, the riveting posters, cartoons, fine art prints and drawings on display chronicle this massive international conflict from its onset through its aftermath.

“World War I: American Artists View the Great War” is made possible by the Swann Foundation for Caricature and Cartoon, and is one in a series of events the Library is planning in connection with the centennial of the United States’ entry into World War I.  An online version of the exhibition is available at loc.gov/exhibits/american-artists-view-the-great-war/.  Katherine Blood and Sara Duke from the Prints and Photographs Division at the Library of Congress led the division’s curatorial team.  Betsy Nahum-Miller from the Library’s Interpretive Programs Office is the exhibition director. 

The art exhibition complements the upcoming major exhibition “Echoes of the Great War: American Experiences of World War I,” which will open Tuesday, April 4, 2017.  “Echoes” will feature more than 200 items and will draw from a wide array of original materials from the Library of Congress, which has the most comprehensive collection of multi-format World War I holdings in the nation.  In combination, these exhibitions reveal the extraordinary stories of this turbulent time in our nation’s history and the powerful global forces that war unleashed.

Now through April 2017, the Library of Congress is featuring twice-monthly blogs about World War I, written by Library curators who highlight stories and collection materials they think are most revealing about the war.  The blogs can be viewed at loc.gov/blogs/.  In 2017 and 2018, the Library will offer lectures, symposia and other programming on World War I, produce educational materials, publish a book about the war, and plant Victory Gardens in the front beds at its Jefferson and Adams buildings. 

The Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division holds nearly 16 million photographs, drawings and prints from the 15th century to the present day.  International in scope, these visual collections represent a uniquely rich array of human experience, knowledge, creativity and achievement, touching on almost every realm of endeavor: science, art, invention, government and political struggle, and the recording of history.  For more information, visit loc.gov/rr/print/.

The Library of Congress is the world’s largest library, offering access to the creative record of the United States—and extensive materials from around the world—both on site and online. It is the main research arm of the U.S. Congress and the home of the U.S. Copyright Office. Explore collections, reference services and other programs and plan a visit at loc.gov, access the official site for U.S. federal legislative information at congress.gov, and register creative works of authorship at copyright.gov.

313.jpgLas Vegas, NV, December 19, 2016 - Morphy Auctions, the finest auction destination for fresh to the market collections, is pleased to announce this can’t miss sale to be held on Thursday, January 19th at the company’s Las Vegas, Nevada gallery starting at noon EST.  This event will feature “the best of the west” across numerous collecting categories and price points.   All items in this sale are available for preview now.

This sale’s selection of over 50 American and English Bowie knives is truly on the cutting edge.  Bowie knives are fixed blade fighting knives with a cross-guard and a clip point; they are named after James Bowie who was known for his knife fighting skills. Bowie died at the Alamo.  Getting right to the point, lot #226, a Rezin Bowie Presentation Knife, is the big prize in this key category.  This example was one of four knives given by Rezin Bowie, brother of James Bowie, to four important friends in honor of James’ accomplishments.  This knife was gifted to Edwin Forrest, a popular American actor who was friend to both Bowie brothers.  This well documented rarity with provenance is estimated at $100,000-200,000 and should be of great interest to historians, museums, and miliatria enthusiasts worldwide.  

Other rock-star caliber Bowie knives include lot #55, a c. 1835 knife stamped Schively 75 Chestnut Street Philad., estimated at $75,000-125,000.  This breathtaking example, complete with its beautiful, classic skeletal style Schively scabbard with German silver mounts, is one of less than two dozen known in existence.  And lot #56, a massive c. 1835 knife stamped Broomhead & Thomas Celebrated American Hunting Knife, is estimated at $45,000-60,000. This rarity, in wonderful condition, is detailed with German silver mounts, Mother of Pearl scales, four decorative rivets, and a nameplate on both sides.  It also comes with its original brown leather scabbard.  

This event offers a 24 carat opportunity to purchase some of the finest antique gold bars, nuggets, gold quartz jewelry, watches, and accessories in memory.  Collectors will undoubtedly take a shine to the more than 60 precious metal selections on offer.   Bar none, lot #106, a Harris Marchand & Co. gold bar with serial number 6476, is the prime investment in this auction with its $250,000-350,000 estimate.  This large, all original and documented rectangular ingot weighs 56.65 ounces and has an 1857 value of $1002.42.  Lot #104, a spectacular and highly ornate pocket watch, is another timely auction highlight.  This solid gold timepiece, estimated at $50,000-80,000, is made and signed by the Illinois Watch Company and features elaborate gold in quartz and moss agate decorations, elegant engraving, and a highly desirable watch chain.  And lot #114, a rare gold match safe inlaid with gold quartz on both sides as well as its top, should spark lots of interest with its $15,000-25,000 estimate.  

Native American cultural materials and weapons are two key categories in this exciting, upcoming sale.  Many of these one of a kind treasures and artifacts exhibit extraordinary craftsmanship.  Lot #169, a c. 1870 Cheyenne beaded war shirt is made from buffalo hide and features hair drops.  It is estimated at $30,000-60,000.  Lot #4, a beautiful c. 1860 Northern Plains contour pipe bag detailed with an unusual pony beaded panel with a stylized butterfly, copper cones, and brass beads, is estimated at $15,000-25,000.  And lot #10, a c. 1860’s early Sioux beaded buffalo hide cradle decorated with horse tracks is estimated at $20,000-40,000.

It’s time to get a handle on this event’s selection of interesting and antique tomahawks.  Lot #179, a c. 1760 Eastern pipe tomahawk, features an iron head with a scalloped edge and brass inlay, a blade engraved with a cannon on one side and the sun on the reverse, and a brass inlaid pipe bowl.  It retains its original gasket and haft and is estimated at $50,000-100,000.  Lot #346, a c. 1870 Cheyenne Plains tomahawk with an extremely wide pictorial blade depicting two Indians in battle is estimated at $30,000-40,000.  And lot #13, a c. 1870 Plains pipe tomahawk is unusually decorated with two bat wing cut-outs, seven inlaid brass circles, and design elements punched around the blade.  This stunning, rare example is estimated at $30,000-40,000.

Antique materials relating to America’s expansion in the 1800’s is well represented in this sale.  Many “Go West” themed items are on offer, including signs, posters, calendars, displays, and other ephemeral categories.  lot #316, a Rock Island railroad reverse glass advertising sign has Mother of Pearl inlays along the entire locomotive and shows incredible detail. This sign would have hung in an executive’s office and was made by the Western Sandblasting Co. in Chicago.  It is estimated at $40,000-80,000.  Could there be a bidding war over lot #146, a Battle Axe cigar reverse glass advertising sign?  This remarkable example shows an image of a smiling Native American and an older well-dressed gentleman enjoying some Battle Axe tobacco; the colors are magnificent and this piece has a great presence.  It is estimated at $80,000-150,000.  And it’s “California, here I come!” with lot #313, an advertisement from 1898 for “California's Golden Jubilee and Mining Fair.” This jewel of a piece pictures a miner with axe slung over his shoulder and raising a large gold nugget above his head.  It has an auction estimate of $40,000-80,000.

This sale rounds out with an intoxicating blend of outstanding vintage and antique back bar bottles, with over 50 examples on offer.  Lot #258, a c. 1890 fine old gin label under glass bottle featuring an attractive young woman wearing a large hat, flirts with a $15,000-25,000 estimate.  Lot #87, a c. 1895 Custer's Reserve whiskey back bar bottle decorated with enameled lettering and a fantastic image of Custer riding a horse, takes a stand at $10,000-15,000.  And lot #415, a c. 1895 a Black Cat Whiskey enameled bar bottle in excellent plus condition will have collectors “feline groovy” with its $4,000-6,000 estimate. 

According to Dan Morphy, Morphy Auctions’ President, "We are so looking forward to kicking off our 2017 auction year in Las Vegas with this truly outstanding sale.  The “western themed” merchandise on offer is among the highest quality and diverse in nature to come to auction in memory.  Clearly, Las Vegas is the ideal location for an auction event featuring these “geospecific” categories!  The antique bottles and advertising selections in this sale are also truly remarkable.  Just being around them is like taking a trip backward in time.  We welcome you to visit our gallery in Las Vegas to view these rarities in person, or of course check them out online anytime at www.morphyauctions.com.”

About Morphy Auctions:
Morphy Auctions, the finest auction destination for fresh to the market collectibles, is located in Denver, Pennsylvania. The company also has an office in Las Vegas, Nevada.  A full service auction house, the company presents over 30 premier auctions annually, as well as monthly discovery sales. Morphy's team of specialists includes the nation's finest and most recognized experts in popular collecting categories including advertising; firearms; fine automobiles, automobilia and petroliana; coin-operated machines; antiques, fine, and decorative art; dolls, bears, toys, and trains; cast iron; coins; marbles; and jewelry.  Morphy Auctions is owned by President and Founder Dan Morphy, himself a lifelong and passionate collector of antiques, banks, and numerous other categories.  Morphy's has been in business since 2004 and has grown from two to over 65 employees in over a decade.   

Morphy Auctions, Las Vegas is located at 4520 Arville Street, Las Vegas, NV 89103.   We can be reached by phone at 702-382-2466, by fax at 702-382-6513, and by email at info@morphyauctions.com.  Our Las Vegas gallery is open Monday through Friday from 9:00am-4:00pm. For more information on Morphy's, please visit www.MorphyAuctions.com.

Image: Lot 313 California's Golden Jubilee Advertisement, est. $40,000-80,000. Courtesy of Morphy Auctions.

091cf2fae7a905a46cae9b1a5fdfdf92da40cf3b.pngBOSTON, MA - (December 16, 16) A Marilyn Monroe signed photograph sold to $24,959 according to Massachusetts-based RR Auction.

The sultry vintage matte-finish portrait of Monroe taken during a Frank Powolny glamour shoot in 1953, signed and inscribed in white ink, “To Jimmie, Best regards, Marilyn Monroe.”

Monroe and Powolny most famously teamed up in 1953 for a series of stunning, artfully framed publicity stills for the 1953 film Gentlemen Prefer Blondes.

“Powolny captured countless stars in photos that ended up in newspapers, magazines and theater lobbies around the world,” said Robert Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction.

Immortalized for his classic World War II pinup of Betty Grable, Powolny remained a trusted photographer for Monroe throughout her career, and is noted as taking the last known still photographs of the starlet during production of Something's Got to Give, one week before her death in 1962.

 “A gorgeous image elevated by the contrast of Monroe’s white signature and the deepness of the unlit ‘film noir’ background,” said Livingston. 

Highlights from the sale include, but are not limited by:

Greta Garbo signed and inscribed photograph to Eva von Berne, sold for $17,908.

James Dean 'East of Eden’ oversized signed photograph, sold for $12,383.

Three Stooges signed photograph of the ‘Dizzy Doctors’, sold for $8,467.

Peg Entwistle oversized signed photograph, sold for $6,072.

Wizard of Oz: Billie Burke Signed photograph,sold for $5,598.

Superman: George Reeves signed photograph, sold for $5017.

The Tom Gregory Hollywood Auction from RR Auction began on Thursday, December 8th and concluded on Thursday, December 15, 2016. For information, visit the RR Auction web site at www.rrauction.com.  

Image: Glamorous, boldly signed 1953 Frank Powolny portrait of Marilyn.

Dallas - Following the death of former astronaut and Senator John Glenn, experts at Heritage Auctions - the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer - caution collectors about fake and forged autographs entering the marketplace. 

“Whenever a celebrity or historical figure passes, we quickly see spurious signatures and counterfeit memorabilia being offered online and at flea markets,” said Michael Riley, director of Space Collectibles at Heritage Auctions. “Legendary astronaut John Glenn’s passing is an opportunity for fraudsters to trick the public with forged autographs and other fake items purportedly from him.”

Glenn, the man author Tom Wolfe called “the last true national hero America has ever made” died Dec. 8. The former war hero, astronaut and United States Senator was revered across the country, and his death elicited an outpouring of sentiment to his family from around the globe he once circumnavigated.

Following his history-making achievement as the first American to orbit the Earth to his career in the U.S. Senate and even a bid for the U.S. Presidency, Glenn lent his autograph often on objects as diverse as baseballs, book signings of his memoir, publicity photographs and many other keepsakes. 

If the price is too low to be believed, there is a chance the item is fake, forged or stolen. Consider that in October 2009, a photo with a mat signed by 28 astronauts - including Glenn - sold for $15,535. In October 2008, a pair of Mercury 7 Type M Test Gloves Glenn wore sold for $7,170. In May 2016, a Glenn-autographed photo of himself in an orange spacesuit that was taken for his STS-95 mission in 1998, when at 77 he became the oldest person to fly in space, sold for $750. 

Genuine Glenn autographs usually sell for $50-$100, and higher for special items, such as an authentic signature on a genuine item related to his career as an astronaut, like a Mercury-Atlas 6 (Friendship 7) Space Flown One Dollar Bill, which sold for more than $20,000 at auction, according to Riley.

Hopefully, the market will not be flooded with Glenn-signed memorabilia. He has been in the public eye since 1959 as an astronaut and U.S. Senator and has willingly signed items, so there is no shortage of his mementos on the market.

“The ideal method of authenticating an autograph is to get it in the hands of a knowledgeable expert,” Riley said. “Those extremely familiar with his signature can determine if it is real or a fake. 

Nonetheless, there are steps people can take to reduce the risk of getting lured into a transaction that is done dishonestly, priced unfairly, or even both:

·         Always make sure to buy and sell through a reputable dealer.

·         Beware of Autopen Signatures. The Autopen (a machine that produces mechanized replicas of autographs) can appear authentic, but there is a website that allows collectors to check signatures against known machine patterns.

Heritage Auctions is the largest auction house founded in the United States and the world’s third largest, with annual sales of more than $800 million, and over one million online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and receive access to a complete record of prices realized, with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com.

Want to get the up-to-the-minute updates and breaking news stories about Heritage Auctions? Follow us on HA.com/Facebook and HA.com/Twitter. To view an archive of Heritage press releases go to: HA.com/PR. To link to this release on your blog or Website: HA.com/PR-3086.

12_Newton.JPGThe Fine Books & Manuscripts sale totaled $9,433,063, with 82% sold by lot and 91% sold by value, making this the highest total for a various owner sale of Books & Manuscripts at Christie’s. There was active in-room, phone, and online participation from institutions, established collectors, and new buyers with registered bidders from over 25 countries.

The top lot was Sir Isaac Newton’s (1642-1727) Philosophiae naturalis principia mathematica (estimate: $1,000,000-1,500,000), which realized $3,719,500, nearly four times its low estimate and setting a new world auction record for a printed scientific book. 

Other sale highlights included nine lots of correspondence to the Marquis de Chastellux (1734-1788), featuring six letters by George Washington (1731-1799) and three by Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826), which collectively realized $1,138,750, with single lots more than doubling initial estimates.

The top lot of the selection was George Washington's (1732-1799) Autograph letter signed (“Go: Washington”), Mount Vernon, 25 April, 1 May 1788, to François Jean de Beauvoir, Marquis de Chastellux (estimate: $80,000-120,000), which realized $307,500.

Strong results were achieved for private collections including early botanical books belonging to Cornelius J. Hauck (1893-1967), which sold 90% by lot, and an important collection of major 19th century American authors, formed by Mrs. J. Insley Blair of Far Hills, New Jersey, which sold 92% by lot, with many titles more than doubling initial estimates.

BEVERLY HILLS, California - A Production Cel and Key Master Background of the Evil Queen and her Magic Mirror from Walt Disney’s Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs conjured $59,750 to lead Heritage Auctions’ $1,385,924 Animation Art Auction in Beverly Hills. The Dec. 10 auction is the fifth straight animation auction to surpass $1 million during the last two years, realizing a grand total of $7.4 million.

“This only proves the animation market is increasingly being considered as fine art,” said Jim Lentz, Director of Animation at Heritage Auctions. “No other auction house has been able to deliver consignors anywhere near our $7 million in successful bids over the last two years.”

A rare, Production Cel Sequence and Pan Key Master Background Setup from the 1965 holiday classic, A Charlie Brown Christmas, sold for $59,750, but it was art from Walt Disney Studios that claimed the lion’s share of bids.

Concept art from artist Mary Blair proved popular, as her imagining of Disneyland’s It’s a Small World attraction sold for $31,070; her concept painting for the mermaid sequence in 1953’s Peter Pan ended at $26,290 and concept art of Pan and Wendy, Michael, John and Tinker Bell flying off to Neverland sold for $14,340.

A hand-painted Cel Setup of the Blue Fairy chatting with Jiminy Cricket from Pinocchio sold for $21,510, and Production Cels and Master Pan Production Background Setup of the main characters from 1955’s Lady and the Tramp ended at $13,145.

Warner Brothers cels by Chuck Jones saw intense bidder interest as 15 bidders competed to own a single Production Cel of Elmer Fudd and Bugs Bunny from the animated short What’s Opera, Doc?, which sold for $13,145. A Color Painting of Bugs Bunny and Friends hand-drawn by Jones himself sold for $12,547.

Additional highlights include, but are not limited to:

A group of Four Original Drawings of various Disney characters published by Good Housekeeping in the 1930s and 1940s sold for a combined $21,569.

An Original Painting featuring “Snow White” by Peter Max sold for $11,950.

A drawing of the “Horned King” by Tim Burton for the 1985 film The Black Cauldron brought $11,950.

A circa 1935-39 Production Cel and Background Setup featuring both Mickey and Minnie Mouse from the short the Brave Little Tailor/Music Land realized $10,755.

A rare, detailed Model Sheet from 1940, showing early renditions of title character Pinocchio, sold for $9,560, nearly double its $5,000 pre-auction estimate.

Gulliver's Travels Production Cel Setup and Key Master Background Setup (Max Fleischer, 1939) sold for $7,170

A rare Title Cel and Master Background Set up for Super Friends animated television program sold for $1,673.

Heritage Auctions is the largest auction house founded in the United States and the world’s third largest, with annual sales of more than $800 million, and over one million online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and receive access to a complete record of prices realized, with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com.

Want to get the up-to-the-minute updates and breaking news stories about Heritage Auctions? Follow us on HA.com/Facebook and HA.com/Twitter. To view an archive of Heritage press releases go to: HA.com/PR. To link to this release on your blog or Website: HA.com/PR-3082.

Signature Image.jpgNew York, NY, December 2016 — One of the most popular and enigmatic American writers of the nineteenth century, Emily Dickinson (1830-1886) wrote almost 1,800 poems. Nevertheless, her work was essentially unknown to contemporary readers since only a handful of poems were published during her lifetime and a vast trove of her manuscripts was not discovered until after her death in 1886.  

Often typecast as a recluse who rarely left her Amherst home, Dickinson was, in fact, socially active as a young woman and maintained a broad network of friends and correspondents even as she grew older and retreated into seclusion. Bringing together nearly one hundred rarely seen items, including manuscripts and letters, I’m Nobody: Who are you?—a title taken from her popular poem—is the most ambitious exhibition on Dickinson to date. It explores a side of her life that is seldom acknowledged: one filled with rich friendships and long-lasting relationships with mentors and editors.  

The exhibition closely examines twenty-four poems in various draft states, with corresponding audio stops.  In addition to her writings, the show also features an array of visual material, including hand-cut silhouettes, photographs and daguerreotypes, contemporary illustrations, and other items that speak to the rich intellectual and cultural environment in which Dickinson lived and worked. The exhibition is organized in conjunction with Amherst College. 

“Emily Dickinson’s work—and life—remain endlessly compelling to literary scholars and to the larger artistic community,” said Colin B. Bailey, director of the Morgan Library & Museum. “With its experimental poetics and vivid language, her verse continues to be a source of critical inquiry, while her quiet, unassuming years in Amherst are celebrated in music, theatre, and the cinema. The Morgan’s exhibition explores a less well-known aspect of her life—her personal and professional friendships—that will surely delight and surprise exhibition-goers.”

THE EXHIBITION

I. Childhood Years

“I attend singing school.”

Born in 1830, Emily Dickinson was part of a tight-knit family at the social center of Amherst, a small college town in western Massachusetts. She lived almost her entire life in the shadow of Amherst College, which was cofounded by her grandfather and where her father served as treasurer between 1835 and 1873. Life in such an environment brought a steady stream of visitors from far and wide, and Dickinson lived within an intellectually stimulating community that would later be reflected in her letters and poetry. Her father was protective, yet encouraged his children to pursue educational opportunities. Primary schooling for young women was not uncommon in Dickinson’s time, and she formed many strong attachments to her schoolmates and instructors at Amherst Academy, where she was part of a close group of friends known as the circle of five. Her exposure to poetry and keen use of language dates to her youth, as does her interest in the natural world and aesthetic presentation, evident in the books from her library, early letters, and her herbarium, an album of carefully pressed botanical specimens.

II. A Year at Mount Holyoke

"Everything is pleasant & happy here.”

At the age of sixteen, Dickinson left home to study at Mount Holyoke Female Seminary, a women’s college, in nearby South Hadley, Massachusetts. She tested into the first of three academic levels but was promoted to the second by midyear and took courses in chemistry, botany, history, and languages. She was roommates with her cousin Emily Norcross and her time there is well documented in the surviving letters she sent to her brother, Austin, and friend Abiah Root, one of the circle of five friends from Amherst Academy. It was not unusual for women to attend only a single year of higher education, and Dickinson returned to Amherst at the end of the academic year.

III. Companions and Correspondents

“Stay! My heart votes for you.”

Dickinson was not a student at Amherst College—which was established in 1821 with the explicit goal of educating, in Noah Webster’s phrase, “indigent young men of promising talents and hopeful piety” for the Christian ministry—but, as the daughter of the college treasurer, she was expected to attend public events such as commencement and to assist with the annual trustee’s reception hosted at her father’s house. After the Civil War, the college drifted away from its focus on missionary training, but during Dickinson’s lifetime it was a hotbed for religious revivals. She led a socially active life when she was young, attending performances, concerts, and lectures and remaining close to friends she had made as a child at Amherst Academy. She also formed new relationships, often through her brother, Austin. He introduced her to his social circle and Dickinson would have a brief flirtation with one member. Later, Austin’s wife, Susan, would become one of the poet’s dearest friends. Even as she became more reclusive, and increasingly withdrew from society in the 1860s, Dickinson maintained an active correspondence, composing more than one thousand letters in her lifetime.

IV. Literary Influences and Connections

“After long disuse of her eyes she read Shakespeare & thought why is any other book needed?”

One benefit of life in a college town was access to books, newspapers, and magazines that might not otherwise be readily available. The Dickinson family kept a respectable library in their home, and Dickinson also borrowed books from friends. In addition to her wide-ranging reading habits, she was acquainted with some major figures in the worlds of publishing and literature, chief among them the editors Samuel Bowles, Thomas Wentworth Higginson, and Thomas Niles, as well as the writer and activist Helen Hunt Jackson. Although Bowles and Higginson both championed women writers, their views were far from universal. Helen Hunt Jackson forged her own career as an author and urged Dickinson to publish her poetry, with one small success.

V. Civil War Years

“I heard a Fly buzz-when I died-” 

Massachusetts played an important role in the Civil War, politically and militarily. For a brief time, the state’s Springfield Armory, not far from Amherst, was the sole government manufacturer of muskets and other arms. Hundreds of local residents, both white and African American, joined the Union army, although Dickinson’s brother Austin avoided service. Students and faculty from the college also joined the conflict. Charity events related to the war became a regular feature of daily life. Dickinson began collecting her rapidly increasing output of poems into hand-sewn manuscript booklets, known as fascicles, as early as 1858, but the war years saw a sharp increase in her productivity. Thirty out of forty fascicles and at least five unsewn sets of poems—each of which could include more than twenty drafts—date from the years 1861-65. Most of Dickinson’s poems that were published during her lifetime also appeared during this period.

VI. Lifetime Publications

“I had told you I did not print.”

Closely examining Dickinson’s unique manuscript practices provides a partial answer to the question of why she did not pursue publication. While Dickinson’s social network included supporters of her writing and the work of women writers in general, there were equally strong voices arguing the opposite position. She regularly exchanged letters with influential editors,including Bowles, Niles, and Higginson. But, for all of their progressive views—Bowles, for instance, hired Fidelia Hayward Cooke as literary editor at The Springfield Republican in 1860—Dickinson was constrained by the disapproval of her father and of other figures she admired. Only ten of Dickinson’s 1,789 poems were published during her lifetime but always with added titles and altered punctuation. With one exception, the poems appeared in newspapers and periodicals on densely printed pages and surrounded by articles and advertisements, as was typical for the period. Dickinson is never credited—her poems all were published anonymously—and it is probable they were printed without her consent. At the same time, she did not shun publication altogether. She submitted several poems to Niles who never printed them while Dickinson was alive, but would later publish the first three posthumous editions of her work to great success.

VII. Posthumous Publications and Legacy

“It was not death for I stood up.”

Emily Dickinson died at her home on May 15, 1886, possibly of kidney disease. Of her trove of poems, hundreds had been shared with her network of friends and correspondents, but Dickinsonhad kept sets and fascicles entirely private. These poems were only discovered by her sister, Lavinia, after her death.

Lavinia looked to Susan Dickinson, her sister-in-law and one of the poet’s closest friends, to publish them. But work proceeded slowly, and Lavinia eventually turned the manuscripts over to Mabel Loomis Todd, Austin’s mistress. Todd dedicated much of the rest of her life to editing and publishing Dickinson’s poetry. The first two books—in 1890 and 1891—were coedited by Higginson, the poet’s old literary mentor. Todd and Higginson faced many difficulties when interpreting Dickinson’s challenging manuscripts and were further hindered by technology (Todd’s typewriter did not have lowercase letterforms). They worked to regularize Dickinson’s lines and alter her punctuation in order to make the verse “look” more like conventional poetry. Nevertheless, more than four hundred poems were brought out within ten years of Dickinson’s death, and her indisputably strong literary reputation was quickly established.

Today, Dickinson is widely recognized as one of the most important poets of the nineteenth century and her work is acknowledged as a precursor to modernism. She profoundly influenced later generations of poets, writers, musicians, and visual artists, including Hart Crane, Robert Frost, Elizabeth Bishop, Adrienne Rich, Charles Wright, and Susan Howe; Aaron Copland and Dawn Upshaw; Joseph Cornell and Jen Bervin.

Image: The only authenticated image of Emily Dickinson, Daguerreotype, ca. 1847. The Emily Dickinson Collection, Amherst College Archives & Special Collections. Gift of Millicent Todd Bingham, 1956, 1956.002.

 

Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions’ two-day Interiors sale at Donnington Priory, Newbury, on 10th & 11th January 2017 will include property from the collection of the late Clifford and Rosemary Ellis. Part of the legacy left by the Ellises includes paintings, drawings and posters by both Clifford and Rosemary either separately or working together. Lots range from £100 - £2,000.

There will also be a number of works on offer by other artists such as Walter Sickert, William Scott, Adrian Heath and Howard Hodgkin which the Ellises acquired throughout their long careers. The majority have a direct personal connection to the artist and gives a glimpse of the rich cultural life that the Ellises created during their lifetimes, such as a drawing by Walter Richard Sickert, Grand Hotel Restaurant (Lot 106, est. £1,000-£1,500) which was a gift from Thérèse Sickert to Clifford Ellis in 1942 and thence by descent to the present owners. 

As well as leading the way in the teaching of fine art, husband and wife, Clifford and Rosemary, were both prolific in their own artistic output. The selection reveals the breadth of subject matter and interests of each and also charts the progression of their work over a number of years. The mid 1940s paintings by Clifford are of interest not only in terms of their artistic merit but also in reflecting the art of the period. In his position as head of the Bath Academy, Clifford was undoubtedly exposed to the work of what were to become some of the leading artists of their day and their influence is clearly visible in some of his work. Works by Rosemary Ellis are indicative of a more illustrative style and are closer to the work that the couple created for the ‘The New Naturalist’.

In 1933, the Ellises were commissioned to design a series of posters for the London Underground. They also designed posters together for the Empire Marketing Board which was a government Department established in 1926 with the purpose of encouraging people to buy Empire products. The poster campaigns were an integral part of their advertising program and Clifford and Rosemary produced a number of designs during the 1930s. They also designed posters for Shell and the General Post Office.

In addition to this sale, prints by Clifford and Rosemary Ellis will be on offer in a timed online only auction, which starts at 10am (GMT) on Tuesday 3rd January and closes on Monday 16th January 2017. Both artists were keenly interested in the printmaking process and, as with many of their generation, it formed an integral part of their artistic output. The group ranges from examples of animals and birds by Clifford Ellis comparable to the works produced for ‘The New Naturalist’ series of books to a number of series of linear prints characteristic of 1950s abstraction. All works offered come directly from the estate of the artists and the sale offers a rare opportunity to acquire one of their prints. Many are working proofs with hand-written annotations adding a personal dimension to the work. 

70-Plancius-Spice-Map copy.jpgNew York— “Prices are stronger than they have been in years,” said Caleb Kiffer, Specialist of Maps & Atlases at Swann Auction Galleries. The December 8 sale of Maps & Atlases, Natural History & Color Plate Books wrapped up the 2016 auction season at Swann with strong numbers, selling 88% of the lots offered.

Early maps of the East Indies headlined this sale from its inception, and they did not disappoint. One quarter of the top 20 lots pertained to early European exploration of the region, including “The Spice Map,” a colloquial term for Petrus Placius’s Insulae Moluccae Celeberrimae, 1598, which helped to open the area to Dutch traders. It sold for $31,200*. The highlight of the sale was The Complete East-India Pilot, or Oriental Navigator, 1797, Robert Laurie and James Whittle’s monumental atlas with 113 engraved charts, called the pinnacle of eighteenth-century mapmaking: it sold for $81,250, above a $60,000 high estimate. Also in the sale was one of the first maps ever published of the area, Claudius Ptolemaus’s Undecima Asiae Tabula, circa 1480s, a double-paged engraved map that set the standard for geographical printing ($6,000). “The East Indies section came primarily from a single collection,” Mr. Kiffer said. “It was fun to see them all together, telling the narrative of the spice trade from the perspective of different countries over the span of several hundred years. They were a hot spot in the sale, as were the New York views.”

All but one of the 22 offered lots related to early maps and scenes of New York City sold. Two panoramic views of the city each went for well above their estimates: one was a first state engraving by Robert Havell Jr., which sold for $10,000, while the second was an 1856 graphite drawing by Frederick William Billing showing recognizable landmarks ($8,750). “The Water Map,” as Egbert Viele’s Sanitary and Topographical Map of the City and Island of New York is known, is an 1865 survey of Manhattan still in use today to determine building sites; it was purchased by a collector for $7,250, a record for the work. Ephemera included the 1908-1909 wine list from the Hotel Astor, which offered a magnum bottle of 1877 Château Lafite Rothschild for $15; in 2016, the menu fetched $594.

There was a successful run of maps and charts of New England by Joseph Frederick Wallet Des Barres, including The Coast of New England ($25,000); Buzzards Bay & Vineyard Sound ($12,500); and A Plan of the Town of Newport ($11,250). Each is from the first state of Des Barre’s monumental mariner’s atlas The Atlantic Neptune, printed in London in 1776.

Rare elephant folio prints from John James Audubon’s Birds of America, published in London between 1827 and 1838, saw high prices after competitive attention. The dramatic Mocking Bird, Plate 21, one of Audubon’s most famous images, nearly doubled its estimate to sell for $18,750. Two rare plates, uncut and uncolored, made an appearance in the sale: Passenger Pigeon, Plate LXII, and Three-Toed Woodpecker both illuminate the binding process behind the beloved botanical tome, and were purchased by the Saint Louis Mercantile Library. Fourteen of the 16 Audubon prints offered were sold.

Botanical prints also held strong interest, including plates from Robert John Thornton’s Temple of Flora, 1800-04, all of which sold above their estimates. These were led by The Blue Egyptian Water-Lily, 1804, and The Quadrilateral Passion-Flower, 1802, each of which sold for $2,860. One show-stopper was an engraved plate from the first edition of Mark Catesby and Georg Ehret’s Natural History of Carolina, 1731-43, titled Magnolia Grandiflora, depicting the white flower in dramatic contrast against a black background; it sold for $10,625. In all, 50 of the 58 offered natural and botanical plates and books found buyers.

         A rare deluxe edition of Thomas Shotter Boys’s Original Views of London As It Is, 1842, was also in the sale. Considered the finest lithographed plate book on nineteenth-century London, the 26 hand-colored vistas helped to change the prevailing opinion that only natural views could be beautiful. This extremely rare edition, in its original state, garnered $21,250.

          Mr. Kiffer commented, “the sale indicated a confidence in the market for this material, with very solid prices being achieved for lots sold in the middle of the market as well as the high end. Several items sailed past the high estimates, with overall interest from private collectors and the trade alike.”

Image: Lot 70 Petrus Plancius, "The Spice Map," double-page map of Southeast Asia, London, 1598. Sold December 8, 2016 for $31,200.

December 2016, Boston, MA - Everyone loves ANTIQUES ROADSHOW, the iconic reality series entering its 21st season! The enduring appeal of PBS's most-watched ongoing series is the collection of moments that make up each season - the footnotes to history, the family stories, the astounded reactions. Beginning Monday, January 2 at 8pm an all-new season premieres including this season's top find when an Auguste Rodin bronze is discovered in Fort Worth, Texas.
 
Along with that masterpiece, more amazing items are revealed in the 14-time Emmy® Award nominated series' new season, including three one-hour episodes produced from each of six cities: Fort Worth, Texas; Indianapolis, Indiana; Palm Springs, California; Salt Lake City, Utah; Virginia Beach, Virginia and Orlando, Florida.
 
"As Executive Producer, my best moment each year is the start of a new ANTIQUES ROADSHOW season where we unveil a diverse collection of America's hidden treasures," says Marsha Bemko. "As a fan, my most memorable moment from the 2016 summer tour was the chance to try on Archie Bunker's jacket, which was brought to ROADSHOW by a guest in Palm Springs, CA."
 
Across the 29-episode new season, fans will see memorable appraisals and stories including:
  • An unforgettable reaction in Palm Springs when a guest brings in his late husband's 1966 Roy Lichtenstein screenprint and learns he was always right about owning a treasure. 
  • An incredible family story in Salt Lake City around 1970 Robert Smithson "Spiral Jetty" plans acquired from the owner's father, a contractor who worked with the artist on the project.
  • A heartrending history lesson in Orlando from a 1918 peach can label with a letter from a World War I soldier penned on the back.
  • A favorite unique item in Indianapolis comprised of autographs from President Nixon's 1972 trip to China brought to ROADSHOW by the AP photographer during Nixon's time in office.
  • A new-generation definition of antique in Fort Worth with a rock and roll poster collection, ca. 1968, featuring images promoting Jimi Hendrix, the Grateful Dead and more!
  • A hidden treasure that was revealed in Virginia Beach after being found in the crawl space of the guest's uncle's home, which turned out to be a rare John Needles games table. 
As ANTIQUES ROADSHOW appeals to viewers across generations, interactive ways to experience the 21st season include live tweeting with producers and appraisers Mondays at 8pm ET during new episodes, after-the-show AR Extras Live short-form social broadcasts, bonus footage and more through the weekly AR Extras newsletter and our second-screen Appraise it Yourself play-along game.
 
ANTIQUES ROADSHOW, a production of WGBH Boston, puts the reality in reality television! Part adventure, part history lesson and part treasure hunt, the series is seen by an average of 8 million viewers each week in 2016.

BOSTON, MA - (December 8, 16) A drill chuck used by Commander Dave Scott on the lunar surface during his three historic moonwalks of the Apollo 15 mission sold for $49,000 according to Boston-based RR Auction.

The Apollo Lunar Surface Drill was a necessary piece of equipment for two of the mission’s experiments: the Heat Flow Experiment, and the deep drill core; both of which required the successful operation of the drill chuck.

“The scientific objective of the deep core drill was to obtain a 10-foot core of lunar materials for analysis of thermal properties and stratigraphic composition of the upper surface of the Moon,” said Scott in a letter included in the sale.

“The drill was used to insert a deep core tube into the surface near the probes of the Heat Flow Experiment, to collect lunar material from the surface down to a depth of ten feet.”

Results from the experiments concluded that the Moon, was far more radioactive than previously thought, bore a significant stratigraphic history, revealing a total of 58 individual layers in the deep core sample.

“It was an essential artifact related to some of the most substantial and important lunar surface findings of the Apollo program,” said Robert Livingston, Executive VP at RR Auction.

Highlights from the sale include, but are not limited by:

Mickey Mouse production cel and production background from Fantasia, sold for $54,878.

Dave Scott’s Lunar Surface-used Rover ‘Bearing Map,’ sold for $49,000.

James Madison signed book from his personal collection, sold for $26,043.

Albert Einstein signed and inscribed vintage portrait, sold for $20,212.

CIAM/NASA complete aerodynamic wind tunnel test model, sold for $10,760.

The Autographs, Artifacts & Animation from RR Auction began on November 17 and concluded on December 7. For information, visit the RR Auction web site at www.rrauction.com

 

DALLAS — Frenzied bidding drove the return on a Hand-Carved American Tobacconist Cigar Store Indian to $150,000 to claim top-lot honors in Heritage Auctions’ Americana & Political Auction Dec. 3 in Dallas, Texas that realized a combined $1,783,252.

Created in the manner of cigar store Indians carved by Julius Melchers, and perhaps by Melchers himself, this 67-1/5-inch statue was in such high demand that the ultimate return was more than seven times the pre-auction estimate of $20,000. The figure is depicted wearing a bear claw necklace and medallion with a pelt over his right shoulder.

“A selling price in the mid-five figures range was expected,” Heritage Americana Auctions Director Tom Slater said, but furious bidding drove the price to $150,000. 

“This was a very strong auction,” Slater observes. “We have found that auction items of the best quality - regardless of category -  have tended to exceed expectations, and this auction certainly continues that trend.” 

A red, white and blue Horace Greeley 1872 Presidential Campaign Banner with albumen photo and gold-leaf trim brought in $40,000. The founder and editor of the New York Tribune, among the great newspapers of that era, Greeley served as a senator from New York before running in a race for the presidency that ultimately was won by Ulysses S. Grant. The banner hangs from a wood dowel at the top and is displayed in a shadow box frame.

“This is one of the very best 19th-century political banners,” Slater said. “It has appeared three times in auctions over the last 15 years, selling for an average of a little over $20,000 each time, and never breaking the $25,000 barrier. In Saturday’s auction, it sold for $40,000.”

Among the most popular items were from a collection of coveted presidential memorabilia. Leading the way was a Silver Cigarette Box by Tiffany from the Oval Office during the John F. Kennedy presidency. The box, which has two cedar-lined interior compartments, came with a notarized statement on White House stationery from the previous owner and was removed with other personal belongings after Kennedy’s assassination in order to facilitate the transition to President Lyndon B. Johnson, beat its pre-auction estimate when it went for $45,000. 

Another wildly popular item from the presidential memorabilia group was a pen used by President Franklin Delano Roosevelt to sign a 1940 Naval Buildup Bill that realized $37,500. The pen was enclosed in a framed shadow box along with a letter on White House Stationery that was sent to Captain Joseph M. Patterson in New York after FDR signed the bill, which was an effort to bolster the United States’ defense despite a promise not to send American troops into the European war.

A massive 1840 William Henry Harrison Campaign Pitcher also drew $37,500. Considered by many to be the premier ceramic political display item of the 19th century, it features four panels with portraits of the ninth American president, each of which sits below a log cabin and the words “The Ohio Farmer” and above a patriotic eagle. This lot drew dual interest, from collectors of political artifacts and enthusiasts of American-made pottery. The selling price is believed to be a record for this sought-after item.

One of the more curious lots in the entire auction was a lock of George Washington’s hair, which sold for $32,500, nearly twice as much as its pre-auction estimate. Held together with a blue thread, the lot comes with a detailed chain of provenance, showing that the hair has been in the possession of the families of Lewis Morris (1726-98) and Robert Hunter Morris (1700-64).

Among the top remaining non-political items was a Mormonism: Highly Important Circa 1863-64 Photo Album, which realized $35,000 - nearly doubling its pre-auction estimate. More than 60 of the images deal with Mormon leaders and Salt Lake City; the remaining 30 images are European in origin.

Four bulbs and a socket used in a Thomas Edison patent infringement case brought in $30,000. The provenance of the lot traces back to the consignor’s great aunt, Anna Knudsen, who was married to John C. Rowe, a patent attorney in the firm of Eaton, Lewis and Rowe, which represented Edison in various patent infringement cases.

A lever-action Henry Rifle drew $24,375. Once belonging to Lieutenant Ezra Rideout, the rifle was passed on to his brother, Jacob, likely when Jacob - a member of the clergy - decided in the 1870s to travel west and preach on the frontier, a trek that ultimately landed Rideout in Arizona Territory, where he apparently spent some time in the mining boomtown of Contention, near Tombstone. 

A significant collection of Presidential memorabilia from the estate of  Malcolm S. Forbes offered a fine Cox & Roosevelt Jugate from the St. Louis Button Co., which sold for $17,500, as well as a Bronze Bust of Woodrow Wilson, which ended at $10,000.

 

On 13th December, Sotheby’s London will offer for sale over 40 original illustrations by leading artists, designers, and musicians to benefit House of Illustration.

The pieces offered for sale fall into a number of different sections including “What Are You Like?” (autobiographical drawings by leading cultural figures), Quentin Blake’s illustrations of Sophie and the BFG at St Pancras International station, and original drawings of the Famous Five commissioned to celebrate the series’ 70th anniversary.

Artists include Quentin Blake, Brian Eno, Eric Clapton, Oliver Jeffers, Emma Chichester Clark, Peter Capaldi, David Shrigley, Peter Brooks, Peter Blake, Paul Smith, and Margaret Howell.

A registered charity, House of Illustration is the UK's only public gallery dedicated solely to illustration, with a creative programme of exhibitions, talks and events. Founded by Sir Quentin Blake and opened in July 2014 at the heart of the King's Cross regeneration area, it is the place to see, learn about and enjoy illustration in all its forms. For more information, click here. Ahead of the sale, all the works will be on display at Sotheby’s 34-35 New Bond Street from 9-12 December 2016.

Original drawings by Quentin Blake showing the BFG in London at St Pancras Station Quentin Blake, “The BFG and Sophie in London I, II and III”, each est. £1,500-2,000.

“What are you Like?” Autobiographical Drawings by Leading Artists, Designers, and Musicians

In 2008 The House of Illustration invited people from many disciplines to express themselves visually by playing "What Are You Like?". This was a Victorian parlour game in which players were asked to describe themselves by doing a series of drawings of their favourite things.

Contributors were asked to illustrate eight favourite things from a list of twelve-their favourite animal, book, clothes, comfort, food, pastime, place, possession, music, shoes, weather and their pet aversion. They were encouraged to use whatever medium they most enjoy.

Browse all 31 works here (lots 233-263).

Brian Eno,'WHAT ARE YOU LIKE?' Est. £1,000-1,500

Brian Eno is a British musician, composer, record producer, singer, writer, and visual artist. Described as one of popular music’s most influential and innovative figures, he was a member of Roxy Music in the 1970s and has collaborated with numerous artists including David Byrne, David Bowie, Coldplay, and James Blake.

Peter Brookes, 'WHAT ARE YOU LIKE?' Est £1,500-2,000

Peter Brookes is the multi-award-winning political cartoonist for The Times, a post he has held since 1992. He has contributed to many other magazines, including The Spectator, Radio Times, The Times Literary Supplement and the New Statesman.

Quentin Blake, 'WHAT ARE YOU LIKE?' Est. £3,000-5,000

Quentin Blake is a world-renowned, multi-award-winning British illustrator who has written and illustrated over 300 books, including some of the greatest children’s books of the last fifty years. He was the UK’s first Children’s Laureate and is the founding trustee of House of Illustration.

Peter Capaldi,'WHAT ARE YOU LIKE?', Est. £1,500-2,000

Peter Capaldi is a BAFTA-award-winning British actor, writer and director. He is best known for being the twelfth and current actor to play the Doctor in the BBC TV series Doctor Who, and for the role of Malcolm Tucker in the BBC comedy series The Thick of It.

Paul Smith, WHAT ARE YOU LIKE?' Est. £1,000-1,500

Paul Smith is a renowned British designer with a global design brand. In 2011, he was awarded the Outstanding Achievement in Fashion Design award at the British Fashion Awards for his exceptional contribution to the British fashion industry.

David Shrigley, 'WHAT ARE YOU LIKE?' Est. 2,000-3,000

David Shrigley is an award-winning British artist whose sculpture ‘Really Good’ was unveiled as the Fourth Plinth Commission in London’s Trafalgar Square in 2016. He was shortlisted for the Turner Prize in 2013 and his work is included in prominent international collections, including the Museum of Modern Art in New York, Art Institute of Chicago and Tate London.

Eric Clapton, 'WHAT ARE YOU LIKE?', Est. £2,000-3,000

Eric Clapton is a world-renowned guitarist, singer and songwriter, widely considered one of the most important and influential guitarists of all time. Eric Clapton has won 18 Grammy awards and the Brit Award for Outstanding Contribution to Music.

Peter Blake, 'WHAT ARE YOU LIKE?', Est. £2,500-3,500

Peter Blake is a world-renowned British artist and pioneer of 'Pop Art'. One of his best-known works is the 1967 album cover for The Beetles’ Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band. In 1981 he was elected a member of the Royal Academy and in 1994 he was made the Third Associate Artist of the National Gallery.

Margaret Howell, 'WHAT ARE YOU LIKE?', Est. £800-1,200

Margaret Howell is a world-renowned British clothing designer. She was elected a Royal Designer for Industry in 2007.

The Typescript for “Doctor Who: Into the Dalek”, Est. £2,000-3,000

Illustrated with a Drawing by Peter Capaldi, Dr Who Himself The actor Peter Capaldi (b. 1958) was revealed as the twelfth incarnation of Doctor Who during August 2013 and his performances have been enthusiastically received (‘all the hallmarks of a great Doctor’, ‘the air of the classic Doctor’ and ‘wise and thoughtful’). “Into the Dalek” is the second episode of Capaldi’s first series, and his first story involving Daleks. First broadcast on 30 August 2014, it was given positive reviews. The Independent called the episode ‘a classic sci-fi adventure with all the spectacle of a blockbuster’.

Original Illustrations for the covers of Enid Blyton’s Famous Five

In 2012, to celebrate the 70th anniversary of Enid Blyton's much-loved Famous Five series, five of the most illustrious children's illustrators of today were asked to provide new special anniversary covers for the first five adventures in the series. These original artworks were published by Hodder Children's Books for the 70th anniversary edition. Please click here to see all five illustrations (lots 294-298).

House of Illustration is a registered charity which receives no public funding and depends on its admission price and the generosity of its supporters to put on exhibitions, to commission new illustration work, promote new illustration talent and to run its illustrator-led learning programme for schools, families, students and enthusiasts of all ages. 

houseofillustration.org.uk. @illustrationHQ

NEW YORK - One of the rarest of all Enigma Machines, the M4, designed for use by the German Navy during World War II, was sold today (7 December) for $463,500 at Bonhams History of Science and Technology Sale in New York. This is a world record price at auction for an M4 Enigma surpassing the previous highest price of $350,000 also set by Bonhams in 2015. The fully operational machine dating from 1943 had been estimated at US$280,000-350,000.

The M4 Naval Enigma was ordered in 1941 when the head of the German Navy Admiral Karl Doenitz believed, correctly, that the security of the Naval M3 Engima had been compromised. The M4 was reserved for deployment by U-boat forces on land and at sea to enable the Naval High Command to communicate securely with the U-Boat fleet. The machine in the sale is in fine condition and is, therefore, believed to have been used from a base on shore rather than from a U-Boat.

Bonhams Science and Technology specialist Tom Lamb said, "This M4 Enigma was in perfect condition and very desirable. Most of the 120 or so M4 Enigma machines known to have survived are in museums or in government hands so this was a rare chance to acquire one of the very few still available. I am, of course, delighted to have broken our own world record."

In total the sale made $1,109,000 with 73% of the lots sold. Other highlights included:

A first edition of the General Theory of Relativity signed and inscribed by Albert Einstein. Estimated at $80,000-100,000 it sold for $125,000.

A handwritten letter from Charles Darwin to the Secretary of the Royal Society on the merits of candidates being considered for the award of the Royal Medal and the Copley Medal for 1857. The letter sold for $93,750 having been estimated at $20,000-30,000.

A handwritten manuscript by Isaac Newton about his family's pedigree written in preparation for his knighthood in 1795. It was sold for $60,000 against an estimate of $50,000-70,000.

A piece of the original mold which led Alexander Fleming to the discovery of penicillin. Estimated at $10,000-15,000 it sold for $46,500.

Walt Disney signed Last Will and Testament      1.jpegCALABASAS, Calif.— Walt Disney’s Last Will and Testament, plus his signed document marking the genesis of the Disney Empire/brand; How the Grinch Stole Christmas production artwork (perfectly timed to the 50th anniversary of the animated TV special!) and Tim Burton’s The Nightmare Before Christmas original artwork and set pieces; Disneyana, featuring rare animation art and Disney park props, including an “Atom-mobile” miniature prop from the retired Journey Through Inner Space attraction, an assortment of props from The Pirates of the Caribbean attraction, a miniature Jungle Cruise boat, cast member attraction costumes and rare hand-silkscreened ride posters highlight Profiles in History highly anticipated Animation and Disneyana auction, Friday, December 9, 2016.

Other featured items include the instantly recognizable I Dream of Jeannie and Bewitched opening titles cels and the most comprehensive collection of artist Robert “Bob” William John Olszewski works ever assembled—from his earliest days, prior to working with Goebel/ Hummel, to his most spectacular and desirable Disney-related pieces. Every work of art exhibits the world-renown, legendary attention to detail, design, depth and quality that has inspired Bob’s celebrated reputation and legacy.  Every piece in this collection is extremely rare, sold out, and no longer available. While many items are signed, upon request, Bob has graciously agreed to personally sign any of the lots that are not.

This sale represents a rare opportunity for collectors on so many fronts. In addition to Walt Disney’s last will and testament and signed document trademarking his legendary name, we have an extensive selection of illustration art, including Charles Schulz, Dr. Seuss, Chuck Jones, Gary Larson, E.H. Shepard and Robert Crumb. I am especially excited to have a wide array of Bob Olszewski’s extraordinary sculptures in this sale, highlighted by the Disneyland Main Street diorama. There’s literally something here for everyone!, said Joe Maddalena, owner of Profiles in History. 

Additional auction highlights include: 

  • The Transformers original animated series never-before-seen production art, scripts, and cels
  • An incredible selection of Christmas illustration art and original paintings
  • “Cinderella” ball gown production cel on a master production background from Cinderella
  • Original Disney concept art by Eyvind Earle and Mary Blair.
  • Charles Schulz “Peanuts” art including an It’s the Great Pumpkin, Charlie Brown storyboard
  • Comic strip art by Charles Schulz, Gary Larson and Patrick McDonnell

Qualified bidders can participate in person, by telephone, fax, submit absentee bids or participate online in real time from anywhere with Internet access across the globe. For more information, including a PDF and flip book of the entire auction catalog with full item descriptions, please visit www.profilesinhistory.com.

Image credit: Profiles in History. 

vcsPRAsset_534765_124134_a7012519-49fb-4ec9-a272-3ea5ef31c725_0.jpgPreview days for Kaminski Auctions Thanksgiving sale were very well attended which was an indication of good things to come for the annual auction.  Old faces and friends visiting the preview, plus 1700 visiting online and over 30% of them new users to the site brought a worldwide audience to add to the excitement of the sale.  A collection of Richard F. Outcault (American, 1863-1928) "Buster Brown" Sunday comic strip original art works that had descended through the family of the artist brought the most excitement to the day. Buster Brown was a comic strip character created in 1902 by Richard F. Outcault and was adopted as the symbol of a children’s shoe company called the Brown Shoe Company in 1904.  In the early 20th century Buster Brown and his pit bull terrier "Tige” were well known to the American public.   

The six Buster Brown lots were hotly contested over the phones and through multiple Internet bidding platforms.  They were finally hammered down at $47,700 with buyer’s premium and all sold to the same European bidder.  The top lot of the collection was titled "The Worm Turns Twice," dated March 19th, 1916.  It had been published in the Philadelphia Record. All of the Outcault artwork included the original newspaper sheet.

Other artwork and decorative arts on offer were from the Belvedere Guest House on Fire Island, New York.  Three Robert Bliss (American, 1925-1981), paintings sold as separate lots with the highest titled "Boy at the Beach," oil on masonite, signed and dated bringing $7,800. A 19th century classical marble bust of Robert Burns brought $5,700 and another of Sir Walter Scott brought a similar price.  Top lot from the Belvedere was an outstanding 18th century French Louis XV basin decorated with carved putti and figureheads. The basin had a particularly beautiful copper liner with a crest on the embossed center. Originally purchased at Park Bennett, New York in the 1940s to 1950s, it sold for $14,000.

A signed Tiffany Studios Turtleback table lamp from a private collector with an exquisite leaded stained glass shade was the top lot of the two- day sale with an $18,000 hammer price.  A surprise lot was a set of twelve Baccarat crystal "Czar" pattern stemware comprised of three different forms including four each of wine, champagne and water goblets, each with four colors of blue, rose, green and chartreuse that brought $10,800.

Top name estate jewelry brought good prices with a signed Van Cleef ladies’ eighteen carat gold and diamond bracelet from a New York collection bringing $14,400, a circa 1920 Cartier diamond, platinum and sapphire fur clip sold for $8,400 and a ladies' diamond and platinum engagement ring with a 3.53carat center stone sold for $18,000.

Day one of the sale which featured the majority of Asian items in the auction saw a huge painting by Brian Coole (British, born 1939) titled  “The Hongs of Canton from the Mainland”, oil on board from a New Hampshire estate sell for $11,400, while a circa 1950’s modern Chinese painting of a boat by the coast, signed lower right and inscribed verso "Given to George and Rosalie Humphrey, Sept. 1953, by Sergei Eliseev Professor at Harvard-Yenching Institute, Originally in Shanghai Museum then in Fogg Art Museum in Cambridge Massachusetts " brought $15,600.

All prices quoted include 20% buyer’s premium for all prices realized go to www.kaminskiauctions.com.

Image: Richard F. Outcault (American, 1863-1928), "Buster Brown" Sunday comic strip original art, titled "The Worm Turns Twice.”

Screen Shot 2016-12-07 at 9.39.37 AM.pngBernard Quaritch Limited has just published a new catalogue of books from the library of the conductor and musician Christopher Hogwood (1941-2014). This second catalogue of works from Hogwood’s library is titled ABCD, and comprises alphabet books, fine printing and artists’ books, books on Cambridge and the University Printer’s ‘Christmas Books’, and works by Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (aka ‘Lewis Carroll’).

The finely-produced and beautiful books in this catalogue include works by Richard Avedon, Peter Blake, Eric Gill, Florence Keynes, David Kindersley, Gwen Raverat, Virginia Woolf, etc., and reflect Hogwood’s eclectic bibliophile interests and his love of Cambridge.

For further information, please contact Mark James (m.james@quaritch.com / 020 7297 4873) or Anke Timmermann PhD (a.timmermann@quaritch.com / 020 7297 4855).

9. Hunt IX, 2016 © Hugo Wilson, Courtesy Shapero Modern    small.jpgShapero Modern is delighted to present Chroma hunt, an exhibition of hand-coloured etchings by the celebrated British artist, Hugo Wilson.

The images in this portfolio of nine etchings are closely related to Wilson’s recent series of paintings which portray the most primal of all rituals, the hunt. Hunting scenes were popular with wealthy collectors in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. They represented a kind of ‘trophyism’ and a way of displaying mastery over nature. Wilson’s etchings are based on, or inspired by, famous paintings by old masters such as Rubens and Stubbs and show bizarre events where great beasts such as lions and crocodiles have been trained to hunt other animals. These images of writhing, snarling forms, some recognisable, others indistinct, portray immense animal strength - but the hunter remains unseen. Suggestive of mythic battle scenes, Wilson’s paintings shake the foundation of the context that they appear to mimic.

Wilson’s classical training is evident in his extraordinary technical facility - he studied at the renowned Charles H. Cecil Studio in Florence, Italy - as well as in his reverence for the masters of the Western artistic canon. His work suggests both a devotion to and subversion of this tradition. Wilson’s interest in mutability and instability is manifested in these works that take elements from European old master paintings and classical sculpture, and subjects them to a process of transformation. In the finished works reconfigured elements from the originals hover at the edge of legibility whilst new possibilities for meaning emerge.

The art historian Alison Bracker has written: ‘As his stunning new work confirms, Wilson translates the aesthetics of past centuries and cultures into an oeuvre that continually wrestles with one question in particular: why has man persisted in creating and sustaining ideological structures throughout time? The question invigorates the artist’s ‘Hunt’ paintings, which re- imagine the hunting rituals and mythologies enacted within works by Rubens, Stubbs and Venetian painter Jacopo de’ Barbari.’ †

Wilson works across a range of media including painting, drawing, sculpture and printmaking. His use of etching in these works also recalls eighteenth and nineteenth century natural history illustrations, particularly John James Audubon’s ornithological masterpiece, The Birds of America, 1827. Wilson’s interests are wide-ranging and encompass science, religion and culture, systems of classification, history and memory. Addressing such diverse subjects, his work enacts an investigative process in which the outcome is by no means certain. The work forms a series of open-ended questions and correspondingly provisional answers.

† Alison Bracker, from ‘Never a Single Approach,’ in Hugo Wilson, Parafin, London, 2015

Shapero Modern
14th December 2016 - 10th January 2017
Private View: Tuesday 13th December, 6—8.30 pm

Image: Hunt IX, 2016 © Hugo Wilson, Courtesy Shapero Modern.

Lot 1 - GAUR ITS RUINS AND INSCRIPTIONS - Estimate Rs 7,00,000-Rs 8,00,000 ($10,295-$11,765) - Image 1.jpgMumbai, December 6 2016: StoryLTD’s upcoming online auction, Old Maps, Books and Photographs, features 82 rare and carefully selected old maps, vintage photographs, and gilt-bound books. The lots offer a glimpse into over 200 years of colonial India, presenting an extraordinary opportunity for collectors of historical memorabilia.

StoryLTD’s previous auctions of rare books have been well-received, highlighting a growing interest in the category among serious collectors. The upcoming sale extends the category to include maps, and photographs of picturesque landscapes, monuments, and portraits of maharajas. The categories also present some of the earliest recordings of official events such as coronations, battle scenes, and ethnographic studies of Indian life.

The books on auction date from the mid-1700s to the early 20th century. Featuring exquisite gilded covers, lavish illustrations and vivid descriptions of accounts as they unfolded at the time, these books range from INR 14,000 - 8 lakhs. The maps range from engraved, hand-coloured, topographical renderings, to records of early settlements in India and around the world. They are estimated between INR 20,000 - 3 lakhs. Photographs include rare, hand-coloured portraits of royal families, and albumen photographs of Indian monuments. They are estimated between INR 25,000 - 6 lakhs.

The auction will take place on storyltd.com on 13 - 14 December 2016.

About StoryLTD:

Launched in 2013 by Saffronart, India’s leading online auction house, StoryLTD (pronounced ‘Story Limited’), is an online art purchasing platform intended to give both first-time bidders and serious collectors an opportunity to acquire unique Indian fine and decorative art pieces. Featuring a carefully curated, exclusive selection that includes fine art, photographs, limited edition prints, textiles and jewellery, to home accessories, vintage and designer furniture.

StoryLTD partners with some of the leading designers, independent retailers, manufacturers, artists, collectors and dealers from India and around the globe, and offers its clients an unparalleled collection that encompasses a variety of styles, designs and historical periods— hidden behind every object and art work they present is a unique historical, aesthetic and cultural narrative — its ‘Story’. Everything at StoryLTD is ‘limited’ in its individuality, availability and value; nothing is commonplace.

Image: Gaur: Its Ruins and Inscriptions. London, 1878. Estimate: Rs 7,00,000-Rs 8,00,000 ( $10,295-$11,765).  

101-Nietzsche copy.jpgNew York—Works by and about twentieth century artists dominated the scene at Swann Galleries’ biannual sale of Art, Press & Illustrated Books on Thursday, December 1. Of the top 20 lots in the sale, only two were published before 1900. The sale also broke several auction records.

The highlight of the sale was a rare limited edition of Das Werk von Gustav Klimt, 1918, the only monograph published in the artist’s lifetime. The retrospective work, with richly printed collotype plates, ten in color with gold and silver highlights, sold to a collector for $60,000*. Another outstanding lot was a preparatory proof of László Moholy-Nagy’s Composition which was published in the Belgian avant-garde magazine Het Overzicht, circa 1924. The print sold after competitive bidding for $17,500, a record for the work.

The most complete set ever to come to auction of the Mexican Stridentist journal Horizonte, 1926-27, made its debut. The periodical was edited by Leopoldo Méndez and Ramón Alva de la Canal, and contributors included Diego Rivera and Rufino Tamayo. Stridentism was a radical avant-garde art movement founded in Mexico City in 1921, formed out of the momentum of the Mexican Revolution; Horizonte was their outlet. The set sold for $22,500.

Auction records were set for a scarce first edition of Die Farbenklaviaturen von Le Corbusier, 1931, a wallpaper sample book designed by the artist to allow people to create harmonious color combinations in their homes ($6,000), as well as Kurt Schwitters’s Die Silbergäule, Merz 8. Die Kathedrale, 1920, with seven lithographs, which sold to a collector for $4,420. The first limited edition of Five Poems, 2002, by Kara Walker and Toni Morrison broke its previous auction record to sell for $1,000.

Several works made their auction debuts, including Percy Bysshe Shelley’s The Sensitive Plant, 1898, one of ten copies printed on vellum for the Guild of Women Binders, which sold to a collector for $5,250. The ornate Insel-Verlag edition of Friedrich Nietzsche’s Also Sprach Zarathustra, 1908, designed and bound by Eleanore Ramsey, also went to a collector for $15,000.

Further highlights included a first edition of the satirical alphabet book skewering the 1913 Armory show, titled The Cubies’ ABC, by Mary M. and Earl H. Lyall, which sold for $4,750. Douze Quatrains, 1930, by Pierre Bragenell, with 12 erotic pochoirs attributed to Gerda Wegener, was purchased by a collector for a record $5,500. Another record was set for a scholarly compilation by Hsiang Yüan-Pien titled Noted Porcelains of Successive Dynasties, 1931, which garnered $5,250.

Modern fairy mythology performed well in the sale, including Fairyland, 1926, an Australian picture book by Ida Rentoul Outhwaite, which sold for a record-breaking $4,250. Similarly, the first English trade edition of The Book of Fairy Poetry, 1920, sold for nearly four times the high estimate at $1,750. The book contains the first illustrated version of J.R.R. Tolkien’s poem Goblin Feet. While not strictly fairy-related, Lewis Carroll’s Alice in Wonderland, illustrated and signed by Salvador Dalí, brought $5,750.

Christine von der Linn, Swann Galleries’ Art, Press & Illustrated Book specialist said, “I was overjoyed at the amount of excitement and active participation from bidders around the world for the lots on offer in this small but powerpacked sale. This auction was curated very specifically, with small, strong selections of European Avant-Garde books and prints, fine illustrated books, and works by artists featured in major museum exhibitions this year. In particular, the enthusiasm surrounding the Moholy-Nagy shows at the Guggenheim and The Art Institute of Chicago, and the Mexican Modernism show at the Philadelphia Museum of Art has actively sparked rediscovery of important artists. That was definitely reflected in the interest in those lots this week. ” She added, “I haven’t had so much fun in a sale in a long time.”

Image: Lot 101 Friedrich Nietzsche, Also Sprach Zarathustra, Insel-Verlag edition, bound by Eleanore Ramsey, 1908. Sold December 1, 2016 for $15,000, the book's first appearance at auction. (Pre-sale estimate: $8,000 to $10,000)

Screen Shot 2016-12-06 at 8.18.03 AM.pngNEW YORK, 5 December 2016—The Bible collection of renowned theologian and author, Dr. Charles Caldwell Ryrie, soared over pre-sale expectations today at Sotheby’s New York, realizing $7,341,818 (estimate $3.5/5.4 million). Over the course of four hours, 195 printed and manuscript Bibles in Hebrew, Greek, Latin, English and numerous other languages, as well as other theological works, were offered, led by the Wycliffite New Testament in the later version, in Middle English, which tripled its estimate and achieved $1.7 million (estimate $500/800,000). With many lots coming to the marketplace for the first time in decades, this impressive collection garnered interest from both public institutions and private collectors from around the world.

Selby Kiffer, International Senior Specialist, Books & Manuscripts, stated: “The outstanding result of today’s sale of The Bible Collection of Dr. Charles Caldwell Ryrie is a testament to the dedication with which this towering figure assembled his extraordinary group of Bibles and letters signed by theological figures. The sale followed a well-received exhibition that, despite the acclaimed Formatting the Word of God exhibition in 1998-99, marked the first time the full extent of the collection was revealed.”

The heart of The Bible Collection of Dr. Charles Caldwell Ryrie lies in early English translations of the Bible, including the top lot of today’s auction, John Wycliffe’s Wycliffite New Testament in the later version, in Middle English. Produced in England around 1430, numerous telephone bidders competed for this rare manuscript, finally selling for $1,692,500 against a pre-sale estimate of $500/800,000. Bible in English, Coverdale’s Version is another such example: faithfully and truly translated from Dutch and Latin into English, this first edition is one of the most complete copies to appear at auction in over twenty years, and sold for $348,500 (estimate $150/250,000).

Non-English Bibles, particularly manuscripts, also achieved significant prices. “The Benton Gospels” in Greek, written in Constantinople from the early to mid-10th century, realized $250,000 (estimate $50/80,000) while The Four Gospels, in Greek sold for $275,000 (estimate $50/80,000). Bible with Prologues and Interpretations of Hebrew Names, in Latin, hailing from Italy, hence the nickname [Italian Bible], obtained $200,000 in the New York salesroom this afternoon.

Screen Shot 2016-12-05 at 9.13.47 AM.pngLos Angeles, CA — Depart Foundation announced that it will present a comprehensive exhibition of rare and important historical works by one of the most influential photographers of the American West, Edward S. Curtis (1868-1952). Curated by Bruce Kapson, Rediscovering Genius: The Works Of Edward S. Curtis will mark the premier institutional showing of Curtis’s masterwork body of Copper Photogravure Printing Plates used in the production of his epic publishing venture The North American Indian, and will include examples from every photographic medium in which the artist worked.

The Copper Photogravure Printing Plates are the source of origin for every vintage photogravure print extant and produced in The North American Indian. The exhibition's compilation of 30 individual Plates, presented in their original copper and inked state, is being shown for the first time in the 110-year history of this rediscovered body of the artist’s work. Each Plate is a unique work and a primary document of one of the most significant publishing ventures of the 20th century. Curtis spent more time refining and perfecting the imagery in these Plates than in any other medium. “Their three-dimensionality offers a wholly new material and aesthetic experience that is distinct from Curtis’s more widely exhibited gravures, photographic prints, and orotones. The immediacy of the copper Plates is unlike any other vehicle for these iconic images; it is as though they allow the viewer to be transmitted through the frame to the very moment the image was captured,” said Kapson.

In addition to these unique Copper Photogravure Printing Plates, Rediscovering Genius will showcase rare and notable examples drawn from every other photographic medium with which Curtis worked to help contextualize their significance. Among them, a very rare Hand-Colored Glass Lantern Slide from Curtis's "Musicale" lecture series, in which he displayed photographic images alongside his early recordings of Native American music and languages to illustrate their rituals and traditions.

A pioneer in many respects, Curtis in 1904, only a few years after field motion picture cameras were available, was using them to document Navajo, Hopi and Cheyenne rituals. As part of the exhibition, Curtis’s pioneering 1914 feature film, In the Land of the Head-Hunters (War Canoes) will run continuously and Anne Makepeace's biographical documentary on Curtis, Coming to Light, Edward S. Curtis and the North American Indians, will be screened as a separate event at Depart Foundation in Los Angeles on Friday, December 9, 2016. Kapson says, "Believing that motion pictures were increasingly the medium to reach the masses - and that this first film might lead to other motion pictures based on Indian subjects - Curtis founded his own film company in Seattle and created a full-length film on Kwakiutl Indian life in 1914. Curtis lived and worked with the Kwakiutl for three years, and as Makepeace's documentary Coming to Light reveals, Curtis and his work are still cherished and honored by the descendants of those who participated."

Edward S. Curtis's work had the duality of being an incredible artistic creation and a document of a people. He was the first photographer to portray American Indians as anything other than objects of curiosity, and the first photographer to involve them as both active participants and contributing collaborators in the making of their own image.

Curtis created a vision of the American Indian that had never existed and never been surpassed. He produced images that not only record real daily activity, but also convey a dignity, universal humanity and majesty.

Bruce Kapson

Bruce Kapson is a respected expert on Edward S. Curtis and is widely regarded as the leading research authority on the Master Exhibition Prints of Curtis. As a Curtis curator and independent research scholar, he is responsible for several groundbreaking discoveries in the field and he has appraised major institutional and private collections. The consulting expert and a partner in the world’s largest archive of Original Copper Photogravure Plates from Curtis’s The North American Indian, Kapson’s gallery is considered the expert source for original works.

DEPART Foundation
DEPART Foundation provides an alternative platform for creative experimentation and exploration, set within a global context, that thrives outside of conventional, cultural structures. The impact of its work can best be understood as the charting of new artistic destinations with every project and program it undertakes.

Since its founding in 2008, DEPART Foundation has served as a catalyst for the Italian art and cultural community, strengthening the dialogue between Italy and the international art world. Like multiple outposts in Europe and U.S., DEPART Foundation has actively encouraged artistic production through sponsorship of young and established artists and the provision of spaces and resources conducive to the research, production and exhibition of new work, and to the presentation of educational and public programs.

Some of the most interesting and dynamic artists of our time, from around the world, have been presented for the first time in Rome by DEPART Foundation. They include Cory Arcangel, Joe Bradley, Nate Lowman, Ryan McGinley, Tauba Auerbach, Darren Bader, Louis Eisner, Roe Ethridge, Sam Falls, Mark Flood, Elias Hansen, Brendan Lynch, Oscar Murillo, Sarah Braman, Seth Price, Jon Rafman, Stephen G. Rhodes, Amanda Ross-Ho, Sterling Ruby, Lucien Smith, Valerie Snobeck and Frances Stark.

NOVEMBER 18, 2016-JANUARY 7, 2017

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION

Lyn Winter, +1 213 446 0788, lyn@lynwinter.com Livia Mandoul, +1 407 919 93924, livia@lynwinter.com

DEPART FOUNDATION

Damiana Leoni and Lorena Stamo, roma@departfoundation.org

Image: Edward S. Curtis, Pulini and Koyame - Walpi, Volume 12, 1921, Copper Photogravure Printing Plate, 9 x 6 inches.

vcsPRAsset_531423_103864_e89bfb76-c449-4a7a-a938-3db90fe30582_0.jpgLos Angeles, California - Julien’s Auctions, the world-record breaking auction house to the stars is now in the Guinness Book of World Records for the second time,  having sold the most expensive dress ever to be auctioned. The Marilyn Monroe “Happy Birthday Mr. President” dress worn by Monroe on Saturday, May 19, 1962, at a Democratic fundraiser and early 45th birthday celebration for President John F. Kennedy at Madison Square Garden, was sold by Julien’s Auctions on November 17th, 2016 in Los Angeles for $4.8 million. The dress was sold to Ripley’s Believe it or Not and surpassed all other records for a dress sold at auction. Julien’s Auctions is also in the Guinness Book of World Records for selling Michael Jackson’s white glove for $420,000 in 2009 making it the most expensive glove ever sold at auction.

Under a bright spotlight, the legendary Marilyn Monroe walked on stage and peeled away her white ermine fur coat, revealing a skintight, sheer, flesh-colored dress that sparkled with over 2,500 handstitched crystals.  The custom Jean Louis creation was so tight fitting that Marilyn wore nothing underneath and had to be sewn into it at the last minute. When Marilyn appeared and the dress was finally revealed the entire audience gasped.

“Wow, what an honor and such exciting news,” said Darren Julien, President & CEO of Julien’s Auctions. “We never imagined we would be in the Guinness Book of World Records again and I must say it is pretty amazing. We owe a great deal of gratitude to the many people who have trusted us throughout the years with their personal and career items. Can’t wait to do it all over again in 2017.”

The Guinness Book of World Records announcement is one of many accolades Julien’s Auctions has received recently as the auction house continues to break world records. World records were set when Julien’s Auctions sold John Lennon’s original 1962 J-160E Gibson guitar for $2.41 million; The Beatles drum skin from their famous appearance on The Ed Sullivan Show in 1964 which sold for $2.12 million; Ringo Starr’s 1963 Ludwig Oyster Black Pearl three piece drum kit which sold for $2.2 million; Michael Jackson’s “Thriller” jacket which sold for $1.8 million; Ringo Starr’s personal copy of The White Album pressed with #000001 which sold for $790,000; Michael Jackson’s white glove which sold for $420,000 (and also in the Guinness Book of World Records) and Marilyn Monroe’s grave marker which sold for $212,400.

“Marilyn Monroe’s dress was one of the most exciting moments in our auction house’s history. I am thrilled that this was the dress that broke all records and now has a place in the Guinness Book of World Records,” said Martin Nolan, Executive Director of Julien’s Auctions. “I am so very proud to be able to have our name in the record books alongside such an enduring and timeless beauty as Marilyn.”

bulbs.jpegDALLAS - An archive of Thomas Edison’s lightbulbs, court evidence and the keys to his famed Menlo Park, New Jersey, laboratory where he invented the phonograph, sold for a combined $64,375 at a Dec. 3 public auction of Historical Americana held by Heritage Auctions in Dallas. The archive included six, 19th century lightbulbs tied to a famous court case, which had descended in the family of Edison’s own attorney for more than 100 years. 

“These bulbs were entered as evidence when Edison sued three different companies for allegedly infringing on his patent for the incandescent bulb,” said Don Ackerman, a consignment director for Historical Americana for Heritage Auctions. “Edison’s own keys were used to open the doors of his laboratory was where the genius earned his nickname as “The Wizard of Menlo Park.”

One bulb in the archive was created by Heinrich Göbel, a German inventor who claimed to have invented the incandescent lightbulb in 1868, years before Edison did in 1879. The bulb and related documentation sold for $23,750. Göbel did not apply for a patent, but served as a star witness against Edison when Edison sued three manufacturers of incandescent lamps who he claimed infringed against his bulb patents. The set of five bulbs used in the court case sold for $30,000.

“Both ‘original’ Goebel lamps and reproductions were offered as exhibits, but there was no proof that any of them were made prior to 1880,” Ackerman said. “This tactic by defense attorneys became known as the "Goebel Defense" and it has since been used in other similar cases."

Multiple bidders pushed the auction price of the keys to $10,625. Consigner Charlie Knudsen, who acquired the items from his great aunt, who was married to one of the attorneys whose law firm represented Edison in patent lawsuits, was excited during the auction.

“This is such an important archive - I’m glad it will go to a good home, to someone who also appreciates Edison’s contribution to science and history,” he said.

Heritage Auctions is the largest auction house founded in the United States and the world’s third largest, with annual sales of more than $800 million, and over one million online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and receive access to a complete record of prices realized, with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com.

Want to get the up-to-the-minute updates and breaking news stories about Heritage Auctions? Follow us on HA.com/Facebook and HA.com/Twitter. To view an archive of Heritage press releases go to: HA.com/PR. To link to this release on your blog or Website: HA.com/PR-.

 

pnin_pjs2410_300dpi.jpgAUSTIN, Texas — The Harry Ransom Center at The University of Texas at Austin has acquired books from Gabriel García Márquez’s library. The collection will reside alongside the author’s literary archive, which the Ransom Center acquired in 2014. The selection of more than 180 books includes those that are inscribed, signed and sometimes annotated. 

This selection from the Gabriel García Márquez library reveals expected and unexpected friendships and varied connections between the Nobel laureate and others. The collection includes books inscribed to García Márquez and to his wife, Mercedes, by friends and prominent political and cultural figures such as Isabel Allende, Richard Avedon, Fidel Castro, Bill Clinton, J. M. Coetzee, Carlos Fuentes, Pablo Neruda, Toni Morrison and Mario Vargas Llosa, among others. Also within the library are a number of García Márquez’s own works with annotations by the author.

“I was García Márquez’s official biographer and knew him for 20 years, until his death,” said Gerald Martin, the Andrew Mellon Professor Emeritus of Modern Languages at the University of Pittsburgh. “Few have had access to his library. I am thrilled by this extraordinary acquisition. … I would like nothing better than to take a flight from London tomorrow and spend a year (or more) among the riches of the Harry Ransom Center — my current American dream!”

One of the oldest presentation books is an inscribed first edition of Augusto Monterroso’s “Obras Completas (y otros cuentos)” (“Complete works (and other stories)”). García Márquez once said of one of Monterroso’s works, “This book should be read with your hands in the air: Its danger is based on its sly wisdom and the deadly beauty of its lack of seriousness.” The most recent books are Fidel Castro’s “La contraofensiva estratégica” and “La Victoria estratégica,” published in 2010. In a 1983 interview in Playboy, García Márquez said of Castro, “Ours is an intellectual friendship.”

With 15 books, Colombian poet and author Álvaro Mutis has the largest representation in the library. Authors in the collection come from more than 15 countries including Argentina, Chile, Colombia, Cuba, Guatemala, Mexico, Peru, Uruguay and Venezuela.

Many authors associated with the Latin American Boom are represented in the collection with inscribed editions including Julio Cortázar’s “Rayuela” (“Hopscotch”), José Donoso’s “El obsceno pájaro de la noche” (“The Obscene Night Bird”), and works by Carlos Fuentes, Mario Vargas Llosa and Juan Rulfo.

While processing and cataloging the collection, Amy F. Brown, the Ransom Center’s cataloging librarian, noted that “The García Márquez library is unique in its depth and variety. These books took me through a veritable Latin American ‘republic of letters.’”

Some of the books from the García Márquez library and their inscriptions can be seen online. The collection is open and accessible for research at the Ransom Center.

Image: Pablo Neruda's "Nueva odas elementales" (1963). Photo by Pete Smith.

BEVERLY HILLS — Items from the estate of creative comedy and advertising genius Stan Freberg (1926 - 2015) will be available to his fans in a public auction of animation cels and related memorabilia conducted by Heritage Auctions in Beverly Hills, California, and online Dec. 10 and 11, 2016.

Personally selected by his widow, Hunter Freberg, the items include the first draft script for his acclaimed 1961 comedy album, “Stan Freberg Presents The United States of America Volume One: The Early Years;” the 1953 Gold Record award for the satirical “St. George and the Dragonet:” the script for his award-winning 1958 recording “Green Chri$tma$;” animation cels from his prodigious voice-over work and important items from his memorable TV commercials. Other highlights offered in “The Treasures of Stan Freberg Collection” are his 1960 Hollywood Walk of Fame plaque and the Inkpot Award he received at the 2009 San Diego Comic-Con. 

“Stan Freberg was a genius who rose to the height of achievement and stardom in so many different fields. Advertising Age called him the father of the funny commercial,” said Jim Lentz, Director of Animation Art at Heritage Auctions. 

“He was an animation voice-over actor for over 70 years, from age 18 to 88. He achieved fame as a puppeteer with the television program, “Time for Beany,” and with his space alien puppet, Orville. He was the leading comedy album recording artist for Capitol Records, a prominent television personality and a Radio Hall of Fame star,” explained Lentz.

Many of the awards and animation cels were kept at home “so we could see them all the time,” said Hunter Freberg. “He was the son of a Baptist minister and always said God had given him the blessings for all the creativity he had. No words can describe living with THE Stan Freberg. We laughed so hard, and never had a boring moment together!,” she recalled.

Highlights from the Stan Freberg Collection include:

·         Freberg’s personal, typed with handwritten notations first draft script for his acclaimed 1961 comedy record album, “Stan Freberg Presents The United States of America Volume One: The Early Years.” The manuscript is accompanied by a second version of the script for nine sections of the album and a copy of the actual vinyl record that sold more than one million copies (est. $5,000).

·         A typed manuscript for the 1953 recording of “St. George and the Dragonet” that starred Freberg, June Foray, Daws Butler and Hy Averback as a parody of the popular radio and television crime series, “Dragnet.” The record quickly rose to number one on both the Billboard and Cash Box record charts. The script is accompanied by a vinyl record, “The Best of Stan Freberg,” that includes “St. George and the Dragonet.” (est. $1,000).

·         The Capitol Records gold record award Freberg received for “St. George and the Dragonet.” (est. $1,000).

·         An original script and sheet music for Freberg’s acclaimed holiday season satire record, “Green Chri$tma$” (est. $5,000), and the 1958 Best Comedy Performance nomination certificate he received for that record from the National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences.

·         The Hollywood Walk of Fame award presented to Freberg on February 9, 1960 when his star was formally unveiled at 6145 Hollywood Blvd. in Los Angeles, and a second award presented to him on November 3, 2010 to mark the 50th anniversary of the famous Hollywood Walk of Fame (est. $2,000).

·         Animation cells including an artist’s proof (#19 of 50) of Bugs Bunny and Pete Puma (voiced by Freberg) from the 1997 Warner Brothers cartoon, “Rabbits Kin,” signed by Freberg (est. $750); a hand-painted production cel of Pete Puma from the 1990 season of “Tiny Toons” (est. $1,000); Freberg’s personal favorite cel depicting The Three Bears (est. $750) (Freberg voiced “Junyer Bear”) hand-signed by legendary cartoon artist and director Chuck Jones; and a one-of-a-kind cel created and inscribed by “The Simpsons” animator Phil Ortiz that depicts Homer Simpson and Freberg and voice-over actress June Foray as Simpson characters (est. $750).

·         The Inkpot Award he received at the 2009 San Diego Comic-Con convention for Achievement in Animation (est. $1,000); the 1992 “Annie’s” Winsor McCay Award (est. $1,000) from the International Animated Film Society for Freberg’s “distinguished lifetime contribution to the art of animation;” and his 1995 Radio Hall of Fame Award (est. $1,000).

·         Examples of materials created by Freberg to produce award-winning comedic advertising and marketing campaigns for Chung King Chow Mein (est. $1,000) and Kaiser brand aluminum foil (est. $1,000).

Heritage Auctions is the largest auction house founded in the United States and the world’s third largest, with annual sales of more than $800 million, and over one million online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and receive access to a complete record of prices realized, with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com. 

Want to get the up-to-the-minute updates and breaking news stories about Heritage Auctions? Follow us on HA.com/Facebook and HA.com/Twitter. To view an archive of Heritage press releases go to: HA.com/PR. To link to this release on your blog or Website: HA.com/PR-.

Screen Shot 2016-12-01 at 9.37.45 AM.pngDreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions is delighted to be offering the books and photogravure prints from Edward Sheriff Curtis' anthropological masterpiece, The North American Indian as part of their Books, Photographs and Other Works on Paper sale on 15th of December 2016 (1:30pm).

This ethnographical survey by photographer and chronicler, Edward Sheriff Curtis (1868-1952) remains one of the most significant and powerful insights into the world of the indigenous peoples of North America. The sale this December, which will take place at Bloomsbury House, 24 Maddox Street, London, will include volumes one to thirteen of the twenty volume series alongside a large number of the original accompanying portfolio plates. Many of the portfolio plates, which carry attractive estimates ranging from £300 to £1,800, will be offered as separate lots, appealing to a broad selection of budgets and collectors.

The North American Indian documents over eighty distinct native peoples from the culture areas of the trans-Mississippi west. The volumes contain a huge repository of ethnographic information including the outlines of social organisation, biographies of key leaders, myths and more. The sale catalogue features an introduction by Mick Gidley, Emeritus Professor of American Literature & Culture at the University of Leeds and author of several works on Curtis, including Edward S. Curtis and the North American Indian, Incorporated (Cambridge University Press, 1998; paperback, 2000).

The books and portfolios were originally issued to subscribers between 1907 and 1930, each volume and set of plates supposedly one of 500 copies (most likely a smaller run). These volumes therefore only entered the major libraries and homes of the super-rich. The set featuring in the auction was subscribed to by Sir William Northrup McMillan (1872-1925), an American industrialist and friend of Theodore Roosevelt, the latter who also provided the foreword to The North American Indian. Russell Mount, cataloguer of the Curtis lots at Dreweatts & Bloomsbury Auctions notes, ‘a set with an intriguing connection to Roosevelt, the President being first a portrait subject of Curtis, then soon his friend, supporter, and confidant. Roosevelt's encouragement to persevere with the project of The North American Indian was of inestimable importance to Curtis’.

The volumes (Lot 200, Est: £60,000-80,000, pictured) incorporate 983 plates with photogravures taken by Curtis himself. Curtis’ ‘documentary pictures’ cover portraiture, tribal arts & crafts, shamanisitic rituals, maps and plans. Lots 201-518 are comprised of the larger-format photogravure plates issued in the portfolios and include many of the more famous photographic images such as Mósa - Mohave (pictured below) which sees the subject powerfully returning the viewer’s gaze (Lot 251, Est £1,500 - £2,000).

Appealing to collectors of both photography and Americana alike, the striking photographic portraits of tribal Chiefs, men, women and children are documented alongside landscapes images. Lot 288, On The Little Bighorn - Apsaroke, 1908 (Est £1,000 - £1,500) and Lot 354 Sun Dance Encampment - Piegan (Est £1,000-£1,500) show the people’s ease with the natural world. Elsewhere, scenes of village life are depicted in Story Telling- Apache, (Lot 210 Est: £1,200 - £1,800) and The Blanket Weaver - Navaho (Lot 232, Est £1,000 - £1,500). Although these scenes may have been reconstructed for the camera, they not only capture the dignity and pride of the native peoples, but also document the craftsmanship inherent within the native cultures.

NEW YORK——The Estate of Maureen O'Hara sale at Bonhams New York today (29 November) sold over 95% of her private documents, clothing, and memorabilia, reaching a total over $445,000. "The Irish style icon's personal effects were volleyed between phone, internet and a healthy crowd of in-room bidders from Ireland, Europe, South America, and Asia," explains Catherine Williamson, Director of the Fine Books and Manuscripts and Entertainment Memorabilia at Bonhams Los Angeles.

The infamous cache of love letters from Quiet Man Director John Ford sold for $75,000. Written during the run-up to filming Ford's 1952 film The Quiet Man, almost all of them are in their original envelopes. After meeting on the set of How Green Was My Valley (1941) O'Hara and Ford began a long and often turbulent friendship colored by Ford's obsessive – and sometimes violent – fascination with the red-haired siren, who he called his 'Rosebud'. O'Hara later said of the director," for years I wondered why John Ford grew to hate me so much. I realize now that he didn't hate me at all. He loved me very much and even thought that he was in love with me." Read more about the two's famous relationship in Neil Lyndon's Bonhams Magazine essay.

O'Hara is perhaps best known for her iconic portrayal of Mary Kate Danaher in The Quiet Man, opposite John Wayne. There was competitive bidding on items associated with the classic film, including O'Hara's personal, heavily annotated The Quiet Man script (originally given to John Ford, with his name on the cover), which sold for $50,000. O'Hara's clothes and jewelry also proved exceedingly popular. A tweed jacket she wore in The Quiet Man (estimated $5,000-7,000), sold for $16,250. Another highlight was O'Hara's pair of Meissen porcelain floral encrusted covered vases, which sold for $31,250 against an estimate of $3,000-5,000.

Bonhams Director of Entertainment Memorabilia, Catherine Williamson, said, "It's clear that O'Hara's appeal is evergreen—she speaks just as much to young movie goers to those who saw her when her films first premiered. She had a fantastic sense of style and her clothing and accessories proved particularly popular, often selling for as many as 10 times their low estimates."

Maureen O'Hara (1920-2015) grew up on the outskirts of Dublin. She joined Dublin's Abbey Theatre in 1934 and spent three years training with the company. At 17, O'Hara was discovered by British actor Charles Laughton, who signed her to a contract with his Mayflower Pictures. Her first major film was the Alfred Hitchcock-directed Jamaica Inn (1939), co-starring Laughton. This was swiftly followed by her first Hollywood movie, The Hunchback of Notre (1939), which cemented her movie star status. Known as "The Queen of Technicolor" for her fiery red hair and emerald green eyes, O'Hara appeared in more than 60 movies and was awarded an honorary Oscar in 2014 for her contributions to the film industry.

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