June 2012 Archives

The Library of Congress has acquired the personal papers of American astronomer, astrobiologist and science communicator Carl Sagan (1934-1996).

A celebrated scientist, educator, television personality and prolific author, Sagan was a consummate communicator who bridged the gap between academe and popular culture.

The Sagan collection has come to the Library through the generosity of writer, producer and director Seth MacFarlane, and is officially designated The Seth MacFarlane Collection of the Carl Sagan and Ann Druyan Archive.

The collection comprises approximately 800 boxes of materials that document Sagan’s life and work and includes his extensive correspondence with scientific colleagues and other important figures of the 20th century. It also includes book drafts, publications files, "idea files" on various subjects, records of various symposia, NASA files and academic files covering the years he taught at Cornell University. Among the personal files are his birth announcement, handwritten notebooks of his earliest thoughts and grammar-school report cards. In addition to manuscript materials, the collection includes photographs, audiotapes and videocassettes. Researchers and scholars will be able to use the collection once it has been fully processed by the Library’s archivists.

"We are honored to preserve and make accessible to researchers the legacy of Carl Sagan, a man who devoted his life to the study of the universe," said Librarian of Congress James H. Billington. "The Sagan papers are a rich addition to the Library’s already-outstanding collection of science manuscripts and other materials from such prominent figures as Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Edison, Alexander Graham Bell, Sigmund Freud, J. Robert Oppenheimer and E.O. Wilson."

"Carl was the exemplar of the citizen scientist," said Druyan, Sagan’s long time professional collaborator and his widow. "For him, the values of democracy and science were intertwined. I can think of no more fitting home for his papers than the nation’s library. Thanks to Seth, Carl’s prodigious life’s work will endure to awaken future generations to the wonders of the scientific perspective."

Sagan and Druyan co-wrote several books, and the "Cosmos" television series and were co-creators of the motion picture, "Contact." Druyan was the creative director of NASA’s Voyager Interstellar Record Project (http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/spacecraft/goldenrec.html).

"The work of Carl Sagan has been a profound influence in my life, and the life of every individual who recognizes the importance of humanity's ongoing commitment to the exploration of our universe," said MacFarlane. "The continuance of our journey outward into space should always occupy some part of our collective attention, regardless of whatever Snooki did last week."

MacFarlane is the creative force behind the television shows "Family Guy," "American Dad!" and "The Cleveland Show." "Family Guy" has garnered four Emmys and seven Emmy nominations, including one in the Outstanding Comedy Series category. MacFarlane makes his directorial feature film debut on June 29, 2012, with the live-action and computer-generated comedy, "Ted." His orchestral/big band album, "Music Is Better Than Words," debuted at number one on the iTunes Jazz charts on Sept 27, 2011, and received two Grammy nominations, including Best Traditional Pop Vocal Album.

MacFarlane has teamed up with Sagan’s original creative collaborators—writer/producer Ann Druyan and astrophysicist Steven Soter—to conceive a 13-part "docu-series" that will serve as a successor to the Emmy and Peabody Award-winning original series, "Cosmos." Produced in conjunction with FOX and the National Geographic Channel, "Cosmos: A Space-Time Odyssey" will explore how human beings began to comprehend the laws of nature and find their place in space and time. By exploring never-before-told stories of the heroic quest for knowledge, the series aims to take viewers to other worlds and travel across the universe for a vision of the cosmos on the grandest scale.

Carl Sagan earned a Pulitzer Prize for his bestseller, "The Dragons of Eden: Speculation on the Evolution of Human Intelligence." His science-fiction novel, "Contact," became both a bestseller and a feature film. It is estimated that more than a billion people around the world have viewed his popular PBS show, "Cosmos."

Sagan specialized in planetary astronomy. His early work on planetary surfaces and atmospheres is considered pioneering, and he made landmark contributions to NASA’s Mariner, Pioneer, Apollo, Galileo, Viking and Voyager space-exploration programs. For his unique contributions, he was awarded medals for Distinguished Scientific Achievement and Public Service from NASA, the National Science Foundation and the National Academy of Sciences.

A staunch advocate of the scientific method, Sagan was known for his research on the possibilities of extraterrestrial life, for his research and campaigns of public education on the dangers of global warming and the "nuclear winter" that could result from a nuclear war.

To examine Sagan’s legacy as a role model for future American scientists, the Library of Congress will sponsor a "Summit on Science Education" late next year. The event, which will bring together scientists, educators, policy-makers and students, will underscore Sagan’s conviction that it is critical to understand and appreciate the centrality of science in the everyday lives of Americans and to create a renewed national consciousness about preparing the next generation of scientists.

The Library of Congress, the nation’s oldest federal cultural institution and the largest library in the world, holds more than 151 million items in various languages, disciplines, and formats. The Library seeks to spark imagination and creativity and to further human understanding and wisdom by providing access to knowledge through its magnificent collections, programs, publications and exhibitions. Many of the Library’s rich resources can be accessed through its website at www.loc.gov.

[ITHACA, NY] National Book Auctions, located in Ithaca, NY hosted a Sunday, June 24th auction that featured a broad range of rare antique books as well as groups of collectible ephemera. Featured was a large collection of primarily antique works from the fields of geology and paleontology. Also offered was another session from a large nautical library which will be brought to market over a series of auctions this year.

Bringing a hammer price of $861.00 (including buyer’s premium) was an album of antique and vintage Chinese stamps. This collection contained over 800 stamps from inception to 1950, with some regional names and specimens from the early days of the People’s Republic of China.

A lot comprised of twenty-seven volumes of Portia Takakjian’s “The 32-Gun Frigate Essex” brought a hammer price of $399.75 (including buyer’s premium). This is a title in the “Anatomy of the Ship” series, and originates from the large collection of nautical material that will continue to be offered over a series of auctions.

Bringing a hammer price of $369.00 (including buyer’s premium) was a portfolio containing 32 Soviet political posters. The majority of these color posters represent art from the time of the Russian Revolution and World War II. The front panel of the portfolio bears the name of Aurora Art Publishers (Leningrad) in English and Russian. Captions on versos of posters are in Russian, English and French.

A first printing of Leonard Cohen’s publication “Book of Mercy” achieved a hammer price of $307.50 including buyer’s premium). Cohen is a Canadian singer-songwriter, musician, poet, and novelist. His work often explores religion, isolation, sexuality, and interpersonal relationships.

National Book Auctions is a public auction service specializing in books, ephemera, and art. National Book Auctions is a targeted service offering experience and expertise unique to marketing antique and modern books and ephemera for consignors and collectors alike. Preview for the upcoming Sunday, July 8th auction is at 10 a.m. and the live auction starts at noon. For more information or to consign collectible material please contact David Hall, Business Manager, at 607-269-0101 or email mail@nationalbookauctions.com.

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New York - On June 22, at Christie’s New York, George Washington’s annotated copy of the Constitution and Bill of Rights (1789) sold for $9,826,500, setting a new world auction record for an American book or historical document. After 223 years, it remains in near-pristine condition, with Washington’s bold signature and his armorial bookplate. Remarkably, in the margins of the Constitution, Washington has added careful brackets and marginal notes. These notations highlight key passages concerning the President’s responsibilities, testifying to Washington’s careful, conscientious approach to his powers and responsibilities in his ground-breaking first term.

Chris Coover, Senior Specialist of Books and Manuscripts, comments: “George Washington’s annotated copy of the Constitution and Bill of Rights (1789) sold for an extraordinary $9,826,500 -- a world auction record for any American book or historical document. A number of bidders competed pursued this exceptional item, but in the end the successful bidder was a representative of the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association of the Union, the non-profit educational organization which owns and operates the historical site and museum of George Washington’s Virginia home. The unique book had been in the Mount Vernon library until 1876 and will soon be returned to that library.”

In a bustling saleroom, auctioneer John Hays, Deputy Chairman, opened the bidding at $1.3 million. After four minutes of bidding by multiple buyers in the room and on the phone, the winning bid was placed in the saleroom by the Mount Vernon Ladies’ Association.

Washington’s copy of the Acts of Congress was offered for sale by the Estate of H. Richard Dietrich, Jr. Upon Washington’s death, it remained in the library at Mount Vernon for many years and until it was sold at auction in 1876. Later, it was acquired by the Heritage Foundation of Deerfield, Massachusetts, and sold again at auction in 1964, when it was acquired by the noted Americana collector Richard Dietrich.

Rare books and manuscripts relating to the most revered and respected American presidents have inspired record prices at Christie’s in recent years. Washington’s personal copy of the Constitution and Bill of Rights has far-surpassed the previous record for an American manuscript, an autograph manuscript of Lincoln’s 1864 election victory speech, which also sold at Christie’s New York for $3,442,500 in February 2009. An autograph letter written in 1787 by George Washington to his nephew Bushrod Washington, on the subject of the ratification of the Constitution, was the previous world auction record for a Washington document of $3,218,500 in December 2009.

About Christie’s
Christie’s, the world's leading art business, had global auction and private sales in 2011 that totaled £3.6 billion/$5.7 billion. Christie’s is a name and place that speaks of extraordinary art, unparalleled service and expertise, as well as international glamour. Founded in 1766 by James Christie, Christie's has since conducted the greatest and most celebrated auctions through the centuries providing a popular showcase for the unique and the beautiful. Christie’s offers over 450 auctions annually in over 80 categories, including all areas of fine and decorative arts, jewellery, photographs, collectibles, wine, and more. Prices range from $200 to over $100 million. Christie's also has a long and successful history conducting private sales for its clients in all categories, with emphasis on Post-War and Contemporary, Impressionist and Modern, Old Masters and Jewellery. Private sales totaled £502 million / $808.6m in 2011, an increase of 44% on the previous year.

Christie’s has a global presence with 53 offices in 32 countries and 10 salerooms around the world including in London, New York, Paris, Geneva, Milan, Amsterdam, Dubai, Zürich, and Hong Kong. More recently, Christie’s has led the market with expanded initiatives in growth markets such as Russia, China, India and the United Arab Emirates, with successful sales and exhibitions in Beijing, Mumbai and Dubai.

*Estimates do not include buyer’s premium. Sales totals are hammer price plus buyer’s premium and do not reflect costs, financing fees or application of buyer’s or seller’s credits.
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A rare 15th century manuscript of Werner Rolewinck’s world history, Fasciculus temporum, sold for $102,000 at PBA Galleries’ June 21, 2012, auction of Rare Books & Manuscripts, within the range of the $100,000/150,000 presale estimate. The strong price demonstrates the vigor of the antiquarian market, as rare and important material continues to climb in value.
 
Rolewinck’s Fasciculus temporum was a significant work in its day, a history of the world with dual parallel timelines dating both from creation and the birth of Christ. The manuscript version that sold at PBA Galleries dates from around 1471, preceding the first printing of 1474 by Arnold ther Hoernen in Cologne. There are only thirteen known manuscript examples extant, and six of those were produced after the printed version came out - and the copy at PBA Galleries was the only one known to be in private hands. Rolewinck’s history was important, not the least for its being immensely popular it its day - it went through 30 editions before 1500, the bestselling 15th century book by a contemporary author. Indeed, the Fasciculus was apparently the second publication of any living author, seeming to be predated only by Robertus Valturius’ De re militari (1472).
 
Besides being rare and important, the Fasciculus manuscript has another characteristic that lends to its great desirability and value, that of beauty. It is a striking example of the craft of the medieval scribe, calligrapher and illuminator. The manuscript comprises 30 vellum leaves, in Latin, handwritten in brown and red ink, with numerous roundels in red. There are three miniature paintings in colors (of Joseph, Mary and the baby Jesus in the manger; Christ nailed to the cross; and a resurrected Christ, a halo of tooled gold leaf surrounding his head, holding a gold leaf orb that is also delicately tooled), and a large, elaborate initial in red and blue leading off the text, with several smaller initials in red or blue. Of further note is the large size of the manuscript, done in “Grand Format,” dwarfing the printed versions. This allows fuller utilization of the elaborate roundel format, with an elegance and beauty not available in the printed version. This grand format is a characteristic of the pre-publication manuscripts only - post-1474 manuscripts typically followed the smaller format of the printed book. The printed examples did have a series of small woodcut illustrations, markedly different from the three beautifully executed miniature paintings in this manuscript. The manuscript is elegantly bound in 17th century paneled calf with gilt tooling.
 
For the full catalogue description of the Fasciculus temporum, go to www.pbagalleries.com and click the catalogues link on the toolbar.
 
About PBA Galleries
PBA Galleries of San Francisco is the only west-coast auction house specializing in books & manuscripts, maps & atlases. The company offers private and heirloom libraries at auction, providing clients with a staff of professional appraisers, online and printed catalogues, and bi-monthly auctions where participants can bid in person, by phone, fax, e-mail, and in real-time by signing up at the PBA Galleries website. For more information contact Shannon Kennedy - 415 989 2665 - shannon@pbagalleries.com .
 
PBA Galleries
133 Kearny Street - 4th Floor
San Francisco, California 94108
New York, NY, June 22, 2012—Just in time for Independence Day, The Morgan Library & Museum is exhibiting several objects from its noted holdings of important Americana. The items were chosen to reflect the country’s achievements and struggles as it marks the Fourth of July holiday. The works are on view in the museum’s historic 1906 McKim building and are part of a larger exhibition of twenty-nine items from the Morgan’s permanent collections. They will remain on view through September 8.

No Fourth of July celebration would be complete without a nod to the nation’s first president, George Washington. On view is Washington’s striking life mask, a plaster cast made by noted French sculptor Jean-Antoine Houdon in preparation for his clay bust and final marble life-size sculpture of Washington. Made when the President was fifty-three, the life mask is unique and represents his truest likeness.

Also on view is a rare fragment of Washington’s inaugural address draft. The speech he delivered from the balcony of Federal Hall on Wall Street in April 1789 differed significantly from the contents of the earlier draft in which Washington praised the Constitution’s “balances arising from the distribution of the Legislative, Executive, and Judicial powers” and declared that “no government before introduced among mankind ever contained so many checks and such efficacious restraints to prevent it from degenerating into any species of oppression.”

Another Presidential writing on view, this one from James Madison, reminds us of a darker time in American history. Writing to the Marquis de Lafayette in November 1820—by which time slavery had become the most divisive issue in the republic—Madison observed, “All these perplexities develop more & more, the dreadful fruitfulness of the original sin of the African trade.”

Noah Webster spent twenty-seven years and learned twenty-six languages in preparation for his work familiar to all Americans, An American Dictionary of the English Language. On display is the manuscript for Webster’s Dictionary, which was finally published in 1828 when he was seventy years old. His was the first major American dictionary, and the last ever to be compiled by a single individual.

From the time he graduated from Harvard College in 1837 until shortly before his death at the age of forty-four, Henry David Thoreau filled volume after volume of blank books covered in marbled paper with his observations, thoughts, and revelations, firmly believing that a closely examined life would yield infinite riches. Thoreau later used a slightly revised version of the journal entry on view in his “Natural History of Massachusetts” essay for the Transcendentalist magazine The Dial.
 
The following is a complete list of the twenty-nine items on view in the McKim building this summer:

Americana
Jean Antoine Houdon’s George Washington’s Life Mask, 1785
Henry David Thoreau’s autograph journal, March 30-September 30, 1841
James Madison’s letter to the Marquis de Lafayette, 1820
George Washington’s inaugural address draft fragment, 1789
Noah Webster’s An American Dictionary of the English Language manuscript
Alexander Wilson’s American Ornithology with engravings by Alexander Lawson, 1828-29
 
Also on View
Breviary of Eleanor of Portugal, ca. 1500-10
Claude Debussy’s La Belle au bois dormant, 1890
Die geesten of geschiedenis van Romen (Deeds of the Romans), 1481
Raoul-Auger Feuillet’s Recueil de dances, 1700
Gospel Book, mid-tenth century
Gospel Book (“Mathilda Gospels”), end of the eleventh century
Joseph Haydn’s Symphony No. 91 in E-flat Major, 1788
Ernest Hemingway’s letter to George Plimpton of The Paris Review, 1954
Hyginus’s Poetica astronomica, 1485
Marianne Moore’s letter to Robert B. Young of the Ford Motor Company, 1955
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Piano Concerto in C Major, 1785
Vladimir Nabokov’s Stikhi (Poems), 1916
Ovid’s Les métamorphoses with engravings after Eisen, Gravelot, Boucher, and others, 1767-71
Samuel Pepys’s notes in shorthand, 1695
Edgar Allan Poe’s Tamerlane manuscript, 1828
Le roman de Lancelot du lac, ca. 1310-15
Franz Schubert’s Fantasie in G Major for Piano, 1810
Tarot cards from the Visconti-Sforza deck, ca. 1450
Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s manuscript commonplace book, ca. 1796
Paul Verlaine’s Parallèlement with lithographs by Pierre Bonnard, 1900
Jacopo Vignola’s Regola delli cinque ordini d’architettura, ca. 1564
Oscar Wilde’s manuscript of The Picture of Dorian Gray, 1889-90

The programs of The Morgan Library & Museum are made possible with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

The Morgan Library & Museum
The Morgan Library & Museum began as the private library of financier Pierpont Morgan, one of the preeminent collectors and cultural benefactors in the United States. Today, more than a century after its founding in 1906, the Morgan serves as a museum, independent research library, musical venue, architectural landmark, and historic site. In October 2010, the Morgan completed the first-ever restoration of its original McKim building, Pierpont Morgan's private library, and the core of the institution. In tandem with the 2006 expansion project by architect Renzo Piano, the Morgan now provides visitors unprecedented access to its world-renowned collections of drawings, literary and historical manuscripts, musical scores, medieval and Renaissance manuscripts, printed books, and ancient Near Eastern seals and tablets.

General Information
The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue, at 36th Street, New York, NY 10016-3405
212.685.0008
www.themorgan.org
Just a short walk from Grand Central and Penn Station

Hours
Tuesday-Thursday, 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; extended Friday hours, 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; closed Mondays, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year's Day. The Morgan closes at 4 p.m. on Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve.

Admission
$15 for adults; $10 for students, seniors (65 and over), and children (under 16); free to Members and children 12 and under accompanied by an adult. Admission is free on Fridays from 7 to 9 p.m. Admission is not required to visit the Morgan Shop.
 
New York, NY, June 2012—Josef Albers (1888-1976) is best known for his series of paintings Homage to the Square, in which he repeatedly explored color relationships within a similar format of concentric squares. Much less familiar, however, are the painted studies on paper that Albers made for his paintings. Expressively experimental, the works offer a revealing look at the artist’s investigation of form and color.

Now, for the first time in New York, The Morgan Library & Museum will present an exhibition entirely devoted to this aspect of the artist’s work. Josef Albers in America: Painting on Paper, on view from July 20 to October 14, features approximately eighty such studies spanning the four decades after the artist left Nazi Germany and immigrated to the United States.

The exhibition begins with studies for abstract geometric compositions from the late 1930s, when Albers—a onetime instructor at the Bauhaus— returned to painting after having devoted his recent years to working with glass. Albers’s studies for the Variant / Adobe series, from the 1940s, reveal the influence that his time in Mexico, and specifically the country’s pre-Columbian architecture, had upon his art. The majority of the exhibition—over fifty works—is devoted to the Homage to the Square series (1950-1976). These vibrant sketches—never exhibited in the artist’s lifetime and rarely seen after his death—provide important insight into Albers’s working method and, in contrast to the austerity and strict geometry of the finished paintings, are remarkable for their freedom and sensuality.

“The Morgan is noted for exhibitions that explore the artistic process and the often surprising, experimental drafts that lead to a finished work of art,” said William M. Griswold, director of the Morgan. “This show is a prime example for an artist whose name is ordinarily associated with a rigorous and highly disciplined approach to composition, but whose painterly studies exhibit an unexpectedly spontaneous informality.”  
 
PAINTING ON PAPER
Born in Bottrop, Germany in 1888, Albers came from a family of craftsmen, and the virtues of craftsmanship—precision, discipline, and technical proficiency—were of central importance to his work. Whereas his paintings themselves took only a few hours to complete, Albers’s preparatory work entailed producing series upon series of meticulous studies.

Of equal concern for Albers were the materials from which art was made. At the Bauhaus, where he taught for thirteen years, he encouraged his students to explore the potential of paper and cardboard for their work. The limitations and possibilities of paper were of particular interest to him. A less formal and rigid material than the Masonite panels or vinylite that he used for his finished works, paper provided Albers an ideal surface on which to experiment, and to process his ideas.

In 1933, the Bauhaus was forced to close under pressure from the new Nazi government. Albers and his wife, Anni, immigrated to America, where he would head the art department of Black Mountain College in North Carolina. In the United States, Albers matured as a painter as his fascination with geometric form grew and his travels took him to Mexico, a place that would have a lasting influence upon his work.

MEXICO AND THE VARIANTS / ADOBES SERIES
The Albers’ visited Mexico for the first time in 1935. They returned to the country regularly over the next several decades, sometimes staying for several months. The profound effect of Mexico’s colors and pre-Columbian architecture and sculpture upon Albers’s work is difficult to overestimate. “Mexico,” he wrote to Nina and Wassily Kandinsky in 1936, “is truly the promised land of abstract art.” 

Mexico reconfirmed Albers’s faith in the expressive power of color, and it was here—after years of producing nothing but stained glass, furniture designs, woodcuts, and linocuts—that Albers returned to painting. He significantly expanded his color range, incorporating magenta, turquoise, violet, and ocher, among other colors, in varying combinations.

The country’s architecture, from adobe houses to Mesoamerican structures, inspired the artist’s geometric abstract paintings from the 1940s, especially the Variant / Adobe series, which he began in 1947. In studies for the series—whose compositions resemble a wall structured by abstract window openings—Albers investigated the effect of several pure, unmixed colors juxtaposed with one another. In a letter to friend Franz Perdekamp in September 1947, Albers wrote, “Since January [I have painted] only one theme in about seventy studies. What interests me most now is how colors change one another according to the proportions and quantities [I use]…I’m especially proud when [I can make] colors lose their identity and become unrecognizable.”
 
HOMAGE TO THE SQUARE
In 1950, Albers found the ideal vessel through which to explore his fascination with the interaction of color: a group of nested squares.

Like the Adobe series, it is possible that Homage to the Square evolved from Albers’s preoccupation with the ancient architecture and sculpture of Mexico. His main concern in these paintings, however, was not the form of the square itself, but rather color. “Color,” Albers said, “is the means of my idiom. It’s autonomic. I’m not paying ‘homage to the square.’ It’s only the dish I serve my craziness about color in.” As evidenced in the notes Albers sometimes wrote in the margins of a work, or at times within the color field itself, these studies were essentially experimental in nature.

Albers restricted his first Homage to the Square paintings to shades of gray and black. Eventually, he used myriad color combinations, not subscribing to specific color harmonies, such as those based on complementary contrasts. Albers famously remarked that “color is the most relative medium in the world,” and many Homage to the Square paintings have colors that initially appear odd or discordant, but which engender a visual intensity when seen together: fiery oranges and reds; light grays and pale yellows; bright blues and dusky mauves.

The square never lost its appeal for Albers. It was a source of endless inspiration, and the form in which he most successfully investigated his fascination with the interplay of color. From 1950 until his death twenty-six years later, he created some two thousand Homage to the Square paintings.

Josef Albers in America is organized by the Staatliche Graphische Sammlung in Munich and the Josef Albers Museum in Bottrop, Germany. Works are drawn from the Josef and Anni Albers Foundation in Bethany, Connecticut and the Josef Albers Museum in Bottrop. The Morgan is the sole United States venue and final stop for this exhibition, which first traveled to multiple venues in Europe. Isabelle Dervaux, Acquavella Curator of Modern and Contemporary Drawings at the Morgan, is the coordinating curator of the exhibition at the Morgan.  





PUBLIC PROGRAMS
Gallery Talk

Josef Albers in America: Painting on Paper
Friday, July 20, 7 pm
Isabelle Dervaux, Acquavella Curator of Modern and Contemporary Drawings at The Morgan Library & Museum, will lead this informal exhibition tour.
Free


Lecture

Josef Albers: At Home and At Work
Friday, September 21, 6:30 pm
Nicholas Fox Weber, who knew and worked with Josef Albers in the last years of the artist’s life, will speak about how Albers worked and provide a personal glimpse into the life of the passionate, funny, original, crusty, and ferociously independent man who changed the way people look at color. 
Free with museum admission


Film
Josef and Anni Albers: Art is Everywhere
Friday, October 5, 7 pm
(2006, 57 minutes)
Director: Sedat Pakay
This documentary is the first to present in tandem the lives of two artistic pioneers of 20th century Modernism. It includes rare footage of Josef and Anni Albers and features a number of unprecedented interviews with many personal friends and colleagues, such as Robert Rauschenberg, Sidney Janis, Denise Rene, John Szarkowski, John Cohen, and architect Philip Johnson. Produced in association with The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation. 
Free
 
SPONSORSHIP

This exhibition is generously supported by The Josef and Anni Albers Foundation and the Rita Markus Fund for Exhibitions, and by contributions from Mickey Cartin, Nancy Schwartz, Carroll Janis, Inc. and The Hilla von Rebay Foundation.

The programs of The Morgan Library & Museum are made possible with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

The Morgan Library & Museum
The Morgan Library & Museum began as the private library of financier Pierpont Morgan, one of the preeminent collectors and cultural benefactors in the United States. Today, more than a century after its founding in 1906, the Morgan serves as a museum, independent research library, musical venue, architectural landmark, and historic site. In October 2010, the Morgan completed the first-ever restoration of its original McKim building, Pierpont Morgan's private library, and the core of the institution. In tandem with the 2006 expansion project by architect Renzo Piano, the Morgan now provides visitors unprecedented access to its world-renowned collections of drawings, literary and historical manuscripts, musical scores, medieval and Renaissance manuscripts, printed books, and ancient Near Eastern seals and tablets.

General Information
The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue, at 36th Street, New York, NY 10016-3405
212.685.0008
www.themorgan.org
Just a short walk from Grand Central and Penn Station

Hours
Tuesday-Thursday, 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; extended Friday hours, 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; closed Mondays, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year's Day. The Morgan closes at 4 p.m. on Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve.

Admission
$15 for adults; $10 for students, seniors (65 and over), and children (under 16); free to Members and children 12 and under accompanied by an adult. Admission is free on Fridays from 7 to 9 p.m. Admission is not required to visit the Morgan Shop.
 
Los Angeles - Bonhams will be conducting tours of the famed Serendipity Warehouse in Berkeley, CA, and accepting bids on the contents through July 16th.  To make an appointment to view the warehouse, please contact Adam Stackhouse at 415- 503-3266.  

Additional property from Serendipity Books will be featured at Bonhams throughout the summer of 2012, including:
•    Russian, Baseball and Modern Literature on June 19 in the New York Fine Books and Manuscripts auction;
•    A large collection of screenplays on June 24 in the Los Angeles Entertainment Memorabilia auction;
•    A large collection of art and fine press books on July 15 in the Los Angeles Period Art & Design auction;
•    Approximately 500 multi-volume lots of books in the Shelf Sale on June 26, available for viewing onsite at the Berkeley store June 22-25 and selling through our online bidding platform only.

About Peter Howard
Peter Howard [1939-2011] of the landmark Bay Area Serendipity Books has been eulogized as “one of the most imaginative booksellers of his generation.”  Howard stocked not only individual titles but entire collections.  The store was organized in sections by the original source: a collection of modern poetry from collector X is in one corner; another collection with similar titles from another source might be on the opposite side of the building.  It wasn’t a library and so, to Howard’s mind, it wasn’t supposed to be organized like one.

The bookstore on University, for those who never crossed its threshold, was a warren of rooms filled to the roof with titles from the mundane and popular to the erudite and obscure.  Howard wanted people to search for their books, looking carefully and hopefully finding not only what they were looking for, but far more.  

NEW YORK—Bonhams offered for the first time this week an auction session dedicated to the sale of Russian Literature and Works on Paper. Among the 135 lots were Imperial Russian color-plate books and maps, original Constructivist designs, memorabilia of the Ballets Russe, avant-garde children’s books, samizdat publications, and high-spots in Russian literature including rare editions of Chekhov and Dostoevsky, Babel and Brodsky. This offering certainly met a hunger in the marketplace and saw spirited bidding from around the globe.

Leading the group was a chromolithographed book showing the Coat of Arms of the Imperial Russian Provinces. This first edition with plates by Ilin sold for three times the high estimate of $5,000-7,000, ultimately claiming $21,250. Another Imperial top lot was a rare account of the wedding of the first Romanov ruler, selling for $18,750 against a pre-sale estimate of $6,000-8,000. Written by Platon Petrovich Beketov, this volume is complete with all 65 engraved illustrations whereas copies ordinarily have only 63.

A first edition, presentation copy of Anton Chekhov’s collection of short stories At Dusk witnessed energetic bidding ultimately claiming $16,250, against a pre-sale estimate $8,000-12,000. It is signed and affectionately inscribed by Chekhov to Pavel Svabodin, an actor in the Moscow Art Theater where Chekhov’s plays were first performed.

The top lot from the Soviet period was an extremely rare work of privately printed homoerotica: Mikhail Kuzmin’s Curtained Pictures, 1920, with illustrations by Vladimir Milashevskii. Copies were available only to select collectors of erotica who purchased it directly from the author. Although the book was made in St. Petersburg (Petropolis at the time), the publishers stated Amsterdam as the place of publication to avoid legal prosecution.

Sought after works of the Mir Iskusstva (World of Art) included those by Alexandre Benois, Leon Bakst, and Ivan Bilibin; and of the Russian avant-garde by Vera Ermolaeva, Vladimir Lebedev, Alexander Rodchenko and Vladimir Mayakovsky. A diminutive and rare Yiddish children’s book illustrated by El Lissitsky in 1919, entitled Grandfather’s Curses, sold for $8125 against a pre-sale estimate of $5000-6000. Christina Geiger, Director of the Fine Books and Manuscripts Department, states, “We were so delighted with the enthusiasm of the Russian collectors that we plan another sale devoted to Fine Russian Books, Manuscripts, Maps and Works on Paper to be held in the next six months to a year. Consignments are now invited!”

For further press information please contact Julie Saunders Guinta at 917.206.1681or julie.saunders@bonhams.com.

On Tuesday, 10th July 2012, Sotheby’s London will offer an extraordinary mid-14th century manuscript written in Medieval Welsh — a language of near-legendary rarity — within its sale of Western Manuscripts and Miniatures. Almost certainly brought to America by Welsh settlers in the 1700s, it ranks among the earliest medieval manuscripts in that country. The sale in London marks its return to Britain for the first time in at least a century and a half. It is the earliest manuscript of its kind ever offered in a public sale and the first medieval manuscript in Welsh to come to the market since 1923. The manuscript is estimated at £500,000-700,000.*

The Laws of Hywel Dda are attributed to Howel the Good, king of Wales (c.880-950). Partly derived from ancient Celtic and Irish justice systems, his laws are exceptionally liberal for their time: they focus on just restitution for crimes rather than violent punishments, and take progressive standpoints in their treatment of women, especially in respect to divorce and division of property. A woman could just as easily divorce her husband as he could her; and a woman who found her husband committing adultery was entitled to a payment of six-score pence (ten shillings) for the first occasion, a pound for the second, and could divorce him on the third.

The Laws of Hywel Dda came to be a crucial symbol of Welsh national identity, perhaps above any other Welsh text. It was the standard for Welsh law until Llywelyn ap Gruffyd’s rebellion against English overlordship in 1282; Llywelyn’s entreaty to King Edward I to maintain Welsh law was rebuffed by the archbishop of Canterbury, who believed that the laws had been inspired by the devil.

Remarkably, this manuscript survived in America, where large Welsh-speaking colonies were established in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. The manuscript was the property of William Philipps (1663-1721), a barrister from Brecon, whose signature appears at the end of the volume, and most probably was carried to America by his immediate heirs. It was presented to the Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston, where it has since been kept.

This manuscript is one of only two medieval manuscripts in Welsh outside the UK, and is the earlier of the two. In fact, there are only 80 surviving medieval codices or fragments in Welsh, of which some two-thirds are now in the National Library of Wales, one-sixth in the British Library, and almost all others in institutional ownership in the British Isles. Thus, this is most probably the last appearance of a medieval manuscript in Welsh on the market.

"Get a Spine" Blog Launched Today

CHARLOTTESVILLE, VA -- Today marks the launching of the new used-book blog, "Get a Spine" (getaspinebooks.com), which chronicles two book lovers' pursuit of used classic literature, and the people they meet and places they go while in search of works to add to their home library.

Inspired in large part by a love of great literature and a strong belief in the importance of physical books and brick-and-mortar bookstores, "Get a Spine" is intended to be as much about the adventure as it is the acquisition. It is the moments of discovery, of surprise, and of joy that often accompany an outing in search of used classics that create a full story, and give the book a life of its own -- by the memories associated with the discovery -- once it's in our house.

As our first post on the newly launched site says:

"Some regular features of 'Get a Spine' will include: bookseller reviews from the places we visit; a book events and happenings calendar; a series we're calling "The Spine Nine," which asks the different booksellers we encounter the same nine questions about who they are, what they do, etc.; an 'Inside the Book' feature detailing the kinds of things one finds between the pages of a used book that aren't related to the story at all; an 'Overheard at ...' series, where we post some of the fun/funny/odd/other things we hear in our searching; links to resources and other sites/blogs of interest to used-book seekers; news related to used books and classic literature; and, of course, details about what we find, how we found it, and why we added it to our library. Plus, there will be much more to come as we go."

At "Get a Spine," we believe foremost that great works of literature are a supreme form of art, but we also strongly believe that a book, in its physical form, is often a work of art itself. We also believe the books we collect should be read. Our library is not a museum, and we don't want to live in a world where actual books are only display pieces.

Readers of/visitors to "Get a Spine" will have the opportunity to subscribe to the site to receive new posts when they are added; leave comments and/or suggestions or contact us about bookstores we should visit, editions we are seeking, information on sales, upcoming book events we should list, etc.; read bookseller reviews; view our card catalog; and hopefully get as much out of keeping up with "Get a Spine" as we do putting into it. It's a celebration of used books, classic literature, and the people who carry the torch for both.

About us

Deborah: Has read Pride and Prejudice eight times (once in Spanish). ... NaNoWriMo 2008 Winner. ... Holds a BA in English because she loves great works of literature, and a Graduate Certificate in Publishing because she needed a job. ... Has had library cards in six states and two countries. ... Top five favorite novels of all time: Bleak House (Dickens), Pride and Prejudice (Austen), Love in the Time of Cholera (Garcia Marquez), Jane Eyre (Brönte), The Razor's Edge (Maugham).

Kristian: Grew up in Cooperstown, N.Y., which is famous for being the home of America's first great and world-renowned novelist, James Fenimore Cooper. And also for the Baseball Hall of Fame. ... Once spent an 18th-birthday gift of $100 on used classic novels in Madison, Wis. ... Has cataloged and entered holdings for university and state historical society libraries. ... Re-discovered his love of spending time with great works of fiction after spending too many years without them.
National Book Auctions, located in Ithaca, NY, will host a Sunday, June 24th auction featuring a broad range of rare antique books as well as groups of collectible ephemera.  Featured is a large collection of primarily antique works from the fields of geology and paleontology.  We will also offer another session from the large nautical library we are bringing to market over a series of auctions this year. During this auction, books offered from this collection include many brand new books, offered in groups.  Ephemera lots include magazines, advertising and various other genres.

This auction features our first session of offerings from a collection of books relating to geology and paleontology, which boasts over one thousand books and printed works.  Included are antique books, monographs, titles issued in very small printing runs and a host of books with pleasing antique engravings and lithographs.  Topics covered are fossils, dinosaurs, tectonics, mining, precious gems, etc., drawn from excavations and works around the globe.  The collection also branches out to include titles from the fields of botany, zoology and other sciences. Important titles from this collection include the 1884 first edition of Karl Eugen von Ujfalvy’s “Aus dem Westlichen Himalaja,” featuring fold-out tables and color maps, along with the 1896-1899 printing of volume IV of Stanton and Ortmann’s  “Reports of the Princeton University Expeditions to Patagonia,” published in two volumes with pleasing plates and the fold-out color map. Many of the items from this collection are signed by the authors and other prominent scientists in their fields.

Featured among the rare and collectible books to be sold are many first editions, author-signed copies, and numerous other rare titles.  Featured is the 1837 first edition of Charles Dickens’ debut novel, “The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club.”  Other desirable volumes include Josias Simmler’s “Helvetiorum Respublica,” published in 1627, and the “Oeuvres de Jean Racine de l'Academie Francoise,” published in three volumes in 1789.

Found throughout this auction are pleasing groups of ephemera.  Featured are signed documents and other items bearing the autographs of notables such as James Fennimore Cooper and Kenneth Roberts.   Group lots of ephemera include themes such as postage, magazines, advertising and additional topics.

National Book Auctions is a public auction service specializing in books, ephemera, and art. National Book Auctions is a targeted service offering experience and expertise unique to marketing antique and modern books and ephemera for consignors and collectors alike. Preview for the upcoming Sunday, June 24th auction is at 10 a.m. and the live auction starts at noon. For more information or to consign collectible material please contact David Hall, Business Manager, at 607-269-0101 or email mail@nationalbookauctions.com.
(June 15, 2012 - Palm Beach, FL) The Palm Beach Show Group is pleased to announce the acquisition of the Los Angeles Art Show from the Fine Art Dealers Association (FADA). The acquisition that closed Wednesday includes the Los Angeles Fine Art Show: Modern & Contemporary and the Los Angeles Fine Art Show: Historic and Traditional. A specialized section within these shows, The Los Angeles IFPDA Fine Print Fair, will continue to function under the auspices of the International Fine Print Dealers Association (IFPDA) but will be produced and managed by the existing Los Angeles Art Show production team.
 
The annual Los Angeles Art Show, created by FADA more than 17 years ago, is one of the longest running venues for contemporary, modern, and traditional art in the country. The 2012 show hosted more than 100 prominent galleries and drew more than 50,000 visitors with its two-show concept that distinctly separates modern and contemporary works from historical and traditional exhibits. The progressive show style provides two individual concepts under one roof and garners the appeal of an expansive international audience.
 
“The Los Angeles Art Show is uniquely diverse and is certainly one of the most interesting shows in the world,” stated Scott Diament, CEO of the Palm Beach Show Group. “We would like to thank FADA for developing a world class event with such a magnetic and international draw. We are confident that under our direction this show will be taken to the next level.”
 
The Palm Beach Show Group, headquartered in Palm Beach County, FL, currently owns and produces four nationally acclaimed shows including its’ signature Palm Beach Jewelry, Art & Antique Show, now in its tenth year.
 
In conjunction with Kim Martindale, the 17 year General Manager of the Los Angeles Art Show, the LA Art Show, Inc. will combine the large organizational strength of the Palm Beach Show Group with the managerial and local expertise of the KR Martindale team, to continue to produce high quality fairs.
 
Betina Tasende, President of the Fine Art Dealers Association stated, “As a well-respected organization of art galleries, FADA continues to fully support the Los Angeles Art Show. It has been a part of our association for the past 17 years and we are confident the Palm Beach Show Group has the necessary enthusiasm and infrastructure to grow this event appropriately.”
 
With historic ties to Far Eastern exhibitors and collectors, the Los Angeles Art Show merges the West Coast arts community with premiere Asian art presented by galleries from China, Korea and the United States. These galleries offer a rare glimpse into classical and modern Asian Arts. International highlights of the show also include prestigious European galleries and extraordinary South American exhibitors.
 
“The city of Los Angeles has established itself over the last 20 years as one of the most important art centers in the United States and the Los Angeles Art Show has been an important factor in making this happen,” stated Martindale, “We believe that the show will flourish under the direction of the Palm Beach Show Group. This transition will surely be smooth, and one that we have been looking forward to for quite some time.”
 
Plans for the show include the expansion of Modern and Contemporary components, an area in which the Palm Beach Show Group projects a massive potential.
 
“Our extensive marketing efforts will make an immense impact on the reach and participation associated with this show,” stated Diament. “We believe we possess all of the elements to take something as great as the Los Angeles Art Show and make it exceptional.”
 
The Palm Beach Show Group is currently welcoming applications for inclusion in the LA Art Show 2013 from national and international galleries. For more information about the Los Angeles Art Show, send inquiries to info@palmbeachshow.com.
 
New York, NY, June 14, 2012—In 1976 composer Philip Glass and director Robert Wilson redefined opera with the debut in Avignon, France, of Einstein on the Beach. The nearly five-hour, non-narrative work broke a host of operatic conventions and would become the most celebrated of the many collaborations between these two giants of the musical and theatrical stage.

Beginning on July 13, The Morgan Library & Museum will exhibit for the first time Glass’s autograph score for Einstein on the Beach as well as Wilson’s production storyboards totaling more than one hundred designs. It is the first time the score has been exhibited and the first time it has been united with Wilson’s work since the opera premiered more than thirty-five years ago. Robert Wilson/Philip Glass: Einstein on the Beach will run through November 4.

The exhibition will also include archival film of the premieres in Brussels and Paris, as well as an excerpt from a New York rehearsal. In addition, Einstein on the Beach: The Changing Image of Opera, a documentary about the 1984 restaging of the production at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, will be screened throughout the run of the exhibition in the Morgan’s Gilder Lehrman Hall. Combining clips and interviews with Wilson and Glass, the film offers a rare look at their creative process and collaborative working method.

“Few works of modernist opera have left as deep an imprint as Einstein on the Beach,” said William M. Griswold, director of The Morgan Library & Museum. “Revolutionary in its music and stagecraft, the work launched one of the most successful artistic collaborations of the late twentieth century. It is riveting to see the juxtaposition of the storyboard designs and original score as Wilson and Glass strove to blend their extraordinary talents to create a milestone in operatic history.”

Einstein on the Beach
Created as a metaphorical look at the most celebrated genius of the twentieth century, Einstein on the Beach debuted at the Avignon Festival on July 25, 1976. Breaking with tradition, Glass composed the work for the synthesizers and woodwinds of the Philip Glass Ensemble in addition to voices and solo violin, instead of the traditional orchestral arrangement. Abstract dance sequences, choreographed by Lucinda Childs and Andrew de Groat, were juxtaposed against a sequence of large, recurring images projected on a screen at the back of the stage. The opera’s four acts were framed and connected with a series of short scenes or “knee plays.” Rather than the conventional intermission, the audience was free to enter and exit throughout the almost five-hour performance.

The sung portions of the opera use number sequences and solfège syllables (do, re, mi, fa, sol, la, ti); the spoken sections feature texts by Christopher Knowles, Ms. Childs, and actor Samuel M. Johnson. Contemporary events and notable people of the 1970s are referenced in various scenes—from the famous trial of heiress-turned-revolutionary Patty Hearst to the Beatles and pop singer David Cassidy.

Although Einstein on the Beach is essentially plotless, the climactic scene clearly depicts nuclear holocaust. Glass recalled that, as a child, Albert Einstein had been a hero. “Growing up just after World War II,” he said, “it was impossible not to know who he was. The emphatic, if catastrophic, beginnings of the nuclear age had made atomic energy the most widely discussed issue of the day.”

Visitors to the exhibition will enter a gallery awash in blue light, reminiscent of the opera’s stage lighting. The archival footage on view was selected from the Robert Wilson Audio/Visual Collection at the Theatre on Film and Tape Archive at The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts.

Einstein on the Beach was the first in Glass’s portrait trilogy, followed by Satyagraha (1980), in which the composer turned his attention to Gandhi, and Akhnaten (1984), based on the life of the Egyptian pharaoh. Currently, a new production of Einstein on the Beach is making a yearlong international tour in honor of Glass’s 75th anniversary year.

Glass’s autograph manuscript is shown with the permission of Paul Walter, who recently placed it on deposit at the Morgan. The Wilson storyboards have been lent by William Kistler.
 
Related Programming

Gallery Talk
Robert Wilson/Philip Glass: Einstein on the Beach
Friday, July 13, 7 pm
An informal tour led by exhibition curator Fran Barulich, Mary Flagler Cary Curator, Department of Music Manuscripts and Printed Music at the Morgan.
Free

Film
Einstein on the Beach: The Changing Image of Opera
Friday, July 13, 8 pm
(1985, 58 minutes)
Director: Mark Obenhaus
A look at the 1984 landmark production of Einstein on the Beach staged at the Brooklyn Academy of Music, this film offers a window into Wilson and Glass’s collaborative creative process. The film will also be screened daily throughout the duration of the exhibition.
Free with admission

Concert
World Premiere of Philip Glass’s “Stoker”
Sunday, October 21, 3 pm
This concert will feature the world premiere of Glass’s “Stoker,” and other works for two pianos and piano four hands, performed by Dennis Russell Davies and Maki Namekawa.
Debussy, “En blanc et noir,” for two pianos
Stravinsky, “Le Sacre du printemps,” for piano four hands, arranged by Stravinsky
Glass, “Stoker,” for piano four hands (world premiere)
Glass, Four Movements for Two Pianos
Tickets available after August 1: $35; $25 for Members. Available online at www.themorgan.org/programs; or by calling 212-685-0008 x560
Organization and Sponsorship
Robert Wilson/Philip Glass: Einstein on the Beach was organized by Fran Barulich, Mary Flagler Cary Curator, Department of Music Manuscripts and Printed Music.

The programs of The Morgan Library & Museum are made possible with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

The Morgan Library & Museum
The Morgan Library & Museum began as the private library of financier Pierpont Morgan, one of the preeminent collectors and cultural benefactors in the United States. Today, more than a century after its founding in 1906, the Morgan serves as a museum, independent research library, musical venue, architectural landmark, and historic site. In October 2010, the Morgan completed the first-ever restoration of its original McKim building, Pierpont Morgan's private library, and the core of the institution. In tandem with the 2006 expansion project by architect Renzo Piano, the Morgan now provides visitors unprecedented access to its world-renowned collections of drawings, literary and historical manuscripts, musical scores, medieval and Renaissance manuscripts, printed books, and ancient Near Eastern seals and tablets.

General Information
The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue, at 36th Street, New York, NY 10016-3405
212.685.0008
www.themorgan.org
Just a short walk from Grand Central and Penn Station

Hours
Tuesday-Thursday, 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; extended Friday hours, 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; closed Mondays, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year's Day. The Morgan closes at 4 p.m. on Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve.

Admission
$15 for adults; $10 for students, seniors (65 and over), and children (under 16); free to Members and children 12 and under accompanied by an adult. Admission is free on Fridays from 7 to 9 p.m. Admission is not required to visit the Morgan Shop.
 
A century ago, New York philanthropist Jacob H. Schiff purchased an initial collection of nearly 10,000 Hebrew books and pamphlets from bibliophile and book dealer Ephraim Deinard for the Library of Congress. This gift formed the nucleus of what is today one of the world’s greatest collections of Hebraic materials and Judaica, comprising some 200,000 items.

The Library is celebrating the centennial of its Hebraic Collection with the publication this month of "Perspectives on the Hebraic Book: The Myron M. Weinstein Memorial Lectures at the Library of Congress" and an exhibition titled "Words Like Sapphires: 100 Years of Hebraica at the Library of Congress, 1912-2012."

"Perspectives on the Hebraic Book" comprises the texts of the Myron M. Weinstein Memorial Lectures on the Hebraic Book, which were delivered annually from 2000-2009 at the Library of Congress. The compilation is edited by Peggy K. Pearlstein, head of the Hebraic Section in the Library’s African and Middle Eastern Division.

The broad scope of the lectures was designed to reflect the wide-ranging scholarly interests of Myron M. Weinstein (1927-1998), who served his 29-year career at the Library of Congress in the Hebraic Section, which he headed from 1980 until his retirement in 1984. The lecture series and its publication in book form were made possible by Weinstein’s sisters, Muriel Sterne and the late Helen Avati, with additional support from Project Judaica Trust Fund.

Each chapter analyzes unique perspectives on the Hebrew manuscript and book. Joseph R. Hacker, Hebrew University of Jerusalem, discusses the printing of Hebrew books in the 16th-century Ottoman Empire. Grace Cohen Grossman, Skirball Cultural Center in Los Angeles, examines 18th- and 19th- century Hebrew prayer broadsides. Bernard Dov Cooperman, University of Maryland, offers a view of the impact of printing on Italian Jewish piety. Jonathan D. Sarna, Brandeis University, chronicles the Jewish book in America. Zachary M. Baker, Stanford University, reflects on the Yiddish theater and its legacy. Marsha L. Rozenblitt, University of Maryland, explores 19th-century Viennese Jewry through the Isak Noa Mannheimer prayer book. Gershon Greenberg, American University, investigates the struggles of Hasidic religious thinkers to find a response to the Holocaust. Evelyn M. Cohen, an independent scholar, compares two 15th-century Joel ben Simeon manuscripts. Doris A. Hamburg, National Archives and Records Administration, describes the conservation of the 1478 Joel ben Simeon manuscript known as "The Washington Haggadah," which is housed in the Library of Congress. The rare item was rebound by the Library of Congress before its display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art last spring.

"Perspectives on the Hebraic Book: The Myron M. Weinstein Memorial Lectures at the Library of Congress," a 240-page softcover book with 30 illustrations, is available for $35 in the Library of Congress Shop, 10 First St. S.E., Washington, D.C. 20540-4985. Credit-card orders are taken at (888) 682-3557, or shop on the Internet at www.loc.gov/shop.

"Words Like Sapphires: 100 Years of Hebraica at the Library of Congress, 1912-2012," will be on view Oct. 25, 2012, through March 16, 2013, in the South Gallery of the Thomas Jefferson Building at 10 First Street S.E., Washington, D.C. The exhibition, made possible by generous support from the Abby and Emily Rapoport Trust Fund at the Library of Congress, will feature more than 60 items dating from the 7th century through the present. Items from 15 countries in nine languages include Hebrew manuscripts, incunabula (pre-1501 books), torah scrolls, Yiddish sheet music and contemporary limited edition artists’ books. More than half of the items in the exhibition have never been displayed.

The Hebraica publication and exhibition are part of the Library’s "Celebration of the Book," which includes an exhibition, June 25 through Sept. 29, on "Books That Shaped America" and a series of programs, symposia and other events that explore the important and varied ways that books influence our lives.

The Library of Congress, the nation’s oldest federal cultural institution and the largest library in the world, holds more than 151 million items in various languages, disciplines, and formats. The Library seeks to spark imagination and creativity and to further human understanding and wisdom by providing access to knowledge through its magnificent collections, programs, publications and exhibitions. Many of the Library’s rich resources can be accessed through its website at www.loc.gov.

Philadelphia, Thursday, June 14, 2012-- Coinciding with the nation's celebration of Flag Day on June 14th, Freeman's is proud to announce that a complete and extremely rare eighteenth-century battle flag of the Eighth Virginia Regiment under the command of Colonel Peter Muhlenberg (1746-1807) will be offered in 'The Pennsylvania Sale' scheduled for November 14, 2012. Dating from the Revolutionary War, the "Grand Division" color is painted with a scrolling white ribbon and inscribed "VIII Virg. Regt." The remarkably intact silk flag has faded from its original salmon-red color to a golden hue as the flag descended in the Muhlenberg family line for more than 200 years.  (Est. $400,000 - 600,000)
 
Commenting on the sale, Samuel M. "Beau" Freeman II, Freeman's Chairman and specialist in Americana said: "Revolutionary battle flags are rare and those in private hands are almost unknown or only fragments have survived-this is an extraordinary discovery. Muhlenberg is a legendary hero of the Continental Army and this flag represents his Virginia regiment. This flag pre-dates the Tarleton Colors and may be the last remaining battle flag in private hands."
 
"This Regimental Color led our brave ancestors into battle, fighting in the name of freedom. The flag is from a regiment organized at the beginning of the Revolution and descends directly from Colonel Muhlenberg," shared Col. J. Craig Nannos, Freeman's consulting specialist.
 
A clergyman, Muhlenberg understood that the time of peace had passed, and in a rousing sermon on January 21, 1776, removed his clerical robe to reveal his military officer's uniform as he read aloud lines from the Book of Ecclesiastes.  After recruiting men from his congregation to join him, his military prowess made him the legendary "Fighting Parson" and he rose through the ranks to become a general officer in the Continental Army.
 
The Eighth Virginia was known as the "German Regiment" consisting primarily of German-American settlers from various areas of southwestern Virginia and West Virginia.  The regiment was involved in many major battles including local conflicts, the Battle of Brandywine and the Battle of Germantown as well as the pivotal Battle of Monmouth.  The infantry regiment has continued to distinguish itself in military history, as the Stonewall Brigade in the Civil War, the courageous 116th Regiment in the D-Day invasion and its current status as the 116th Brigade Combat Team assigned to the Virginia Army National Guard.
 
Freeman's is pleased to be offering this rare and early American Revolutionary flag from the highly-regarded Muhlenberg family who contributed so much to the growth of our nation. This auction follows Freeman's recent success in achieving 12 auction records in the sale of Historic USS Constitution Colors from the Collection of H. Richard Dietrich, Jr.
 
ABOUT FREEMAN'S  Founded in 1805, Samuel T. Freeman & Co has upheld an exemplary role as America's oldest auction house and achieves record-setting prices for clients around the world. Located on Chestnut Street, Freeman's offers over 30 auctions a year in categories including: American Furniture, Decorative & Folk Arts, English & Continental Furniture & Decorative Arts, Asian Arts, Fine American & European Paintings & Sculpture, Modern and Contemporary Art, Rare Books, Oriental Rugs, Fine Jewelry & Watches.  For more information, visit www.freemansauction.com or contact 267.414.1240.
June 13, 2012--Amherst. The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art in Amherst, MA, will kick off its 10th anniversary with a special exhibition that highlights its permanent collection for the very first time. Iconic Images: Ten Years of Collecting, which will run from October 30, 2012 through February 24, 2013, will draw from more than 10,000 works now in the collection.

Artists on view will include the masters of the past, including William Steig, Ludwig Bemelmans, Maurice Sendak, Leo Lionni, Margot Zemach, and Arnold Lobel, as well as the great artists of our day, including Ashley Bryan, Eric Carle, Rosemary Wells, Jerry Pinkney, Mo Willems, and Jules Feiffer. Many iconic characters will be represented, including Babar, Shrek, Frog and Toad, and Madeline.

“Even though The Carle is young in museum terms, we have a collection of work of the highest order,” says Chief Curator Nick Clark. “Our role is to preserve it, exhibit it, and make it available for study so we can ensure it will continue to touch people’s lives well into the future.”

Since opening in 2002, The Carle has grown into a vital cultural center for artists, writers, teachers, librarians, scholars, and families - a place where important conversations about the future of art, books and education happen every day. The Museum has shared hundreds of exhibitions, presentations, and educational programs with more than a half million guests in Amherst and even more around the world.

“All of the work in this collection was donated, typically by collectors or artists and their families,” says Alexandra Kennedy, the executive director. “They want to see it help serve our mission — to inspire a love of art and reading through picture books. We’re very proud to be the country’s leading center for the enjoyment and study of picture books, and our collection is our greatest asset.”

About Picture Book Art
In the last few decades, picture book art — the illustrations created for reproduction in books — has been gaining recognition in the broader fine arts world as critics and collectors get the opportunity to view the original work.
“When you look at original art you are looking at the hand of the artist and can see the subtlety of the work,” Clark explains. “Museums around the U.S. are starting to recognize that children’s book illustration, which is so beautifully crafted, can draw in a young audience of art lovers. After all, for most children, picture-book art is the art they love first.”

The picture book, which did not become a staple of childhood until early in the twentieth century, has attracted many of the world’s greatest illustrators, all drawn to its complex and rewarding interplay of art and story. Because most picture book art is created on paper, it is very fragile — prone to fading, expansion, contraction, and mold — so requires a carefully monitored environment in terms of temperature, humidity, and light. For every six months of exhibiting the art, it must be taken off view for ten years so that light does not degrade it. The Carle carefully preserves its collection in its special storage area, bringing it out only for exhibition in its galleries or to travel it to other states and countries.

Clark, who has been spearheading the growth of The Carle’s permanent collection since the Museum was in its building phase, sees boundless possibilities in the educational applications for illustration, noting its rich historical, cultural, and artistic values. “Art is a way to record events in our lives, describe the world we live in, enhance our faith, address philosophical questions,” says Clark. “It can serve as our conscience, our guide, our comforter. Art puts us in touch with the intangibles of our world and nourishes our spirit. For generations, picture books have played that role for children and their parents.”

November 10th Weekend Celebration
The opening member reception for Iconic Images: Ten Years of Collecting, is set for November 10th with many of the featured artists present. The general public is invited on November 11th for a major book-signing event and a shopping bazaar featuring hard to find and rare picture books and products.
Several other special exhibitions will also be on display throughout that weekend:

    •    Beyond Words: The Independent Art of Eric Carle is the first major exhibition of the paintings, drawings, and sculpture that Carle has created for himself and his friends, all testaments to his passion for experimentation, design, and expression.
    •    Our British Cousins: The Magical Art of Maisy and Friends features the colorful work of popular British artist Lucy Cousins.
    •    Starry Night: An installation of more than a dozen large three-dimensional stars created by local picture book artists will be on display in the Great Hall, celebrating the Museum’s anniversary and the upcoming holiday season.
To commemorate the Museum’s tenth anniversary, renowned sculptor Nancy Schön has created a bronze maquette of The Very Hungry Caterpillar, which will be on display in The Great Hall. Best known for her “Make Way for Ducklings” sculpture at the Boston Public Garden, Schön is offering the maquette for sale throughout the Museum’s anniversary year and contributing all profits to The Carle. Each buyer is invited to tour Schön’s studio in Newton, Massachusetts, to learn more about the fascinating process of bronze casting.

A sample of the year’s major events follow.

All events and dates are subject to change.

November 10, 2012: Anniversary Kick-off Party for Members, celebrating Iconic Images: 10 Years of Collecting.

November 11, 2012: Book signing and holiday bazaar.
December 11, 2012: Exhibition opening of Some Book! Some Art!: Selected Drawings by Garth Williams for Charlotte’s Web.
March 2013: Study Tour of the Early Childhood Centers of Pistoia, Italy with Museum Educators
March 12, 2013: Exhibition opening of Latino Folk Tales: Cuentos Populares, Art by Latino Artists
May 4, 2013: Peter Sis, speaker, 2013 Annual Barbara Elleman Research Library Lecture
June 8, 2013: Children’s Book Festival celebrating The Carle’s 10th anniversary and its community of artists
June 22, 2013: Exhibition opening of Seriously Silly: A Decade of Art & Whimsy by Mo Willems
November 2013: Anniversary closing ceremony

ABOUT THE MUSEUM
The mission for The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, a non-profit organization in Amherst, MA, is to inspire a love of art and reading in young children through picture books. The only full-scale museum of its kind in the United States, The Carle collects, preserves, presents, and celebrates picture books and picture book illustrations from around the world. In addition to underscoring the cultural, historical, and artistic significance of picture books and their art form, The Carle offers educational programs that provide a foundation for arts integration and literacy.

Eric and Barbara Carle founded the Museum in November 2002. Eric Carle is the renowned author and illustrator of more than 70 books, including the 1969 classic, The Very Hungry Caterpillar. Since opening, the 40,000-foot facility has served more than half a million visitors, including 30,000 schoolchildren. Its extensive resources include a collection of more than 10,000 picture book illustrations, three art galleries, an art studio, a theater, picture book and scholarly libraries, and educational programs for families, scholars, educators, and schoolchildren. Educational offerings include professional training for educators around the country. Museum hours are Tuesday through Friday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday 12 noon to 5 p.m. Open Mondays in July and August and during MA school vacation weeks. Admission is $9 for adults, $6 for children under 18, and $22.50 for a family of four. For further information and directions, call 413-658-1100 or visit the Museum’s website at www.carlemuseum.org.
New York—On June 11, Bonhams hosted the Fine Writing Instruments: The Mel Wilmore Collection of Extraordinary Montblancs auction which featured the greatest single collection of fine Montblanc pens ever offered at auction. These spectacular examples belonged to Mel Wilmore who is described as one of the top Montblanc collectors worldwide, so much so that he had a hidden pen room constructed in his estate, designed and arranged by several important Montblanc employees. Pens reflecting popular celebrities, national pride, commemorative anniversaries and ones exhibiting the finest artistry found great competition among the most discerning pen collectors.

Ivan Briggs, The Fine Writing Instruments specialist, states about the auction, "Mr. Wilmore's fine Montblanc pens represented a unique opportunity for collectors to acquire legendary pens that seldom come to market, and international interest in the sale was unprecedented. The highlights preview in Hong Kong was met with great enthusiasm, and bids were received from top collectors in the Americas, Europe, Asia and the Middle East. Our clients in Asia were particularly enraptured my Mr. Wilmore's pens, many of which feature themes celebratory of Asian cultural heritage. Once again, Montblanc's creations have demonstrated their viability on the secondary market with an auction total of over $1 million, and Bonhams was delighted to have been a part of this historic offering."

Leading the auction was the world's first skeleton pen made by Montblanc's master craftsmen in observance of the brand's 75th birthday. Using the Meisterstück 149 as their model, Montblanc skeletonized the pen, revealing the perfection of the design by eliminating all superfluities. This limited edition example along with a solid gold watch sold for $68,500 (pre-sale est. $60,000-75,000).

Another top highlight to the auction came to Mr. Wilmore because of his stellar negotiating skills and dedication to his passion for collecting the finest and rarest. This was a complete set of eleven limited edition fountain pens made in commemoration of Nelson Mandela's 80th birthday. Only 80 sets of these 11 pens were made, the first set presented to Nelson Mandela and the 80th meant for the South African government. After Mr. Wilmore made a very persuasive argument for the 80th set, he succeeded. Offered in auction was one of only four complete sets, selling for $41,250 (pre-sale est. $35,000-50,000).

Several top lots exhibited the talented and accomplished design talent of Montblanc's Atelier Privés artisan workshop. These pens, crafted for the most astute pen collectors, were received most favorably. Leading this group was a Magical Black Widow White Gold and Diamond Skeleton Pen featuring a delicate black diamond spider and white diamond spider web. Some cultures deem the spider a symbol of good fortune; its figure eight shaped body symbolizes infinity, and to honor this idea, Montblanc only produced eight pens. This one sold for $55,000 (pre-sale est. $30,000-40,000). Françios Ateliers Privés was made as a tribute to the first king of the Renaissance. Featuring black Tahitian mother-of-pearl facets and 342 brilliant-cut diamonds this was one of Montblanc's most exclusive pens and sold for $37,500 (pre-sale est. $32,000-45,000).

Skeleton pens, pens designed to reveal the instrument's inner-workings, proved popular throughout the auction, especially those paying tribute to iconic celebrities and influencers. Leading this group was a Charlie Chaplin Skeleton Limited Edition of 88 fountain pens, which from the bowler hat captop to the solid gold walking cane clip, pays tribute in almost every detail to this cinematic icon. This playful tribute pen sold for $41,250 (pre-sale est. $25,000-35,000). Also in this group was a pen dedicated to musical icon John Lennon, a Limited Edition 70 Skeleton Fountain Pen selling for $35,000 (pre-sale est. $28,000-35,000).

Illustrating American pride was the George Washington America's Signatures for Freedom Series, limited edition of 50 selling for $28,750 (pre-sale est. $20,000-25,000). This lead a series honoring America and its president, complete with a gold nib engraved with a halo of stars and the legend "America's Signatures for Freedom." Another patriotic highlight was the White House Skeleton Fountain Pen which was inspired by the architecture of the president's home. Selling for $23,750 this impressive pen was made with transparent blue resin and white gold columns complete with a sapphire-eyed eagle adorning the base of the sapphire-tipped clip (pre-sale est. $22,000-32,000).

For more information on the sale, go to www.bonhams.com/auctions/20002.

BEVERLY HILLS - The Jerry Weist Collection of Science-Fiction and Fantasy art anchors Heritage Auctions June 27-28 Illustration Art Signature® Auction with iconic art from greats of the genre such as Frank R. Paul, J. Allen St. John, Michael Whelan, Alex Schomburg, Wally Wood, and many others.
 
“This is our second special auction from the estate of the pioneering collector, publisher, historian and scholar Jerry Weist,” said Todd Hignite, Vice President of Heritage Auctions, “who many of us had the pleasure to also name as a good friend.”
 
This is one of the most important collections of artwork from the genre to ever be offered and the impeccable selection represents the last substantial group from the estate. Highlights include Frank R. Paul’s masterful Wonder Stories pulp cover, August 1930 (estimate: $10,000+) and Michael Whelan’s amazing Descent, The Martian Chronicles cover, 1990 (estimate: $10,000+), from the ground-breaking work of fiction by the recently passed Ray Bradbury.
 
“Among many other accomplishments, Jerry wrote a superb biography of Ray Bradbury, Bradbury: An Illustrated Life, and was an avid Bradbury collector as well,” said Hignite. “This auction includes several lots—including the art to some of the greatest EC Comics adaptations ever done—related to that great genius of science fiction, who passed away this week at age 91.”
 
Pin-Up and Pulp Art continue to be incredibly hot areas of Illustration Art collecting and this auction promises a wide selection of rare and stunning pieces, many of which come from the continued boon of The Estate of Charles Martignette, led by Gil Elvgren’s charming and vibrant Skirting the Issue (Breezing Up), estimated at $30,000+ and Up in the Air (Whooooooosh!), 1965, also with a $30,000+ estimate—the group of Elvgrens in this sale are among the nicest Heritage has ever offered.
 
Other stand-outs include masterworks from all periods of Alberto Vargas’ illustrious career, including Glamour Pin-Up, circa 1940s, one of the great master’s best works, estimated at $50,000+, a terrific and exceedingly rare Saturday Evening Post cover by the incomparable Charles Gates Sheldon, Lady with Puppet, The Saturday Evening Post cover, October 31, 1925, as well as an incredible grouping by contemporary great Olivia, who rivals any of the mid-century masters of the female form.
 
A richly varied selection of magazine cover, story, and advertising art from the Golden Age of American Illustration is also included, including Study for The Saturday Evening Post cover, March 10, 1934, by J.C. Leyendecker, estimated at $15,000+.
 
Many more of the undisputed greats are represented, including Norman Rockwell, Maxfield Parrish, James Montgomery Flagg, and Frank Earle Schoonover, just to name a few, along with a beautiful selection of children’s book art, including charming Where the Wild Things Are sketches by the late Maurice Sendak.
 
Heritage Auctions is far and away the largest auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s third largest, with annual sales of more than $800 million, and 700,000+ online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and receive access to a complete record of prices realized, with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com
 
Want to get the up-to-the-minute updates and breaking news stories about Heritage Auctions? Get them as they happen at: HA.com/Twitter; Facebook: HA.com/Facebook.To view a complete archive of Heritage press releases go to: HA.com/PR. To link to this press release on your blog or Website: HA.com/PR-2223.
 
On June 21, 2012, PBA Galleries in San Francisco will offer one of the rarest and most significant pieces it has ever brought to auction, a manuscript on vellum in “Grand Format” of the Fasciculus Temporum of the 15th century monk and historian Werner Rolewink, produced c.1471. The Fasciculus is a history of the world with dual parallel timelines dating both from creation and the birth of Christ. It was the first history of the world to be printed (by Arnold ther Hoernen, in Cologne in 1474), and was immensely popular, going through 30 editions before 1500, and has the claim to be the bestselling 15th century book by a contemporary author. Indeed, the Fasciculus was apparently the second publication of any living author, seeming to be predated only by Robertus Valturius’ De re militari (1472). This is one of only thirteen known manuscript copies of the work and the only known copy in private hands, and also one of only seven known manuscripts that predate the printed book.
 
The manuscript comprises 30 vellum leaves, in Latin, handwritten in brown and red ink, with numerous roundels in red. There are three miniature paintings in colors (of Joseph, Mary and the baby Jesus in the manger; Christ nailed to the cross; and a resurrected Christ, a halo of tooled gold leaf surrounding his head, holding a gold leaf orb that is also delicately tooled), and a large, elaborate initial in red and blue leading off the text, with several smaller initials in red or blue. Of further note is the large size of the present manuscript, done in “Grand Format,” dwarfing the printed version. The leaves are 43.5 cm. (17¼”) tall, much larger than the 29 cm. (11½”) of the 1474 printed version. This allows fuller utilization of the elaborate roundel format, with an elegance and beauty not available in the printed version. This grand format is a characteristic of the pre-publication manuscripts only - post-1474 manuscripts typically followed the smaller format of the printed book. The printed version did have a series of small woodcut illustrations, markedly different from the three beautifully executed miniature paintings in this manuscript. The manuscript is elegantly bound in 17th century paneled calf with gilt tooling. It is estimated to sell for between $100,000 and $150,000. Here is a link to the item description and accompanying images http://www.pbagalleries.com/search/item226838.php?
 
About PBA Galleries
PBA Galleries of San Francisco is the only west-coast auction house specializing in books & manuscripts, maps & atlases. The company offers private and heirloom libraries at auction, providing clients with a staff of professional appraisers, online and printed catalogues, and bi-monthly auctions where participants can bid in person, by phone, fax, e-mail, and in real-time by signing up at the PBA Galleries website. For more information contact Shannon Kennedy - 415 989 2665 - shannon@pbagalleries.com.
 
PBA Galleries
133 Kearny Street - 4th Floor
San Francisco, California 94108
AUSTIN, Texas — The Harry Ransom Center presents the exhibition “I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America,” which explores the career of American stage and industrial designer, futurist and urban planner Norman Bel Geddes (1893-1958).

Running from Sept. 11, 2012, to Jan. 6, 2013, the exhibition includes work from more than 60 of Bel Geddes’ projects, including materials relating to “Futurama,” Bel Geddes’ 1939-1940 New York World’s Fair installation for General Motors.

“I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America” highlights more than 300 items from Bel Geddes’ extensive archive at the Ransom Center, a humanities research library and museum at The University of Texas at Austin, including models, drawings, paintings, film footage and photographs.

The exhibition reflects the broad range of Bel Geddes’ interests and work and demonstrates how he shaped and continues to influence American culture and lifestyle. A polymath who had little academic or professional training in the areas he mastered, Bel Geddes had the ability to look at trends and the contemporary environment and envision how they could affect and alter the future.

“When you drive on an interstate highway, attend a multimedia Broadway show, dine in a sky-high revolving restaurant or watch a football game in an all-weather stadium, you owe a debt of gratitude to Norman Bel Geddes,” said exhibition organizer Donald Albrecht, an independent curator and curator of architecture and design at the Museum of the City of New York.

“It was Bel Geddes, more than any designer of his era, who created and promoted a dynamic vision of the future with an image that was streamlined, technocratic and optimistic.”

A paradoxical figure of equal parts visionary and pragmatist, serious inventor and inveterate promoter, naturalist and industrialist, democrat and egoist, Bel Geddes sought nothing less than the transformation of modern American society through design.

The exhibition is organized into five sections that highlight some of the diverse work of Bel Geddes: “Setting the Stage 1916-1927,” “Industrious Design 1927-1937,” “A Bigger World 1937-1945,” “Futurama 1939-1940” and “Total Living 1945-1958.”

Bel Geddes focused on theater design early in his career, adapting the American stage to the principles of the New Stagecraft movement in Europe and creating immersive theater experiences. A multitalented theatrical genius, Bel Geddes designed shows’ costumes, lighting and scenery, often taking complete control of the audience experience.

In the late 1920s, Bel Geddes was one of the leading practitioners and founders of the new field of industrial design and popularized streamlining as a design concept with his publication “Horizons” (1932). He produced designs with streamlined aesthetics for products and ideas as diverse as home appliances, flying cars and floating airports. He also designed factories, offices and nightclubs.

“Bel Geddes played a seminal role in shaping the expectations and behavior of American consumers and helped to transform both the industrial design and theater design professions into modern businesses,” said Albrecht.

Bel Geddes became an urban visionary, and the pinnacle of his career was “Futurama,” a dramatic visualization of a future American city that gave Depression-era Americans genuine hope for a better future within their lifetimes.
The installation included more than 35,000 square feet with detailed scale models of highways, 500,000 individually designed miniature buildings, 1 million trees of 13 different species and 50,000 scale model cars and buses, 10,000 of which moved.

Bel Geddes later moved from designing individual products to designing complete systems, such as urban utopias and national highway plans. He also designed a never-built suspended roof or all-weather, all-purpose stadium for the Brooklyn Dodgers during 1948-52. In the 1950s, Bel Geddes conceived of a tropical walless house that could be open or closed to the elements as weather dictated.

Complementing the exhibition is “Visions of the Future,” the Ransom Center’s 10th Fleur Cowles Flair Symposium, which brings together historians, architects, industrial designers and visionaries in the fields of science fiction, film, theater and future studies to explore the ways the future has been imagined over time.

Scheduled for Nov. 1-3, the symposium will feature panel topics including “Imagining the Future,” “Designing the Future,” “Marketing the Future,” “Motorways in the Twentieth Century and Today” and “Today’s Visions for Tomorrow,” with science fiction writer Bruce Sterling, whose archive is held at the Ransom Center, delivering the keynote address.

Accompanying the exhibition is the publication “Norman Bel Geddes Designs America,” which will be published by Abrams in November. Edited by Albrecht in association with the Ransom Center and the Museum of the City of New York, the 400-page publication includes 20 essays by scholars that cover Bel Geddes’ life, career and specific projects.

The exhibition and the companion publication have been made possible in part with support from the National Endowment for the Humanities, the trustees of the Edith Lutyens and Norman Bel Geddes Foundation, the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, Furthermore: a program of the J.M. Kaplan Fund, the Marlene Nathan Meyerson Family Foundation, an FAIC/Tru Vue Optium® Conservation Grant, Janet and Jack Roberts, and IBM Corp.

“I Have Seen the Future: Norman Bel Geddes Designs America” can be seen in the Ransom Center Galleries on Tuesdays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with extended Thursday hours until 7 p.m. On Saturdays and Sundays the galleries are open from noon to 5 p.m. The galleries are closed on Mondays.

The Museum of the City of New York also plans to host the exhibition.

Cowan is the only small town in America with an international book fair.  The most prominent antiquarian book fairs are usually held in large cities such as St. Petersburg, Washington D. C., Atlanta, Albuquerque, New York, Boston, Philadelphia, Seattle, Denver, and San Francisco.  Thanks to word of mouth and international press this small American town of 1700 people is widely becoming known as the small town with a big fair.  The 2012 Tennessee Antiquarian Book Fair will be held July 21 and 22 at Monterey Station in Cowan.  Booksellers from more than half the states east of the Mississippi River and at least one foreign country will exhibit at this year’s fair.  Virginia, Indiana, Michigan, Ohio, New York, and Florida are just some of the states represented by participating booksellers.  Attendance at the event could easily exceed the local population.

The fair will include lectures by authors and scholars on many different topics of interest to collectors and book lovers in general.  One of the speakers will be Dr. John McCardell, 16th Vice-Chancellor of the University of the South.  Dr. McCardell’s specialty is U.S. history in the 19th century with special emphasis on the South and on American historiography.  He will speak on the role of history and memory in the cultural narratives of the Civil War.  Children’s literacy, the life of Sissieretta Jones, and book collecting 101 are just some of the other scheduled lectures.

Cowan is located just an hour's drive northwest of Chattanooga.  It was established in the early 1850's as a station for the Nashville and Chattanooga Railroad.  The town is best known for its railroad depot museum and the nearby 2200-ft long, hand-drilled tunnel. Monterey Station is a 20,000 sq ft air conditioned venue and is an easy day trip from Atlanta, Birmingham, Chattanooga, Huntsville, Knoxville, and Nashville.

The fair will include a variety of collectable and rare books, autographed documents, and other ephemera.  Bibliophiles will discover modern first editions of mystery, science fiction, and literature.  Collectable books and documents concerning the War Between the States, the American Revolution, and both World Wars will be available.  Dealers specializing in children’s literature, art, religion, fine bindings, and books about books will also be exhibiting at the fair.  Book prices ranging from $10 to $50,000 are sure to pique the interest of the leisure reader as well as the most avid collector.

The fair will be open 10 AM to 5 PM on Saturday and 11 AM to 4 PM on Sunday. Admission is $5 for adults and free to those under 18. The price covers both days and includes attendance at all the lectures as well as admission to the fair. Seating in the lecture hall is limited and will be filled on a first-come, first-served basis.

Contact:  Tom McGee                             
TN Antiquarian Booksellers’ Assn.                    
Tel. 931/636-5752
Cell Phone:  615/330-3812
Email:  tom@tennaba.org
www.tennaba.org

Frederic Chopin, a Polish composer (1810-1849) considered one of the great masters of Romantic music. His piano works are often technically demanding, with an emphasis on nuance and expressive depth.

A rare one-page document signed by Chopin is currently up at auction, from New Hampshire based RR Auction in June.
 
A receipt, dated March 1840, for the sale of the copyrights to two of his musical compositions. In part: “Received of Messrs. Wessel & Co.…Frith Street, Soho Square, London, at the price or sum of Sixteen Pounds…all my Copyright and Interest, present and future, vested and contingent or otherwise, for all the Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland of and in the following works.” A secretary has filled in the title and a brief description of each work, “Grande Valse brillante Opus 42,” and “Quatre Mazurkas, Op 41,” including a musical staff showing the meter, key, and notes of the respective opening measures.

Chopin’s mazurkas, based on traditional Polish folk dances, are among his most characteristic short works for piano. The set of four referred to in this letter, published as Op. 41, was written between 1838 and 1840, when he was recovering from a tubercular infection and enjoying the companionship of his famous lover, the novelist George Sand. Waltz in A-flat major, Op. 42, written in 1840, is one of composer’s finest efforts in the form. Its aristocratic tone led Chopin’s friend and fellow composer, Robert Schumann, to comment that when the work was played at a dance, “Half the ladies should be countesses at least.” The year before his death in 1849, Chopin visited England where he was warmly welcomed by his numerous admirers.
 
“A musical rarity, relating to two of the composer’s greatest works,” says Bobby Livingston, VP at RR Auction.

Among the museum quality pieces:

·      * A stunning original blueprint of his masterwork, Fallingwater, accompanied by a letter in which Frank Lloyd Wright fumes about its construction.
·      * A rare letter written by Beatrix Potter, British author and illustrator whose Edwardian-era tales of naughty rabbits, ‘bad’ mice, and other amusingly mischievous animals take a place among the most enduring and beloved works in the annals of children’s literature.

The auction, which features more than 1,550 items, runs through June 20 at 7:00PM Eastern.  For additional details, go to www.rrauction.com.
WORCESTER, MA— In honor of the American Antiquarian Society’s (AAS) bicentennial, the Grolier Club of New York will host an exhibition entitled In Pursuit of a Vision: Two Centuries of Collecting at the American Antiquarian Society from September 12 through November 17, 2012.  
            In Pursuit of a Vision tells the story of the significant collectors, librarians, and bibliographers who helped develop and expand the Society’s collections. The AAS library, recently described by the Pulitzer and Bancroft award-winning historian Gordon S. Wood, as “the greatest collection of early Americana in the world,” began with a founding gift of 4,000 volumes and now comprises holdings of over four million items of all manner of pre-twentieth century printed materials including books, pamphlets, newspapers, broadsides, graphic arts materials, ephemera and manuscripts created throughout the United States, the West Indies and a good portion of Canada. The Society possesses the largest collection of pre-1821 American imprints in the world.
             The exhibition and accompanying catalog describe seminal examples from the key individuals responsible for forming the AAS collections. The Society’s history begins with its founder Isaiah Thomas, who was a Revolutionary War printer and later the foremost publisher in the Early Republic. His initial donation included many of his own imprints including an early broadside containing a poem by America’s first significant black poet, Phillis Wheatley. Composed when she was seventeen in 1770, the poem describes the death of George Whitefield the English clergyman who prompted the Great Awakening, a massive religious revival that swept throughout the American Colonies in the 1740s.  The exhibition also contains a pamphlet Thomas created in 1775 composed of eye-witness depositions describing the battles of Lexington and Concord entitled “A Narrative, of the Excursion and Ravages of the King’s Troops Under the Command of General Gage, on the Nineteenth of April, 1775.”  
            Many of the items on display at the Grolier Club document pivotal moments in American history including the first Confederate imprint, a hastily created extra sheet from the Charleston Mercury proclaiming “The Union is Dissolved” on December 20, 1860. This broadside was donated to the Society by Nathaniel Paine a prominent Worcester collector and AAS member who responded to the Society’s call to preserve contemporary materials during the then unfolding Civil War.  The settlement of the West is depicted in another 1866 broadside that advertises - using thirteen wooden and metal type faces and vivid red and blue ink -  a history of the vigilantes of Montana Territory that could be purchased for the sum of $2.25 in “Greenbacks” or discounted to $2.00 if purchased in gold dust. This was a gift to the Society from Donald McKay Frost, who along with Thomas W. Streeter, did much to expand the Society’s coverage of the Midwest, South, and West.
            The development of American culture is also represented by the collectors showcased in the exhibition. Among these items is the only known copy of Pamela by Samuel Richardson, printed by Benjamin Franklin in 1742. This was the first modern novel published in America. Other items on display include a first edition of John Greenleaf Whittier’s Poems Written During the Progress of the Abolition Question in the United States, Between the Years 1830 and 1838  donated to the society by Herbert E. Lombard. Frank Brewer Bemis donated many rare first books of prominent American authors including Nathaniel Hawthorne’s Fanshawe, a Tale, published in 1828 and Ralph Waldo Emerson’s Letter from the Rev. R.W. Emerson, to the Second Church and Society published in 1832.
            The Society’s extensive collection of graphic arts materials is represented by such materials as a chromolithograph entitled Cloisonné Vase published by the Boston firm of Louis Prang & Company in 1896 and an 1858 watercolor by David Claypoole Johnston entitled Taproom both of which were part of the collection of Charles Henry Taylor, a member of the family who founded the Boston Globe newspaper.
            In Pursuit of a Vision also examines the impact collectors of specialized fields had on building the AAS collections with examples of children’s literature, almanacs, hymnals, Louisiana imprints, racy newspapers, Caribbean newspapers and cookbooks, annotated auction catalogs and book bindings all part of the exhibition. Additionally, the exhibition details the development of American bibliography and book history the important role the Society has played in these fields.
 
LOCATION AND TIME: In Pursuit of a Vision will be on view at the Grolier Club, 47 East 60th Street, New York, from September 12 - November 17, 2012. The exhibit will be open to the public free of charge, Monday - Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Additional information and directions are available at www.grolierclub.org.
 
CATALOG: A fully-illustrated 300-page color catalog of In Pursuit of a Vision, published by the American Antiquarian Society, will be available at the Grolier Club.
 
About the Grolier Club
            Founded in 1884, the Grolier Club is America’s oldest and largest society of bibliophiles and enthusiasts in the graphic arts. Named after Jean Grolier the Renaissance collector renowned for sharing his collection with his friends, the club maintains a 100,000 volume library, publishes books, conducts exhibitions, lectures and symposia to foster an appreciation the art, history, production and commerce of books.
 
About the American Antiquarian Society
            Celebrating its bicentennial as the country’s first national historical organization, the American Antiquarian Society is both a learned society and a major independent research library.
            The Society sponsors a broad range of programs - visiting research fellowships, research, education, publications, lectures, and concerts - for constituencies ranging from school children and their teachers through undergraduate and graduate students, postdoctoral scholars, creative and performing artists and writers, and the general public.
            The AAS library is open Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday from 9:00 a.m.-5:00 p.m. and Wednesday from 10:00 a.m.-8:00 p.m. It is closed on all legal holidays. The library is open to serious researchers, free of charge. Complimentary public tours are held Wednesdays at 3:00 p.m.  The AAS website is www.americanantiquarian.org.
             
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Alfred Wainwright is one of hillwalking’s heroes, and, to those who love the outdoors, a national treasure. Excitingly for them, one of Wainwright’s original manuscript notebooks, containing his comments and maps used in the production of his earliest work, is about to go under the hammer.

It will be sold by Carlisle based H&H Auction Rooms www.hhauctionrooms.co.uk on June 25, in their catalogued auction of Antiques, Fine Art, Collectors’ Items and Furniture.

Alfred Wainwright MBE (1907-1991), pipe smoker, fell-walker, author and illustrator is best known for his magnum opus; a seven volume Pictorial Guide to the Lakeland Fells published between 1955 and 1966.  Comprising entirely of reproductions of his manuscript it has become the standardized reference work to 214 of the fells that make up the English Lake District.  Many walkers have followed literally in his footsteps, with his books in hand to guide them.

The blue bound ledger contains pages of the iconic pencil script and detailed plan drawings so distinctively and meticulously reproduced in print. It is offered for sale, with over 20 Ordnance Survey maps used and annotated by the author - plus over 25 more from his assistant Cyril Moore. Carrying a pre-sale estimate of between £2000-3000, this unique and unprecedented offering is being sold as one lot.

Commenting prior on the much anticipated sale of Wainwright’s notebook Georgina Nixon, Auctioneer and Valuer of H&H Auction Rooms said:

‘Wainwright’s notebook will be of great interest to both enthusiasts and scholars alike, it provides real insight into the process of working and indeed to the unique style of the author.  Although a number of more up-to-date guidebooks are on the market, Wainwright’s works remain ever popular for their depth and detail, something still cherished by followers to this day. The unique value of the collection comes in its having been kept together.”

This same auction will feature amongst its highlights a number of works by other prominent Cumbrian artists including Thomas Bushby (1861-1918).  One work by Bushby features a showery vignette of a grandmother and her young grandson clad in the distinctive red beret much favoured by the artist.  The two are captured as they return from market, down a winding country lane.  This carries a pre-sale estimate of £2000-3000.  

“While it has been suggested that the location in this painting is Brisco, near Carlisle, we would like to hear from anyone who can fully identify the location.” says Georgina.

Followers of modern local artists may find the work of Marion Bradley (b. 1946) of interest. A number of her fine pencil drawings are on offer including intimate scenes of rural cottages and a large scale study of a tree with an estimate of £50-80 per work.  

The H&H Auction Rooms Catalogue sale auction takes place on Monday 25 June from 10am. Viewing is available on the Friday before the sale 9am-5pm, Saturday 9am-12pm and from 9am the morning of the sale.

For more information please visit www.hhauctionrooms.co.uk or telephone 01228 406 320

DALLAS - Custer's Last Rally, 1881, John Mulvany ‘s epic 11 x 20 foot oil painting will sell at auction on June 10 at Heritage Auctions, part of the company’s Legends of The Wild West Signature® Auction. The painting, a truly blockbuster achievement, represents one of the great “One-Hit Wonders” of American painting and a cultural phenomenon in its time. The painting is expected to bring $200,000+ and is part of a special Custer grouping in the auction.
 
“John Mulvany had his proverbial 15 minutes of fame when he unveiled his masterwork, Custer's Last Rally, in March of 1881,” said Tom Slater, Director of Americana Auctions at Heritage. “His trajectory might well be compared with that of another one-hit wonder, Archibald MacNeil Willard, who created one of the most iconic American paintings, Spirit of '76, for the 1876 Centennial Celebration.”

For some years Mulvany scratched out a living as an artist, mainly doing portraits. In 1879, he was inspired to paint a definitive scene of the Little Bighorn battle, in which George Armstrong Custer perished with his entire command.  Custer is strong and determined as the focal point with all of his adjutants, facing death bravely, with defiance, and hopeless surrounded by scores of attacking Indians.
 
It took two years to complete and immediately achieved wide recognition. The first major exhibition of the work occurred in New York City, where it created a sensation.
 
“There were no movies back then, certainly, and no pictures of the battle,” said Slater, “and yet Little Bighorn loomed huge in the recent memory of the nation. People were simply clambering to see this painting as it brought to life all the frantic combat which the public had envisioned at Little Bighorn.”
 
Large crowds paid an admission price of 50 cents (25 cents for children) - no small sum in its day - to gaze, mesmerized, at the painting. Walt Whitman waxed poetic about it in a published review; Custer's widow, Libbie, was said to have swooned at the sight of it. A popular print of the painting was made and sold and, for a decade, periodic additional exhibitions helped provide Mulvany with a livelihood.

Over the years it has had periods of exhibition interspersed with long years in storage. In 1926, it was on display at the Heinz Ocean City Pier in Ocean City, New Jersey. In the 1950s it was shown for several years at the Memphis Pink Palace Museum and, most notably, in 1967 at the Amon Carter Museum in Fort Worth. In recent years it has been intermittently on the market, though, always with a seven-figure price tag.

In 2009, eminent art appraiser Paul Rossi, former director of the Gilcrease Museum, declared the work to be “an invaluable collector's piece in American Western art and a true national treasure.”

“Like Archibald MacNeil Williams, John Mulvany produced only one masterwork,” said Slater. “He became a drunken derelict and committed suicide by jumping into New York's East River in 1906. Although he painted for years, little of his work has survived. This one shining moment, however, was enough to ensure his place in the pantheon of American historical painters. It’s a magnificent historical work that will be known and admired for generations.”
 
Further Custer and Custer-related lots include:
 
George Armstrong Custer - His Personal Cavalry Saddle from the Indian Wars Period, with Terrific Provenance: It was obtained by legendary collector Lawrence Frost from the Custer family in 1941. It’s hard to imagine a more meaningful relic of Custer than his personal Indian Wars-era cavalry saddle. Here is something with an important and personal connection to this legendary Western figure, the saddle on which he undoubtedly sat while he did what he loved best, and for which he is best remembered. Opening bid: $10,000.
 
Colt Revolver Found at the Little Bighorn Battle Site in 1935: A Most evocative relic, this 1860 model Colt Army revolver, made in late 1867, was undoubtedly brought into the battle by an Indian combatant, as Custer's men were using a newer model. It was found along the banks of the Little Bighorn at the site of the battle, buried in the ground with only the butt visible. The river was unusually high at the time of the battle, and it seems probable that the weapon was dropped into the water and lost. But at the time it was recovered, the river was lower, allowing it to be detected. What is particularly interesting about this gun is the fact it is still loaded (albeit with corroded and non-functional bullets). Opening bid: $5,000.
 
Fine Plains Indians Saddle, with Accompanying Research Attributing It to the Cheyenne War Chief Two Moons, a Major Figure at Little Bighorn, and One of Fraser's Three Models for the Buffalo Nickel:  Two Moons (1842-1917) was present at virtually every significant skirmish or battle between the Cheyenne and U.S. Army forces, and was one of the significant war chiefs of the Cheyenne at Little Bighorn. Although accounts are conflicting, some name him as the man who took Custer's life. Other accounts include him among the prominent Cheyenne who prevented the ritual mutilation of Custer's body after the battle. Opening bid: $5,000.
 
Heritage Auctions is far and away the largest auction house founded in the United States, and the world’s third largest, with annual sales of more than $800 million, and 700,000+ online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and receive access to a complete record of prices realized, with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com
 
Want to get the up-to-the-minute updates and breaking news stories about Heritage Auctions? Get them as they happen at: HA.com/Twitter; Facebook: HA.com/Facebook.To view a complete archive of Heritage press releases go to: HA.com/PR. To link to this press release on your blog or Website: HA.com/PR-2221.
[ITHACA, NY] National Book Auctions, located in Ithaca, NY hosted a Sunday, June 3rd auction that featured a broad range of rare antique books, as well as a quantity of posters and ephemera. Featured was a large collection of modern first editions, the majority of which retained their original dust jackets. Also offered was another session from a large nautical collection which will be brought to market over a series of auctions this year.

Bringing a collective hammer price of $3474.75 (including buyer’s premium) were three volumes of “Camera Work: A Photographic Quarterly.” These were edited and published by Alfred Stieglitz, who was an American photographer and modern art promoter who was instrumental over his fifty-year career in making photography an accepted art form. “Camera Work” was a completely independent magazine of pictorial photography that was meant to carry forth the same artistic standards of the photo-secessionist movement.

Gertrude Stein’s “The Autobiography of Alice B. Toklas” brought a hammer price of $1168.50 (including buyer’s premium) This book of Stein’s is written in the guise of an autobiography authored by Alice B. Toklas, who was her lover. This is a rare second printing autographed by both Gertrude Stein and Alice B. Toklas, along with an inscription to Eugene Stinson, famous music critic for the Chicago Daily News.

Bringing a hammer price of $1560.00 (including buyer’s premium) was an antique sketchbook with original drawings and watercolors.  This volume bears the name of its original owner, Edith L. Willis, and the date of 1885, which have been stamped in gilt on the front cover.  Mrs. Willis was married to Dr. Frederick Willis and they were related to the Louisa May Alcott family. Mrs. Willis circulated the sketchbook among several artists, principally or exclusively in the Boston area in 1885. Some artists contributing their work include Benjamin Champney, T. M. Kellogg, and William Henry Burr, among several others.

National Book Auctions is a public auction service specializing in books, ephemera, and art. National Book Auctions is a targeted service offering experience and expertise unique to marketing antique and modern books and ephemera for consignors and collectors alike. Preview for the upcoming Sunday, June 24th auction is at 10 a.m. and the live auction starts at noon. For more information or to consign collectible material please contact David Hall, Business Manager, at 607-269-0101 or email mail@nationalbookauctions.com.
New York—On Thursday, June 21 Swann Galleries will conduct an auction of 19th & 20th Century Literature with a compelling selection of literary works and publisher’s bindings in exceptional condition.

Coinciding with the 200th anniversary of the birth of Charles Dickens, the sale offers a number of first editions by the author, many of which are extra-illustrated. These include The Adventures of Nicholas Nickleby, London, 1839, with numerous plates and a signed inscription by Dickens from New York City, three days before his final reading in America (estimate: $4,000 to $6,000); Bleak House, London, 1583, containing an autograph letter signed by Dickens about the novel to his friend, the writer Peter Cunningham ($4,000 to $6,000); as well as The Posthumous Papers of the Pickwick Club, Dealings with the Firm of Dombey and Son and The Personal History of David Copperfield.

A wonderful selection of works by master English Caricaturists and graphic humorists of the 19th century features George Cruikshank’s The Comic Almanack, London, 1835-53 ($800 to $1,200); Cruikshank’s Fairy Library, containing an inscribed Hop-O’-My-Thumb, 1853 ($800 to $1,200) and Robert Cruikshank’s Weeds of Witchery, 1837 ($500 to $750). Thomas Rowlandson highlights include Surprising Adventures of the Renowned Baron Munchausen, 1809 ($600 to $900) and The English Dance of Death, 1914-17 ($1,000 to $1,500).

There are also Omnium Gatherum, illustrated by Henry Heath, 1840 ($600 to $900); John Leech’s Mr. Sponge’s Sporting Tour, 1852 ($400 to $600) and the satirical Portraits of the Spruggins Family, arranged by Richard Sucklethumkin Spruggins, Esq., with grotesque portraits of a fictional aristocratic family by Walter Sneyd ($250 to $350).

Nineteenth century literary highlights include a run of fore-edge paintings; one of only 15 sets of the extra-illustrated edition of The Works of William Thackeray, 52 volumes, New York and London, 1878 ($4,000 to $6,000); a first edition of Robert Louis Stevenson’s Treasure Island, London, 1883 ($5,000 to $7,500); a scarce first edition of Kate Chopin’s The Awakening, Chicago and New York, 1899 ($2,000 to $3,000); and exquisite examples of English, French and Italian bindings.

From the 20th century are three science fiction classics, a signed first edition of Hugo Gernsback’s Ralph 124C 41+; A Romance of the Year 2660, Boston, 1925, a foundational text in the sci-fi pantheon ($8,000 to $12,000); Philip K. Dick’s The Man in the High Castle, New York, 1962 ($2,000 to $3,000); and a first edition of Frank Herbert’s Dune, with the author’s scarce signature, Philadelphia, 1965 ($3,000 to $4,000).

Among children’s literature highlights are first editions of A.A. Milne’s The Christopher Robin Books, four volumes, London, 1924-28 ($5,000 to $7,500); and Sir John Tenniel’s Illustrations to Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking-Glass, one of 250 sets, with prints of all the original illustrations, London, 1988 ($1,500 to $2,500).

Notable poetry lots are Robert Frost’s Locked Out (As Told to a Child), as published in The Forge, Volume No. 2, Philadelphia, 1917 ($600 to $900); and an inscribed first edition of Elizabeth Bishop’s Poems North & South - A Cold Spring, with a pen drawing by Bishop on the front endpaper and containing a Typed Letter Signed, Boston, 1955 ($1,000 to $1,500).

Other fine examples of modern literature are two editions of James Joyce’s Ulysses, one a “Giant Joyce” copy from the first edition of 150 copies on Vergé d’Arches, Paris, 1922 ($6,000 to $9,000), the other one of 2000 on handmade paper, London, 1922 ($4,000 to $6,000); early printer’s proofs of the French edition of Antoine de Saint-Exupery’s Pilote de Guerre, warmly inscribed in French to his goof friend Michel Bertin ($3,000 to $4,000); Vladimir Nabokov’s Lolita, Paris, 1955 ($3,500 to $5,000); and first editions of William Faulkner, Graham Greene, John Irving, Cormac McCarthy and Tennessee Williams.

The auction will begin at 1:30 p.m. on Thursday, June 21. The works will be on public exhibition on Saturday, June 16, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.; Monday, June 18 to Wednesday, June 20, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Thursday, June 21, from 10 a.m. to noon.

On June 19 from 6 to 8 p.m. Swann Galleries will host a reading by writers from the non-profit ONE STORY. The evening will also include classic literature trivia. Prizes will be awarded. Wine and appetizers will be served. This event is free but space is limited. RSVP to litevent@swanngalleries.com or 212-254-4710 ext 305.
 
An illustrated catalogue with information on bidding by mail or fax is available for $35 from Swann Galleries, 104 East 25th Street, New York, NY 10010, or online at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information, and to arrange in advance to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact John Larson at (212) 254-4710, extension 61, or via email at jlarson@swanngalleries.com, or Christine von der Linn at extension 20, or cvonderlinn@swanngalleries.com.

Live online bidding is also available via Artfact.com.
 
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New York, NY, June 4, 2012—The Morgan Library & Museum will open its vault again this summer for an exhibition of twenty-nine exceptional items from its permanent collections, including its noted holdings of important Americana. The works will go on view Tuesday, June 5 in the museum’s historic 1906 McKim building, and range from Noah Webster’s Dictionary manuscript, to revealing letters by Ernest Hemingway and James Madison, to music manuscripts by Mozart, Debussy, Schubert, and Haydn. The display will remain on view through September 8.

The items from American history are chosen with an eye towards celebrating the country’s achievements and struggles as the Fourth of July holiday approaches. The presentation’s centerpiece is the manuscript of a work familiar to all Americans, Noah Webster’s classic An American Dictionary of the English Language. Webster spent twenty-seven years and learned twenty-six languages in preparation for his Dictionary, which was finally published in 1828 when he was seventy years old. His was the first major American dictionary, and the last ever to be compiled by a single individual.

When George Washington delivered his inaugural address from the balcony of Federal Hall on Wall Street in April 1789, its content differed significantly from that of an earlier draft, a rare fragment of which is on view. In his draft, Washington praised the Constitution’s “balances arising from the distribution of the Legislative, Executive, and Judicial powers” and declared that “no government before introduced among mankind ever contained so many checks and such efficacious restraints to prevent it from degenerating into any species of oppression.”

Another Presidential writing, this one from James Madison, reminds us of a darker time in American history. Writing to the Marquis de Lafayette in November 1820—by which time slavery had become the most divisive issue in the republic—Madison observed, “All these perplexities develop more & more, the dreadful fruitfulness of the original sin of the African trade.”

Included among the other works from the Morgan’s collections of literature, rare books, music, and medieval art are the original manuscript of Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray, revealing more overt homoerotic passages that were deleted before publication; an extremely rare set of fifteenth-century Italian tarot cards; Franz Schubert’s earliest surviving work, composed when he was just thirteen years old; and a fourteenth-century illustrated Arthurian legend of Lancelot.

The following is a complete list of the twenty-nine items on view in the McKim building this summer:

Americana
Jean Antoine Houdon's George Washington's Life Mask, 1785
James Madison’s letter to the Marquis de Lafayette, 1820
Henry David Thoreau's autograph journal, March 30-September 30, 1841
George Washington's inaugural address draft fragment, 1789
Noah Webster’s An American Dictionary of the English Language manuscript
Alexander Wilson’s American Ornithology with engravings by Alexander Lawson, 1828-29

Also on view
Breviary of Eleanor of Portugal, ca. 1500-10
Claude Debussy’s La Belle au bois dormant, 1890
Die geesten of geschiedenis van Romen (Deeds of the Romans), 1481
Raoul-Auger Feuillet’s Recueil de dances, 1700
Gospel Book, mid-tenth century
Gospel Book (“Mathilda Gospels”), end of the eleventh century
Joseph Haydn’s Symphony No. 91 in E-flat Major, 1788
Ernest Hemingway’s letter to George Plimpton of The Paris Review, 1954
Hyginus’s Poetica astronomica, 1485
Marianne Moore’s letter to Robert B. Young of the Ford Motor Company, 1955
Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s Piano Concerto in C Major, 1785
Vladimir Nabokov’s Stikhi (Poems), 1916
Ovid’s Les métamorphoses with engravings after Eisen, Gravelot, Boucher, and others, 1767-71
Samuel Pepys’s notes in shorthand, 1695
Edgar Allan Poe’s Tamerlane manuscript, 1828
Le roman de Lancelot du lac, ca. 1310-15
Franz Schubert’s Fantasie in G Major for Piano, 1810
Tarot cards from the Visconti-Sforza deck, ca. 1450
Samuel Taylor Coleridge’s manuscript commonplace book, ca. 1796
Paul Verlaine’s Parallèlement with lithographs by Pierre Bonnard, 1900
Jacopo Vignola’s Regola delli cinque ordini d’architettura, ca. 1564
Oscar Wilde’s manuscript of The Picture of Dorian Gray, 1889-90
 
The programs of The Morgan Library & Museum are made possible with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

The Morgan Library & Museum
The Morgan Library & Museum began as the private library of financier Pierpont Morgan, one of the preeminent collectors and cultural benefactors in the United States. Today, more than a century after its founding in 1906, the Morgan serves as a museum, independent research library, musical venue, architectural landmark, and historic site. In October 2010, the Morgan completed the first-ever restoration of its original McKim building, Pierpont Morgan's private library, and the core of the institution. In tandem with the 2006 expansion project by architect Renzo Piano, the Morgan now provides visitors unprecedented access to its world-renowned collections of drawings, literary and historical manuscripts, musical scores, medieval and Renaissance manuscripts, printed books, and ancient Near Eastern seals and tablets.

General Information
The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue, at 36th Street
New York, NY 10016
212.685.0008
www.themorgan.org
Just a short walk from Grand Central and Penn Station

Hours
Tuesday-Thursday, 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; extended Friday hours, 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; closed Mondays, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year's Day. The Morgan closes at 4 p.m. on Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve.

Admission
$15 for adults; $10 for students, seniors (65 and over), and children (under 16); free to Members and children 12 and under accompanied by an adult. Admission is free on Fridays from 7 to 9 p.m. Admission is not required to visit the Morgan Shop.
 
Kestenbaum & Company will conduct an early Summer auction of Fine Judaica on Thursday, June 21 at 3:00 pm at their New York City gallery located at 242 West 30th Street. Viewing will be held from Sunday, June 17 through Wednesday, June 20.  The extensive, 420-lot auction covers a broad range of collecting categories from Printed Books, Manuscripts and Autograph Letters to Illustrated Books, Graphic Art and Ceremonial Art. Also featured within the sale is Part III of the Alfonso Cassuto Collection of Iberian Judaica.

Perhaps the most important lot of the sale, and featured on the auction catalogue cover, is the Ferrara Bible, one of the great landmarks in the history of printing and a masterpiece of sixteenth century book production. Printed in 1553, it is the first Spanish translation of the entire Hebrew Bible and was printed for Jews who had carried the Spanish language with them into their exile. With its Gothic typography and intricate design, this stately folio became the classic Spanish version of the Bible for Marranos and the entire Sephardic diaspora, for centuries thereafter. The pre-auction estimate is $30,000-50,000 (Lot 307).

Also within the section of Iberian-Judaica is an important Hebrew Bible printed in Portugal, consisting of the Former Prophets with commentaries by David Kimchi and Gersonides. Produced in Leiria, 1494, this Bible was one of the last Hebrew books printed before the Portuguese expulsion of 1497, and is in fact, the most voluminous of all Hebrew incunables. The pre-sale estimate is $50,000-60,000 (Lot 306). Also of note is a fascinating cache from the fifteenth-seventeenth centuries, of personal documents relating to the Spanish Conchillos, one of the great and influential Marrano families, resident in Tarazona, Aragon, estimate $12,000-18,000 (Lot 308) and Miguel (Daniel Levi) de Barrios’ book of poems composed in praise of the Portuguese military victory of 1663 and dedicated to the Count of Villaflor, Amsterdam, 1673, estimate $4,000-5,000 (Lot 304). Texts by Joseph de la Vega (Penso) and David Nieto, and books relating to the Inquisition are also featured in this section.

Among the general section of printed books are noteworthy early texts such as the very first  edition, in any language, of the Kabbalistic work, Sepher Yetzirah, Paris, 1552, at an estimate of $8,000-10,000 (Lot 213) and Benedictus Arias Montanus’ Tractatuum Biblicorum…which includes the rare map of the world captioned in Hebrew, Frankfurt am Main, 1696, estimate $5,000-7,000 (Lot 195). Also of importance is the complete set of the first edition of Moses Mendelssohn’s monumental Bible translation, Berlin, 1783, at an estimate of $8,000-10,000 (Lot 194).

Prominent within a section of Chassidic works is a complete copy of the important Siddur of Rav Asher, Lemberg, 1787, estimate $10,000-15,000 (Lot 75) and another prayerbook, with commentary by R. Shneur Zalman of Liadi, known as the Siddur D”ach, Zhitomir, 1863-64, at an estimate of $4,000-5,000 (Lot 183). Passover Hagadahs are well represented within the auction. On offer is an attractive, eighteenth century illuminated Hagadah, owned for nearly a century within the family of the famed Jewish artist, Ephraim Moses Lilien (1874-1925). Composed on thick parchment with pen-and-ink and watercolor illustrations, this lovely manuscript is estimated at $30,000-50,000 (Lot 261). Another beautiful Hagadah was designed by Anglo-Jewish artist William Rothenstein in a limited edition of just 100 copies. Printed in London, 1930, the pre-sale estimate is $6,000-8,000 (Lot 130).

American Judaica highlights include a unique copy of a text produced by the Jewish Community of Barbados in 1843, containing prayers of thanks offered to the Almighty for sparing the Jews of that island from the devastation of the earthquake that hit the West Indies that year, estimate $8,000-10,000 (Lot 15) and the first Aschkenazi Machzorim (for the New Year and Day of Atonement) printed in America, New York, 1854, at an estimate of $10,000-15,000 (Lot 20). A significant lot in the Anglo-Judaica section of the sale is a pamphlet by Samuel H. Ellis containing rare printed documents relating to the election of a new Chief Rabbi of England in 1844, estimate $1,200-1,800 (Lot 48). Of note among French Judaica being offered is one of only two copies extant of Isaac Adolphe Cremieux’s landmark speech written in Nimes, 1827, protesting the obligation of a Jew to take a special oath on the Torah before testifying in a secular court, a practice carried over from the Middle Ages, estimate $1,000-1,500 (Lot 112). Noteworthy in the German Judaica section is a checklist of Jews permitted to enter the city of Augsburg to conduct trade, circa 1800, at an estimate of $1,200-1,800 (Lot 117).  Further highlights continue to span the globe with texts relating to Jews in China (Lot 88), Corfu (Lot 90), Sweden, (Lots 217-219), Ethiopia (Lot 100), Morocco (Lot 197) and elsewhere in the Middle East (Lots 102-103).

Holocaust related lots worth mentioning include Hans Severus Ziegler’s Entartete Musik: Eine Abrechnung, in which he enthusiastically favors what the Nazis viewed as “degenerate music”, that is, primarily anything composed by Jewish musicians, Dusseldorf, 1938, estimate $5,000-7,000 (Lot 145) and Menachem Mendel Kirschbaum’s scarce Hebrew pamphlet relating to burial rites for Jews cremated in Nazi concentration camps, Cracow, 1939, estimate $3,000-5,000 (Lot 146).

Further significant books include the first edition in the English language of Karl Marx’s Captial: A Critical Analysis of Capitalist Production, London, 1887, estimate $1,500-2,000 (Lot 193); the first American edition of Theodor Herzl’s Der Judenstaat, New York, 1904, estimate $1,500-2,000 (Lot 228) and eye-witness reports, that were printed on linen (to evade police detection), concerning the atrocities committed against Jews during the Russian Civil War, estimate $1,000-1,500 (Lot 205).

The Manuscripts section, which also includes Autograph Letters and a range of sumptuous illuminated Ketubot, covers topics both religious and secular. Top lots include a singular fifteenth century Yemenite manuscript of Maimonides’ commentary on the Mishnah, estimate $30,000-40,000 (Lot 280) and an eleventh century manuscript of Nissim Gaon’s Megilath Setarim, Yemen, 1017, at an estimate of $20,000-25,000 (Lot 281). Also featured is a Hebrew Prayer-Book written on vellum from Italy, circa, 1400, estimated at $15,000-18,000 (Lot 277).
Of further interest is an autograph manuscript by Samson Raphael Hirsch, written in defense of Jewish tradition, and entitled “Rabbi Josua: Der Mann der Goldene Mitte”, Frankfurt a/ Main, 1857, estimate $5,000-7,000 (Lot 260); an autograph manuscript by Joseph Hayyim of Baghdad, the “Ben Ish Hai”, 1890, estimate $5,000-7,000 (Lot 267); and an historic autograph letter by Rabbi Moshe Soloveitchik relating to his son’s (Rabbi J. B. Soloveitchik) campaign for appointment as chief Rabbi of Tel-Aviv, 1935, at an estimate of $8,000-10,000. Autograph letters from the Karlin-Stolin Chassidic Rebbes are also featured.

An additional fascinating lot is the original signed proclamation issued in Jerusalem 1931, that protests the decision of the sports organization Maccabi to schedule soccer matches on the Sabbath. Seeking to preserve the unity of the fledgling community of Jews in Palestine at the time, the protest was organized and endorsed by over thirty of the country’s leading intellectuals almost all of whom were not religious themselves. The pre-auction estimate is $10,000-12,000 (Lot 262).

Art enthusiasts will have much from which to choose. The Graphic Art section of the auction includes a large selection of paintings and other artwork by noted Jewish artists such as Saul Raskin, Arthur Szyk, Issachar Ryback, Al Hirschfeld, Louis Lozowick, Abraham Walkowitz and Vasily Dmetrevich Polenov.

Rounding out the auction is a section of Ceremonial Art featuring Chanukah lamps, Kiddush cups, spice towers, among others. Highlights include a large, exotic Indian brass Chanukah lamp, early nineteenth century, estimate $10,000-15,000 (Lot 378); a large Dutch brass Chanukah lamp, circa 1700, estimate $15,000-18,000 (Lot 379), and a highly attractive Bezalel silver Chanukah lamp, at an estimate of $3,000-5,000 (Lot 384). Also sure to find favor among collectors is a Ludwig Wolpert designed silver Kiddush beaker, estimate $1,000-1,5000 (Lot 391), a Ludwig Wolpert designed silver honey dish, estimate $6,000-8,000 (Lot 392) and an exceptional set of silver Torah ornaments created by the internationally renowned silversmith Kurt J. Matzdorf at an estimate of $15,000-20,000 (Lot 399).

For  further  information  relating  to  bidding  or  any  other  queries,  please  contact Jackie  Insel at  212-366-1197.

DALLAS - The only known document in private hands signed by both legendary American explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, the men who opened up the West for America after the historic Louisiana Purchase of 1803, is expected to bring $100,000+ in Heritage Auctions’ June 10 Legends of the Wild West Signature® Auction.
 
In July, 1803, the United States - at the price of four cents an acre (totaling $15 million) - purchased 828,000 square miles of land from France. The Louisiana Purchase was arguably the most important land deal of the 19th century, doubling the size of the United States and giving it control of the important port city of New Orleans.

“Considering how the names Lewis and Clark are linked in the popular mind, it’s nothing short of amazing that this should be the only surviving document bearing both their signatures that exists in private hands,” said Tom Slater, Director of Americana Auctions at Heritage, “but that is indeed the case. Careful research confirms the Library of Congress doesn’t have anything, though there are possibly one or two land grants signed by both held in other institutional collections. It’s almost impossible to overstate the significance of this offering. Here’s a case where immense historical significance, profound human interest and extreme rarity come together to form a truly museum-quality treasure.”
 
Shortly after the Louisiana Purchase, Thomas Jefferson appointed Lewis and Clark to lead the 33-man Corps of Discovery on an exploration of the territory, which would take 2-1/2 years and produce more than 140 different maps, document nearly 50 different Indian tribes and record 300 previously unknown (at least to European Americans) species of plants and animals. After reaching the Pacific Ocean, the group turned back eastward and arrived back in St. Louis on Sept. 23, 1806.

In 1807, President Jefferson appointed Meriwether Lewis governor of the Territory of Upper Louisiana with William Clark as an agent of Indian affairs as well as brigadier general of the militia of the territory. Meriwether Lewis signs this land indenture to prominent fur trader Pierre Chouteau (named in the document as Peter) as governor, six weeks before his death. William Clark and William C. Carr sign as witnesses.


Meriwether would die of a gunshot to the head and chest just six weeks after the signing of this document and, 200 years later, his death remains a mystery. He died en route to Washington, D.C. to take care of some financial business and explain his failures as governor. On the morning of Oct. 11, 1809, Lewis met his end at Grinder's Stand, a tavern located some 70 miles southwest of Nashville, Tennessee. It is generally accepted by scholars (and at the time by Thomas Jefferson and William Clark) that he committed suicide, but his family insisted that he was murdered.
 
The death of Lewis fell so near to the signing of this document that Carr, an original witness to the signing, was called upon a second time to attest to the document's legality. The document was notarized on the verso on Jan. 5, 1810, attesting to the veracity of the indenture.
 
“Auction records dating back to the 1970s fail to disclose another example of a document signed by both men, let alone one of such an historic nature,” said Slater.  “As such, its significance and romantic appeal to institutional and private collectors alike is immense.”
 
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New York, NY, June 1, 2012—Although best known for his brightly colored, minimalist paintings, Ellsworth Kelly has also worked with sculptural forms for most of his professional career. These often large-scale works exhibit the same spare, clean-edged beauty associated with his paintings, while also highlighting the natural textures and surfaces of the materials from which they are made.

Beginning June 19, The Morgan Library & Museum will place on view three of Mr. Kelly’s sculptures—a bronze piece, one in mahogany, and the other in redwood—in the museum’s multi-storied, glass-enclosed Gilbert Court. Each standing from twelve to fifteen feet high with long, almost totemic shapes, the works will be accompanied by a selection of studies, models, and drawings showing the artist’s exploration of sculptural form.

The exhibition is the third in a series of summer shows at the Morgan devoted to modern and contemporary sculpture. In 2011, the Chinese artist Xu Bing created a new version of his sculpture The Living Word specifically for the Gilbert Court, and in 2010 three sculptures by Mark di Suvero were installed in the same space.

An icon of modernism whose paintings grace the walls of museums throughout the world, Mr. Kelly is less known for his work as a sculptor. Yet his interest in the discipline dates to the 1950s and the early years of his career when he began to work with wood, attracted to the beauty of its grain and colors. In the ensuing years and to the present day, the artist has continued his explorations.

The exhibition’s studies, models, and drawings, in particular, speak to Kelly’s working method. Drawings from the 1970s, for example, show how the first totem sculptures were planned as a series cut from the same aluminum plate, with the concave and convex curves echoing each other. The approximately two-foot high models fabricated in the same material as the final pieces allowed Kelly to visualize the forms in three dimensions and their relationship to the surrounding space.

“Ellsworth Kelly is among that select group of artists whose names are synonymous with the term ‘modernism’ and whose paintings are among the most universally recognized of our time,” said William M. Griswold, director of The Morgan Library & Museum. “His work as a sculptor is equally important. The Morgan is delighted to present these extraordinary pieces as part of its recently inaugurated program of summertime sculpture exhibitions in the Gilbert Court.”

The three works in the show are all untitled and exhibit a similar quiet, spare form that rises from a narrow base to a slightly wider top. The materials from which they are made—bronze, mahogany, and redwood—offer variations in color, surface, and texture. The pureness of the edges of the pieces bears stylistic similarities to the clean lines in Mr. Kelly’s paintings.
Two of the works are from private collections and one is in the collection of the artist. The studies, models, and drawings that are displayed in cases in an alcove off the Gilbert Court are preparatory for works in steel, bronze, and wood.

The exhibition will remain on view in the Gilbert Court through September 9, 2012.

Organization and Sponsorship
Ellsworth Kelly: Sculpture is organized by Isabelle Dervaux, Acquavella Curator, Modern and Contemporary Drawings.

The installation is made possible by the Ricciardi Family Exhibition Fund, and by a generous donation from Susanna and Livio Borghese, in honor of Parker Gilbert and in appreciation of his many contributions to The Morgan Library & Museum.

The programs of The Morgan Library & Museum are made possible with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and by the New York State Council on the Arts with the support of Governor Andrew Cuomo and the New York State Legislature.

The Morgan Library & Museum
The Morgan Library & Museum began as the private library of financier Pierpont Morgan, one of the preeminent collectors and cultural benefactors in the United States. Today, more than a century after its founding in 1906, the Morgan serves as a museum, independent research library, musical venue, architectural landmark, and historic site. In October 2010, the Morgan completed the first-ever restoration of its original McKim building, Pierpont Morgan's private library, and the core of the institution. In tandem with the 2006 expansion project by architect Renzo Piano, the Morgan now provides visitors unprecedented access to its world-renowned collections of drawings, literary and historical manuscripts, musical scores, medieval and Renaissance manuscripts, printed books, and ancient Near Eastern seals and tablets.

General Information
The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue, at 36th Street
New York, NY 10016
212.685.0008
www.themorgan.org
Just a short walk from Grand Central and Penn Station

Hours
Tuesday-Thursday, 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; extended Friday hours, 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; closed Mondays, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year's Day. The Morgan closes at 4 p.m. on Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve.

Admission
$15 for adults; $10 for students, seniors (65 and over), and children (under 16); free to Members and children 12 and under accompanied by an adult. Admission is free on Fridays from 7 to 9 p.m. Admission is not required to visit the Morgan Shop.

MIDDLEBURG, VA. The National Sporting Library and Museum is pleased to announce the opening of a new exhibition, Endangered Species, by the contemporary Washington, D.C., artist Kay Jackson, is comprised of over twenty contemplative gold-leaf panel paintings and boxes.

Jackson’s work is strongly influenced by Byzantine and late-Medieval motifs. Many of the pieces present a detailed relief of an endangered land, avian, or aquatic animal - among them the Grevy's zebra, Fijian banded iguana, whooping crane, and crayfish - contrasted against delicate and intricate backgrounds. A master of water gilding techniques, Jackson also designs each frame as an extension of the composition. These evocative works exalt the beauty of each species and underscore the need for continued wildlife conversation efforts.

Endangered Species
June 6 - December 30, 2012 
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