February 2012 Archives

Los Angeles, CA, February 29, 2012 - Spike TV raises the stakes as for the first time ever the networks highest-rated non-scripted original series “Auction Hunters” premieres a special, one hour LIVE auction event.  Showcasing two of the best prospectors in the business, Allen Haff and Ton Jones, the episode will broadcast LIVE from an exclusive storage auction in Los Angeles. Hosted by “Loveline” co-host and former “Dancing with the Stars” contestant Mike Catherwood, “Auction Hunters: Live” premieres Wednesday, March 21 at 9:00 PM, ET, immediately followed by the series premiere of “American Digger.”
 
“Auction Hunters: Live” follows Haff and Jones at a white-glove only auction in Los Angeles, as the duo is challenged to condense a week’s worth of work into one hour of LIVE television.  Haff and Jones will have to hurry to buy a unit, dig through it, and select a few items to present for sale to the assembled group of on-set experts.  The pressure is on as this rare auction could potentially lead to their biggest payday or greatest loss to date.  With the cameras rolling and the stakes higher than ever, Spike’s “Auction Hunters” are primed for the ultimate challenge.

“Auction Hunters: Live” kicks-off season three of the series on its new day and time Wednesday, March 28 (9:00 PM, ET/PT) with back-to-back episodes filmed in Alaska.  Additional locations for the new season include New Orleans, Washington D.C., New York City, Honolulu, Denver and Los Angeles.
 
“Auction Hunters” is produced by Gurney Productions and executive produced by Scott Gurney and Deirdre Gurney. Sharon Levy is Spike TV’s Executive Vice President, Original Series, Tim Duffy is Senior Vice President of Original Programming for Spike TV, and Jeff Savaiano serves as the Executive in Charge of Production.

About “Auction Hunters”
Every year in America, 50,000 storage facilities hold auctions for abandoned storage units and, at these auctions, over $1 billion worth of goods changes hands.  Each unit has the potential to be a goldmine or a bust for those who make their living hunting unclaimed property.  “Auction Hunters” cuts the lock and opens the door into the high stakes, financial risks and potential rewards where the right purchase can bring in serious cash.  The series follows Haff and Jones in their quest to win auctions, dig for abandoned historical treasure and sell them for a profit
 
About Spike TV
Spike TV is available in 99.8 million homes and is a division of Viacom Media Networks.  A unit of Viacom (NASDAQ: VIA, VIAB), Viacom Media Networks is one of the world's leading creators of programming and content across all media platforms.  Spike TV's Internet address is www.spike.com and for up-to-the-minute and archival press information and photographs, visit Spike TV's press site at http://www.spike.com/press.  Follow us on Twitter @spiketvpr for the latest in breaking news updates, behind-the-scenes information and photos.
 
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HIDDEN TREASURE: a spectacular illustrated book celebrating the 175th anniversary of the National Library of Medicine, the world’s largest medical library.

“My fantasy holiday is a week spent locked in the archives of the National Library of Medicine, so you can imagine how excited I am about this book. It’s an incomparable treasure trove. I hugged it to my chest like a four-year-old with a new pair of shoes.”
— Mary Roach, author of Stiff and Packing for Mars

With more than 17 million items dating from the eleventh century to the present, the National Library of Medicine, founded 175 years ago, is the world’s largest medical library — America’s home to a rich worldwide heritage of objects from rare early medical books to disturbing, precise nineteenth-century surgical illustrations to delightful mid-twentieth-century animated cartoons.

Despite more than a century and a half of classification and cataloguing, buried in the sheer mass of this collection are wondrous items largely unseen by the public and obscure even to librarians, curators, and historians. The individual objects — rare, extravagant, idiosyncratic, and sometimes surprising — brought to light in this book glow with beauty, grotesquery, wit and/or calamitous tragedy. Among the objects featured are a series never before reproduced of hauntingly delicate paintings and illustrations of “monstra” collected in the early decades of the nineteenth century “from the museum of Dr. Klinkenberg” in the Netherlands; charming hand-painted glass “magic lantern slides,” which doctors projected in slideshows to entertain and help cure inmates at St. Elizabeths Hospital for the Insane; the mimeographed report of the Japanese medical team first to enter Hiroshima after the atomic blast; surreal views of mechanically sliced cadavers in the photographic anatomical atlas of fin-de-siècle France’s notorious surgeon-provocateur Eugène-Louis Doyen; and a staggering variety of objects from around the world and through seven different centuries.

Each hidden treasure included here has been specially selected and is accompanied by a brief essay by a distinguished scholar, artist, collector, journalist, or physician. Delivered from the obscurity of the library’s massive archive, these marvels speak to us, charm us, repulse us, amaze us, inform us, and intrigue us — and present a tantalizing glimpse of some of the precious and remarkable objects to be found within one of the world’s great hidden treasures: the National Library of Medicine.
 
ABOUT THE EDITOR: Michael Sappol is curator-historian at the History of Medicine Division of the National Library of Medicine and the author of A Traffic of Dead Bodies and Dream Anatomy and co-editor of A Cultural History of the Body in the Age of Empire. His current work focuses on twentieth-century modernist medical illustration and the history of medical film.

ABOUT BLAST BOOKS: For more than twenty years, Blast has been publishing books on extraordinary cultural and historical subjects, from Mütter Museum to Another Science Fiction: Advertising the Space Race 1957-1962. Visit www.blastbooks.com.

“Opening this volume is like lifting up the lid of a treasure chest. The images and artifacts from the NLM’s historical coffers are intriguing, sometimes startling, unfailingly fascinating, and made all the more evocative by the authoritative, playful short reflections, many written by leading scholars in the history of medicine. Brilliantly conceived and beautifully produced, this is an amazing exploration of the visual and material cultures of health, medicine, and the body in their widest and most imaginative reaches.”
—John Harley Warner, Chair of History of Medicine at the Yale University School of Medicine

Hidden Treasure: The National Library of Medicine
Edited by Michael Sappol
Hardcover with jacket • 10 x 11" • 240 pages 450 color illustrations • $50.00 • nonfiction
isbn 978-0-922233-42-7
Publication date: April 2, 2012
Blast Books
Distributed by Publishers Group West • www.pgw.com
P. O. Box 51, Cooper Station, New York, NY 10276-0051 • www.blastbooks.com
[February 28, 2012, Amherst] In November 2012, The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art in Amherst, MA, will kick off its 10th anniversary with a year of special events, including parties, exhibitions, festivals, professional workshops, and family activities. The Carle, which opened its doors November 22, 2002, has become a major cultural resource in its young life, drawing more than a half million visitors from around the world and engaging audiences of all ages in picture books.
 
“Our founders, Eric and Barbara Carle, dreamed of creating a museum that would celebrate picture books and inspire a love of art and reading,” says Alexandra Kennedy, executive director. “We’re very proud of the many ways the Museum has fulfilled that mission. In just ten years The Carle has become a vital center for artists, writers, teachers, librarians, scholars, and families — a place where important conversations about the future of art, books, and education happen every day.”
 
On November 10, 2012 the Museum will host its anniversary launch party, inviting back the many renowned artists who have exhibited their work in its galleries. The evening will include tours of Iconic Images: Ten Years of Collecting, the first major exhibition drawing on the Carle’s permanent collection of more than 10,000 illustrations. Guests will have a chance to view works by William Steig, Ludwig Bemelmans, Maurice Sendak, and many more. The other special exhibitions on view will be Eric Carle’s Independent Art — a look beyond his famous book illustration — and an exhibition of the work of British artist Lucy Cousins and her beloved Maisy character. Other exhibitions slated for the anniversary year include Garth Williams’s rarely viewed original drawings from Charlotte’s Web and a major exhibition of work by Mo Willems.
 
The night’s event will include the debut of a bronze Very Hungry Caterpillar commemorative maquette created by renowned sculptor Nancy Schön. Best known for her “Make Way for Ducklings” sculpture at the Boston Public Garden, Schön is offering the maquettes for sale throughout the Museum’s anniversary year and contributing all profits to The Carle.
 
All events are in the planning stage and dates are subject to change.
June 9, 2012: Children’s Family Book Festival: Baseball Bonanza and press announcement for the year of anniversary events
October 2012: Educator Night with Speaker Howard Gardner, plus anniversary year
information for attending teachers and librarians
November 10, 2012: Anniversary Kick-off Party with Eric Carle and Friends, including tours of two new exhibitions, Beyond Books: The Independent Art of Eric Carle and Iconic Images: 10 Years of Collecting
December 11, 2012: Some Book! Some Art!: Selected Drawings by Garth Williams for Charlotte’s Web exhibition opens
March 2013: Study Tour of the Early Childhood Centers of Pistoia, Italy with Museum Educators
March 12, 2013: Latino Folk Tales: Cuentos Populares - Art by Latino Artists
June 8, 2013: Children’s Book Festival celebrating The Carle’s 10th anniversary and its
community of artists
June 22, 2013: Seriously Silly: A Decade of Art & Whimsy by Mo Willems exhibition opens
October 2013: Educator Night
November 2013: Anniversary closing ceremony
 
ABOUT THE MUSEUM
The mission for The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art, a non-profit organization in Amherst, MA, is to inspire a love of art and reading in young children through picture books. The only full-scale museum of its kind in the United States, The Carle collects, preserves, presents, and celebrates picture books and picture book illustrations from around the world. In addition to underscoring the cultural, historical, and artistic significance of picture books and their art form, The Carle offers educational programs that provide a foundation for arts integration and literacy.
 
Eric and Barbara Carle founded the Museum in November 2002. Eric Carle is the renowned author and illustrator of more than 70 books, including the 1969 classic, The Very Hungry Caterpillar. Since opening, the 40,000-foot facility has served more than half a million visitors, including 30,000 schoolchildren. Its extensive resources include a collection of more than 10,000 picture book illustrations, three art galleries, an art studio, a theater, picture book and scholarly libraries, and educational programs for families, scholars, educators, and schoolchildren. Educational offerings include professional training for educators around the country. Museum hours are Tuesday through Friday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., Saturday 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., and Sunday 12 noon to 5 p.m. Open Mondays in July and August and during MA school vacation weeks. Admission is $9 for adults, $6 for children under 18, and $22.50 for a family of four. For further information and directions, call 413-658-1100 or visit the Museum’s website at www.carlemuseum.org.
 
 
The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art: By the Numbers
 
Since it’s opening, The Carle has hosted more than a half-million visitors from around the world, including 30,0000 school children.

The Museum has more than 1,500 paid members, both local and international, from Amherst to Australia.

The Carle is home to three major sculptures: Imaginary Garden by Leo Lionni, Tome by Tom Patti, and The Red Elephant by Mo Willems.

The Carle’s permanent collection includes more than 10,000 illustrations from major picture book artists, including works from William Steig, Ludwig Bemelmans, and Maurice Sendak.

Since its inception, The Carle has created more than 50 exhibitions, highlighting work by such iconic figures as Beatrix Potter, Dr. Seuss, and A.A. Milne. Many of the exhibitions have traveled throughout the U.S. as well as to Europe and Asia, providing museums everywhere the opportunity to introduce young audiences to the importance of picture book art.

Family friendly programming includes more than 300 special programs a year, including art-making classes, films, story times, book signings with artists and writers, and live theater and music performances.

Since opening, The Carle has engaged more than 5,000 teachers and librarians in workshops and lectures that encourage arts integration and early literacy.

Simmons College and The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art offer four graduate programs in children's literature at The Carle: M.A. in Children's Literature, M.F.A. in Writing for Children, M.A. in Children's Literature/M.F.A. in Writing for Children, M.A. in Children's Literature/M.S. in Library Science.

The Carle opens its doors to the clients of more than 100 local agencies serving at risk families and children. In 2011 the Museum received its first National Endowment for The Arts grant, providing arts and literacy programs to second graders at a Title One school in Holyoke, Massachusetts.

The Carle proudly supports the efforts of established and up and coming artists and authors. Since opening, more than 500 of them have signed books and presented their books, art, and art-making at the Museum.

The Carle regularly collaborates with the five colleges in its region — Smith, Amherst, Mt Holyoke, Hampshire and the University of Massachusetts, Amherst — through academic courses and through Museums10, a consortium of area museums including those from all five colleges. The Museum also partners with Smith College’s Department of Education and the world-renowned early childhood educators of Pistoia, Italy, to create exciting educational opportunities for teachers.

MARIAB News and Upcoming Events

Massachusetts & Rhode Island Antiquarian Booksellers proceeds apace in these parlous times. Last September we met at Grey Matter Books in Hadley and approved 2 new members who have been booksellers for many years, but recently relocated to Massachusetts: Stuart Bennett Rare Books and L. & T. Respess Books, both of Northampton. In October, we sponsored the 7th Annual Pioneer Valley Book & Ephemera Fair, managed by Flaminto Eventz. We had a full house of dealers & record attendance thanks to NPR sponsorships, local advertising and postering nearby college campuses. In December we had our final meeting of the year at Bearly Read Books in Sudbury. We had our first meeting of 2012 at The Commonwealth Museum in Boston which houses the Massachusetts State Archive. We joined a tour with Director Stephen Kenney, viewed 17th century charters for the colony, the state’s copy of the first printing of the Declaration of Independence, and the manuscript of the 1780 state constitution by John Adams. We had lunch and installed new officers: Katharyn Dawson, Second Hand Prose, Acton, Secretary; Duane Stevens, Wiggins Fine Books, Shelburne Falls, Treasurer; Peter L. Masi, Montague, Vice-president; Tom Nealon, Pazzo Books, West Roxbury, President.

We are currently in the process of updating information for our 2012-2013 Directory which should be published in April. Copies are available through our website: www.MARIAB.org

We will be sponsoring the second Boston Book, Paper & Photo Exposition & Sale on Saturday, May 5, 2012, at Shriners Auditorium, Wilmington, Massachusetts, produced by Marvin Getman, Impact Events Group. Last year we had over 70 dealers, a great gathering of special displays and seminars, very strong attendance. We already have over 50 dealers registered for this year. www.bookandpaperexpo.com
NEW YORK - Heritage Auctions Feb. 22-24 Vintage Comics & Comic Art Signature® Auction has officially become the single greatest comics auction ever conducted, realizing $8.9+ million over three days, completely obliterating the company’s previous world-record total of $6.03+ million set in May 2011. The auction garnered massive international media attention and captured the imaginations - and bids - of collectors all over the world.
 
“The mix of rarity, value and quality was simply irresistible to collectors,” said Ed Jaster, Senior Vice President of Heritage. “We knew that we had something special going in to this one, but we had no idea just how special. Now we know and we couldn’t be happier with the outcome. Consider this: before Heritage started Comics auctions more than a decade ago, no comic auction had ever exceeded $2.2 million. We’ve now almost quadrupled that.”
 
All told, the auction realized $8.3+ million on 1,854 lots, translating into a mind-boggling 99.9% sell-through rate by total value. All prices below include 19.5% Buyer’s Premium.
 
The star of the auction was, without a doubt, the inimitable Billy Wright Collection, which realized $3.5 million by itself, led by Wright’s incredible CGC FN+ 6.5 copy of Detective Comics #27 (DC, 1939). The comic brought $522,813, the third-highest price the Heritage Comics category has realized for any comic book or piece of original art in the comic category’s history.
 
“The Wright copy of Detective #27 was emblematic of the incredible quality of the collection,” said Lon Allen, Managing Director of the Comics Category at Heritage. “With just 345 comics in all, it featured fully 44 of the top 100 comics of all time, many in simply superb condition, which the uniformly great prices reflect.”
 
Other highlights from Billy Wright include Batman #1 (DC, 1940) CGC VF+ 8.5, which brought close to double the Overstreet Price Guide value when it finished the day at $274,850, All-American Comics #16 (DC, 1940) CGC VF 8.0, the first appearance of Green Lantern, which realized $203,150 on its way to becoming the most ever realized for any copy of this comic and Captain America Comics #2 (Timely, 1941) CGC NM 9.4, which became the rare non-major “Key” comic book to break the $100,000 mark when it realized $113,525.
 
The original comic art section of the auction was led by the incredibly rare Bill Watterson Calvin and Hobbes 1989-90 Calendar Cover Watercolor Illustration Original Art, circa 1988, which brought $107,550 from a determined high-end collector.
 
“We knew that collectors would love this piece,” said Todd Hignite, Vice President of Heritage Auctions. “Even so, we were impressed when this amazing rarity came in a double its estimate. Comic strip related pieces seldom command anywhere near this kind of money. Except for one Charles Schulz Peanuts Sunday strip, this is the highest price something from this genre has ever brought - quite fitting for such an iconic and important piece from the reclusive Bill Watterson.”
 
John Romita Sr.’s original cover art for Amazing Spider-Man Annual #3 Spider-Man vs. the Hulk and the Mighty Avengers (Marvel, 1966) was the other piece of original comic art that broke the six-figure threshold, bringing $104,563 when bidding had finished.
 
“We thought this had the look of a six-figure item,” said Hignite, “and it certainly didn’t disappoint.”
 
Further highlights of this World Record auction include, but are certainly not limited to:
 
Fantastic Four #5 Curator pedigree (Marvel, 1962) CGC NM 9.4: Easily the best copy Heritage has ever offered of the first appearance of Doctor Doom, one of the all-time great comic book villains. Realized: $65,725.
 
Steve Ditko The Amazing Spider-Man #22 Circus of Crime Battle Page 12 Original Art (Marvel, 1965): Here's to "Sturdy" Steve Ditko, who polished up another show-stopping Silver Age masterpiece, in this peerless page from the Stan Lee story, “The Clown and His Masters of Menace.” This page, purchased for $25 in the 1970s, beat Heritage’s previous high price realized for a page of Ditko art by fully $5,000. Realized: $44,813.
 
Jack Kirby and Paul Reinman X-Men #1 Page 7 Original Art (Marvel, 1963): One of Heritage’s best results for a Kirby panel page. From the hallowed halls of the House of Ideas comes this historic masterpiece of X-Men art - from the story that astonished comic fans everywhere - the first appearance, and origin of what eventually grew to become the world's most exciting superhero team. Realized: $43,819.
 
Dave Gibbons Watchmen #5 Rorschach Dons His Mask Page 18 Original Art (DC, 1987): “This relentless world: there is only one response to it…” One of the key players in the Watchman saga, Rorschach, discusses his origins with the prison psychiatrist in this classic flashback sequence. This great, self-contained and symmetrically designed (not to mention hair-raising) page by writer Alan Moore and ace artist Dave Gibbons features the ultimate vigilante suiting up for battle. Realized: $16,730.
 
Heritage Auctions, headed by Steve Ivy, Jim Halperin and Greg Rohan, is the world’s third largest auction house, with annual sales more than $800 million, and 700,000+ online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and gain access to a complete record of prices realized, along with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com.
 
Want to get the up-to-the-minute updates and breaking news stories about Heritage Auctions? Get them as they happen at: www.Twitter.com/HeritageAuction; Facebook: www.HA.com/Facebook.To view a complete archive of Heritage press releases go to: HA.com/PR. To link to this press release on your blog or Website: HA.com/PR-2165.

Arts and Antiques at Don Presley March 3

ORANGE, Calif. - Southern California’s finest estates continue to yield their treasures to Don Presley, whose March 3rd “Once in a Lifetime” auction of antiques, art and collectibles includes an exciting array of genuinely unique items.

The first of the one-of-a-kind entries in the sale is an incredible photorealistic Italian micromosaic artwork depicting the Roman Forum and its surrounding landscape. Composed of thousands of pieces of hand-laid miniature pieces of glass, the circa-1870s artwork was executed in the manner of Vatican master mosaicist Cesare Roccheggiani. Artworks of this type were created for noblemen and wealthy aristocrats visiting Rome during their Grand Tour of Europe. Each commissioned work was painstakingly crafted and reflected the artist’s own impression of the subject, just as though it were a painting. One of four antique micromosaics included in Presley’s sale, it measures 11¾ by 14¼ inches and is estimated at $15,000-$25,000.

The second unquestionably unique item in Presley’s sale is a remarkable mid-19th-century sultan’s photo album containing pictures of his concubine, as well as other people and views of Constantinople.

For several decades the album was the property of the Scottish Rite Museum in Los Angeles. It comes with a signed letter from the person who donated it to the Scottish Rite Temple for its archives. The letter reads: "While on duty with the Navy for 2 1/2 years (1919 to 1921) in Constantinople, an assistant postmaster gave me this album as we were jointly working, photographing mosques and other places of interest in that area. The original photographer is, of course, unknown. Originally the album was probably in the archives of the sultans, as the gold insignia on the cover is the Official Seal of the Sultan…Photos 19 to 40 are priceless, as photographically they are what is known as the "wet plate" process in which the photographer would wet a sheet of glass with collodion, put it in the camera and take the picture as soon as possible thereafter, but the edges of the plate would dry, leaving a reticulation on the outer edges, which are the "fingerprints" of the wet plate process.” The writer goes on to explain that the wet plate process was abandoned after the so-called dry plate process was invented in 1880.

“This photo album has to be seen to be believed,” said Don Presley. “I can’t imagine there is another one like it in the world.” Its presale estimate is $6,000-$10,000.

Another deaccession from the Scottish Rite Museum is a metallic tapestry that was donated to the fraternal organization around 1900. Woven with silver and gold threads, it is decorated with arcane Masonic or possibly Knights Templar symbols including a skull and bones, stonemasonry tools, a handshake, and a pentagram overlaid with a diamond.

“This tapestry is a mystery. We can’t identify some of the symbols. It may have been a burial shroud, as it does not appear that it was ever hung,” said Presley. “We showed it to a museum curator who said he thinks it’s 300 to 400 years old, and to an expert dealer who sells only the highest quality of textiles. He said he has never seen anything like it before and that it is a minimum of 200 years old.” Estimate: $15,000-$25,000.

These three very special items offer a mere taste of what lies in wait on March 3rd at Don Presley’s gallery. The sale also includes fine paintings by listed artists, Chinese ivory carvings, an elaborately carved Chinese brush pot, and an ivory, jade and coral screen. An exceptional pair of late-19th-century Chinese cloisonné elephants, 22½ inches tall, are entered in the sale with a $12,000-$25,000 estimate.

Among the porcelain highlights are an exquisite Sevres center bowl with candelabra, est. $15,000-$25,000; a 19th-century German KPM hand-painted portrait plaque, $6,500-$8,000; and two outstanding Royal Vienna productions - a vase, $9,000-$15,000; and a covered urn, $4,500-$6,000.

An Affortunato Gory (French/Italian, 1895-1925) gilt bronze and ivory Art Deco sculpture carries a $7,000-$9,000 estimate, while a bronze and marble bust is expected to make $7,000-$10,000. A signed Eugene Bernoud gilt bronze and ivory figure of the goddess Athena is estimated at $4,000-$6,000.

Following in the footsteps of other Tiffany & Co. timepieces that have brought outstanding prices at Presley’s, an ornate Tiffany wall clock commissioned by a hotel in St. Louis measures 47 inches long. It is estimated at $15,000-$25,000.

The auction also includes two French Erard harps, $12,000-$20,000 each; a pair of Art Deco club chairs from the RMS Queen Mary, a mother-of-pearl inlaid papier-mache table with two chairs, and a wealth of other high-end antiques and artworks from some of the West Coast’s finest homes and estates.

The auction will commence at 12 noon Pacific Time on Saturday, March 3, 2012. Preview Mon.-Sat. 10-5. The gallery is located at 1319 W. Katella Ave., Orange, CA 92867. All forms of bidding will be available, including live at the gallery, by phone, absentee or live via the Internet through LiveAuctioneers.com. For additional information, call Don Presley at 714-633-2437 or e-mail info@donpresleyauction.com. View the catalog at www.LiveAuctioneers.com or on the Presley website at www.donpresleyauction.com.

Chicago, Illinois - February 2012 - Leslie Hindman Auctioneers, one of the nation’s leading fine art auction firms, announces the February opening of a new auction facility in Denver, Colorado. The office is located in Denver’s Golden Triangle, 960 Cherokee Street, situated just blocks away from the Denver Art Museum and the new Clyfford Still Museum. Leslie Hindman Auctioneers has been in expansion mode over the past two years opening salerooms in Naples, Palm Beach, Milwaukee, Denver and coming soon to New Orleans.

“The current market is creating the perfect environment for the expansion of our firm,” says Leslie Hindman, CEO/President of the firm bearing her name.  “People are interested in selling their valuable personal property in an effort to raise capital or retire debt.  Additionally, the influence of the global art market and strong prices realized have resulted in consecutive record years for our company.”  “We are delighted to better serve our clients in the West and Southwest, both buyers and sellers, by being available and in closer proximity” says Jim Sharp, Director of Regional Offices.

The Anne S. and Robert E. Clay Collection of Native American Art is scheduled to go on the block at Leslie Hindman Auctioneers’ Denver saleroom on March 11, 2012. The sale will include over 300 lots of Pueblo pottery, Navajo rugs and Southwestern jewelry.   Mr. and Mrs. Clay were active members of the Douglas Society at the Denver Art Museum.  Over the years the Clays made donations from their collection to the Denver Art Museum, The Wheelwright Museum in Santa Fe and made loans to other institutions in the area.

The Denver office representatives, Maron Hindman and Annie McLagan, both worked previously with Leslie Hindman Auctioneers in Chicago.  Ms. McLagan was a Director of Salvage One in 1984-1995, then the largest antique architectural salvage company in America and owned by Leslie Hindman.  Ms. McLagan relocated to Denver with her family.  She has been involved as the representative for Leslie Hindman Auctioneers since then.  Maron Hindman was the Director of Marketing at Leslie Hindman Auctioneers in Chicago from 1988-1996 before relocating to Denver in 2010.

The Denver facility will be fully supported by Hindman’s specialists in each department including: Fine Art, Jewelry and Timepieces, Books and Manuscripts, Asian Works of Art, Furniture and Decorative Arts and Vintage Couture and Accessories. The saleroom will hold three auctions a year and regular appraisal appointments. To view information on the forthcoming auction and appraisal schedule, please visit www.lesliehindman.com.

About Leslie Hindman Auctioneers
For three decades, Leslie Hindman Auctioneers has been an industry leader combining recognition as one of the nation’s foremost fine art auctioneers with a global base of buyers. Founded in 1982, sold to Sotheby’s in 1997 and reopened in 2003, Leslie Hindman has remained a constant force behind high profile auctions of everything from contemporary paintings and fine jewelry to French furniture and rare books and manuscripts, and always achieves the highest prices while maintaining the highest levels of integrity and 
customer service.

FALLS CHURCH, Va. - In order to meet the demands of Washington, D.C.’s booming market for art and antiques, Quinn’s Auction Galleries has relocated to a more spacious venue in the heart of suburban Falls Church. The new 14,400-sq.-ft. premises at 360 S. Washington St. encompass three floors, with the gallery and reception area at street level, the Fine Arts department on the second floor, and executive/administrative offices on floor three. Goods to be offered in future sales are stored at a secure offsite warehouse.
 
“Having dedicated areas available for each aspect of the business has streamlined our operation. We really need the extra room, because we’ve never been this busy before,” said Quinn’s Vice President Matthew Quinn. In addition to cataloged auctions of fine and decorative art and antiques, Quinn’s conducts regular Wednesday night auctions. Its sister auction company, Waverly Rare Books, is also headquartered at the new location.
 
The South Washington Street gallery is technically Quinn’s third address since opening for business in 1995. Co-founded by Matthew’s father, antique dealer Paul Quinn, and elder brother David, Quinn’s was originally based in a building on Maple Street in Falls Church. Father and son #1 started out hosting monthly auctions but soon progressed to holding weekly sales that attracted both collectors and the trade.
 
Matthew had joined the family business, which was on an upswing when, in 2001, tragedy struck. A 6-alarm electrical fire swept through Quinn’s warehouse premises, leaving the business in total ruin and with losses approaching $3 million.
 
“We refused to be disheartened,” Matthew Quinn said. “We agreed that we had to rebuild, and immediately started drawing up plans for how the new layout should look.”
 
The community of Falls Church loved the local auction house that sold world-class antiques, and supported the reconstruction effort. “Thanks to the understanding people at Jennings - who owned our burned-out building - the City of Falls Church, and Marriott, who allowed us to continue doing business under a tent on a piece of land they owned, Quinn’s Auction Galleries soldiered on,” Quinn said.
 
Six months and three days after the fire, the Quinns returned to their newly rebuilt facility to conduct a grand re-opening and fundraiser benefiting the city’s firefighters and the Community Foundation for the National Capital Region.
 
With a new space, a new look and a renewed sense of confidence, the Quinn triumvirate acquired Waverly’s, a respected auction company specializing in books, maps and manuscripts; and adopted new technology - Internet live bidding - which multiplied their annual revenues to a peak figure of $4 million. At around the same time, Washington lost its century-old auction house Sloan’s, which left a sizable market share open to Quinn’s. Thus began Quinn’s ascent to the next level: national recognition.
 
“Since then, we’ve more than doubled our annual revenue and expanded our very loyal following. The move to the new venue is the next step forward for us and will enable us to keep up with Washington’s demand for an estate-oriented fine art and antiques auction house,” said Quinn. “The nation’s capital is a sweet spot for ‘old money’ estates, diplomats’ residences and the homes of other people with very good taste who are now at a stage of their lives where it makes sense to downsize. The treasures just keep on coming, and we’re ready for them.”
 
Quinn’s Auction Galleries and Waverly Rare Books are located at 360 S. Washington St., Falls Church, VA 22046. Tel. 532-5632, e-mail info@quinnsauction.com. Online: www.quinnsauction.com.
 
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[ITHACA, NY] National Book Auctions, located in Ithaca, NY, hosted a Sunday, February 19th auction featuring a broad range of rare antique books, as well as an intriguing assortment of ephemera and artwork. Of particular note were rare first editions of early and modern titles, many of which were signed. This 474-lot auction also featured two important bronze sculptures and Major League Baseball collectibles.

A limited edition sculpture by Erte brought a hammer price of $5400.00 (including buyer’s premium). This sculpture depicts The Three Graces of beauty, charm and elegance. It is one of a collection of 18 pieces entitled "Erte: Image in Bronze." This edition was produced and distributed by Fine Art Acquisitions Ltd. of New York, and is number 311 of 375.

Realizing a hammer price of $2952.00 (including buyer’s premium) was a complete six-volume set by Henry Fielding titled “The History of Tom Jones, a Foundling.” This handsome antique set is bound in full leather binding with raised bands, gilt lettering, and ornamentation.

A complete 36-volume set titled “Library of the Civil War” sold for $1291.50 (including buyer’s premium). This deluxe edition of the history of the Civil War contains contributions by many eminent historians. Some of its contents include a biography of Robert E. Lee, the personal memoirs of Ulysses E. Grant, and Jefferson Davis’ “The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government.” This set is bound in handsome blue leather, with gilt tooling.

Bringing a hammer price of $1020.00 (including buyer’s premium) was an original oil painting on canvas painting by Charles D. Hunt. This painting depicts a view of the small New England town of Middlebury, Vermont from an elevation, with pastoral scene in foreground and several houses and churches at center. This well preserved painting is housed in a gilt frame, and features the artist’s original signature.

National Book Auctions is a public auction service specializing in books, ephemera, and art. National Book Auctions is a targeted service offering experience and expertise unique to marketing antique and modern books and ephemera for consignors and collectors alike. Preview for the upcoming Sunday, March 18th auction is at 10 a.m. and the live auction starts at noon. For more information or to consign collectible material please contact David Hall, Business Manager, at 607-269-0101 or email mail@nationalbookauctions.com.
AMHERST, NH -- RR Auction is proud to announce their first Civil War auction in March. This compelling array of more than 450 items that offer an intensely comprehensive look into some of the key figures in our country’s most bloody conflict; letters, photos, and exemplary artifacts meld together to tell the harrowing story of our nation’s most defining war. Esteemed notables such as Abraham Lincoln, U. S. Grant, Jefferson Davis, “Stonewall” Jackson, Robert E. Lee, Mary Todd Lincoln, and the assassin who sealed the crushing, woeful fate of one of America’s most beloved presidents, John Wilkes Booth, have all been drawn together, once again, to tell their story.

While the nation watched, helpless and desperate, as countless sons and daughters were swallowed up by the atrocities of war, tragedy of the starkest kind struck the White House; Willie Lincoln succumbed to typhoid fever. Devastation overcame the Lincolns, and, accompanied by its black-bordered mailing envelope, addressed in Mary Todd’s own hand and free-franked by president “A. Lincoln,” the First Lady expresses the overwhelming grip that has clutched her family in a letter dated May 5, 1862.

After the first shots were fired at Fort Sumter, the nation was plunged head-long into the grueling war between the states. Just six days after that fateful attack, Jefferson Davis, the newly-appointed Provisional President of the Confederate States, writes in gratitude on April 18, 1861, acknowledging the support of South Carolina’s leading role as the first secessionist state: “I have the pleasure of receiving your letter of the 9th inst enclosing a copy of a Resolution, passed by the Convention of the people of South Carolina.”

The greatest military tactician of the Civil War, Thomas J. “Stonewall” Jackson, exacted his terror on Union forces through this very battle order, dispatched to General Richard Ewell, stating, “This will place you within two days march of either Swift Run Gap or Fisherville Gap. You had better have five days rations with you…The move in Fredericksburg was probably designed to prevent reinforcements being sent to me.” This genius maneuver enabled Ewell to mislead Union forces, allowing for Jackson’s undetected strike on the unsuspecting Yankee troops, resulting in Jackson’s first victory of the campaign.

As the creation of carte-de-visite photographs emerged during the Civil War era, people became obsessed with collecting those of presidents and other celebrities, making the acquisition and display of such images an immensely popular phenomenon. Robert E. Lee, Commanding Officer of all Confederate forces, made a practice of mainly signing half-bust carte-de-visite photos of himself, rarely ever laying a pen to full-length portraits. But the general made an exception, signing a larger, oval Vannerson image, featuring a rare, full pose of Lee in dress uniform and presentation sword, which he signed “R. E. Lee” for the admiring ladies of Baltimore, Maryland. Another exceptional photo, a traditional carte-de-visite widely heralded as one of the greatest of the president, captures Lincoln seated at a table with a copy of the Washington Daily Morning Chronicle in hand, boldly signed, “A. Lincoln,” compliments of skilled photographer, Alexander Gardner.

John Wilkes Booth, the ultimate performer, both on and off stage, pens a gorgeously large and florid signature on a letter written to Joseph Simonds, a man who would later be implicated as an unkowing partner in a Lincoln kidnapping plot. Speaking of his current theatre tour in November of 1861, Booth reference’s Lincoln’s favorite actress, Maggie Mitchell: “After here Monday night, 25th, they count high on me but I am doubtful as to my success. Maggie Mitchel is playing a good engagement here.” Booth made no attempts to hide his vehement disdain for Lincoln and his war on slavery, and after carrying out the heinous assassination on April 14,1865, he took his performance to the stage of the Ford Theatre, exclaiming “Sic semper tyrannis! The South is avenged!”
 
This exceptional arrangement of Confederate and Union memorabilia, including pieces from George Custer, J. E. B. Stuart, William T. Sherman, and George B. McClellan, plus an array of uncommon Civil War-era weapons and other artifacts will be available for bidding March 15 - March 22. A preview will be available beginning Friday, March 24th. For additional details, go to rrauction.com.

ABOUT RR AUCTION
For more than 30 years, RR Auction has offered collectors more than 1,250 quality, fully guaranteed signed items each month, including photos, documents, letters, and books from a variety of categories.

"The Best Book Fair in the World” Returns to the Park Avenue Armory for its 52nd Year, April 13-15, 2012.

HOURS
Friday, noon - 8pm Saturday, noon - 7pm Sunday, noon - 5pm
Preview, Thursday, April 12, 5pm - 9pm tickets $35

ABOUT THE FAIR:
Declared by the late Andy Rooney of CBS’ 60 Minutes as the “Best Book Fair in the World,” the New York Antiquarian Book Fair returns to the Park Avenue Armory for its 52nd Anniversary. Sponsored by the prestigious Antiquarian Booksellers’ Association of America and the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers, the 52nd Annual New York Antiquarian Book Fair promises to be our best exhibit to date. Over 200 expert dealers from all over the world will fill the historic Park Avenue Armory with rare books, illuminating manuscripts, autographs, maps, and finely bound volumes. Books ranging from history, law, philosophy, to children’s books, fashion, art, and more can be found with a wide price range. This year’s show features a record number of dealers. There’s sure to be something for everyone.

UPDATES:
Follow us on twitter (@SLSfairs), our blog (sanfordLsmith.wordpress.com), or our website (sanfordsmith.com) for the most up-to-date news about the fair and its exhibitors.

PREVIEW:
The first chance to view merchandise and make purchases will be at the preview, Thursday, April 12 from 5pm - 9pm.

Tickets are available for $35 and may be purchased at the door.

DISCOVERY DAY:
A favorite tradition, Discovery Day gives visitors, with admission, the opportunity to bring their own rare books, manuscripts, maps, etc. (up to 5 items) for advice and free appraisals from Exhibitors on Sunday, April 15, from noon - 3pm.

PUBLIC INFO:
The New York Antiquarian Book Fair will take place at the Park Avenue Armory at 67th Street, NYC, April 13 - 15, 2012. Hours are Friday from noon to 8pm, Saturday from noon to 7pm, and Sunday from noon to 5pm. A café and bar will be open during show hours. Admission is $20 daily, $30 for a two-day pass, or $45 for a run-of-show pass. Special rates for students, groups and library associations are available. The Park Avenue Armory is wheelchair accessible; please call 212.777.5218 to make arrangements. Contact emily@sanfordsmith.com or press@sanfordsmith.com for more information.

www.sanfordsmith.com www.abaa.org
Washington, D.C.—This summer, The Phillips Collection presents an outstanding selection of works on paper by two of the most critically acclaimed artists working today, Jasper Johns and Antony Gormley. Jasper Johns: Variations on a Theme, the first exhibition of Johns’s work at the Phillips, traces the celebrated American artist’s investigations in printmaking with 90 iconic works created from 1960 to today. Antony Gormley: Drawing Space is the first major U.S. exhibition of drawings by the British artist best known for sculpture, installation, and public projects. Both exhibitions are on view at the Phillips, June 2 through Sept. 9, 2012.
 
JASPER JOHNS: VARIATIONS ON A THEME

     One of the foremost printmakers of the modern era, Jasper Johns revolutionized the field with innovations in lithography, intaglio, silkscreen, and lead relief. For more than five decades, he has tested the medium’s boundaries, reinventing the same subjects in endless variations. This exhibition features these groundbreaking examples—targets, American flags, numbers, and other subjects, including newer motifs like hand gestures from American Sign Language.
   
     “Jasper Johns’s persistent experimentation not only transformed printmaking but set the standard for contemporary art,” says Phillips Director Dorothy Kosinski. “A champion of visionary American artists since 1921, the Phillips is proud to present over five decades of Johns’s graphic achievements, including our own The Critic Sees (1967). We are deeply grateful to the John and Maxine Belger Family Foundation whose collaboration makes a project on this scale possible.”
 
     The exhibition spans Johns’s entire printmaking career, beginning with his first experiments and culminating in 2011. In 1960, Universal Limited Art Editions (ULAE) founding director Tatyana Grosman encouraged Johns to work on lithographic stones, and he completed five prints and began his celebrated 0-9 series. Inspired, Johns saw printmaking as a vehicle to transform ideas already developed in painting, drawing, and sculpture.
 
     Johns’s collaborations with master printers, including those at ULAE in New York and Gemini G.E.L. in Los Angeles, were essential to his work. They empowered him to test methods unprecedented in the history of the medium. He said: “It’s the printmaking techniques that interest me . . . the technical innovation possible.” Six ingenious lead relief prints realized at Gemini G.E.L. from 1969 to 1970 are featured in the exhibition.

     Johns mines art history, including his own work, to repeat and vary motifs. Fragments-According to What (1971) excavates six details from his 1964 painting, According to What. The exhibition brings together all six prints from this important series. In 1976, Johns partnered with writer Samuel Beckett on the book Foirades/Fizzles. Its 33 etchings by Johns and five text fragments by Beckett are on view with other significant works, including the 1st Etchings portfolio (1968), Corpse and Mirror (1976), The Seasons (1980s), Green Angel (1990s), and his most recent Shrinky Dink series (2011), layered with imagery from letters to fragmented cubist forms.

     Jasper Johns: Variations on a Theme is organized by The Phillips Collection in collaboration with the John and Maxine Belger Family Foundation.
 
ABOUT THE ARTIST

     A central figure in modern and contemporary art, Jasper Johns’s work is represented in nearly every major museum collection and has been the subject of one-person exhibitions throughout the world. Born in Georgia in 1930 and raised in South Carolina, Johns grew up wanting to be an artist. He moved to New York City in his 20s and emerged as a force in the American art scene in 1958 with a solo show at Leo Castelli Gallery from which the Museum of Modern Art purchased three pieces. For 50 years Johns has challenged the possibilities of printmaking, painting, and sculpture, laying the groundwork for a wide range of experimental artists. He represented the United States at the Venice Biennale in 1988 and was awarded the Grand Prix. President Barack Obama awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2011. Johns currently lives and works in Sharon, Conn., and the Caribbean island of Saint Martin.
 
ANTONY GORMLEY: DRAWING SPACE

     Antony Gormley: Drawing Space is the first major U.S. exhibition of drawings by the critically acclaimed British artist, following the recent presentation of his drawings at the Museo d’Arte Contemporane Roma (MACRO) in 2010, as well as the British Museum, London, in 2002. Known for sculpture, installation, and public artworks that investigate the relationship of the body to space, Gormley is also an exquisite draftsman. The exhibition introduces a wide array of works on paper that span the artist’s nearly-40-year career with a selection of recent sculpture, emphasizing the intrinsic link between the two media.
 
     “The Phillips is thrilled to introduce Antony Gormley to American audiences as a graphic artist and examine closely the evolution of his process,” says Dorothy Kosinski. “His work pushes us to consider art’s central role in the human experience, a value shared by our founder Duncan Phillips who believed in art’s power to transform the world.”
 
     Drawing has always been a core part of Gormley’s practice. Often made at night, these works are spontaneous, direct, and exploit unusual materials such as burnt chicory, prickly pear cactus juice, earth, casein, and copper sulphate. They investigate the human form and its connection to natural and architectural surroundings. Although he usually uses his own body as the subject for his work, Gormley addresses collective experience and memory. Early on, Gormley used drawing to develop ideas for his sculpture, but these works have evolved to show a range and intensity beyond the purpose of studies. His recent drawings are as direct as any yet made; high-energy scratches on pigment-soaked paper, which activate the viewer’s space.
 
     Antony Gormley: Drawing Space is organized by The Phillips Collection.
 
ABOUT THE ARTIST

     Antony Gormley was born in London in 1950. He studied archaeology, anthropology, and art history at Trinity College, Cambridge (1968-71), and Buddhist meditation in India and Sri Lanka (1971-4), experiences that profoundly inform his art. Gormley’s work has been exhibited at premier museums in England, Demark, Sweden, Germany, China, Mexico, and Russia. His major public works include Angel of the North (Gateshead, England), Another Place (Crosby Beach, Liverpool), Event Horizon (New York), Habitat (Anchorage), and Exposure (Lelystad, Netherlands). Gormley was awarded the Turner Prize in 1994, a South Bank Prize for Visual Art in 1999, and the Bernhard Heiliger Award for Sculpture in 2007. He was made an Officer of the British Empire in 1997 and is an Honorary Fellow of the Royal Institute of British Architects, Trinity College, and Jesus College, Cambridge. Gormley has been a Royal Academician since 2003 and a British Museum Trustee since 2007.
 
ABOUT THE PHILLIPS COLLECTION

     The Phillips Collection is one of the world’s most distinguished collections of impressionist and modern American and European art. Stressing the continuity between art of the past and present, it offers a strikingly original and experimental approach to modern art by combining works of different nationalities and periods in displays that change frequently. The setting is similarly unconventional, featuring small rooms, a domestic scale, and a personal atmosphere. Artists represented in the collection include Pierre-Auguste Renoir, Vincent van Gogh, Edgar Degas, Henri Matisse, Pierre Bonnard, Paul Cézanne, Pablo Picasso, Paul Klee, Claude Monet, Honoré Daumier, Georgia O’Keeffe, Arthur Dove, Mark Rothko, Milton Avery, Jacob Lawrence, and Richard Diebenkorn, among others. The Phillips Collection, America’s first museum of modern art, has an active collecting program and regularly organizes acclaimed special exhibitions, many of which travel internationally. The Intersections series features projects by contemporary artists, responding to art and spaces in the museum. The Phillips also produces award-winning education programs for K-12 teachers and students, as well as for adults. The museum’s Center for the Study of Modern Art explores new ways of thinking about art and the nature of creativity, through artist visits and lectures, and provides a forum for scholars through courses, postdoctoral fellowships, and internships. Since 1941, the museum has hosted Sunday Concerts in its wood-paneled Music Room. The Phillips Collection is a private, non-government museum, supported primarily by donations.

VISITOR INFORMATION

     The Phillips Collection is located in the heart of Washington’s historic Dupont Circle neighborhood, at 1600 21st Street, NW, near the Dupont Circle Metro (Q Street exit). Museum hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.; Thursdays until 8:30 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. Closed Mondays and New Year’s Day, Independence Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve, and Christmas Day.
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The British Library publishes the first detective novel…The Notting Hill Mystery

‘Is that chain one of purely accidental coincidence, or does it point with terrible certainty to a series of crimes, in their nature and execution too horrible to contemplate?’ - Ralph Henderson, narrator

The British Library has today published The Notting Hill Mystery by Charles Felix, widely considered to be the first detective novel ever published. Originally serialised between 1862 and 1863 in the magazine Once a Week and then published as a single volume in 1863, The Notting Hill Mystery has not been commercially available since then, until now.

For years, many considered the first detective novel to be Wilkie Collins’s The Moonstone, published in 1868, while others have proposed Emile Gaboriau’s first Monsieur Lecoq novel, L’Affaire Lerouge. However, The Notting Hill Mystery can truly claim to be the first modern detective novel and pre-dates both of these by several years.

Presented in the form of diary entries, family letters, chemical analysis reports, interviews with witnesses and a crime scene map, the novel displays innovative techniques that would not become common features of detective fiction until the 1920s.

The Notting Hill Mystery features insurance investigator, Ralph Henderson, who is building a case against the sinister Baron ‘R___’, suspected of murdering his wife in order to obtain significant life insurance payments. During his methodical investigation, Henderson encounters a maze of intrigue including a diabolical mesmerist, kidnapping by gypsies, slow-poisoners, a rich uncle’s will and three murders.

The British Library has made this landmark text available once again in a trade edition. This new edition also includes George du Maurier’s illustrations, the first edition to do so since the original publication in serial form.

The Notting Hill Mystery is published by the British Library Publishing, 21 February 2012, price £8.99 / ISBN 9780712358590, 198 x 130 mm, 312 pages http://publishing.bl.uk/

The Notting Hill Mystery is available to buy from the British Library shop www.bl.uk/shop (T +44 (0)20 7412 7735 / email bl_shop@bl.uk )

DALLAS, TX - Heritage Auctions’ website, HA.com, proved itself the dominant online auction source last month, obliterating its competition with nearly 725,000 unique visitors to Heritage Auctions site in the first month of 2012, according to Compete.com, a website devoted to tracking web traffic. Compete.com ranked HA.com as one of the top 3,000 sites in America (there are over 150,000,000 American web sites) at #2,967.
 
“Our exact number of unique visitors last month was actually 724,931,” said James Halperin, Co-Chairman of Heritage Auctions, “No other major auction house came close to those numbers.”
 
The total number of unique visitors to HA.com is nearly double the combined total number of unique visits the websites of Heritage Auctions’ five closest competitors’ web sites (Christies ranked as #9093, Sothebys #36,342, Bonhams #36,363, Stacks & Bowers #154,997 and Phillips De Pury #244,256) received in the last 12 months. Christies.com, was the closest, with just more than 238,000 unique visitors:
 
http://siteanalytics.compete.com/ha.com/
http://siteanalytics.compete.com/christies.com/
http://siteanalytics.compete.com/sothebys.com/
http://siteanalytics.compete.com/bonhams.com/
http://siteanalytics.compete.com/stacksbowers.com/
http://siteanalytics.compete.com/phillipsdepury.com.com/
 
“We put a tremendous amount of research and time into making our website comprehensive, customer friendly and easily accessible,” said Halperin. “Collectors, historians and art aficionados alike have responded with great enthusiasm. We’re humbled and grateful for that support and will continue to strive to make HA.com one of the most useful sites on the web.”
 
Heritage Auctions, headed by Steve Ivy, Jim Halperin and Greg Rohan, is the world’s third largest auction house, with annual sales more than $800 million, and 700,000+ online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and gain access to a complete record of prices realized, along with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com.
 
Want to get the up-to-the-minute updates and breaking news stories about Heritage Auctions? Get them as they happen at: www.Twitter.com/HeritageAuction; Facebook: www.HA.com/Facebook.To view a complete archive of Heritage press releases go to: HA.com/PR. To link to this press release on your blog or Website: HA.com/PR-2163.
Pasadena, Calif. (February 16, 2012) Drawing rave reviews from exhibitors and visitors alike, the 45th California International Antiquarian Book Fair concluded on February 12 at the Pasadena Convention Center.   The Southern California edition of the ABAA (Antiquarian Booksellers' Association of America) Book Fair logged its highest attendance numbers since 2002 with dealers reporting strong sales.
 
The Book Fair's new Pasadena venue afforded booksellers a bright and spacious setting in which to display their treasures and put visiting dealers and fairgoers in close proximity to the world-class dining and cultural attractions for which the city is famous.
 
"We are thrilled that our move to Pasadena has proved such a success," said Michael R. Thompson, Book Fair Chair of the Southern California Chapter of the ABAA. "It's particularly gratifying to hear from booksellers who say they loved the new venue and hope that we will return in future years."
 
More than 200 members of the ABAA and the International League of Antiquarian Booksellers (ILAB) from 24 states, the District of Columbia, Australia, Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Great Britain, Italy and the Netherlands exhibited in Pasadena.
 
The Book Fair took advantage of the move to Pasadena to establish a partnership with the Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens in nearby San Marino. Ticket sales from the first day of the Book Fair benefited the Huntington and Fair tickets gave attendees free admission to the Huntington.
 
The Book Fair also included an exciting special exhibit and slate of talks and seminars that attracted standing-room only audiences.  "A Love Affair with Books: Personal Stories of Noted Collectors" was a colorful, wide-ranging exhibit examining the avid pursuits of rare book collectors past and present -- from legendary library builders such as Henry Huntington and William Andrews Clark to contemporary Southern California book lovers including actress Sarah Michelle Gellar and Oscar-winning producer Tony Bill. Bill joined fellow collectors Mary Murphy and Los Angeles Times film critic Kenneth Turan at a panel moderated by Los Angeles Times columnist, author and TV/radio personality Patt Morrison. The Bibliographical Society of America sponsored a talk by Library of Congress Chief of the Rare Books and Special Collections Division Mark Dimunation.
 
Kicking off the Book Fair, exhibitors received a warm welcome at an evening reception sponsored by DeWitt Stern set in the magnificent courtyard garden of the Pacific Asia Museum -- one the nation's foremost institutions dedicated to the arts and culture of Asia and the Pacific Islands.
 
The Book Fair's move to the Pasadena Convention Center also proved a boon to nearby hotels and restaurants.  Together the Hilton and Sheraton racked up close to 800 room nights from visiting dealers and attendees. Out-of-town collectors from as far away as New Hampshire and Texas made the Book Fair the centerpiece of a mini-vacation to Pasadena.
 
Recognized as one of the world's largest and most prestigious exhibitions of antiquarian books, the California Antiquarian Book Fair is an annual event that alternates between Southern and Northern California. The next Book Fair will take place in San Francisco on February 15 - 17, 2013 at the Concourse Exhibition Center. For more information, visit www.labookfair.com. Connect with the Book Fair at http://twitter.com/labookfairorhttp://www.facebook.com/LABookFair.
 
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New York, NY, February 16, 2012— Animals have provided a particularly fertile source of inspiration for artists, writers, and composers for centuries. From the carving of ancient seals with fearsome lions and mythical beasts, to the depiction of the serpent in representations of Biblical scenes by such luminaries as Albrecht Dürer, to more recent portrayals of endearing animal figures in children's stories, such as Babar and Winnie the Pooh, animals are everywhere. Beginning March 2, The Morgan Library & Museum will explore the representation of animals—as symbols, muses, moral teachers, talking creatures, and beloved companions—in eighty works of art, demonstrating the varied roles animals have played in the hands of some of the most renowned artists represented in the Morgan's collections. In the Company of Animals: Art, Literature, and Music at the Morgan will run through May 20.



"Animals abound in art, literature, and music," said William M. Griswold, director of The Morgan Library & Museum. "Whether it is Albrecht Dürer's iconic Adam and Eve, Edgar Allen Poe's unforgettable "The Raven," or such seminal stories from our childhood as Jean de Brunhoff's Babar and E.B. White's The Trumpet of the Swan, artists have employed animals throughout history to communicate important ideas and themes. In the Company of Animals takes the visitor on a delightful and informative tour of some the greatest of these works from the Morgan's superlative collections."




SYMBOLS


"Hope" is the thing with feathers—
That perches in the soul—
— Emily Dickinson

Animals are not always simply animals. They can represent gods, saints, myths, sins, temperaments, emotions, and ideas. Since ancient times, artists have repeatedly turned to animals to address eternal questions of life and meaning. 


The oldest work in the exhibition, a Mesopotamian cylinder seal used to make an impression when rolled over damp clay, is datable about 3500—3100 BC. Lions prowl across the surface of the inch-high engraved stone, symbolizing the potential chaos of the natural world. Order is restored, however, by the one-eyed hero who grasps two lions upside-down. His domination over such feared creatures adds to his strength and power. 



The lion is one of many animals that make an appearance in Joseph Haydn's Creation, a musical evocation of God's creation of the world. The first edition on view shows the "roaring" lion, as represented by bass trills; the leaps of the "flexible tiger," by ascending runs; and the jumping of the "nimble stag," conveyed by staccato sounds reminiscent of hunting horns. Haydn, who published this first edition himself, considered Creation the "greatest work of my life."


The fall of Man as depicted in Albrecht Dürer's masterful engraving Adam and Eve, of 1504, is witnessed and aided by animals. A serpent twists itself around a branch to offer Eve the forbidden fruit as four creatures lie at the couple's feet. Though the references are obscure today, art historian Erwin Panofsky noted that an educated person in the sixteenth century would have easily recognized the moral connotations and the temperaments (or humors) associated with each animal: the elk, melancholic gloom; the rabbit, sanguine sensuality; the cat, choleric cruelty; and the ox, phlegmatic sluggishness.



Also on display is a letter in which Edgar Allen Poe sends a last minute revision of the tenth and eleventh stanzas of "The Raven" to John Augustus Shea of The New-York Daily Tribune, where the poem appeared the very next day. This revision is the earliest surviving portion of "The Raven" in the poet's hand. Poe's initial choice for his "bird of ill-omen" representing "Mournful and Never-Ending Remembrance" was a parrot. However, Poe quickly decided that the raven was "infinitely more in keeping with the intended tone" of the poem. 



When describing the connection between his work and nature, Jackson Pollock famously commented, "I am nature." Pollock's Untitled (Abstract Ram) dates about 1944, a time when the artist incorporated Jungian theories of the unconscious and imagery of the American Southwest into his work. The drawing is suggestive of a sheep-like animal with a circular horn, elongated head and muzzle, and swirls of curly wool. 




MORAL TEACHERS


But ask now the beasts, and they shall teach thee 
— Job 12:7



Foxes are considered sly, lambs gentle, and owls wise. We often make moral judgments about animal behavior, and animals have long served as stand-ins for humans in moral tales, from Aesop's fables to Animal Farm.
 

Although Aesop is credited with many of the fables we know today—The Tortoise and the Hare, for example—no writings securely attributable to the sixth-century BC Greek storyteller survive. The exhibition includes three works related to Aesop, including the earliest known manuscript of his life and fables, made in southern Italy in the tenth or eleventh century. This manuscript also contains the earliest known Greek translation of the Fables of Bidpai, animal stories of Indian origin. Also on view in the exhibition is a 1666 edition of the life and fables of Aesop, lavishly illustrated by one of the most accomplished animal and bird painters in seventeenth-century England, Francis Barlow. The displayed page depicts Aesop surrounded by adoring animals listening to one of his tales. Finally, a 1931 edition of Aesop's fables combines stories collected by the seventeenth-century English author Roger L'Estrange with fifty illustrations by American artist Alexander Calder.



First published in 1667, Charles Perrault's Tales from Times Past, with Morals: Tales of Mother Goose remains our source for many traditional fairy tales. Though fairy tales had been told for centuries, Perrault was the first to have them written down and published. On display is the manuscript page and illustration that tells the tale of Puss in Boots, who uses his industriousness and wits to help his penniless owner marry a princess. 




TALKING CREATURES


"An animal is something you feel like talking to."
— A child's definition of an animal (1951)



Storytellers have long used talking animals to highlight human foibles. Unlike the animals in fables and fairy tales, which maintain their animal characteristics, the talking creatures in this section of the exhibition blur the distinction between animal and human.



George Orwell had a difficult time finding a publisher for Animal Farm, his tale of a utopia gone wrong, at the end of WWII. As Orwell himself noted, "the fable does follow...so completely the progress of the Russian Soviets and their two dictators, that it can apply only to Russia...." He further surmised, "it would be less offensive if the predominant caste in the fable were not pigs." A first edition of the novel (eventually published in 1945) shows Orwell's original subtitle, Animal Farm: A Fairy Story. 



A life-long equestrian, Anna Sewell was appalled by the way horses, especially working horses, were often treated by their owners. She said that her purpose in writing Black Beauty, her only novel, was "to induce kindness, sympathy, and an understanding treatment of horses." Sewell's endeavor would appear to have been successful—the novel remains one of the best-selling books of all time. According to the title page of the 1877 first edition on view, the novel is translated from the "original equine." 


"It was a dark and stormy night...." So begins every story that Snoopy, Charlie Brown's pet beagle and struggling novelist, attempts. The comic strip character was silent for two years before creator Charles M. Schulz gave him a voice. Inspired by his childhood dog Spike, Schulz decided to let Snoopy "think," noting that he had always thought there were "a lot of dogs that were smarter than their young masters." The illustration on display shows Snoopy beginning another tale.



Although a favorite among children, Jean de Brunhoff's Babar faces adult-size challenges. In his illustration for page nine of Histoire de Babar, the young elephant—not yet in his signature green suit—arrives at the edge of the city. The scene becomes melancholy when one realizes that Babar is on his own, his mother having just been killed by a hunter. 



Sometimes musical instruments, rather than words, give a character his or her voice. Included in the exhibition are the typescript and manuscript for E.B. White's The Trumpet of the Swan, a tale of a swan named Louis who, born mute, finds his voice after discovering his talents on the trumpet. White's typescript and manuscript are on view. Sergey Prokofiev completed his Peter and the Wolf—a commissioned work intended to educate young children's musical tastes—in just four days. Haunting French horns represent the wolf within the piano score on view. 




MUSES


"... endless forms most beautiful and most wonderful have been, and are being, evolved."
— Charles Darwin, Origin of Species (1859)



Animals have long served as scientific and aesthetic inspiration, sometimes simultaneously. This section presents works ranging from thirteenth-century Persia to twentieth-century America, including a number of examples from the Renaissance, when a new perspective on the natural world created a lasting interest in observing, categorizing, and understanding animals. Some works reflect journeys to distant lands, filled with strange and wonderful creatures. Others show an interest in those subjects closer to home, including depictions of rural life and domestic animals. 


Masters of the human figure, Rembrandt Harmensz. van Rijn and Peter Paul Rubens also made a number of animal sketches. Rembrandt's Forequarters of an Elephant, of about 1637, is thought to be one of several depictions of a female elephant named Hansken who traveled from Ceylon to Amsterdam in 1637. The artist paid special attention to the texture of Hansken's skin, and accurately depicted her with no tusks. Rubens's Study of a Sleeping Lion is a preparatory sketch for one of the ten lions that appear in his dramatic, large painting Daniel in the Lions' Den. 




The lion appears again in Ibn Bakhtīshū's Manafi -I hayavan, an important thirteenth-century Persian manuscript. The work describes the nature of humans, animals, birds, reptiles, fish, and insects, and also offers advice on the medicinal uses of animals. According to the text, "the tooth of a lion tied on a child makes teething easy."


In the sixteenth century when Dutch artist Jacob de Gheyn sketched his Studies of a Frog, Dragonfly, and Fantastic Bird, creatures such as the unicorn and the griffin were still believed to exist. Even Leonardo da Vinci included the occasional dragon in his sketches. Also on display is an anonymous watercolor of a lynx and recumbent unicorn from a fifteenth-century model book—an essential point of reference for medieval artists who wished to depict animals—which shows a similar pairing of reality and myth.



John James Audubon is best known for his meticulous depictions of animals, such as this preparatory study for Gray Rabbit: Old male, female, and young, which later appeared in his The Viviparous Quadrupeds of North America (1845—1848).

In addition to his published comments on rabbits' tendency to make "inroads upon the kitchen-garden, feasting on the young green peas, lettuces, cabbages, &c., and doing a great deal of mischief," Audubon also added a deeply personal note on the reverse of the drawing: "I drew this Hare during one of the days of deepest sorrow I have felt in my life, and my only solace was derived from my Labour. This morning our beloved Daughter[-in-law] Eliza died."


A celebration of pure fancy, Debussy's ballet for children, La boîte à joujoux (The Toy Box), follows a group of toys that come to life, escape from their box, fall in love, and go off on adventures. The first edition on view shows the charming illustrations of artist André Hellé, who also conceived of the story.






COMPANIONS


"Animals are such agreeable friends — 
they ask no questions, they pass no criticisms." 
— from Scenes of Clerical Life, George Eliot



What do our relationships with animals reveal about ourselves? How can we imagine and appreciate the lives of others, whether they be animal or human? The strong bond between animals and humans is explored in these works, which focus on the beloved companions of writers and artists, as well as fictional and mythological characters.


St. Francis, the patron saint of animals, is represented in an illuminated Belgian psalter dating to 1270—1280. In the page on display, St. Francis preaches to an audience of birds that reportedly did not fly away until he had finished speaking. St. Francis was said to have hoped for "an edict prohibiting anyone from catching or imprisoning my sisters the larks."



When poet Elizabeth Barrett Browning's beloved cocker spaniel, Flush, was returned after being held for ransom, he "threw himself into my arms... palpitating with joy... in that dumb inarticulate ecstasy which is so affecting... love without speech!" Browning related the story in a letter to Richard H. Horne, including a sketch of "Flushie," noting that he is "my friend—my companion—& loves me better than he loves the sunshine without." 



Virginia Woolf took up the subject of Barrett Browning's pet in Flush: a biography, in which she imagines life from the dog's perspective. In one scene, Woolf addresses a quandary of particular interest to her: that we can feel so close to an animal though it remains ultimately unknowable. She considers Flush's lack of reaction to his likeness in Barrett Browning's letter: "He could smell nothing; he could hear nothing ... The fact was that they could not communicate with words, and it was a fact that led undoubtedly to much misunderstanding. Yet did it not lead also to a peculiar intimacy?"


One hundred fifty years after Barrett Browning described her relationship with Flush, David Hockney made a similar observation about his dachshunds, Boodgie and Stanley, noting, "These two dear little creatures are my friends...I notice the shapes they make together, their sadness and their delight." Special preparations were needed for Hockney's series of drawings of his dogs: "I had to leave large sheets of paper all over the house and studio to catch them sitting or sleeping without disturbance." The drawing on view shows Boodgie and Stanley resting on a cushion, curved around one another. 



T.S. Eliot—"Old Possum" to his godchildren—published Old Possum's Book of Practical Cats in 1939 with inspiration from his own cat, Jellylorum. The idea for a book of poems about cats and their nature began with an illustrated letter from Eliot to his four-year-old godson Tam Faber. In it, he speaks of Jellylorum, whose "one idea is to be useful." He "straightens the pictures" by swinging on them and "looks into the dustbin to see that nothing's wasted." Eliot illustrated the dust jacket for the first edition on display. 


A nineteenth-century drawing by Nicolas Hüet depicts an unusual variety of companion, a giraffe known as Zarafa with her Sudanese caretaker, Atir. The giraffe was a political gift from Muhammed Ali, the Ottoman Viceroy of Egypt, to Charles X of France in an attempt to convince the King not to interfere in the war between the Ottoman Empire and the Greeks. After a two-year journey from Sudan to Paris (which included two boat rides and a 550 mile walk from Marseilles to Paris), Zarafa lived with Atir in the Jardin des Plantes for eighteen years, where he "slept within scratching reach of her head." 




PUBLIC PROGRAMS


TALK

Animalish
with Susan Orlean
Thursday, March 8, 6:30 p.m.

Noted New Yorker magazine writer and author Susan Orlean (Rin Tin Tin: The Life and the Legend, The Orchid Thief) will offer her take on living with animals and their evolving place in our lives, from the backyard to the family home. In the Company of Animals: Art, Literature, and Music at the Morgan will be open at 5:30 pm especially for program attendees. 

Tickets: $15; $10 for Members




GALLERY TALK

In the Company of Animals: Art, Literature, and Music at the Morgan
Friday, March 9, 7 p.m.

Clara Drummond, Assistant Curator, Literary and Historical Manuscripts, leads this informal tour of the exhibition.

Free




FILMS

Animated Animals

Friday, April 13, 7 p.m.

My Dog Tulip

(2009, 83 minutes)

Directors: Paul and Sandra Fierlinger

This heartwarming film follows the journey of an elderly English bachelor, an excitable German shepherd, and their very unlikely friendship. Based on J.R. Ackerley's book of the same name, My Dog Tulip features the award-winning animations of Paul Fierlinger and the voices of Christopher Plummer, Lynn Redgrave, Isabella Rossellini, and Euan Morton.



preceded by



Animal Beatbox

(2011, 3 minutes)

Director: Damon Gameau

From aardvark to zebra, this stop-motion film celebrates the wonders of the animal kingdom to an infectious beat. Made in a spare room of the director's mother's house on an impressively modest budget of $85, Animal Beatbox took top prize at the Australian short film festival Tropfest in 2011.

Free




FAMILY PROGRAM

My Book is a Beast 
Saturday, April 21, 2— p.m.
Join book artist and educator Stephanie Krause in a creative book making workshop inspired by the exhibitions In the Company of Animals: Art, Literature, and Music at the Morgan and Rembrandt's World: Dutch Drawings from the Clement C. Moore Collection. After a quick tour of the exhibitions, children will bind and decorate their own animal-shaped journals using beautiful papers and fine art materials. 

Tickets: Adults: $6; $4 for Members; $2 for Children. 




TICKETS

Available online at www.themorgan.org/public, or by calling (212) 685-0008 x560.




ORGANIZATION AND SPONSORSHIP


In the Company of Animals is organized by Clara Drummond, Assistant Curator, Literary and Historical Manuscripts.

This exhibition is supported by a generous gift from Tina Santi Flaherty, in honor of her faithful companions Jackie, a white Labrador retriever, and Scarlett, a King Charles spaniel.

Additional assistance is provided by the Janine Luke and Melvin R. Seiden Fund for Exhibitions and Publications, and by Jeannette and Jonathan P. Rosen.


The programs of The Morgan Library & Museum are made possible with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and from the New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency.

The Morgan Library & Museum

The Morgan Library & Museum began as the private library of financier Pierpont Morgan, one of the preeminent collectors and cultural benefactors in the United States. Today, more than a century after its founding in 1906, the Morgan serves as a museum, independent research library, musical venue, architectural landmark, and historic site. In October 2010, the Morgan completed the first-ever restoration of its original McKim building, Pierpont Morgan’s private library, and the core of the institution. In tandem with the 2006 expansion project by architect Renzo Piano, the Morgan now provides visitors unprecedented access to its world-renowned collections of drawings, literary and historical manuscripts, musical scores, medieval and Renaissance manuscripts, printed books, and ancient Near Eastern seals and tablets.



General Information

The Morgan Library & Museum

225 Madison Avenue, at 36th Street, New York, NY 10016-3405

212.685.0008

www.themorgan.org


Hours
Tuesday-Thursday, 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; extended Friday hours, 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; closed Mondays, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year's Day. The Morgan closes at 4 p.m. on Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve.



Admission

$15 for adults; $10 for students, seniors (65 and over), and children (under 16); free to Members and children 12 and under accompanied by an adult. Admission is free on Fridays from 7 to 9 p.m. Admission is not required to visit the Morgan Shop.

LiveAuctioneers Reports Spike in Traffic

NEW YORK (LAPRS) - LiveAuctioneers.com, the Manhattan-based provider of Internet live-bidding services to more than 1,200 auction houses worldwide, wrapped 2011 with robust 4th-quarter results.
 
During the final three months of last year, there were more than 6.8 million visits to LiveAuctioneers’ site - an 11.5% increase over the comparable quarter of 2010. Of those visits, more than half were attributable to unique visitors - 3,596,188 in all.
 
Significantly, the average amount of time spent per visit increased by 19%, and the number of site engagements that exceeded 30 minutes rose by 50.91% when compared to Q4 2010. The number of page views spiked, as well, with 64.8 million recorded in the last quarter of 2011 vis-a-vis 47.8 million page views in Q4 2010.
 
The dramatic increase in the number of people visiting online auction catalogs and placing bids via mobile devices was among the top trends noted in LiveAuctioneers’ Q4 2011 statistics.
 
“Mobile visits to LiveAuctioneers-supported auction catalogs were up nearly 180 percent in comparison to the fourth quarter of 2010. There are several reasons for this,” said LiveAuctioneers.com’s CEO, Julian R. Ellison. “People are much more comfortable with mobile devices, now. That’s one factor. Another is the mainstream acceptance of apps as a reliable and convenient means of conducting transactions via smart phones and tablets.” LiveAuctioneers.com currently offers apps for iPhone and Android; iPad and iPod Touch devices can access LiveAuctioneers through iPhone apps.
 
Another aspect of site visitation that saw a healthy boost was traffic referred from search engines. In the fourth quarter of 2011, visitors forwarded to LiveAuctioneers as a result of searches or click-throughs from Google, Yahoo, Ask and other search engines jumped by 30.54% over the comparable quarter of 2010.
 
“LiveAuctioneers.com is celebrating its 10th anniversary in 2012, and we can already tell from early trending that it’s quite likely to be another record-setting year for us,” said Ellison. “In particular, we’ve noticed that auctioneers are paying much closer attention to our online-marketing products, such as e-newsletters, and they’re investing in professionally produced publicity campaigns from LiveAuctioneers PR Services. There’s definitely a competitive energy in the marketplace.”
 
Online: www.LiveAuctioneers.com
FALLS CHURCH, Va. - The premier attraction of Waverly’s March 1 Fine and Rare Books, Maps & Manuscripts auction is an 1840 first edition of John James Audubon’s The Birds of America. It comes with provenance from the Washington, DC-area collection of Charles Truitt and is estimated at $40,000-$60,000.

Known as an “octavo” edition, the 9-inch-tall book is especially desirable because it is complete, with all 500 illustrations present.

“Usually Audubon editions of this type are pilfered for their famous and decorative illustrations, which people frame and display. This one is special because it is 100 percent complete,” said Waverly’s specialist Anson Brown.

The consignor of the Audubon book is Charles Truitt’s son, who has kept and cared for the important book from his father’s collection for many years. He has also consigned to auction an edition of John James Audubon and John Bachman’s The Quadrapeds of North America. It is estimated at $3,000-$6,000.

Another highlight of the 215-lot sale is a circa-1900 fully leather-bound edition of The Life of Napoleon, which came to Waverly’s from a couple in Winchester, Va., who had it on a bookshelf for 38 years.

“The gentleman knew that it probably had value, as he noticed that it was an edition of 1 of 26 volumes issued by the publisher. Upon examining the set at Waverly’s, we found that it contained a letter signed around 1794 by Napoleon Bonaparte, when he was a general,” said Brown.

The letter was likely dictated by Napoleon, penned by his secretary, marked “personal” and signed by Napoleon, according to Brown. “What is most remarkable is that, after 38 years of ownership, the couple never even knew the letter was there,” Brown said. “They were pleasantly surprised when I told them the auction estimate would be $4,000-$6,000.”

Other noteworthy items in the March 1 sale include a certificate of membership in the Society of the Cincinnati, signed by President George Washington, estimate $2,000-$3,000; and Andrew Ellicott’s map titled “Plan of the City of Washington in the Territory of Columbia,” estimate $1,000-$3,000.

“This is probably the strongest auction we’ve had in the last couple of years,” said Brown. “In addition to connoisseur’s items like the Audubon Birds of America edition, we also have a number of pieces that aren’t particularly rare but still quite sought after by collectors,” said Brown.

Waverly’s March 1 Fine and Rare Books, Maps & Manuscripts auction will commence at 6:30 p.m. at Quinn’s & Waverly’s galleries located at 360 S. Washington St., Falls Church, VA 22046. For information on any item in the upcoming auction, call 703-532-5632 or e-mail info@quinnsauction.com. Visit Quinn’s & Waverly’s website at www.quinnsauction.com.

BEVERLY HILLS, CA - A rare edition of Ernest Hemingway’s first book, Three Stories & Ten Poems [Paris]: Contact Publishing Co., 1923, one of just 300 copies printed brought $68,500 on Feb. 8 to lead Heritage Auctions’ $736,000+ Rare Books Signature® Auction, which took place at the company’s Beverly Hills showrooms. All prices contain 25% Buyer’s Premium.
 
The edition contains a warm inscription from Hemingway to two of the editors of The Little Review, the important ‘little magazine’ that published works by avant garde writers of the time such as James Joyce and T. S. Eliot. The inscription reads: “For j.h. [Jane Heap] and Margaret Anderson with love from Hemingway.”
 
Complementing the rare edition of Hemingway’s first book was another important early edition from Hemingway, which, while not as rare or valuable as the top lot in the auction, showed surprising strength: a First Edition, First Printing in the scarce First Issue dust jacket of his Men Without Women, New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1927 more than doubled pre-auction estimates to finish at $5,313.
 
“There was great enthusiasm across the board in this auction,” said James Gannon, Director of Rare Books at Heritage Auctions, “especially for classic American literature, with Hemingway asserting his authority as the perennial favorite.”
 
Another perennial American favorite and literary giant, Edgar Allan Poe, drew a good amount of attention from collectors for just one of 750 first edition copies of his first prose collection, complete and in the original cloth, Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque, Philadelphia: Lea and Blanchard, 1840, which realized $21,250.
 
The rarest edition of Willa Cather's masterpiece Death Comes for the Archbishop, New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1927, number 40 of 50 specially-bound copies printed on Japan vellum and signed by Cather on the limitation page, brought a world record price for the title when it went to an advanced collection for a $16,250 final price realized.
 
“This is a beautiful copy of one of the rarest finds in the Cather canon,” said Gannon, “and this price was at least three times as much as any edition of this same book had ever brought at auction.”
 
Fine and rare editions of classic Children’s Literature have seen an uptick on desirability in the last few years, which was much in evidence in the February auction, as one of 2,500 copies of Lewis Carroll’s Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, featuring 12 Illustrations with Original Woodcuts and an Original Etching by Salvador Dali, New York: Maecenas Press-Random House, 1969, signed by Dali, captured the imagination of collectors along with a $7,500 price realized, while a First Edition in the scarce First Issue Dust Jacket of Maurice Sendak’s classic Where the Wild Things Are, New York: Harper & Row, 1963, set off a minor bidding battle before settling at the impressive final price realized of $4,063.
 
Another top Children’s Literature related highlight, while not a book, was a likely unpublished charming original pen-and-ink watercolor drawing by Dr. Seuss, circa 1935, of a Dog Wearing a Scary Mask and Frightening Three Cats achieved the impressive final price realized of $12,500, showing that original Seuss art continues to be highly sought-after.
 
Further highlights include, but are not limited to:
 
First Edition of Alexander Pope's Homer, With a Subscription Slip Signed by Pope: Realized: $13,750.
 
The Exceedingly Scarce First Edition of Scouting for Boys, Lieut.-General R. S. S. Baden Powell: Realized: $10,000.
 
A Remarkable Collection of Over One Thousand Pocket Books, Encompassing the Imprint's First 21 Years: Including a Complete Run of the First 1,257 Titles. Realized: $6,875.
 
One of 500 First Editions of Thomas Hardy's Second Book, Under the Greenwood Tree, A Rural Painting of the Dutch School: First edition, one of 500 printed. Realized: $5,938.
 
Heritage Auctions, headed by Steve Ivy, Jim Halperin and Greg Rohan, is the world’s third largest auction house, with annual sales more than $800 million, and 700,000+ online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and gain access to a complete record of prices realized, along with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com.
 
Want to get the up-to-the-minute updates and breaking news stories about Heritage Auctions? Get them as they happen at: www.Twitter.com/HeritageAuction; Facebook: www.HA.com/Facebook.To view a complete archive of Heritage press releases go to: HA.com/PR. To link to this press release on your blog or Website: HA.com/PR-2162.
 
The exhibition “Ray Safford, Rare Bookman,” at the Grolier Club second floor gallery, offers a look into the storied New York firm of Charles Scribner's Sons and the literary, publishing, and rare-book worlds in turn-of-the-century New York. Ray Safford was a consummate rare bookman and book collector, whose entire career and life revolved around books and Scribner's.

Over more than four decades, Ray Safford's work in Scribner's retail business gave him unusual connections with people ranging from author Joseph Conrad and illustrator Arthur Burdett Frost to capitalist Henry Clay Frick and publisher Frank Nelson Doubleday. Interesting or unusual items in his personal collection lead us to other luminaries of his day—Mark Twain, Robert Louis Stevenson, and Lewis Carroll.

The exhibit presents letters, manuscripts, bookplates, photographs, inscribed books, and books with drawings added to them. Highlights include a letter to Safford from Arthur Burdett Frost (the illustrator of two Lewis Carroll books, but best known as the illustrator of Uncle Remus) describing his difficulties with Carroll (“the fussiest little man I ever met”); a pencil drawing of Brer Rabbit and the Tar Baby by Frost in a copy of Uncle Remus; a Mark Twain letter to his publisher James Osgood encouraging publication of a eulogy Twain found, describing it as “the finest thing American lips have uttered, except Mr. Lincoln's Gettysburg speech”; a typescript of an unpublished Kipling poem with Safford's notation about Kipling's wish that the poem never be published; and May Safford's charming story of their 1923 visit in England with the Conrads.

Ray Safford joined Scribner's in the mid-1880s when the business was on Broadway, and became life-long close friends with two other young men there—Frank Nelson Doubleday, later the famous publisher, and Edward W. Bok, later the noted editor and author. Safford stayed with Scribner's and by 1912 was the firm's rare bookman and in charge of the retail operation. Safford knew Scribner authors and illustrators including Eugene Field, Maxfield Parrish, Henry van Dyke, Oliver Herford, and Howard Pyle, all represented in the exhibit by letters or inscribed books. Through Doubleday and Bok he had contact with people such as Joseph Conrad and Rudyard Kipling. Ray Safford retired in 1928, from Scribner's final home, 597 Fifth Avenue.

A high point of Ray Safford's bookselling career occurred in 1903 when he sold a magnificent copy of a First Folio Shakespeare (now at the Huntington Library) for the then-enormous sum of $12,500. The buyer was an intriguing individual, Emilie B. Grigsby, a stunning beauty with exquisite taste in fine objects, the controversial convent-educated daughter of a Cincinnati madam, and the “ward” (mistress) of traction magnate Charles Tyson Yerkes. “Miss G.” proved quite capable of playing in the men's world of rare books. In the exhibit are a small group of items related to the sale and Miss Grigsby's contact with Grolier founder William Loring Andrews, who inscribed books and transcribed poems for Miss Grigsby (probably at the request of Scribner's). These inscriptions later caused Andrews considerable embarrassment. Scribner's bought all of the Andrews-inscribed items at Grigsby's 1912 auction and the two poems Andrews transcribed for Miss Grigsby are in the exhibit, having survived in Ray Safford's papers.

A catalogue accompanies the exhibition, and includes the full texts of the story of the Saffords' visit with the Conrads; the Mark Twain letter to James Osgood with part of the eulogy referred to in the letter; the A. B. Frost letter to Safford with Frost's comments about Lewis Carroll—all three of these texts are believed to be previously unpublished,—and information about Emilie Grigsby, her purchase of the First Folio Shakespeare, as well as the connection with William Loring Andrews.

LOCATION AND TIMES: “Ray Safford, Rare Bookman” will be on exhibit at the Grolier Club of New York, 47 East 60th Street, from February 16 through April 13, 2012. Gallery hours are Monday through Saturday, 10am to 5pm. Open to the public free of charge.

FORTHCOMING EXHIBITIONS:
February 22-April 28, 2012. “Torn in Two: The 150th Anniversary of the Civil War.”
Curated by Ronald E. Grim. (Ground Floor Gallery.)
April 18-June 1, 2012. “Through a Papermaker’s Eye: Artists’ Books from the Collection of Susan Gosin.” (Second Floor Gallery.)
May 15-July 28, 2012. “Aaron Burr Returns to New York: an Exhibit of Burr and His Contemporaries.” (Ground Floor Gallery.)

www.grolierclub.org

Thirty Rare Works at the Morgan Library

New York, NY, February 13, 2012—Beginning tomorrow, The Morgan Library & Museum will exhibit nearly thirty extraordinary works from its extensive collections of printed books, illuminated manuscripts, music, and literary and historical manuscripts. The diverse objects—which include a portion of The Scarlet Letter, fifteenth-century tarot cards, a first edition of William Faulkner's Light in August, and a John Cage manuscript—will be displayed in the Morgan's sumptuous McKim building. These works will remain on view through June 3, 2012.




LETTERS: SCANDAL, POLITICS, AND TERROR

On view is all that remains—a single sheet containing the title and table of contents—of the manuscript for Nathaniel Hawthorne's tale of a scandalous affair, The Scarlet Letter. Though Hawthorne's son accused publisher James T. Fields of destroying the rest of his father's manuscript, Hawthorne himself once told an inquirer, "I threw that in the fire...put it up in the chimney long ago." 

Before his presidency, Andrew Jackson faced censure by Congress for military actions during the First Seminole War. On display is Jackson's letter to Major William B. Lewis in which he relayed his "happy triumph over my enemies" after the effort was defeated. Known for his difficult personality, Jackson went on to write of his continued suspicions of Senator John Williams, "to whom has been traced all the hidden slander." Jackson's revenge was complete when he won Williams's Senate seat in 1823. 

Madame Roland was granted the rare privilege of writing materials while imprisoned during France's Reign of Terror. On view is her letter to Jacques-Bernand-Marie Montané, one of the many famous letters Roland penned in her delicate hand, then gave to a visitor to smuggle out. Less than two months after writing the letter Madame Roland stood on the guillotine platform in the Place de la Révolution where, observing a statue extolling Liberty, she exclaimed, "Oh Liberty, what crimes are committed in your name!"




IMPROV

Early in his career, John Cage composed pieces for percussion ensemble. On one occasion, Cage was asked to provide music for a dance performance, but found the venue too small to accommodate his musicians. In an ingenious moment of improvisation, he placed bolts, screws, and other objects between the strings of a grand piano, thus providing the percussive sounds usually supplied by the ensemble, and creating what came to be known as a prepared piano. The experiment was a success, and Cage went on to compose several pieces for prepared piano. Visitors will see one such composition—Dance no. 1 from Three Dances—along with the accompanying table of instructions for preparing the second piano. 

Faced with intense and continuous pain in his right wrist, Henry James began to dictate his words in 1897, introducing new prose rhythms into his work. On view is the typescript of two chapters of the novel What Maisie Knew (almost all that survives of James's working draft). The typescript provides insights into James's construction and revision of his narrative, which forgoes conventional, plot-driven storytelling and instead provides readers with an impressionistic view of ten-year-old Maisie's subjectivity. 




SUPPLEMENTAL INCOME 

When not making midnight rides, Paul Revere spent his days as a silversmith and, to earn extra money, as a copper engraver. In 1764 patriot, jeweler, musician, and Handel enthusiast Josiah Flagg commissioned Revere to print Flagg's compilation of tunes. The first bound printing on view is opened to reveal what is thought to be the first publication of Handel's music in America. 

Within the span of only three years, William Faulkner published Sartoris, The Sound and the Fury, As I Lay Dying, Sanctuary, and Light in August. Among these American classics of southern writing, only the pulp novel, Sanctuary, was a financial success. At the moment when Faulkner should have been earning substantial royalties, however, his publishers went into receivership. Unable to collect his money, he followed in the footsteps of many great Depression-era writers and made his way to Hollywood. In the months leading up to the publication of Light in August Faulkner served his first stint as a studio writer, continuing to work off and on in this capacity for the next two decades. The Morgan's copy of the first edition of this novel is a remnant of this western trajectory, having been inscribed by the author to Max Wilk, a fellow contract writer at Warner Brothers. 




LOVE AND MARRIAGE 

Edmund Spenser staked his claim as England's heir to Chaucer in 1579 when he published his pastoral poetry sequence, The Shepheardes Calender. Considered by many to be the first great non-dramatic work of the Elizabethan era, the first edition of the Shepheardes Calender is also one of the rarest, surviving in only a few institutions worldwide. The Morgan's copy on view will display the eclogue for April, in which Spenser refers to Queen Elizabeth I as the "fayre Elisa." While the work praises the Queen, Spenser also indirectly denounces her proposed marriage with the French Catholic duc d'Anjou. Clothed in archaic diction and with tropes of lovelorn shepherds, Spenser's couched condemnation may have saved him from the fate of other contemporary critics whose hands were cut off for voicing the same sentiment. 

Tarot cards originated in Milan or Ferrara around 1425-50. Though used as fortune-telling tools today, there is no evidence that tarot cards were originally made for this purpose. Cards from the fifteenth century, like those displayed, are extremely rare and no complete seventy-eight-card deck survives. The cards—which represent the Chariot, Time, the Queen of Swords, and the King of Staves—were likely made for Bianca Marie Visconti and Francesco Sforza whose 1441 marriage united the two families and whose emblems and devices are intermingled on some cards. 




BOUGHT AND SOLD 

Quotidian and art object in one, a receipt by Pablo Picasso includes a quick sketch of his Woman Seated in an Armchair. The artist often executed such sketches as aides-memoire upon the sale of his work. Picasso sold this painting to art dealer Paul Rosenberg for 15,000 francs, also noted on the receipt.

On April 13, 1714 eight members of the Mohawk tribe struck a real estate deal with Dutch settler Adam Vrooman. The related deed on view, which bears the marks and seals of the Native Americans, transferred 340 acres "of the Land Called Schoree" (present-day Schoharie County, New York), from the Mohawk tribe to Vrooman. This is believed to be the earliest surviving deed to property in Schoharie County.




THE END

Naughty children who play with matches, mistreat animals, or neglect their grooming may meet with painful, violent ends. Consider the fate of Struwwelpeter (Slovenly Peter or Shock-Headed Peter), who is one of the memorable characters in Heinrich Hoffmann's 1845 collection of cautionary stories written in verse. Although the book was first published with a different title, Hoffmann's depiction of the long-nailed, wild-haired Peter resonated with thousands of young readers, and the work eventually became known by that name alone. With comic and grotesque imagery that anticipates Tim Burton's Edward Scissorhands, this instant classic of German children's literature has remained in print to this day. The first edition on view is one of the few surviving copies that show how the author originally envisaged his work. 

Scribe and illuminator Maius made his Beatus manuscript—picture cycles and commentary on the Apocalypse—so that the "wise may fear the coming of the future judgment of the world's end." Dating to around 945, the pages on view show the burning of Babylon, along with mourning kings and merchants who, having indulged in its excesses, watch its destruction.




SPONSORSHIP
The programs of The Morgan Library & Museum are made possible with public funds from the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs in partnership with the City Council, and from the New York State Council on the Arts, a state agency.

The Morgan Library & Museum
The Morgan Library & Museum began as the private library of financier Pierpont Morgan, one of the preeminent collectors and cultural benefactors in the United States. Today, more than a century after its founding in 1906, the Morgan serves as a museum, independent research library, musical venue, architectural landmark, and historic site. In October 2010, the Morgan completed the first-ever restoration of its original McKim building, Pierpont Morgan’s private library, and the core of the institution. In tandem with the 2006 expansion project by architect Renzo Piano, the Morgan now provides visitors unprecedented access to its world-renowned collections of drawings, literary and historical manuscripts, musical scores, medieval and Renaissance manuscripts, printed books, and ancient Near Eastern seals and tablets.



General Information
The Morgan Library & Museum

225 Madison Avenue, at 36th Street, New York, NY 10016-3405

212.685.0008

www.themorgan.org


Hours
Tuesday-Thursday, 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; extended Friday hours, 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; closed Mondays, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year's Day. The Morgan closes at 4 p.m. on Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve.

Admission
$15 for adults; $10 for students, seniors (65 and over), and children (under 16); free to Members and children 12 and under accompanied by an adult. Admission is free on Fridays from 7 to 9 p.m. Admission is not required to visit the Morgan Shop.

Los Angeles - Timed to coincide with the 45th California International Antiquarian Book Fair, Bonhams was pleased offer property from the Serendipity Bookstore in Berkeley, CA on February 12.  Highlights included general antiquarian books, art and fine press, modern literature and poetry with a section dedicated to John Steinbeck, Americana and early baseball literature.
 
Peter Howard [1939-2011] of the Bay Area landmark Serendipity Books has been eulogized as "one of the most imaginative booksellers of his generation."  Howard stocked not only individual titles but entire collections.  The store was organized in sections by the original source: a collection of modern poetry from collector X is in one corner; another collection with similar titles from another source might be on the opposite side of the building.  It wasn't a library and so, to Howard's mind, it wasn't supposed to be organized like one.

The bookstore on University, for those who never crossed its threshold, was a warren of rooms filled to the roof with titles from the mundane and popular to the erudite and obscure.  Howard wanted people to search for their books, looking carefully and hopefully finding not only what they were looking for, but far more.
 
Leading the February auction were pieces from Howard's tremendous collection of John Steinbeck material.  Strong online bidding was seen for many of the works on offer.  This included a screenplay adaptation of Cannery Row, an intriguing piece of literary history (est. $2,000-3,000, sold for $12,500). Cannery Row was published in 1945 and certainly given consideration by the studios, but did not make it on screen immediately. In 1948 actor and Steinbeck friend Burgess Meredith wanted to adapt the novel as a vehicle for himself, but that production never materialized. Nonetheless, Steinbeck's biography mentions that he produced a script for that intended project, of which this may be a copy.
 
Additional works of note related to Steinbeck included a first edition, presentation copy of the Sea of Cortez from Ed Ricketts to his new girlfriend, later wife, with a Las Vegas marriage certificate (est. $2,000-3,000, sold for $11,875); copy number 4 of The Red Pony, a presentation copy inscribed to Louis Paul (est. $2,000-3,000, sold for $2,000); an inscribed copy of The Grapes of Wrath (est. $10,000-15,000, sold for $8,750); Steinbeck's novella version of Lifeboat, written at the behest of Alfred Hitchcock (est. $5,000-7,000, $4,375) and a mimeographed manuscript of Viva, Zapata! (est. $2,000-3,000, sold for $3,125).
 
The sale also featured the exceedingly rare James Joyce broadside, Gas from a Burner, his angry farewell to Ireland after the suppression of his book Dubliners (est. $12,000-18,000, sold for $17,500); a selection of Jack London's personal checks from 1905-1915, drawn on various banks, including Oakland Central Bank, Merchant's National of San Francisco, the National Bank of the Pacific, and the Bank of Hawaii (est. $2,500-3,500, sold for $8,750); Nancy Mitford's manuscript of her biography Madame de Pompadour (est. 1,200-1,800, sold for $8,125); Carl Sandburg's guitar (est. $10,000-15,000, sold for $7,500); exceptionally rare first and second editions of Robinson Jeffers novel Stars (est. $1,000-2,000, sold for $5,000); Ross Macdonald's working manuscript of the screenplay version of The Instant Enemy (est. $5,000-7,000, sold for $4,750); original costume designs by Orson Welles for an unknown Shakespearean or other period production (est. $3,000-5,000, sold for $2,500).
 
The Antiquarian section featured early printed works in architecture, travel literature natural history, and English literature that included a first collected edition of Beaumont and Fletcher (est. $1,000-2,000, sold for $3,500) and several William Thackeray titles in parts highlighted by a first edition of Vanity Fair, A Novel Without a Hero (est. $800-1,200, sold for $1,500).
 
The Art, Fine Press and Photography offering included several albums of 19th and early 20th century photograph albums of Buenos Aires (est. $2,000-3,000, sold for $5,625), India (est. $800-1,200, sold for $813) and a collection of authors, artists and composers (est. $1,000-2,000, sold for $3,750).
 
In the Modern Literature and Poetry section works of note included a large group of Lawrence Durrell first editions and letters highlighted by a signed and inscribed copy of Ten Poems (est. $1,500-2,500, sold for $3,500) and a selection of personal letters that included correspondence to Henry Miller (est. $1,000-1,500, sold for $2,750); a strong selection of William Faulkner material, including a signed copy of Sartoris (est. $8,000-12,000, sold for $9,375) and a photograph of himself taken in 1960, signed and inscribed for his longtime love, Meta Carpenter Rebner (est. $3,000-5,000, sold for $3,500).
 
In honor of Howard's great love for the game of baseball, the auction concluded with a rare offering of baseball material that included one of the earliest known baseball broadsides for the first intercollegiate ball game (est. $2,500-3,500, sold for $5,250), among others.
 
Additional property from Serendipity Books will be offered by Bonhams throughout 2012 in the following auctions: Fine Photography in New York on May 8, Period Art & Design in San Francisco on April 15 and May 20, Made in California in Los Angeles on May 21, Fine Books and Manuscripts in New York on June 19 and Entertainment Memorabilia in Los Angeles on June 24.
 

More Serendipity Stock at Bonhams in April

San Francisco—The much-anticipated continuation of Bonhams February 12 sale of property from Serendipity Books in Berkeley, Calif., along with a great selection of European paintings and 20th century designs, will go on the auction block at Bonhams Period Art & Design sale, April 15-16 in San Francisco.

Property from Serendipity Books, on offer April 16, will include more than 200 lots of fiction and poetry, including works by John Steinbeck, Samuel Beckett, William Faulkner, Allen Ginsburg, Robinson Jeffers, Henry James, Richard Ford, Joseph Conrad, Henry Miller, Ring Lardner and others.

Highlights will include a 1924 edition of James Joyce’s Ulysses (est. $300-$500); a first edition of Malcolm Lowry’s Under the Volcano (est. $300-$500); a first edition of John Steinbeck’s  East of Eden (est. $300-$500); an advance proof copy of Horace McCoy’s They Shoot Horses, Don't They? (est. $400-$600); and an advance uncorrected proof along with an advance reader’s copy of Marilyn Robinson’s Housekeeping (est. $400-$600).

Peter Howard (1939-2011), the late owner of Serendipity Books, has been eulogized as “one of the most imaginative booksellers of his generation.”  Howard stocked not only individual titles but entire collections.  He wanted people to search for their books, looking carefully and hopefully finding not only what they were looking for, but far more.

European Paintings on offer will comprise a mix of Old Master and 19th century works. One highlight is a charming mythical subject: a French 18th century oil of Diana and Endymion (est. $4,000-$6,000).

Notable selections featuring Biblical scenes will include a Flemish School 17th century oil on panel of Christ on the Cross (est. $3,000-$5,000) and an Italian School painting of Susannah and the elders (est. $3,000-$5,000) from the late 18th/early 19th century.

Other highlights will include A landscape with a shepherdess and animals by a stream, an oil painting attributed to the Dutch artist Jan Kobell II (1778-1814), featuring cattle and sheep watched over by their shepherdess, against a country view of trees and a blue sky; Church ruins by a river by Alfred Glendening Jr. whose views of the English countryside are well known (est. $3,000-$5,000); and an amusing genre scene The performer cornered by 19th century British artist Alfred W. Cooper (est. $3,000-$5,000).

Also noteworthy will be A portrait of a lady, attributed to James Northcote (British, 1746-1831) featuring a woman thought to be Mrs. Hughes, wearing a white gown and black cloak, looking to the left (est. $3,000-$5,000).

The Director of Period Art & Design auctions in San Francisco, Christine Skinner, says of the auction, "The April Period Art & Design sale will host a strong selection of quality property geared towards the serious collector."

Rounding out the sale will be selections of 20th century design, including a 'Baluster' Charles X style burlwood circular dining table by Therien & Co. (est. $2,000-$3,000); an Art Deco style mahogany dining suite by Baker (est. $2,000-$3,000); a set of five Baroque style side chairs by Michael Taylor Designs (est. $1,500-$2,000); a pair of en suite Art Deco style blue upholstered club chairs (est. $800-$1,200); and a large contemporary travertine marble coffee table with a lower bookcase (est. $800-$1,200), among others.

The sale’s illustrated catalogue will be available online in the weeks preceding it, for review and purchase at www.bonhams.com/perioddesignusa.com.  

Auction Preview: April 13-15, San Francisco
Auction: April 15-16, San Francisco

About the Auction Category: This monthly event will include paintings, prints, rugs, lighting, mirrors, antique furniture, modern designer furniture, decorative accents, silver and much more, with many in the $500-$5,000 price range. The property is hand selected to include items that would appeal to collectors of all levels, interior designers and those who may want to find a unique piece for their home. Sourced primarily from the West Coast, the majority of the property comes from exclusive sources - from high-profile Napa Valley estates filled with contemporary designer furnishings to Pacific Heights homes, embellished with antiques and unique decor. Many of these homes have been styled by high-profile Bay Area interior designers. Each auction catalog will feature an interview with a prominent interior designer with their take on current design trends.

Rare Book School is pleased announce our Summer 2012 course schedule. Rare Book School (RBS) provides continuing-education opportunities for students from all disciplines and levels to study the history of written, printed, and born-digital materials with leading scholars and professionals in the field.

Highlights of the summer schedule include two new courses, G-55: Scholarly Editing: Principles & Practice, taught by David Vander Meulen of the University of Virginia, and L-25: Reference Sources for Researching Rare Books, taught by Joel Silver of the Lilly Library at Indiana University; two courses taught by Rare Book School’s Founding Director Terry Belanger, including I-30: Advanced Seminar in Book Illustration Processes; and the retitled H-15: The History of the Book in America: A Survey from Colonial to Modern taught by Michael Winship of the University of Texas at Austin.


*4-8 June 2012 in Charlottesville, VA*

H-30: The Printed Book in the West to 1800, Martin Antonetti

I-20: Book Illustration Processes to 1900, Terry Belanger

H-70: The History of the Book in America, c.1700-1830, James N. Green

L-30: Rare Book Cataloging, Deborah J. Leslie

L-70: XML in Action: Creating Text Encoding Initiative (TEI) Texts, David
Seaman

*11-15 June 2012 in Charlottesville, VA*

H-60: The History of European & American Papermaking, Timothy Barrett &
John Bidwell

G-30: Printed Books since 1800: Description & Analysis, Tom Congalton &
Katherine Reagan

L-65: Digitizing the Historical Record, Bethany Nowviskie & Andrew Stauffer

G-45: Analytical Bibliography, Stephen Tabor

**G-55: Scholarly Editing: Principles & Practice, David Vander Meulen

*2-6 July 2012 in Charlottesville, VA*

I-30: Advanced Seminar in Book Illustration Processes, Terry Belanger

M-10: Introduction to Paleography, 800-1500, Consuelo Dutschke

L-95: Born-Digital Materials: Theory & Practice, Matthew Kirschenbaum &
Naomi Nelson

H-90: Teaching the History of the Book, Michael F. Suarez, S.J.

G-20: Printed Books to 1800: Description & Analysis, David Whitesell

*16-20 July 2012 in Charlottesville, VA*

H-10: The History of the Book, 200-2000, John Buchtel & Mark Dimunation

G-50: Advanced Descriptive Bibliography, Richard Noble

I-35: The Identification of Photographic Print Processes, James M. Reilly
assisted by Ryan Boatright

L-10: Special Collections Librarianship, Alice Schreyer

B-10: Introduction to the History of Bookbinding, Jan Storm van Leeuwen

*23-27 July 2012 in Charlottesville, VA*

M-20: Introduction to Western Codicology, Albert Derolez

H-40: The Printed Book in the West since 1800, Eric Holzenberg

**L-25: Reference Sources for Researching Rare Books, Joel Silver

G-10: Introduction to the Principles of Bibliographical Description, David
Whitesell

H-15: The History of the Book in America: A Survey from Colonial to Modern,
Michael Winship


** indicates a new course

Details for all courses, as well as our application form, can be found on
the RBS website: http://rarebookschool.org
On Friday, March 2, at 7:30 p.m. Stop Smiling hosts a multi-media evening of performance, readings, and visual presentations by four artists and writers who are not only dissolving the boundaries between the visual and literary but re-envisioning the form of “the book” itself. From uncanny poems made by folding the pages of old paperbacks to an epistolary romance that can only be read in augmented reality, these highly original works are, by turns, playful
and provocative. Come be astonished.

The Stop Smiling Storefront is located at 1371 N. Milwaukee Avenue, Chicago, IL 60622. Blue line: Division or Damen-O’Hare. This event is free and open to the public. Organized in conjunction with the Associated Writing Programs conference. Between Page and Screen by Amaranth Borsuk and Brad Bouse (Siglio, 2012)

Coupling the physicality of the printed page with the electric liquidity of the computer screen, Between Page and Screen chronicles a love affair between the characters P and S while taking the reader into a wondrous, augmented reality. The book has no words, only inscrutable black and white geometric patterns that—when seen by a computer webcam—conjure the written word. Reflected on screen, the reader sees himself with open book in hand, language springing alive and shape-shifting with each turn of the page. Merging concrete poetry with conceptual art, “technotext” with epistolary romance, and the tradition of the artist’s book with the digital future, Between Page and Screen expands the possibilities of what a book can be.

S P R AW L by Danielle Dutton (Siglio, 2010)
In the long line of novels about the vapidity of suburbia, Dutton’s has a narrator who may be one of the most likable. Aloof and hilarious, she dissects their lives with the casualness of a cynical scientist. —Jonathan Messinger, TimeOut Chicago

Absurdly comic and decidedly digressive, S P R A W L chronicles the mercurial inner life of one suburban woman. With vertiginous energy and a deadpan eye, the narrator records the seeming uniformity of her world as she rearranges the banalities and small wonders of suburban life. As the abundance and debris accumulate, the sameness of suburbia gives way to enthralling strangeness. Inspired by a series of domestic still life photographs by Chicago artist Laura Letinsky, Dutton creates her own trenchant series of tableaux, attentive to the surfaces of the suburbs and the ways in which life there is willfully, almost desperately, on display. In locating the language of sprawl itself—engrossing, unremitting, ever expansive—Dutton has written an astonishing work of fiction that takes us deep into the familiar and to its very edge. Short-listed for The Believer Book Award in 2011.

CHICAGO EVENT
Stop Smiling, Siglio, and Ugly Duckling Presse present LOOK! SEE! READ! An Evening of Word and Image with AMARANTH BORSUK, DANIELLE DUTTON, JILL MAGI, AND ERICA BAUM SLOT by Jill Magi (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2012) An experiential investigation of how we move through cultural landmarks and institutions, SLOT presents a lyrical and thinking response to official, landscaped memory. In the book, a person slips in and out of highly designed museums and memorials, looks for a mentor who is more than a tour guide, rebels during the official tour, and occasionally finds the lament she is looking for: in comparisons across history, in ambiguous photo sequences, and in poetry. The resulting text stages a quiet argument between the persistent urge to “slot” things—into narratives, frames, archives—and a clear view of what, by resisting, remains.

Dog Ear by Erica Baum (Ugly Duckling Presse, 2011)

The concept of Dog Ear is simple and straightforward: dog-eared pages of mass-market paperbacks are photographed to isolate the small diagonally bisected squares or rectangles of text. The photographs are formally quite neutral and sedate—cursorily reminiscent of Alber’s “Homage to the Square” series of prints, paintings and tapestries—but the text also demands attention and it is what allows or coaxes the viewer to linger. As Kenny Goldsmith says in his introduction: “The idea that there’s no one correct way to engage with an artwork is at the heart of Erica Baum’s Dog Ear series. Do we see them or do we read them? If we choose to read them, how should we read? Across the fold? Through it? Around it? If we choose to look at Baum’s pictures, how should we see them? As artistic photographs? Documentation? Text art?”

Author/Artist Bios

AMARANTH BORSUK recently won the Slope Poetry prize for her collection Handiwork. She is also the author of the chapbook Tonal Saw (The Song Cave, 2010), and a collaborative work Excess Exhibit (ZG Press). Her poems, essays, and translations have been published widely in journals such as the New American Writing, Los Angeles Review, Denver Quarterly, FIELD, Black Warrior Review, Aufgabe, and ZYZZYVA, among many others. She has a Ph.D. in Literature and Creative Writing from USC and is currently a postdoctoral fellow at MIT where she works on and teaches digital poetry, visual poetry, and creative writing workshops.

DANIELLE DUTTON is also the author of the short story collection Attempts at a Life (Tarpaulin Sky) and editor of Dorothy, a publishing project. Her work has appeared in Bomb, Harper’s, Fence, The Brooklyn Rail, Noon, jubilat, among other journals and magazines. She holds degrees from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, UC-Santa Cruz, and the University of Denver where she was Associate Editor of the Denver Quarterly. Born and raised in California, she is now an assistant professor in the English Department at Washington University in St. Louis.

JILL MAGI works in text and image and is also the author of Cadastral Map (Shearsman), Torchwood (Shearsman), Threads (Futurepoem), the chapbooks Die for love, furlough (In Edit Mode Press), Poetry Barn Barn! (2nd Avenue), Confidence and Autonomy (Ink Press), Cadastral Map (Portable Press at Yo-Yo Labs), and numerous handmade books. Her visual works have been exhibited at the Textile Arts Center, the Brooklyn Arts Council, apexart, AC Institute, and Pace University. Jill runs Sona Books from her apartment in Chicago and teaches at Goddard College.

ERICA BAUM received a B.A. in Anthropology from Barnard College, Columbia University, and an M.F.A. in Photography from the Yale School of Art. She has exhibited in New York, Baltimore, San Francisco, Kansas City, Berlin (Germany), Italy, and Mälmo (Sweden). Her work was included in the book Vitamin Ph: New Perspectives in Photography (Phaidon Press, 2006). She was a 2008 fellow in Photography from the New York Foundation for the Arts. Recent solo exhibitions include Shuffled Glances at Bureau, NYC, and Erica Baum: The Public Imagination at Circuit in Lausanne, Switzerland.

siglio is an independent press in Los Angeles dedicated to publishing uncommon books that live at the intersection of art and literature. Siglio books defy categorization and ignite conversation: they are cross-disciplinary, hybrid works that subvert paradigms, reveal unexpected connections, rethink narrative forms, and thoroughly engage a reader’s imagination and intellect. We believe that challenging work can be immensely appealing: our books are beautiful, affordable, and as much a pleasure to touch and hold as they are to read.
[ITHACA, NY] National Book Auctions, located in Ithaca, NY, will host a Sunday, February 19th auction featuring a broad range of rare antique books, as well as intriguing ephemera and artwork.  Of particular note are rare first editions of early and modern titles, many of which are signed.  Also featured are important Civil War history titles including large, important reference sets.  Ephemera lots include magazines, postage and postal history, advertising and various other genres.  Also being offered are two important bronze sculptures and Major League Baseball collectibles.

Important books in this auction include first editions, many of which are author-signed. Noteworthy examples include an author-signed copy of Michael Shaara’s “The Killer Angels” and first editions by Cormac McCarthy and Herman Melville.  Other lots include decorative sets by classic authors such as Henry Fielding and Charles Dickens as well as early printings of works by Charles Darwin.  Early works in French and Italian, dating back to the 1700’s, will also be sold.  Civil War historical works include the entire 128-volume work, “The War of the Rebellion:  A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies” and the complete 36-volume printing in leather by the Easton Press of “The Library of the Civil War.”  Modern works include hundreds of signed first editions by prominent writers such as Sue Grafton, Ha Jin, Tess Gerritsen, Jeffrey Archer, John Grisham, P. D. James, Dean Koontz and Dick Francis, to name just a few.

Found throughout this auction are pleasing groups of ephemera and artwork. Leading the art field is a pair of limited edition bronze sculptures of works by Erte and Mario Jason.  Dozens of the ephemera lots in this auction offer early postage and postal history including early American cancels and postage from Roman States, as well as cancels which date back centuries.  A large collection of vintage and antique collectible magazines will also be offered.

Other important collections offered in this auction include an array of themes. Reference libraries of Sherlockiana and volumes relating to the assassination of John Fitzgerald Kennedy will be sold.  We will also bring to market more material from the estate of renowned philanthropist and collector, Charles Rand Penney, including items from the 1893 Columbian Exposition, the 1934 Century of Progress World’s Fair in Chicago and the New York World’s Fair in 1939.  Several signed baseballs will be offered including two Waterford Crystal limited edition pieces which commemorate the 2000 World Series win by the New York Yankees.

National Book Auctions is a public auction service specializing in books, ephemera, and art. National Book Auctions is a targeted service offering experience and expertise unique to marketing antique and modern books and ephemera for consignors and collectors alike. Preview for the upcoming Sunday, February 19th auction is at 10 a.m. and the live auction starts at noon. For more information or to consign collectible material please contact David Hall, Business Manager, at 607-269-0101 or email
mail@nationalbookauctions.com.
The Center for Book Arts is Pleased to Present Its Winter 2012 Featured Artist Project
Patricia S. Ward: Re/Vision
January 18th to March 31st 2012
Patricia S. Ward: Re/Vision
When: January 18th to March 31st 2012 Where: 28 W. 27th St., 3rd Floor, New York, NY
Subway: N/R to 28th St, or F to 23rd St Admission: free
Organized by Alexander Campos, Executive Director

In a site-specific installation titled Ward presents a replica of her workspace, along with a number of miniature books and book-objects created from shredded pieces of an unpublished novel on loss, nostalgia, and war. The installation reflects her journey of moving beyond the experience of rejection to delving into the themes that permeate her writing, returning at last to her wartime childhood and incorporating the memorabilia she has carried with her since leaving Lebanon. All objects in the exhibition are meant to be touched and explored, so that viewers can experience more intimately the artist's journey.

Visit our website for up-to-date details: www.centerforbookarts.org

ABOUT THE CENTER FOR BOOK ARTS
The Center for Book Arts is committed to exploring and cultivating contemporary aesthetic interpretations of the book as an art object, while invigorating traditional artistic practices of the art of the book. The Center seeks to facilitate communication between the book arts community and the larger spheres of contemporary art and literature through exhibitions, classes, public programming, literary presentations, opportunities for artists and writers, publications, and collecting. Founded in 1974, the Center for Book Arts was the first organization of its kind in the nation.
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The Center for Book Arts is Pleased to Present Its Winter 2012 Featured Artist Project
Ethan Shoshan: Strange Birds
January 18th to March 31st 2012
Ethan Shosan: Strange Birds
When: January 18th to March 31st 2012 Where: 28 W. 27th St., 3rd Floor, New York, NY
Subway: N/R to 28th St, or F to 23rd St Admission: free
Organized by Alexander Campos, Executive Director

Social ecologist Ethan Shoshan presents an archive of 31 treasured objects and their accompanying conversations. This project encompasses vignettes of people’s lives through objects that hold significant personal meaning to them. Through each object on display, a conversation with its caretaker begins; visitors have the freedom to peruse the objects and listen to an accompanying audio guide conversation. It is through these stories that we engage with the person and create an intimate connection to something deeper within ourselves. Shoshan’s Strange Birds weaves together forgotten histories, memories, and embodied experiences in an affirmation of life and its lessons. Collaborators include: Arthur Aviles, Jill L. Conner, Barry Frier, Bibbe Hansen, Geoffrey Hendricks, Jim Hubbard, Stephen Kent Jusick, Stephen Lack, Agosto Machado, Stefani Mar, Liz McGarrity, Lucia Maria Minervini, Angelo Monaco, Augustmoon Ochiishi, Uzi Parnes, Dennis Redmond, Hunter Reynolds, Charles Rice-Gonzalez, Rob Roth, Edward Rubin, Rafael Sanchez, Arleen Schloss, Gervaise Soeurouge, Sur Rodney Sur, Chris Tanner, Brad Taylor, Gail Thacker, Jack Waters, Kathleen White, Brian "Soigne" Wilson, and Stephen Winter.

Visit our website for up-to-date details: www.centerforbookarts.org

ABOUT THE CENTER FOR BOOK ARTS
The Center for Book Arts is committed to exploring and cultivating contemporary aesthetic interpretations of the book as an art object, while invigorating traditional artistic practices of the art of the book. The Center seeks to facilitate communication between the book arts community and the larger spheres of contemporary art and literature through exhibitions, classes, public programming, literary presentations, opportunities for artists and writers, publications, and collecting. Founded in 1974, the Center for Book Arts was the first organization of its kind in the nation.
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PARIS February -- LES ENLUMINURES gallery will showcase several exceptional examples of Illuminated Medieval and Renaissance miniatures, manuscripts, stained glass and finger rings at TEFAF Maastricht from March 16 - 25.

The world’s premier antiques and art show, The European Fine Arts Fair attracts over 250 of the most esteemed dealers from more than 17 countries and is vetted by no less than 29 different committees comprised of 175 world experts. Each year Maastricht attracts the world’s leading museums, collectors and connoisseurs of art.

Galerie Les Enluminures founder, Dr. Sandra Hindman says she is particularly thrilled to have “Triumph of David,” by the Berlin Master of Mary of Burgundy to show at this year’s TEFAF.
 
Dr. Hindman says, “The Master of Mary of Burgundy was originally named after two manuscripts, one in Berlin (Kupferstichkabinett, MS 78 B 12) made for Mary of Burgundy and her husband Maximilian I and another one in Vienna also made for Mary of Burgundy (ÖNB, Cod. 1857).  Recent scholarship has distinguished between the styles of these two manuscripts, identifying two different artists. This lyrical c1480 illumination is attributed to the Berlin Master, noted as a colorist, with a fine sense of decorative details, and with access to many designs that circulated among the group artists known as the Ghent Associates.”

The Belgian work (153 x 110mm) in tempera and gold leaf has a provenance that includes the Collection Ambroise Firmin-Didot (1790-1876) Hotel Drouot, Catalogue des livres précieux, manuscrits, et imprimés faisant partie de la Bibliothèque de M. Ambroise Firmin-Didot, 10-14 June, 1884, lot 88 and it has been extensively described in literature including Brinkmann, B., et al, in Das Berliner Studenbuch der Maria von Burgund und Kaiser Maximilians:  Handschrift 76 B 12 m Kupfertichkabinett der Staatlichen Museen zu Berlin Preussischer Kulturbesitz, exh. cat., Berlin, 1998; Kren, T., and S. McKendrick, eds., Illuminating the Renaissance. The Triumph of Flemish Manuscript Painting in Europe, exh. cat., London/Los Angeles, 2003; Pächt, O., The Master of Mary of Burgundy, London, 1948.

A second rare and important work to be featured at TEFAF is a Book of Hours (use of Paris) dating from 1410 and the Workshop of the Luçon Master (Paris active c1405-1415).

In Latin and French, this illuminated manuscript is on parchment, complete, and bound in old red velvet. It measures 171 x 130 mm.

Hindman says, “The Luçon Master, a Parisian illuminator of the ‘Golden age of French illumination,’ is known for his elegant sinuous figures and subtle tonalities.  He was active in the generation just before and contemporary with the Boucicaut Master and was first christened by Millard Meiss in 1956 after the cycle of miniatures that illustrates a Missal-Pontifical commissioned by Étienne Loypeau, Bishop of Luçon, later belonging to Jean, Duke de Berry (c. 1405-1407; Paris, BnF, MS lat. 8886).”

“It was written about in Meiss, Millard, French Painting in the Time of Jean de Berry: The Limbourgs and Their Contemporaries, 2 vols., New York, Braziller, 1974, pp. 351-352, 393-397; Meiss, Millard, “The Exhibition of French Manuscripts of the XIII-XVIth-Centuries at the Bibliothèque Nationale,” Art Bulletin 38 (1956), pp. 187-196.”

Sandra Hindman founded Les Enluminures gallery in Paris 20 years ago and has seen it become among the top ranked sources for the most significant Medieval and Renaissance manuscripts and art entering the market.

Les  Enluminures is expanding and adding a New York gallery at 23 East 73 Street in May, 2012. Its Paris gallery is opposite the Louvre at Le Louvre des Antiquaires and Dr. Hindman maintains an office in Chicago where she twice headed the Art History department at Northwestern University during her academic career.  She has written 10 books on the subject and publishes comprehensive catalogues on the four specialties of her business, which include Medieval and Renaissance Illuminations, Manuscripts, Finger Rings and Stained Glass.

Les Enluminures clients range from major museums, libraries and universities to important private collectors.  The gallery is a featured exhibitor at the world’s most prestigious antiques and art fairs in New York, Paris, Maastricht, London, San Francisco and Florence. It has pioneered the use of 21st century technology for this genre, incorporating video ‘tours,’ and a ‘turn the page’ feature for viewing manuscripts on its web site and embracing social media platforms.

IF YOU GO
Galerie LES ENLUMINURES
at TEFAF MAASTRICHT Stand  #274
March 16 - 25
daily 11-7 Sunday 11-6
 
and at Le Louvre des Antiquaires,
2 Place du Palais-Royal,
75001 Paris (France)
Tel: +33 1 42 60 15 58
info@lesenluminures.com
www.lesenluminures.com

Print/Out and Printin' Opening at MOMA

NEW YORK, February 3, 2012—Print/Out at The Museum of Modern Art examines the many roles that prints play in artistic practices today, embracing the versatile and global nature of contemporary art in the last two decades. On view from February 19 to May 14, 2012, in The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art Exhibition Gallery, Print/Out brings together approximately 70 series or projects drawn from MoMA’s extensive collection of more than 50,000 prints and illustrated books, while also including several important loans from private and public collections. Print/Out is part of a series of large-scale print surveys periodically organized by the Museum’s Department of Prints and Illustrated Books in order to assess the current state of the medium. The last two exhibitions were Printed Art: A View of Two Decades, organized by Riva Castleman in 1980, and Thinking Print: Books to Billboards: 1980-1995, organized by Deborah Wye in 1996. Part of Print/Out takes place on the Museum’s second floor with the exhibition Printin’, co-organized by the artist Ellen Gallagher and Associate Curator Sarah Suzuki, and centered around Gallagher’s major portfolio DeLuxe (2004-05). The Museum is also hosting Print Studio, an interactive space that explores the evolution of artistic practices relating to the medium of print, from January 23 to March 9, 2012, in the Mezzanine Level of The Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Education and Research Building. Print/Out is organized by Christophe Cherix, The Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Chief Curator of Prints and Illustrated Books, with Kim Conaty, Curatorial Assistant, Department of Prints and Illustrated Books, The Museum of Modern Art.

Focusing on the medium’s defining characteristics—its reproducibility, collaborative nature, and ability to circulate widely—Print/Out explores how artists have integrated these ideas in some of the most innovative art practices of our time. The exhibition features some 40 artists and artist groups, including Ai Weiwei, Trisha Donnelly, General Idea, Martin Kippenberger, Lucy McKenzie, Aleksandra Mir, Robert Rauschenberg, Rirkrit Tiravanija, SUPERFLEX, and Kelley Walker, along with publishers and publishing projects such as Edition Jacob Samuel, museum in progress, and Permanent Food. Among the notable installations is Thomas Schϋtte’s Low Tide Wandering (2001), an ambitious series of 139 prints that will be hung on site by the artist, criss-crossing the gallery space to create a maze-like, immersive environment.

The earliest works in the exhibition coincide with the geopolitical transformations of the late 1980s and early 1990s, an emblematic point of departure for examining a medium, which, because of its capacity to disseminate information, has often been linked to social change. For Vienna-based association museum in progress (founded 1990), newspapers, magazines, and other media spaces offered effective sites for artist interventions, which founders Kathrin Messner and the late artist Josef Ortner commissioned from an impressive range of international artists. While recognized as an artist and political activist, Ai Weiwei (Chinese, b. 1957) is often overlooked in his role as a pioneering publisher, yet the three volumes he produced in the 1990s—known as The Black Cover Book (1994), The White Cover Book (1995), and The Grey Cover Book (1997)—could well be among his most impactful and enduring legacies. These paperbacks, comprised of artists’ submissions, essays, and translations of existing art-historical and critical texts, offered a new vehicle for circulating and disseminating information among China’s contemporary artists during a moment marked by a near total lack of access to foreign monographs, exhibition catalogues, and art magazines.

Another notable artist’s project that demonstrates the potential of the print medium for spreading ideas across vast geographies is Felix Gonzalez-Torres’ “Untitled” (1991). Based on a black-and-white photograph of an unmade bed, this site-specific project is to be presented on public billboard spaces. As part of Print/Out, the work will be on view on billboards in the following six locations throughout New York City from February 20 to March 18, 2012: 11th Avenue and 38th Street in Manhattan; Neptune Avenue and Guider in Brooklyn; Pennsylvania Avenue near Fulton Street in Brooklyn; Van Dam Street near Queens Boulevard in Queens; 31st Street near Ditmars Boulevard in Queens. One additional billboard will be on view at the entrance to the exhibition.

Print/Out opens with a work by Martin Kippenberger (German, 1953-97), who realized an impressive body of multiples in collaboration with various publishers and galleries throughout his career. On view is a set of screenprints from 1992, Inhalt auf Reisen (Content on Tour), which Kippenberger produced with Austrian publisher Edition Artelier. This series is the result of a multi-stage process that began in 1989 when the artist asked his assistant to make a group of paintings after his own. Deeming the copies “too good,” Kippenberger decided to destroy them, but this apparent end was just the beginning. Several works grew out of these paintings, among them sculptures of industrial containers made to house the smashed-up, discarded paintings, and Content on Tour, whose imagery is based on a photograph of the destroyed paintings in one of the containers. The screenprint exists in four variants: one of the full image and three smaller, cut-down versions, each of which has been mounted on plywood. The artist then used a circular saw to make random linear marks on the surfaces, partially destroying the images and also distinguishing each print as a unique object. The works became the material result of the artist’s previous endeavors in painting, photography, and sculpture, ultimately producing a work that transcends its origin through a long sequence of reproduction and alteration.

Robert Rauschenberg’s (American, 1925-2008) The Lotus Series forms the other bookend to the exhibition. The last printed project completed by the artist before his death, The Lotus Series (2008) exemplifies the experimentation with process and transfer techniques that Rauschenberg engaged in throughout his career. Based on the artist’s small, faded photographs from his trips to China between 1982 and 1985, these 12 large-scale prints were made using high-resolution scans and digital printing processes as well as the photogravure technique. With this series, Rauschenberg blends tradition with innovation, prompting the viewer to look at the receding past with the hyperclarity that recent technology has made possible.

Other featured artists, like Rirkrit Tiravanija (Thai, b. Argentina, 1961) and Philippe Parreno (French, b. 1964), have used prints to recount, share, or reactivate earlier events and ephemeral works. Tiravanija has been challenging traditional models of art-making since the early 1990s, developing a practice based in participation, interaction, and collaboration. Around 1992, the same year as his paradigmatic work Untitled (Free) (which was recently on view in MoMA’s Contemporary Galleries), Tiravanija began to produce editions, publishing the first of many multiples in relation to his ephemeral or experience-based work. These editions included tins of curry paste or a backpack equipped for an expedition, both of which are on view in Print/Out. In 2011 Tiravanija completed what he considers to be his first traditional print project, Untitled 2008-2011 (the map of the land of feeling), comprising three scrolls stretching more than 80 feet altogether. The relentlessly peripatetic artist’s expansive passport—reproduced page by page, end to end—provides both a central organizing structure and an autobiographical narrative, the story of the artist’s life through the places he has visited. For Tiravanija, the laborious production process required for prints of this scale and complexity, involving the collaboration of 40 assistants over a span of four years, was an integral part of the final work.

In Parreno’s Fade to Black (2003)—a set of posters printed in phosphorescent ink—the artist recounts a series of past events organized in collaboration with some of his contemporaries, including Tiravanija as well as Liam Gillick and Pierre Huyghe. Each poster depicts an image or text related to one of these earlier events, with Parreno‘s Argentina vs. Netherlands 1978, Medina 2003 (2003) consisting of a photograph of a workshop that he gave in Medina, Argentina, in 2002. At that workshop Parreno screened the 1978 World Cup soccer final and then asked students “to replay the game in the schoolyard like they would have with a classical theatrical play.” In Print/Out this poster, along with the other posters in the series, is presented in a space in which the lights are programmed to go on and off at regular intervals, producing the strange effect of seemingly blank, white sheets, whose imagery suddenly emerges, glowing vibrantly when the room plunges into darkness. The images repeatedly fade in and out of sight, creating, as the artist describes, “a flickering memory” of his artistic practice.

Another special project presented in Print/Out is by SUPERFLEX, the Copenhagen-based artists’ group (Bjørnstjerne Christiansen [Danish, b. 1969], Jakob Fenger [Danish, b. 1968], and Rasmus Nielsen [Danish, b. 1969]) that has been organizing projects questioning social and economic structures since 1993. The group describes its practice in terms of tools (rather than artworks), utilized in the service of concrete cultural interventions; these tools are not finished products but rather instructions for doing and calls for participation. Copy Light/Factory (2008) addresses the larger implications of copyright through a workshop in which a series of lamp designs are “refabricated” by affixing photocopies of the designs to a basic cubic lighting structure. The resultant lamps reveal how copies of copies can become originals again. At certain times over the course of the exhibition, visitors to the Museum can participate in this project by making these lanterns at work stations, with the results going on view within the gallery space.

Investigating the nature of networks and circulation, Aleksandra Mir (American/Swedish, b. Poland, 1967) has developed a practice that merges cultural anthropology and fine art, investigating social structures, globalization, and the contemporary urban experience. Mir’s elaborate mapping project Naming Tokyo (2003-present) is organized around her solicitation from friends and colleagues of names for Tokyo’s otherwise undesignated streets. Print/Out presents one of the incarnations of this project: blank maps of the city, with legends on the reverse offering proposed organizations for Tokyo’s neighborhoods and streets, according to her research and her friends’ suggestions. Another project, Venezia (all places contain all others) (2009), organized for the 2009 Venice Biennale, consisted of one million fake postcards—ten thousand each of one hundred designs—combining stock images of generic or well-known scenery (such as a picturesque harbor or the New York City skyline) with the Italian city’s name. Just as the colorful maps and playful descriptions of Naming Tokyo mask its underlying critique of colonialism, the Venezia postcards—free souvenirs within the Biennale grounds—explored ideas of tourism, cultural geography, and displacement. In all of her projects, the artist’s light-handed and witty approach to her material often belies the heavier cultural and political content that it invokes.

Print/Out also includes a presentation of the work of California-based printer and publisher, Jacob Samuel (Edition Jacob Samuel, founded 1988). Samuel is best known for his unconventional approach to the print medium, adapting his expertise in the traditional technique of etching to the diverse practices of contemporary artists. This exhibition focuses on Samuel’s “portable printing studio,” a specially made, travel-ready aquatint box that he first used in 1996 with the performance artist Marina Abramović (Yugoslav, b. 1946), traveling to the artist’s Amsterdam studio to work with the artist in her own environment. The result, Spirit Cooking (1996), a portfolio that functions as a cookbook of “essential aphrodisiac recipes,” is on view in the exhibition, along with Samuel’s project with Chris Burden, Coyote Stories (2005), which recounts through handwritten texts and allusive imagery the artist’s personal encounters with coyotes near his Topanga Canyon, California, home. As part of Print/Out, Samuel has worked on a new portfolio with the artists and twin brothers Gert and Uwe Tobias (German, b. Romania, 1973), whose colorful, graphic compositions draw on a range of motifs, from popular culture, Eastern European folk art, and Russian Constructivism. Over the course of three days, Samuel worked with the artists in their Cologne studio, teaching them the basics of etching and helping them translate and adapt motifs from their visual lexicon into a set of plates. Print/Out follows this project through the printing, proofing, and publishing process, presenting a range of working materials and documentation in the galleries, and taking the opportunity to study one of Samuel’s collaborations from start to finish.

Within the exhibition these and other focused presentations are featured alongside areas physically demarcated with dotted wallpaper, in which print series by various artists—including Trisha Donnelly, Damien Hirst, Guillermo Kuitca, Daniel Joseph Martinez, Julie Mehretu, Jorge Pardo, Slavs and Tatars, Kara Walker, Franz West, Pae White, and Xu Bing—are broken apart and interspersed throughout the galleries. The layouts of these sections were designed by Armand Mevis and Linda Van Deursen (Mevis and Van Deursen, Amsterdam), who also served as the designers of the exhibition’s publication. The resulting view within the galleries captures both the familiarity and the ubiquity of prints in today’s landscape, and attests to the extraordinary vitality of a medium central to contemporary artistic practice.

Printin’
February 15-May 14, 2012
The Paul J. Sachs Prints and Illustrated Books Galleries, second floor
As part of Print/Out, the related exhibition Printin’, co-organized by artist Ellen Gallagher (American, b. 1965) and Sarah Suzuki, Associate Curator, Department of Prints and Illustrated Books at MoMA, is also on view. Printin’ takes as its starting point DeLuxe (2004-05), a tour de force portfolio of 60 works by Gallagher that challenged traditional ideas of what a print could be. This technically complex work employs a range of mediums, unorthodox tools, and elements, from slicks of greasy pomade to plastic ice cubes. DeLuxe also offers a constellation of ideas, touching on such issues as portraiture, identity, history, advertising, commodity, and the disruption, translation, and recasting of space. Proposing a kind of technical dissection and conceptual unpacking of this portfolio, Printin’ brings together work by more than 50 artists from multiple disciplines in a sweeping chronology that extends from the 17th century to the present day, to propose a free-flowing yet incisive web of associations that are reflected in DeLuxe. Encompassing prints, drawings, films, books, photographs, sculptures, videos, and comic strips, the exhibition features such artists as Vija Celmins, David Hammons, George Herriman, Rammellzee, Robert Rauschenberg, Martha Rosler, Experiens Sillemans, and many others, forming a dense network of formal, technical, and conceptual connections and intersections.

SPONSORSHIP: Major support for Print/Out is provided by MoMA’s Wallis Annenberg Fund for Innovation in Contemporary Art through the Annenberg Foundation.

The Museum acknowledges generous funding from Anna Marie and Robert F. Shapiro, Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III, Orentreich Family Foundation, Mary M. Spencer, Philip Aarons and Shelley Fox Aarons, and Sally and Wynn Kramarsky.

Additional support is provided by The Junior Associates of The Museum of Modern Art.

RELATED INSTALLATION:
Millennium Magazines
February 20-May 14, 2012
Mezzanine Level, The Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Education and Research Building
This survey of experimental art and design magazines published since 2000 explores the various ways in which contemporary artists and designers utilize the magazine format as an experimental space for the presentation of artworks and text. Throughout the 20th century, international avant-garde activities in the visual arts and design were often codified first in the informal context of a magazine or journal. This exhibition, drawn from the holdings of the MoMA Library, follows the practice into the 21st century. The works on view represent a broad array of international titles within this genre, from community-building newspapers to image-only photography magazines to conceptual design projects. The contents illustrate a diverse range of image-making, editing, design, printing, and distribution practices. There are obvious connections to the past lineage of artists’ magazines and small press architecture and design magazines of the 20th century, as well as a clear sense of the application of new techniques of image-editing and printing methods. Assembled together, these contemporary magazines provide a first-hand view into these practices and represent the MoMA Library’s sustained effort to document and collect this medium. Millennium Magazine is organized by Rachael Morrison and David Senior, MoMA Library.

PUBLIC PROGRAMS:
Artist and Publisher: Printmaking and the Collaborative Process
MoMA hosts two conversations between publishers and artists featured in the exhibition Print/Out and Printin’ as they discuss their creative practice and the process of collaboration. Christophe Cherix, The Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Chief Curator of Prints and Illustrated Books and organizer of Print/Out, moderates.
Thursday, February 16, 6:00 p.m., The Celeste Bartos Theater
Artist Ellen Gallagher in conversation with publishers and printers at Two Palms Press.
Tuesday, February 28, 6:00 p.m., The Celeste Bartos Theater
Artist Marina Abramović in conversation with Los Angeles publisher/printer Edition Jacob Samuel.
Tickets ($10, $8 members and corporate members, $5 students, seniors and staff of other museums) are available online, at the information desk in the main lobby, and at the film desk after 4:00 p.m. Any remaining tickets may be picked up one hour before the start of the program at the Education and Research Building ticketing desk.

Print Studio
January 23 to March 9, 2012
Open daily, Wednesday to Monday, 12:00-4:00 p.m.
Mezzanine Level, The Lewis B. and Dorothy Cullman Education and Research Building
Print Studio is an interactive space that explores the evolution of artistic practices relating to the medium of print. The Studio offers a series of free drop-in workshops, lectures, and events that emphasize accessible and sustainable models for the production and dissemination of ideas.
See separate press release for complete details and schedule or visit MoMA.org/PrintStudio.
Print Studio is made possible by a partnership with Volkswagen of America.

AUDIO GUIDES:
The audio guide accompanying Print/Out features exhibition organizer Christophe Cherix joined
by artists Rirkrit Tiravanija, Alexandra Mir, and Lucy McKenzie, among other artists, publishers, and printers, along with a new, specially-produced soundscape by participating artist Trisha Donnelly. The audio guide accompanying Printin’ is led by artist Ellen Gallagher and Associate Curator Sarah Suzuki. Artists David Shrigley, Simon Fujiwara, and Martha Rosler also discuss the exhibition, while poet Terence Hayes and artist-performer Theaster Gates read the poetry of Aimé Césaire and Bob Kaufman. MoMA Audio is also available for download at MoMA.org, at MoMA.org/audio, and as a podcast on iTunes. MoMA Audio is available free of charge courtesy of Bloomberg.

PUBLICATION:
A fully illustrated publication accompanies the exhibition and includes essays and interviews by Mr. Cherix, Ms. Suzuki, and Ms. Conaty. Print/Out: 20 Years in Print features focused sections on 10 artists and publishers—Ai Weiwei, Ellen Gallagher, Martin Kippenberger, Lucy McKenzie, Aleksandra Mir, museum in progress, Edition Jacob Samuel, SUPERFLEX, Robert Rauschenberg, and Rirkrit Tiravanija—as well as rich illustrations of printed projects from the last two decades by major artists such as Trisha Donnelly, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Thomas Schütte, and Kelley Walker. 236 pages, 585 illustrations. Paperback, $50. Available at the MoMA Stores and online at MoMAStore.org. Distributed to the trade through ARTBOOK | D.A.P. in the United States and Canada, and through Thames & Hudson outside North America.

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Public Information:
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Hours: Wednesday through Monday, 10:30 a.m.-5:30 p.m. Friday, 10:30 a.m.-8:00 p.m. Closed
Tuesday
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Film Admission: $12 adults; $10 seniors, 65 years and over with I.D.; $8 full-time students with current I.D. (for admittance to film programs only)
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BEVERLY HILLS, CA - One of just 300 first edition copies printed of Ernest Hemingway’s first book - Three Stories & Ten Poems. [Paris]: Contact Publishing Co., 1923 - is expected to bring $75,000+ when it comes across the auction block on Thursday, Feb. 8, as the lead lot in Heritage Auctions’ Rare Books Signature® Auction, taking place at the company’s Beverly Hills showroom, 9478 West Olympic Boulevard.

“Any Hemingway first edition is a highly sought-after thing,” said James Gannon, Director of Rare Books auctions at Heritage, “let alone the very first book he ever published. Making it even more interesting is the warm inscription from Hemingway to two of the editors of The Little Review, the important ‘little magazine’ that published works by avant garde writers of the time such as James Joyce and T. S. Eliot and who published Hemingway’s first mature prose work the very same year.”

That inscription reads: “For j.h. [Jane Heap] and Margaret Anderson with love from Hemingway.”

Heritage Rare Book auctions have increasingly become known as a leader in rare Sci-Fi and Fantasy editions, and one of the most interesting groupings of the auction comes from the Jack Cordes Collection of Science Fiction. It is an amazing assemblage of rare first edition Sci-Fi books inscribed to Mr. Cordes by a veritable who’s who of the genre: Ray Bradbury, Ayn Rand, Kurt Vonnegut, Charles Beaumont, and more, including a 1957 first edition of Philip Jose Farmer’s classic The Green Odyssey, New York: Ballantine Books, inscribed to Cordes: “Jack, /I know you'll have/a pleasant voyage on your/green odyssey through the/matrimonial sea, because/you'll not be wanting to escape/your own personal Amra./Philip Jose Farmer.” It is estimated at $2,000+.

Two of the 18th century’s greatest writers are represented by first editions of what are among their most important works: fans of Charles Dickens will thrill to the inclusion of several of his Christmas books, including A Christmas Carol; The Chimes; The Cricket on the Hearth; The Battle of Life; The Haunted Man and the Ghost's Bargain (estimate: $15,000+), while Edgar Allan Poe aficionados will take special note of his Tales of the Grotesque and Arabesque. Philadelphia: Lea and Blanchard, 1840 (estimate: $15,000+).

James Bond fans will be happy to find several early Ian Fleming works in this auction, including a gorgeous first edition of Goldfinger, London: Jonathan Cape, [1959], inscribed by Fleming on the front free endpaper, “To Gerald Micklem, This piece - of homework! from (sic) Ian Fleming.” It carries a pre-auction estimate of $15,000+.

A rare Pony Express Bible - The Holy Bible, Containing the Old and New Testaments… - New York: American Bible Society, 1857, is already making collectors take note as it readies for the auction. The thick, pocket-sized volume, bound in eights, is still in its original custom leather binding, with "PRESENTED BY / RUSSELL, MAJORS & WADDELL / 1858" in gilt at the center of the front board. It is estimated at $10,000+.

“There few things more evocative to Americans than the thought of the Pony Express,” said Gannon. “These bibles, issued to riders and employees of the company that ran the Pony Express are true prizes of Americana, and we expect collectors will bid accordingly.”

Rare Incunabula, or books from the first 50 years of printing following Gutenberg, are represented in the Feb. 8 auction by a rare copy of Guillelmus Duranti’s Rationale divinorum officiorum. [Paris: Ulrich [Gering], Martin [Crantz], and Michael [Friburger], 13 April 1475], which is expected to bring $15,000+.

“This auction, across the board, presents a superb selection of major literature from across the epochs,” said Gannon, “from Chaucer to Cormac McCarthy, a considerable grouping of rare early American imprints, a wonderful selection of genre literature, an outstanding group of children's & illustrated titles and more selected artwork from the estate of illustrator Garth Williams. There is something for every level of collector in this one.”

Further highlights include, but are not limited to:
Samuel Augustus Mitchell, Description of Oregon and California, Embracing an Account of the Gold Regions... Philadelphia: Thomas, Cowperthwait & Co., 1849: Second edition, with an excellent example of the rare “New Map of Texas Oregon and California.” Estimate: $7,500+.

Thomas Hardy, Desperate Remedies. London: Tinsley Brothers, 1871: First edition of Hardy's rare first book, one of only about 500 copies printed. Inscribed by Hardy on a slip of paper mounted on the recto of the front free endpaper of volume I: “Autographed as requested- / Thomas Hardy.” Estimate: $7,000+.

(Joaquin Miller) C. H. Miller, Specimens (A Tale of the Rogue River War), Portland, printed by George Himes, 1868: First edition of Miller's first book and one of the rarest of all books to emanate from the west - only about 10 copies exist. Estimate: $7,500+.

Henry M. Stanley, In Darkest Africa or the Quest, Rescue, and Retreat of Emin, Governor of Equatoria. New York: Charles Scribner's Sons, 1890: Estimate: $4,000+.

Salvador Dali, Illustrator - Lewis Carroll, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland, 12 Illustrations with Original Woodcuts and an Original Etching by Salvador Dali. New York: Maecenas Press-Random House, 1969: One of 2,500 numbered portfolios printed on Mandeure paper, signed by the artist on the title-page. Estimate: $4,000+.

Maurice Sendak, Where the Wild Things Are Prints, (N.p., 1971): Complete set of four art prints, each printed in 1971 from the original drawings for this classic and influential picture book, each printed on a single sheet, measuring 15 x 24 inches, and signed by Sendak in the lower left hand corner. Estimate: $3,000+.

Fine & Dirty at the Center for Book Arts

The Center For Book Arts is Pleased to Present Its Winter 2012 Exhibition

Fine & Dirty
Contemporary Letterpress Art
January 18th to March 31st 2012
Fine & Dirty
When: January 18th to March 31st 2012 Where: 28 W. 27th St., 3rd Floor, New York, NY
Subway: N/R to 28th St, or F to 23rd St Admission: free

Organized by Betty Bright and Jeff Rathermel, Minnesota Center for Book Arts

The practice of letterpress printing incorporates craft standards and the book’s haptic character, along with art world strategies, materials and content. With Fine & Dirty, the Center for Book Arts’ Winter 2012 Exhibition, the curators assemble work that represents the best in letterpress books today, created by established and emerging artists. The exhibit explores the forces that are reshaping the meanings of craft in letterpress printing in the twenty-first century, and that may shed light on the larger craft-world’s relationship to art and to life. The exhibition also investigates other influences on current letterpress work. These include DIY (Do It Yourself) and its playful organizational spin-off for letterpress, ILLSA (Impractical Labor in Service of the Speculative Arts); Asian influences such as wabi sabi; international influences such as the UK’s Ken Campbell’s improvisatory approach and Ron King’s theatrical presentations, and a heightened focus on design and on a wide use of papers seen in work by Germany’s Viktoria Schäpers and Barbara Tetenbaum.

Visit our website for up-to-date details: www.centerforbookarts.org

ABOUT THE CENTER FOR BOOK ARTS

The Center for Book Arts is committed to exploring and cultivating contemporary aesthetic interpretations of the book as an art object, while invigorating traditional artistic practices of the art of the book. The Center seeks to facilitate communication between the book arts community and the larger spheres of contemporary art and literature through exhibitions, classes, public programming, literary presentations, opportunities for artists and writers, publications, and collecting. Founded in 1974, the Center for Book Arts was the first organization of its kind in the nation.
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Los Angeles - Timed to coincide with the 45th California International Antiquarian Book Fair, Bonhams is pleased offer property from the Serendipity Bookstore in Berkeley, CA on February 12.  Highlights will include general antiquarian books, art and fine press, modern literature and poetry with a section dedicated to John Steinbeck, Americana and early baseball literature.
 
Peter Howard [1939-2011] of the landmark Bay Area Serendipity Books has been eulogized as "one of the most imaginative booksellers of his generation."  Howard stocked not only individual titles but entire collections.  The store was organized in sections by the original source: a collection of modern poetry from collector X is in one corner; another collection with similar titles from another source might be on the opposite side of the building.  It wasn't a library and so, to Howard's mind, it wasn't supposed to be organized like one.

The bookstore on University, for those who never crossed its threshold, was a warren of rooms filled to the roof with titles from the mundane and popular to the erudite and obscure.  Howard wanted people to search for their books, looking carefully and hopefully finding not only what they were looking for, but far more.
 
The centerpiece of the February sale is Howard's tremendous collection of John Steinbeck material.  This includes the typed manuscript of "The Pearl of the World," the original short story version of The Pearl (est. $15,000-20,000); copy number 4 of The Red Pony, a presentation copy inscribed to Louis Paul (est. $2,000-3,000); an inscribed copy of Cup of Gold (est. $10,000-15,000); an inscribed copy of The Grapes of Wrath (est. $10,000-15,000); Steinbeck's novella version of Lifeboat, written at the behest of Alfred Hitchcock (est. $5,000-7,000); advance proofs of several of his most famous novels (estimates vary); as well as letters, photographs (estimates vary), and even a signed document relating to a proposed musical version of Viva, Zapata! (est. $2,000-3,000).
 
The Antiquarian section features early printed works in architecture, travel literature natural history, and English literature including a first collected edition of Beaumont and Fletcher (est. $1,000-2,000) and several Thackeray titles in parts (estimates vary).
 
The Art, Fine Press and Photography offering includes a portrait of William Blake by Leonard Baskin (est. $1,000-1,500); a group of signed photographs of Wright Morris (est. $8,000-12,000); and several albums of 19th and early 20th century photograph albums, including images of India and California (estimates vary).
 
In the Modern Literature and Poetry section features a rare broadside of Elizabeth Bishop's poem, The Fish, one of only 12 known copies (est. $3,000-5,000); a large group of Lawrence Durrell first editions and letters (estimates vary); a strong selection of William Faulkner material, including a signed copy of Sartoris, the Ole Miss yearbook from 1918 featuring a submission by Faulkner (est. $8,000-12,000), screenplay adaptations of his work (estimates vary), and a photograph of himself taken in 1960, signed and inscribed for his longtime love, Meta Carpenter Rebner (est. $3,000-5,000).
 
The sale will also feature an impressive group of Robinson Jeffers novels and letters (estimates vary); the exceedingly rare James Joyce broadside, Gas from a Burner, his angry farewell to Ireland after the suppression of his book Dubliners (est. $12,000-18,000); Ross Macdonald's working manuscript of the screenplay version of The Instant Enemy (est. $5,000-7,000); Nancy Mitford's manuscript of her biography Madame de Pompadour (est. 1,200-1,800); Carl Sandburg's guitar (est. $10,000-15,000); and original costume designs by Orson Welles for Macbeth (est. $800-1,200) and another production (3,000-5,000).
 
In honor of Howard's great love for the game of baseball, the auction will conclude with a rare offering of baseball material, including one of the earliest known baseball broadsides for the first intercollegiate ball game (est. $2,500-3,500), and an 18th century German book that contains one of the first known mention of "das englische Base-ball" (and its other variants of the period, Thorball, Schnurball, Fangball and Prellball) (est.12,000-18,000).
 
Additional property from Serendipity Books will be offered by Bonhams throughout 2012 in the following auctions: Fine Photography in New York on May 8, Period Art & Design in San Francisco on April 15 and May 20, Made in California in Los Angeles on May 21, Fine Books and Manuscripts in New York on June 19 and Entertainment Memorabilia in Los Angeles on June 24.
 
The illustrated auction catalog for this sale will be available online for review and purchase at www.bonhams.com/us in the weeks preceding the sale.
 
San Francisco Preview: February 3-5
 
Los Angeles Preview: February 9-11
 
Auction: April 16, Los Angeles, simulcast to San Francisco

 
New York—On Thursday, February 23 Swann Galleries will conduct an auction of Private Press & Illustrated Books that features highly desirable press books from two fine American collections.

The top lot in the sale is the Kelmscott Press masterpiece The Works of Geoffrey Chaucer now newly imprinted, first edition, Hammersmith, 1896 (estimate: $30,000 to $50,000). Master craftsman William Morris only printed 425 copies of this extraordinarily influential book—he had to refuse orders for hundreds more due to time constraints—and upon his death later the same year the woodcuts were given to the British Museum and the fonts to the University Press, Cambridge, so no further copies could be printed.

Other Kelmscott examples of note include a first edition of the first book they printed, The Story of the Glittering Plain, 1891 ($3,000 to $4,000); a copy of The Poems of William Shakespeare, inscribed by Morris to English critic and poet Theodore Watts-Dunton in the year of its publication, 1893 ($4,000 to $6,000); and a rare edition of Syr Ysambrace, one of only eight on vellum and in the original binding, 1897 ($5,000 to $7,500).

Kelmscott’s influence led to the creation of several other English presses, many of which are also represented in the sale. From the Ashendene Press is Cervantes’s Don Quixote, London, 1927-28, which was Ashendene’s largest work ($1,200 to $1,800); and an association copy of Edmund Spencer’s Minor Poems, warmly inscribed by publisher Charles Henry St. John Hornby to engraver Emery Walker of Doves Press, Chelsea 1925 ($2,000 to $3,000). A handful of works by Doves Press are also in the sale.

A wonderful example by Eragny Press is a dedication copy of Songs by Ben Jonson, one of only 10 copies on vellum, with a colored frontispiece, border and initials by Lucien Pissarro, the press’s founder and son of Impressionist painter Camille Pissarro, inscribed by Lucien and Esther Pissarro to J.M. Andreini, London, 1906 ($1,500 to $2,500).

A run of works by the celebrated Golden Cockerel Press features Chaucer’s The Canterbury Tales, Waltham St. Lawrence, 1928-31 ($4,000 to $6,000); Troilus and Criseyde, 1927 ($2,000 to $3,500); and The Four Gospels of the Lord Jesus Christ, 1931 ($4,000 to $6,000).

Eric Gill, who designed typefaces and illustrated several works for Golden Cockerel, also collaborated on one of the most beautiful illustrated books of the 20th century: the Cranach Press’s The Tragedie of Hamlet Prince of Denmark, with a title page designed by Gill, one of 300 in deluxe red morocco binding, Weimar, 1930 ($3,500 to $5,000).

From the same era are a wonderful association copy of Merrymount Press’s printing of the controversial protestant Episcopal revision of The Book of Common Prayer by the General Convention of 1928, ex-collections J.P. Morgan and C.H. St. John Hornby, Boston, 1928-30 ($3,000 to $4,000); an unusually nice copy of Grabhorn Press’s edition of Walt Whitman’s Leaves of Grass, New York, 1930 ($2,000 to $3,000); Shakespeare Head Press’s Odes of Victory; The Nemean and Isthmian Odes by Pindar, one of seven on vellum, Oxford, 1930 ($4,000 to $6,000); and one of the most impressive books by the Gregynog Press, The History of Saint Louis by John, Lord of Joinville Seneschal of Champagne, 1937 ($1,200 to $1,800).

A rich assortment of titles from contemporary and modern American presses includes Arion Press’s Moby-Dick, or, The Whale, one of 250 copies of the first trade edition designed by Andrew Hoyem, San Francisco, 1979 ($5,000 to $7,500), and a deluxe edition of The Great Gatsby, signed by and with two original drawings by Michael Graves, who illustrated the book, 1984 ($4,000 to $6,000); Janus Press’s scarce Aura by Hayden Carruth with an accordion folded multi-color paper pulp landscape, from an edition of 50, West Burke, Vermont, 1977 ($2,000 to $3,000), and The Circus of Doctor Lao, by Charles G. Finney, signed by the author and illustrator Claire Van Vliet, 1984 ($2,500 to $3,500); and Pennyroyal Press’s Through the Looking-Glass and What Alice Found There, one of 50 deluxe copies for patrons signed by Barry Moser, 1982 ($2,500 to $3,500), and The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn, signed by Moser and with an additional suite of prints, 1985 ($1,500 to $2,500).

Examples of collectible Limited Editions Club books are signed copies of John Hersey’s Hiroshima, with a poem by Robert Penn Warren, and illustrated by Jacob Lawrence, New York, 1983 ($1,200 to $1,800); Duane Michaels’s A Tribute to Cavafy: A Selection of Poems with Photogravures, 2003 ($2,000 to $3,000); and Junichiro Tanizaki’s A Portrait of Shunkin, illustrated with Eikoh Hosoe photographs, 2000 ($1,200 to $1,800).

From the modern British Parvenu Press is Judith Kazantzis’s The Garden of Earthly Delights, one of 12 signed copies, London, 2003 ($2,000 to $3,000).

Rounding out the press books are editions from Aquarius Press, Bird & Pull Press, Cheloniidae Press, Essex House press, Grabhorn Press, Nonesuch Press, Officina Bodoni, Tideline Press and more.

Illustrated books of note include Michael Mazur’s collaboration with Robert Pinsky on a new illustrated translation of The Inferno of Dante, first deluxe edition, signed by Mazur, New York, 2002 ($5,000 to $7,500).

The auction will begin at 1:30 p.m. on Thursday, February 23. The books will be on public exhibition Friday, February 17, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Tuesday, February 21 and Wednesday, February 22, from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; and Thursday, February 23, from 10 a.m. to noon.

An illustrated catalogue, with information on bidding by mail or fax, is available for $35 from Swann Galleries, Inc., 104 East 25th Street, New York, NY 10010, or online at www.swanngalleries.com.

For further information, and to make advance arrangements to bid by telephone during the auction, please contact Christine von der Linn at (212) 254-4710, extension 20, or via e-mail at cvonderlinn@swanngalleries.com.

Live online bidding is available via Artfact. Click on the Artfact link on the swanngalleries.com homepage.
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ITHACA, N.Y. (Jan. 31, 2012) - Cornell University Library’s extensive new collection of African-American photographs contains impressive images of iconic leaders of the civil rights movement and world-changing events — but the less momentous moments in black history make up an equally important part of the collection.
 
Among the nearly 2,000 items, recently donated by Beth and Stephan Loewentheil, are images of African Americans going about their regular lives in the 19th and 20th centuries.
 
“Certainly, African Americans were fighting for justice in this country, but at the same time, they were celebrating births and graduations and marriages, mourning deaths, holding family reunions, buying new homes and cars and clothes — the stuff of everyday life,” said Katherine Reagan, curator of Rare Books and Manuscripts. “Those things can be easily overshadowed, but this collection provides a window into the lives of men and women who are so frequently underrepresented in the historical record.”

Images in the collection depict the African-American experience from slavery in the agricultural antebellum South to celebrities of modern media-frenzied America.

“I'm thrilled about the collection for the possibilities it offers for research in African and African American Studies, especially as portraits like those in the new collection are hard to find today in both private and public collections,” said Cheryl Finley, associate professor of art at Cornell. “Images such as these reveal volumes about the social, material, cultural and political lives of the people pictured as well as those who may have lived similar lives or had similar experiences.”

Among the collection’s most memorable images are striking photographs of Martin Luther King Jr. in a jail cell, rare tintypes of freed slaves and personal family photo albums. The photographs also encompass a wide diversity of formats: daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, carte-de-visite photographs, albumen prints, Polaroids and more.

In honor of Black History Month, the Library’s Division of Rare and Manuscript Collections will display a sample of the collection in the gallery space between Olin and Kroch libraries on Cornell’s main campus in Ithaca, N.Y. The exhibition will open Wednesday, Feb. 1, and it is free and open to the public.

The collection will soon be open to researchers from all over the world and, Reagan added, “it has a tremendously high research value. It’s a trove of material that will help scholars who are looking for a more comprehensive view of a period that saw enormous changes for people of color in the United States.”

The African-American photographs are the newest component of the Beth and Stephan JD ’75 Loewentheil Family Photographic Collection, a magnificent set of 16,000 historic images that make up a candid cross-section of the early American experience. Many of those photographs are also currently on display on level 2B of the Carl A. Kroch Library as part of the major exhibition, “Dawn’s Early Light: The First 50 Years of American Photography.”

To learn more and see a sampling of the images, visit http://communications.library.cornell.edu/news/afamphotos.
[ITHACA, NY] National Book Auctions, located in Ithaca, NY, hosted a Sunday, January 29th auction featuring a broad range of rare antique and vintage books, as well as a large collection of intriguing ephemera and artwork. Of particular note were rare first editions of 19th century and modern titles as well as a very large collection of signed modern first editions. This 437-lot auction also featured a select group of estate furniture and other antiques.

A 1965 first printing of Cormac McCarthy’s “The Orchard Keeper” fetched a hammer price of $3240.00 (including buyer’s premium). This scarce first printing of this debut novel contains the author's signature on a laid-in illustrated bookplate. Additionally, a rare stated first edition of Cormac McCarthy’s third publication, “Child of God” brought a hammer price of $799.50 (including buyer’s premium). This volume features a dust jacket featuring a full rear panel photo of a young McCarthy.

Realizing a hammer price of $2829.00 (including buyer’s premium) was a rare first edition of Edwin Lefevre’s “Reminiscences of a Stock Operator.” This work is a thinly-disguised biography of early 20th-century stock investor Jesse Livermore, a remarkable character who first started speculating in New England bucket shops at the turn of the century. What makes this book so intriguing are the observations that Lefevre records about investing, speculating, and the nature of the market itself.

Bringing a hammer price of $799.50 (including buyer’s premium) was an original Disney poster for Children's Book Week which ran Nov. 12-18, 1939. This poster features an illustration of Pinnochio, with the caption "Film classics from the World's Best Books."

National Book Auctions is a public auction service specializing in books, ephemera, and art. National Book Auctions is a targeted service offering experience and expertise unique to marketing antique and modern books and ephemera for consignors and collectors alike. Preview for the upcoming Sunday, February 19th auction is at 10 a.m. and the live auction starts at noon. For more information or to consign collectible material please contact David Hall, Business Manager, at 607-269-0101 or email mail@nationalbookauctions.com.
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