Event Calendar

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October 27, 2017 - September 30, 2019 Headlines of History: Historic Newspapers of St. Louis and the World Through the Centuries at the St. Louis Mercantile Library Association

October 27, 2017 Members' Opening and Bixby Book Club Halloween Party

Join us on Friday October 27 from 6-9pm as we celebrate the opening of the special exhibition Headlines of History: Historic Newspapers of St. Louis and the World Through the Centuries at the St. Louis Mercantile Library Association.

University of Missouri–St. Louis
1 University Blvd.

St. Louis, MO

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Exhibits Midwest
May 25, 2018 - September 30, 2020 ENDURING IDEALS: ROCKWELL, ROOSEVELT, & THE FOUR FREEDOMS

The first comprehensive traveling exhibition devoted to Norman Rockwell's iconic depictions of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Four Freedoms: Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Worship, Freedom of Want, and Freedom of Fear. 

Rockwell, Roosevelt, & the Four Freedoms explores the indelible odyssey of humanity’s greatest ideals. 

The notion of the Four Freedoms has inspired dozens of national constitutions across the globe, yet Franklin D. Roosevelt’s declaration that the United States was willing to fight for Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Worship, Freedom from Want, and Freedom from Fear—now considered a sublime moment in rhetorical history—did not turn out to be the immediate triumph envisioned by the President. As the nation found itself sliding ever closer to direct involvement in World War II, the underlying meaning of his words captured surprisingly little attention among Americans. Following his January 6, 1941, Annual Message to Congress, government surveys showed that only half of Americans were aware of FDR’s Four Freedoms and that less than a quarter could identify them correctly. Moreover, many had no clear idea why the United States was being called upon to enter the war. 

It would take the continuous efforts of the White House, the Office of War Information, and scores of patriotic artists to give the Four Freedoms new life. Most prominent among those was Norman Rockwell, whose images became a national sensation in early 1943 when they were first published in The Saturday Evening Post. Roosevelt’s words and Rockwell’s artworks soon became inseparable in the public consciousness, with millions of reproductions publicizing the Second War Loan Drive bringing the Four Freedoms directly into American homes and workplaces. When Eleanor Roosevelt convinced United Nations delegates to include these ideals in its postwar statement of human rights, FDR’s words—now forever entwined with Rockwell’s images—achieved immortality. 

Born amid the turmoil of World War II, the Four Freedoms have since become one of its greatest legacies, a testament to the paramount importance of human rights and dignity. Brought forward by one of America’s greatest presidents and immortalized by one of its most beloved artists more than seventy-five years ago, the Four Freedoms continue to inspire, resonating across generations as strongly today as they did in their time. 

CO-PRESENTING MAY 25, 2018 - SEPTEMBER 2, 2018: 
ROOSEVELT HOUSE (REIMAGINING THE FOUR FREEDOMS) 

OCTOBER 13, 2018 - JANUARY 13, 2019: 
THE HENRY FORD MUSEUM 
20900 Oakwood Blvd. 
DEARBORN, MI 


FEBRUARY 9, 2019 - MAY 6, 2019: 
THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MUSEUM AND THE TEXTILE MUSEUM 
701 21st Street, NW 
WASHINGTON, DC 


JUNE 4, 2019 - OCTOBER 27, 2019: 
Le Mémorial de Caen 
Esplanade Général Eisenhower 
CS 55026 
14050 Caen Cedex 4 
CAEN, FRANCE 


DECEMBER 15, 2019 - MARCH 22, 2020: 
MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, HOUSTON 
1001 Bissonnet 
HOUSTON, TEXAS 


FALL 2020: 
NORMAN ROCKWELL MUSEUM 
9 Glendale Rd / Rte 183 
STOCKBRIDGE, MA 


The New-York Historical Society 
170 Central Park West 
at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)

New York, NY

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Exhibits International
June 9, 2018 - April 20, 2019 Crossing Boundaries: Art // Maps

When the imaginative journeys of contemporary artists incorporate elements from a cartographer’s toolkit, these borrowings can add narrative, semi-narrative or abstract depth to a work of art. To offer comparison and commentary to encourage exploration of each artwork, maps from several centuries have been selected from the collection of the Norman B. Leventhal Map & Education Center at the Boston Public Library. Our intention in presenting these juxtapositions is to cross the traditional boundaries of art and cartography to stimulate fresh appreciation of both media. 

Mon - Thu 10am - 7pm 
Fri & Sat 10am - 5pm 
Sun 1pm - 5pm 

Norman B. Leventhal Map & Education Center 
Boston Public Library 
700 Boylston Street 
Copley Square

Boston, MA

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Exhibits Mid-Atlantic
June 15, 2018 - June 2, 2019 Daguerreotypes: Five Decades of Collecting

The 2018 installation of the Daguerreian Gallery celebrates the National Portrait Gallery’s golden anniversary by highlighting fifty years of daguerreotype collecting by the museum. Included will be portraits of such iconic figures as activist and reformer Dorothea Dix, entrepreneur and showman P. T. Barnum with Tom Thumb, Seneca Chief Governor Blacksnake, U.S. Navy Commodore Matthew C. Perry, and artist Alfred Waud. 

Daily 11:30am - 7pm 

Free admission 

National Portrait Gallery 
8th and F Streets NW

Washington, DC

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Exhibits Mid-Atlantic
June 29, 2018 - August 31, 2019 Baseball Americana

Americans had been playing baseball long before they agreed on the rules or even settled on how to spell it. 

Base-Ball (1787) 
base-ball (1799) 
base ball (1818) 
Base Ball (1845) 
baseball (1899) 

They didn't always call it baseball either—in some places it was known simply as "town ball" or, more generically, "round ball." No matter what form it has taken, baseball—and its close fraternal twin, softball—has endured. But it hasn't stayed the same in anyone's lifetime. Former major leaguer and announcer Bob Uecker, on hearing the phrase "emotional distress" to describe poor hitting, observed, "When I played, they didn't use fancy words like that. They just said I couldn't hit." 

Baseball Americana features items from the Library of Congress collections and those of its lending partners to consider the game then and now—as it relates to players, teams, and the communities it creates. Although baseball has stayed true to many of its customs, it has also broken with tradition through the invention, competition, and financial interests that still make it the most played sport in the country. 

8:30am - 4:30pm 

South Gallery, 2nd Floor 
Library of Congress Jefferson Building 
10 First Street SE

Washington, DC

More info
Exhibits Mid-Atlantic