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February 07, 2012 -
December 31, 2015
The Life of Art: Context, Collecting, and Display
From the time an object is made until the day it enters a museum's collection, it may be displayed, used, and perceived in different ways. The Life of Art takes selected objects from the Getty Museum's galleries and encourages visitors to sit down and spend time with them, offering the opportunity to examine them closely to understand how they were made and functioned, why they were collected, and how they have been displayed.

Tue – Fri & Sun 10am – 5:30pm
Sat 10am – 9pm
Mon Closed

Free admission

The J. Paul Getty Museum
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
September 10, 2014 -
January 02, 2016
Civil Rights Act of 1964: A Long Struggle for Freedom
This exhibition, which commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964, explores the events that shaped the civil rights movement, as well as the far-reaching impact the act had on a changing society. The act is considered the most significant piece of civil rights legislation since Reconstruction. It prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin in voting, public accommodations, public facilities, public education, federally funded programs, and employment. Audiovisual stations throughout the exhibition present archival footage of the era, as well as contemporary interviews with civil rights leaders and activists reflecting on the civil rights era.

Southwest Gallery
Second Floor, Thomas Jefferson Building
Library of Congress
First St. SE, between Independence Ave. & East Capitol St.
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
December 17, 2014 -
October 18, 2015
World War I and the Rise of Modernism
In commemoration of the World War I Centennial, this exhibition explores the impact of the Great War on the art and artists of that tumultuous era.

Part one examines the art of the German Expressionists, French Cubists, Italian Futurists, British Vorticists and American artists as they responded to pre-war industrialism and urban energy. Part two explores the course of modernism during the devastating war years. Part three focuses on the two main artistic directions that emerged after the war. While French Surrealism probed the irrationality that had led to war, artists at the German Bauhaus embraced rational principles of efficiency and economy, as they sought to build anew.

In collaboration with the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial, the Kansas City Symphony, the Kansas City Ballet and the Lyric Opera.

Wed 10am — 5pm
Thu & Fri, 10am — 9pm
Sat & Sun 10am — 5pm

Closed Mon & Tue, New Year's Day, July 4, Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve & Christmas Day

Free admission
Parking $8 | Free for members

Galleries P31, P34
Nelson-Atkins Building
The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
4525 Oak Street
Kansas City, MO
Exhibit Midwest
January 16 -
October 25, 2015
Freedom Journey 1965: Photographs of the Selma to Montgomery March by Stephen Somerstein
This exhibit features the stunning and historic photographs of Stephen Somerstein, documenting the Selma to Montgomery Civil Rights March in March 1965. Somerstein was a student in City College of New York’s night school and Picture Editor of his student newspaper when he traveled to Alabama to document the March.

He joined the marchers and gained unfettered access to everyone from Martin Luther King Jr. to Rosa Parks, James Baldwin, and Bayard Rustin. “I had five cameras slung around my neck,” he recalled. Over the five-day, 54-mile march, Somerstein took about four hundred photographs including poignant images of hopeful blacks lining the rural roads as they cheered on the marchers walking past their front porches and whites crowded on city sidewalks, some looking on silently-others jeering as the activists walked to the Alabama capital. Somerstein sold a few photographs to The New York Times Magazine, Public Television and photography collectors, but none were exhibited until 2010, when he participated in a civil rights exhibition at the San Francisco Art Exchange.

Rather than choosing photography as a career, Somerstein became a physicist and worked at the Harvard-Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and at Lockheed Martin Company. It was only after his retirement in 2008 that he returned to his photography remarking that he wanted “to have exhibitions of my work and that I realized that I had numerous iconic as well as historic photographs.” Among those photographs were his moving photographs of that memorable march to Montgomery in 1965.

Tue - Thu & Sat 10am - 6pm
Fri 10am - 8pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 02 -
October 25, 2015
Literary Landscapes: Maps from Fiction
Maps of imaginary places have accompanied literature for centuries. Visualizing the fanciful worlds described in works of fiction sets the stage for events taking place in a story and often provides insight into the characters themselves.

In this exhibition of forty items, visitors will discover maps from a variety of fictional genres, learn how authors create imaginary worlds, and appreciate why descriptive geography is essential to the story. People and creatures—even those who exist only in tales—are related to place, and maps of their imaginary worlds allow readers to be transported into the geography of fantasy.

Mon – Thu 10am – 7pm
Fri – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 1 – 5pm

Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Central Library in Copley Square
Boston Public Library
700 Boylston Street
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
February 12, 2015 -
February 15, 2016
Freedom Just Around the Corner: Black America from Civil War to Civil Rights
A chronicle of the African American experience told from the perspective of stamps and mail. Includes letters carried by enslaved Americans, mail to and from famous leaders of the civil rights movement, and a significant selection of original artwork for the USPS Black Heritage stamp series from the Postmaster General’s Collection.

Open daily 10am - 5:30pm
(except December 25)

Free admission

Smithsonian's National Postal Museum
2 Massachusetts Avenue NE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 13 -
December 11, 2015
Finding our Way: An Exploration of Human Navigation
This intriguing exhibition explores both the biological underpinnings of human navigation and its technological history, from the sea-faring cultures of the southern Pacific to early European mariners. Compelling mounted specimens from Harvard’s Museum of Comparative Zoology help tell the story of the human navigational instinct, deeply rooted in animal biology. Viewing accurate scale models of sailing canoes and nautical stick charts from the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, visitors will marvel at how expert navigators, using a relatively simple toolkit, successfully negotiated the complex archipelagos of the southern Pacific.

The exhibition traces the evolution of European celestial navigation, from the quadrant and astrolabe to the cross staff, octant, and sextant and showcases an array of variations in navigational instrument design. The exhibition displays diverse navigational methods used by fourteenth- to nineteenth-century mariners—including compasses and various dead-reckoning tools, as well as nautical atlases, maps, piloting books, and astrological texts borrowed from the Harvard Map Collection and the Houghton Library Archives.

Mon - Fri 9am - 4pm
Closed on University Holidays

Free & open to the public
Children must be escorted by an adult

Special Exhibits Gallery, 2nd Floor
Science Center 371
Harvard Museum of Science & Culture
1 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
February 18 -
December 31, 2015
Occupied Cuba, 1898-1902: Photographs from the Theodore Roosevelt Collection
The years between the end of the Cuban War of Independence in 1898, facilitated by United States involvement as part of the Spanish-American War, and the proclamation of the Cuban Republic in 1902, were a time of much change and transition in Cuba. After the last of the Spanish troops left Cuba in 1898, the United States took over the governance of Cuba. Occupied Cuba brings together some documentary photographs of this time gathered from Harvard’s Theodore Roosevelt Collection.

Theodore Roosevelt Gallery
Pusey Library
Harvard University Libraries
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
March 01, 2015 -
January 03, 2016
A Colorful Folk: Pennsylvania Germans & the Art of Everyday Life
This comprehensive exhibition explores the unique world of the Pennsylvania Germans and their colorful folk art, including decorated manuscripts (fraktur), textiles, furniture, metalwork, and pottery. Embellished with hearts, flowers, birds, and other traditional motifs, these objects reveal a love of color, design, and whimsy. Most are functional, but others were made “just for nice” and attest to the Pennsylvania Germans’ penchant for decorating virtually everything—from a tiny pincushion to the side of a barn.

A Colorful Folk sheds new light on Pennsylvania German folk art and presents more than 125 objects—many never before exhibited or published. Highlights include rare and important examples of fraktur, ranging from elaborate birth and baptismal certificates (made primarily by members of the German Lutheran and Reformed faiths) to an extraordinary religious text made by Mennonite schoolmaster Andreas Kolb. A painted chest decorated in 1783 by fraktur artist Henrich Otto with floral motifs and a pair of camels will also be displayed. Textiles are also prominently featured, including dazzling examples of needlework, quilted objects, and clothing such as an embroidered wedding handkerchief and apron from Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The tools and techniques used by fraktur artists will also be explored in addition to issues of authenticity, forgery, and revivals.

Most objects in the exhibition are drawn from Winterthur’s permanent collection, which now includes the fraktur and textile collection of the late Pastor Frederick S. Weiser, a legendary scholar and collector of Pennsylvania German folk art. More than a dozen private collectors and institutions also loaned important works of art.

An illustrated, 64-page catalogue will accompany the exhibition, presenting new scholarship and many never-before-published objects.

A related conference will be held March 5–8, 2015.

Related exhibitions will be on view at the Philadelphia Museum of Art from February 1–April 26, 2015 and the Free Library of Philadelphia from March 2–July 16, 2015.

Winterthur is closed to the public for our annual seasonal closing but will reopen on March 1, 2015, for the start of our spring season. Members continue to have grounds and garden access while we are closed, dawn to dusk, every day. Please show your membership card at the guard stand at the front gate.

Tuesday–Sunday, 10:00 am–5:00 pm
Last house tour tickets sold at 3:15 pm. Museum Store and Bookstore open Tuesday–Sunday, 10:00 am–5:30 pm.

Closed Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day

Library
Monday–Friday, 8:30 am–4:30 pm
Closed holidays

Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library
5105 Kennett Pike (Route 52)
Winterthur, DE
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 06, 2015 -
January 10, 2016
Spirited Republic: Alcohol in American History
Since the first European settlers arrived, Americans have enjoyed a drink. At times, many of us have enjoyed a lot of drinks. But other Americans, fearing the harm alcohol could do to society and to individuals, have tried to limit or even stop our drinking defining when and where we could consume alcohol.

These two, different views of alcoholic beverages run throughout American history. Sometimes they have existed in relative peace; at other times they have been at war. “Spirited Republic: Alcohol in American History” uses National Archives documents and artifacts to show how government programs and policies changed over time and to illustrate the wide variety of views Americans hold about alcohol. The stories they tell echo today’s debates on regulation of drinking and the legalization of drugs.

Open 7 days a week: 10am - 5:30pm

Free & open to the public

Lawrence F. O’Brien Gallery
National Archives Museum
Constitution Avenue NW (between 7th & 9th St.)
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 20 -
October 11, 2015
Painting Paradise: The Art of the Garden
Whether a sacred sanctuary, a place for scientific study, a haven for the solitary thinker or a space for pure enjoyment and delight, gardens are where man and nature meet.

Painting Paradise: The Art of the Garden reveals the way in which gardens have been celebrated in art across four centuries.

Bringing together paintings, botanical studies, drawings, books, manuscripts and decorative arts, the exhibition explores the changing character of the garden from the 16th to the early 20th century. It includes works by Leonardo da Vinci, Maria Sibylla Merian and Carl Fabergé, and some of the earliest and rarest surviving depictions of gardens and plants.

Open daily, 10:00-17:30
Last admission 16:30

Admission prices
Adult £10.00
Concessions £9.20
Under 17/Disabled £5.20
Under 5 Free

The Queen's Gallery
Buckingham Palace
London, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
March 21 -
October 12, 2015
The Civil War and the Making of Modern Washington
Washington, D.C. underwent remarkable changes, both physically and politically, as a result of the American Civil War. The Civil War and the Making of Modern Washington will examine the city’s transformations from the beginning of the war to Reconstruction through maps, prints, and illustrations of the federal buildings, barracks, hospitals, hotels, and markets constructed to accommodate a ballooning population. The exhibition will also explore Washington’s role as a laboratory for social and political changes during this transformative period in American history.

The George Washington University Museum
The Textile Museum
701 21st Street, NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 21 -
October 12, 2015
Seat of Empire: Planning Washington, 1790–1801
Washington, D.C. was the result of political compromise and artistic imagination. In 1792, George Washington charged French-born architect Pierre “Peter” Charles L’Enfant with a momentous task: to envision the capital of a new nation from a swath of private properties and plantations at the confluence of two rivers. Seat of Empire: Planning Washington, 1790–1801 will present historical maps and related images that tell the story of this early experiment in urban design that shaped the landscape of our nation’s capital.

The George Washington University Museum
The Textile Museum
701 21st Street, NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 21, 2015 -
March 19, 2016
Pointing Their Pens: Herblock and Fellow Cartoonists Confront the Issues
Editorial cartoonists, like all Americans, do not always agree with one another. Issues on which the nation was particularly divided in the twentieth century—the question of U.S. intervention prior to entering World War II, the Red Scare, the Cold War, the Vietnam War, the Watergate scandal, and events in the Middle East—provide the framework for this exhibition. These topics were particularly fertile ground for editorial cartoonists.

The exhibition offers viewers an extensive opportunity to experience the work of Herbert L. Block (1909–2001)—commonly known as Herblock—alongside the work of his contemporaries over the period of four decades and provides visual insights into key moments that shaped the United States in the twentieth century. Pointing Their Pens draws from the comprehensive collections of cartoon art acquired by the Library of Congress since the early 1900s, including the Herbert L. Block Collection and the Art Wood Collection of Cartoon and Caricature.

Graphic Arts Galleries, Ground Floor, Thomas Jefferson Building
Library of Congress
First St. SE, between Independence Ave. & East Capitol St.
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 26 -
October 08, 2015
Women in Cartography: Celebrating 400 Years of Unsung Contributions to the Mapping World
This exhibition recognizes and celebrates the long overlooked role of women in the world of mapping; bringing their stories, accomplishments, and most importantly their maps to light. Curated by Alice Hudson, former Chief of the Map Division at the New York Public Library, Women in Cartography showcases the works of better-known women cartographers such as Marie Tharp, who, in partnership with Bruce Heezen, created the first scientific map of the entire ocean floor, and, Agnes Sinclair Holbrook who created the Hull-House maps, statistical cartographic presentations of social data from the immigrant rich Near West Side neighborhoods of Chicago.

Join us in celebrating these remarkable women and their maps, dating from Coletta van den Keere’s engraved portrait of Jodocus Hondius ca. 1613 to Claire Kiedrowski’s modern GIS and LiDAR work for Kappa Mapping in Maine.

Tue 10am – 4pm
Wed 10am – 4pm
Thu 10am – 8pm
Sat 10am - 2pm

Free and open to the public

Osher Map Library
Portland Campus
University of Southern Maine
314 Forest Avenue
Portland, ME
Exhibit New England
March 26 -
October 22, 2015
Women in Cartography: Celebrating 400 Years of Unsung Contributions to the Mapping World
This exhibition recognizes and celebrates the long overlooked role of women in the world of mapping; bringing their stories, accomplishments, and most importantly their maps to light. Curated by Alice Hudson, former Chief of the Map Division at the New York Public Library, Women in Cartography showcases the works of better-known women cartographers such as Marie Tharp, who, in partnership with Bruce Heezen, created the first scientific map of the entire ocean floor, and, Agnes Sinclair Holbrook who created the Hull-House maps, statistical cartographic presentations of social data from the immigrant rich Near West Side neighborhoods of Chicago.

Tue 10am – 4pm
Wed 10am – 4pm
Thu 10am – 8pm
Sat 10am - 2pm

Free & open to the public

Osher Map Library
Smith Center for Cartographic Education
UM campus
University of Southern Maine
Portland, ME
Exhibit New England
March 30, 2015 -
May 08, 2016
Mathew Brady’s Photographs of Union Generals
Mathew Brady’s Photographs of Union Generals is a part of the NPG’S series of exhibitions marking the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. Although Brady may be best known for his photographic documentation of the Civil War, his New York and Washington, DC galleries also did a brisk business throughout the conflict by producing studio portraits of the ever-changing roster of Union Army generals.

Featuring modern prints made from Brady’s original glass-plate negatives in the National Portrait Gallery’s Frederick Hill Meserve Collection, this installation includes portraits of many of the North’s military leaders, from George McCellan and Ambrose Burnside to William Tecumseh Sherman and Ulysses Grant.

11:30am - 7pm daily
Closed December 25

National Portrait Gallery
Eighth and F Streets NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 11, 2015 -
January 05, 2016
Do The Spirits Return?: From Dark Arts to Sleight of Hand in Early 20th Century Stage Magic
Today, we think of magic as pleasurable sleight of hand with a dash of neuroscience; acts which amuse and astound. But for centuries, the word “magic” evoked more powerful ideas: control over the boundaries between life and death, witchcraft and satanism, the sacred power of relics and amulets, the healing arts of shamans, and the deceptive practices of confidence men. This pre-rational history of “magic” lies just beneath the surface of the golden age of stage magic, as perfectly exemplified by the life and work of Howard Thuston (1869–1936) a former con man, carnival speiler and missionary student who became one of the most famous magicians of his time with a reputation surpassing that of his chief rival Harry Houdini. “Do The Spirits Return?” will explore the surprising intersections between spiritualism, torture theatre, dark arts and early 20th century stage magic as seen in the work of Howard Thurston via stunning, never before exhibited original posters, artworks, artifacts, props, photographs and ephemera drawn from the astounding collection of over 50,000 artifacts amassed by Brooklyn native Rory Feldman.

Wed - Mon, 12:00pm - 6:00pm
Tue, CLOSED

Admission to the Museum & Library is $8. Seniors and students are $6, and children 12 and under are free.

The Morbid Anatomy Museum
424 Third Avenue (corner of 7th Street)
Brooklyn, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 11 -
October 18, 2015
Exhibit: One-of-a-Kind: Unique Photographic Objects from the Center for Creative Photography
This exhibition challenges the expectation that photographs are infinitely reproducible multiples. Typically photographs are printed from a negative or digital capture, and can be produced in editions ranging from a few prints to several hundred. However, some photographic processes – including daguerreotypes, tintypes, and Polaroid prints – produce only a single, one-of-a-kind object.

In other cases, artists choose to use materials in a way that produces a unique artwork, such as sculpting and collaging with or painting and drawing on photographs. The exhibition will include works from the entire history of the photographic medium, from the 1840s to the present day. Unique photographs by David Emitt Adams, Pierre Cordier, Betty Hahn, Bill Jay, Chris McCaw, Joyce Neimanas, Susan Rankaitis and Andy Warhol will be included.

Mon & Tue Closed
Wed 10am - 9pm
Thu 10am - 5pm
Fri 10am - 5pm
(First Fridays: 10am - 10pm)
Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 12pm - 5pm

Doris and John Norton Gallery for the Center for Creative Photography
Phoenix Art Museum
1625 N. Central Avenue
Phoenix, AZ
Exhibit Southwest
April 16 -
December 27, 2015
From Aesop To Updike Edward Gorey’s Book Cover Art
Edward Gorey is well know for over 100 written and illustrated works (though not all titles are books) including The Gashlycrumb Tinies and The Doubtful Guest. The author-artists set and costume designs for his award-winning Broadway Dracula, and his animated sequences to PBS Mystery! boosted his creative achievements.

However, this output overshadows his achievements as a much-in-demand illustrator for other authors. While Gorey was busy creating his world of stiff Victorians, sinister Edwardians, doomed infants, strange creatures, stifling interiors and mysterious landscapes, he was also busy creating a significant body of commercial book design for a variety of authors and publishers. Our 2015 exhibit, From Aesop to Updike: Edward Goreys Book Cover Art & Design is a varied sampling of almost five decades of commercial workan integral component (and not just an intriguing sideline) of Edward Gorey's artistry.

April 16 - June 28
Thu/Fri/Sat: 11:00 - 4:00
Sun: 12:00 - 4:00

July 1 - October 11
Wed/Thu/Fri/Sat: 11:00 - 4:00
Sun: 12:00 - 4:00

October 16 - December 27
Fri/Sat: 11:00 - 4:00
Sun: 12:00 - 4:00

Adults: $8.00
Students & Seniors (65+): $5.00
Children 6-12 years old: $2.00
Children under 6 are free

The Edward Gorey House
8 Strawberry Lane
Yarmouth Port, MA
Exhibit New England
April 25 -
October 12, 2015
Andy Warhol: Campbell's Soup Cans and Other Works, 1953–1967
Andy Warhol’s Campbell’s Soup Cans is the signature work in the artist’s career and a landmark in MoMA’s collection. The 1962 series of 32 paintings is the centerpiece in this focused collection exhibition of Warhol's work during the crucial years between 1953 and 1967. The Soup Cans mark a breakthrough for Warhol, when he began to apply his seminal strategies of serial repetition and reproduction to key subjects derived from American commodity culture. Warhol also developed his signature use of the flat, uniform aesthetic of photo-screenprinting just after he completed the Soup Cans. For the first time at MoMA, the 32 Soup Cans are shown in a line (rather than a grid), echoing the way they were first exhibited at the Ferus Gallery, Los Angeles, in 1962. The exhibition also includes drawings and illustrated books Warhol made in the 1950s, when he started his career as a commercial artist, and other paintings and prints from the 1960s, when he became a beacon of the Pop art movement.

The Paul J. Sachs Prints and Illustrated Books Galleries, second floor
Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 02 -
November 29, 2015
We Are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence
Featuring 60 maps and 40 prints, paintings and objects, this major gallery exhibition traces the American story from the French and Indian War to the creation of a new national government and the founding of Washington, D.C. as its home.

Mon – Thu 10am – 7pm
Fri – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 1 – 5pm

McKim Exhibition Hall
Central Library in Copley Square
Boston Public Library
700 Boylston Street
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
May 08, 2015 -
January 24, 2016
How Posters Work
How Posters Work shows how dozens of different designers—from prominent pioneers like Herbert Matter, Paul Rand, Philippe Apeloig and M/M (Paris), to lesser-known makers—have mobilized principles of composition, perception and storytelling to convey ideas and construct experiences.

Featuring more than 125 posters from Cooper Hewitt’s permanent collection, the exhibition demonstrates how some of the world’s most creative designers have employed design principles to produce powerful acts of visual communication.

The exhibition is organized into 14 subsections: focus the eye, overwhelm the eye, use text as image, overlap, cut and paste, assault the surface, simplify, tell a story, amplify, double the meaning, manipulate scale, activate the diagonal, make eye contact and make a system.

Some of the posters on view include:

Paula Scher’s 1994 poster for “Him” at The Public Theater
Lucian Bernhard’s 1909–1910 “Adler” poster
Michael Bierut’s 1999 poster “Light/Years”
Ladislav Sutnar’s 1958 work “Addo-x”
Frederick Siebel’s 1942 “Someone Talked”

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
2 East 91st Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 09 -
November 29, 2015
Gray Matter: David Macaulay’s Black and White
The Carle is pleased to announce it will host an exhibition of the original art from David Macaulay’s Caldecott award-winning Black and White. The exhibition which will be on view from May 9 to November 29, 2015 is a partial celebration of the 25th anniversary of the book’s publication. Heralded as one of the first post-modern picture books where a unified linear narrative was rejected, the book comprises four possible stories arranged in four panels per page which the reader can read according to their preference. In his acceptance speech, Macaulay praised the committee for its choice of such a seemingly unorthodox book. The visitor will be able to gain a deeper understanding of Macaulay’s process through the wealth of preliminary material.

Tue. – Fri. 10am – 4pm
Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

The Eric Carle Museum
of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
May 11 -
November 13, 2015
Vanessa Bell’s Hogarth Press Designs
Vanessa Bell (1879–1961) was an English painter, designer, and important member of the Bloomsbury roup, a cluster of culturally influential figures in early 20th-century London. Throughout her career she designed many book jackets and illustrations for Hogarth Press, a British publishing house founded by Bell’s sister, author Virginia Woolf, and Leonard Woolf. This exhibition showcases several examples of Bell’s exquisite, yet simple, designs.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

National Museum of Woman in the Arts
1250 New York Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 16 -
November 01, 2015
FRIDA KAHLO: Art, Garden, Life
The New York Botanical Garden announces its major 2015 exhibition, FRIDA KAHLO: Art, Garden, Life, focusing on the iconic artist's engagement with nature in her native country of Mexico. Opening on May 16 and remaining on view through November 1, the exhibition will be the first solo presentation of Kahlo's work in New York City in more than 25 years, and the first exhibition to focus exclusively on her intense interest in the botanical world.

Visitors to the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory will walk through a stunning flower show reimagining Kahlo's studio and garden at the Casa Azul (Blue House) in Coyoacán, Mexico City. Curated by distinguished art historian and specialist in Mexican art, Adriana Zavala, Ph.D., the multifaceted exhibition will include a rare display of more than a dozen original Kahlo paintings and works on paper on view in the LuEsther T. Mertz Library's Art Gallery at the Garden. Accompanying events invite visitors to learn about Kahlo's Mexico and her enduring cultural influence through poetry, lectures, "Frida al Fresco" evenings, Mexican-inspired shopping and dining experiences, and hands-on art activities for kids.

The New York Botanical Garden
2900 Southern Blvd.
Bronx, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 16 -
November 01, 2015
Frida Kahlo: Art, Garden, Life
This blockbuster exhibition is the first to examine Frida Kahlo’s keen appreciation for the beauty and variety of the natural world, as evidenced by her home and garden as well as the complex use of plant imagery in her artwork. Featuring a rare display of more than a dozen original Kahlo paintings and works on paper, this limited six-month engagement also reimagines the iconic artist’s famed garden and studio at the Casa Azul, her lifelong home in Mexico City.
Accompanying events invite visitors to learn about Kahlo’s life and enduring cultural influence through music, lectures, Frida al Fresco evenings, Mexican-inspired shopping and dining experiences, and hands-on art activities for kids. As a complement to your visit, use our new mobile guide to see rare photos and footage, listen to expert commentary, and create your own Frida Selfie to share with friends.

Tue – Sun 10am – 6pm & the following holiday Mondays:
May 25 (Memorial Day)
September 7 (Labor Day)
October 12 (Columbus Day)

The LuEsther T. Mertz Library Art Gallery, 4th Floor
& Ross Gallery
New York Botanical Garden
2900 Southern Blvd.
Bronx, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 17 -
October 04, 2015
From Bauhaus to Buenos Aires: Grete Stern and Horacio Coppola
From Bauhaus to Buenos Aires: Grete Stern and Horacio Coppola is the first major exhibition to focus on the German-born Grete Stern and the Argentinean Horacio Coppola, two leading figures of avant-garde photography who established themselves on both sides of the Atlantic. The exhibition begins in the late 1920s with each artist’s initial forays into photography and typographic design. In Berlin in 1927, Stern began taking private classes with Walter Peterhans, who was soon to become head of photography at the Bauhaus. A year later, in Peterhans’s studio, she met Ellen (Rosenberg) Auerbach, with whom she opened a pioneering studio specializing in portraiture and advertising. Named after their childhood nicknames, the studio ringl + pit embraced both commercial and avant-garde loyalties, creating proto-feminist works. In Buenos Aires during the same period, Coppola initiated his photographic experimentations, exploring his surroundings and contributing to the discourse on modernist practices across media in local cultural magazines. In 1929 he founded the Buenos Aires Film Club to introduce the most innovative foreign films to Argentine audiences. His early works show the burgeoning interest in new modes of photographic expression that led him to the Bauhaus in 1932, where he met Stern and they began their joint history.

Following the close of the Bauhaus and amid the rising threat of the Nazi powers in 1933, Stern and Coppola fled Germany. Stern arrived first in London, where her friends included activists affiliated with leftist circles and where she made her now iconic portraits of German exiles, including those of Bertolt Brecht and Karl Korsch. After traveling through Europe, camera in hand, Coppola joined Stern in London, where he pursued a modernist idiom in his photographs of the fabric of the city, tinged alternately with social concern and surrealist strangeness.

In the summer of 1935, Stern and Coppola embarked for Buenos Aires, where they mounted an exhibition in the offices of the avant-garde magazine Sur, announcing the arrival of modern photography in Argentina. The unique character of Buenos Aires was captured in Coppola’s photographic encounters from the city’s center to its outskirts, and in Stern’s numerous portraits of the city’s intelligentsia, from feminist playwright Amparo Alvajar to essayist Jorge Luis Borges to poet-politician Pablo Neruda. The exhibition ends in the early 1950s, with Stern’s forward-thinking Sueños (Dreams), a series of photomontages she contributed to the popular women’s magazine Idilio, portraying women’s dreams mobilized by the unfulfilled promises of the Peronist regime in Argentine society with urgency and surreal wit.

The exhibition is accompanied by a major publication edited by Roxana Marcoci and Sarah Meister with a selection of original texts by Stern and Coppola translated into English by Rachel Kaplan. The catalogue will consist of three essays on the artists written by the exhibition curators and scholar Jodi Roberts. Special thanks to the Estate of Horacio Coppola and Galerie Jorge Mara— La Ruche.

The Edward Steichen Photography Galleries, third floor
The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 22 -
October 12, 2015
The Hirschfield Century: The Art of Al Hirschfield
Al Hirschfeld (1903–2003) brought a distinct style to celebrity drawings, making his work instantly recognizable —to be “Hirschfelded” was a sign that a performer had arrived. Now for the first time, nine decades of Hirschfeld’s work will be on display at the New-York Historical Society in The Hirschfeld Century: The Art of Al Hirschfeld, a multimedia exhibition organized in partnership with The Al Hirschfeld Foundation and in conjunction with Alfred A. Knopf’s publication of curator David Leopold’s groundbreaking book on the artist. The exhibition of over 100 original works includes many highlights from Hirschfeld’s prolific career with a special emphasis on the New York Times—where he was a contributor for over seven decades. Come see the art that defined New York popular culture and made the 1900s The Hirschfeld Century.

Tue - Thu & Sat 10am - 6pm
Fri 10am - 8pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 26 -
October 18, 2015
In Focus: Animalia
Photographs of animals have circulated since the early history of the medium, initially focusing on those that were tame, captive, or dead. Advancements in camera and film technologies enabled precise recordings of beasts in motion and, eventually, in their natural habitats. Spanning the history of photography, this exhibition examines the expanding tradition of animal representation through the works of artists such as Adolphe Braun, Lisette Model, Horatio Ross, Taryn Simon, Sandy Skoglund, and Alfred Stieglitz, among others.

Tue – Fri & Sun 10:00am – 5:30pm
Sat 10:00am – 9:00pm
Closed Mondays

Free admission

West Pavilion, Lower Level
The Getty Center
1200 N Sepulveda Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
May 30, 2015 -
February 07, 2016
Various Small Fires (Working Documents)
Various Small Fires (Working Documents) brings together artworks and documents from the LACMA archives to tell unusual or overlooked stories of the museum’s first 50 years. Ranging from items that outline a robot roaming the galleries to a Rembrandt painting traveling in disguise to a dog working as a security guard, this exhibit flares up minor, formative, and occasionally incendiary stories that have informed LACMA’s history.

To illuminate these anecdotes and to spark dialogues between objects and documents, Various Small Fires also features works in our collections by artists Reverend Ethan Acres, Barbara Bloom, Chris Burden, Michael Crowe, Eugenio Dittborn, Louise Lawler, Allan McCollum, Maria Nordman, Claes Oldenburg, Terrence O’ Shea, Jackson Pollock, Sanford Roth, Ed Ruscha, James Welling, and possibly George Brecht.

Additionally, the exhibition presents 50 portraits of people looking at art at LACMA—one per year, from 1965 through 2015.

Mon, Tue, & Thu: 11am – 5pm
Wed: Closed
Fri: 11am – 8pm
Sat & Sun: 10am – 7pm

$15 Adults
$10 Seniors (62+) & Students with valid ID
Free Children (17 and under), Members, & Active-duty military personnel including National Guard & Reserve, & their families*

Admission includes access to LACMA's collection galleries and temporary exhibitions with an extra charge for entrance to specially ticketed exhibitions.

* Memorial Day through Labor Day (Monday, May 25 through Monday, September 7, 2015) as part Blue Star Museums. Admission does not include specially ticketed exhibitions.

Art of the Americas Building, Level 3
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
5905 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
June 04, 2015 -
January 02, 2016
First Among Many: The Bay Psalm Book and Early Moments in American Printing
A new exhibition will tell the story of early printing in the American colonies, spanning 100 years, as printing evolved from a colonial necessity to the clarion of freedom.

At the centerpiece of the exhibition will be two copies of the Bay Psalm Book, officially titled "The Whole Booke of Psalmes Faithfully Translated into English Metre" (1640). One copy will be drawn from the Rare Book and Special Collections Division at the Library of Congress. The second copy, which belongs to Rubenstein, will be on display from June 4 through Saturday, Aug. 8. Americans will see these texts together for the first time. Both copies were at one time in the library of the Rev. Thomas Prince and, therefore, originally part of the historic Old South Church Library in Boston.

In the exhibition, The Bay Psalm Book will be seen as launching an approach to publication that was particular to colonial America. Early American printing often was rugged, immediate and practical, fueled by a sense of purpose and devotion. Publications—sermons, pamphlets, newspapers, broadsides—gave shape to the American cause and ideology.

Printing was brought to English North America in 1638. Stephen Daye, a locksmith by training, was under contract to establish a press in North America upon his arrival. In 1640, less than two years after landing in Massachusetts Bay, Daye and his son Matthew printed "The Whole Booke of Psalmes Faithfully Translated into English Metre," the first book printed in what is now the United States. The Bay Psalm Book emerged as the first among many landmark American printings—materials that registered American thought, devotion and revolution. Only 11 copies of The Bay Psalm Book from 1640 are known to exist today.

Approximately 30 additional Library of Congress treasures will be on display, including the Dunlap Broadside of the Declaration of Independence (1776); "Poor Richard’s Almanac" by Benjamin Franklin (1741 and 1742); "Common Sense" by Thomas Paine (1776); "The Federalist," essays by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay (1788); "Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral" by Phillis Wheatley (1773); "The Power of Sympathy," the first novel printed in the colonies (1789); samples of colonial newspapers from Boston, New York, Philadelphia and Williamsburg, Virginia; and the Algonquian Indian Bible, translation by John Eliot (1663).

Mon - Sat 8:30am - 4:30pm

Free and open to the public

South Gallery
Second Level, Thomas Jefferson Bldg.
Library of Congress
10 First Street SE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 04, 2015 -
November 30, 2017
British Guiana One-Cent Magenta: The World’s Most Famous Stamp
The 1856 British Guiana One-Cent Magenta is displayed in the museum’s William H. Gross Stamp Gallery. This exhibition of the stamp is the longest and most publicly accessible showing ever.

Open daily 10am - 5:30pm
(except December 25)

Free admission

Smithsonian's National Postal Museum
2 Massachusetts Avenue NE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 07 -
October 18, 2015
Recent Acquisitions of Italian Renaissance Prints: Ideas Made Flesh
Prints played a pivotal role in the development and transmission of Italian Renaissance style. Because many of these 16th-century prints reproduce the designs of other artists, they have often been undervalued. Yet the sophistication and beauty with which they translate even the most complex idea into sensuous form had no precedent and have few equals. This can be appreciated only in rare, early impressions of these prints. In recent years the Gallery has been fortunate to acquire a surprising number of such impressions. This exhibition presents some two dozen, reflecting the principal styles and numerous major masters of the period.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 11am – 6pm

West Building
National Gallery of Art
National Mall (between 3rd & 9th Streets NW)
6th Street & Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 13 -
October 12, 2015
Magna Carta: Law and Legend, 1215-2015
This exhibition celebrates the 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta by exploring the language and ideology of constitutionalism (both written and unwritten) and the rule of law. While the cornerstone of the exhibition is The Huntington's 13th-century draft of the Magna Carta, the themes move beyond Medieval England to explore the relevance of Magna Carta to later English history, the history of the United States, and the modern world, drawn from various areas of the Huntington’s collections. The exhibition also delves into the legend and popular perceptions of Magna Carta. Over the past eight centuries Magna Carta, as a concept, holds a powerful and empowering place in the imaginations of thinkers, artists, and rebels, demonstrating how people across time have offered unique interpretations of this significant document.

Library, West Hall
The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
June 13 -
October 12, 2015
Magna Carta: Law and Legend, 1215-2015
This exhibition celebrates the 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta by exploring the language and ideology of constitutionalism (both written and unwritten) and the rule of law. While the cornerstone of the exhibition is The Huntington's 13th-century draft of the Magna Carta, the themes move beyond Medieval England to explore the relevance of Magna Carta to later English history, the history of the United States, and the modern world, drawn from various areas of the Huntington’s collections. The exhibition also delves into the legend and popular perceptions of Magna Carta. Over the past eight centuries Magna Carta, as a concept, holds a powerful and empowering place in the imaginations of thinkers, artists, and rebels, demonstrating how people across time have offered unique interpretations of this significant document.

Library, West Hall
The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
June 16 -
October 15, 2015
The Ancestry of the Mother Road: Mapping Route 66
Route 66 looms large in American culture. In song and story, the mother road carries us to the promise of a better life. Traveling Route 66 is still the ultimate road trip even now as we pick our way along a road disrupted by the modern, looking for remnants of an earlier path. Route 66 was years in the making as Americans sought the best path from the East to the West, and is being remade even today, as it continues to hold a special place in the imagination of travelers and wanderers of all kinds. Railroad scouts and surveyors, early auto adventurers, dust bowl migrants, suburban road-tripping families, all following their own paths, but all on the same road.

Corridor Gallery
Pusey Library
Harvard University Libraries
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
June 22 -
October 02, 2015
In the Library: Setting the Scene with Theater Architecture and Set Design
From amphitheaters of the ancient world to the digitally outfitted entertainment centers of today, the theater venue is constantly evolving. But in the 18th and 19th centuries, theaters presented unique problems for architects. While excellent acoustics were critical, so was design, as a theater was meant to represent the modern city in which it stood yet also serve as a lasting and noble reflection of that city's cultural patrimony. This focus installation recounts the comedy and drama that unfolded during this pivotal era in architecture and design as told through a collection of nearly two dozen rare books.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 11am – 6pm

East Building, Ground Floor, Study Center
National Gallery of Art
National Mall (between 3rd & 9th Streets NW)
6th Street & Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 24 -
October 11, 2015
Captain Linnaeus Tripe: Photographer of India and Burma, 1852-1860
This exhibition will feature some of the earliest and most striking views of the landscape and architecture of India and Burma, by a pioneering British photographer. Part of the V&A India Festival.

This captivating exhibition of the pioneering 19th-century British photographer Captain Linnaeus Tripe features over 60 of his most striking views of Indian and Burmese landscape and architecture, taken between 1852-1860. Through these early photographs, Tripe explored the possibilities of this new medium, showcasing and documenting archaeological sites, monuments and landscapes, rarely seen in the West. Tripe creates an impression of the world around him, combining the keen eye of a surveyor with the sensibilities of an artist, while giving testimony to his emerging skills as photographer.

0.00 - 17.45 daily
10.00 - 22.00 Friday (reduced gallery openings after 18.00)

Victoria and Albert Museum
Cromwell Road
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
June 26 -
October 11, 2015
Alice: 150 Years of Wonderland
This exhibition will bring to light the curious history of Wonderland, presenting an engaging account of the genesis, publication, and enduring appeal of Lewis Carroll's classic tale, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

For the first time in three decades, the original manuscript will travel from the British Library in London to New York, where it will be joined by original drawings and letters, rare editions, vintage photographs, and fascinating objects—many never before exhibited.

The enchanting tale of Wonderland was first told “one golden afternoon” to Alice Liddell and her two sisters. Delighted by the fantastic world of logic and nonsense inhabited by rabbits in waistcoats and playing card gardeners, Alice begged for a written copy of her namesake's adventures under ground. Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (better known by his pen name Lewis Carroll) painstakingly wrote out the story, illustrating the original manuscript with his own pen and ink drawings.

Revised and radically expanded, it appeared in 1865 as Alice's Adventures in Wonderland with the iconic illustrations of Sir John Tenniel. But Tenniel was dissatisfied with the printing quality, and the edition was suppressed almost immediately. Now, only twenty-two or twenty-three copies of the first edition are known to survive. It was quickly republished, and Tenniel's brilliant drawings (markedly different from Carroll's own) and their relationship to the text contributed to the initial and enduring success of the book.

From here, the ethos of Alice and the universe of Wonderland took hold of our imagination, and—150 years later—we are still following her down the rabbit hole.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5:00pm
Fri 10:30am - 9:00pm
Sat 10:00am - 6:00pm
Sun 11:00am - 6:00pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue (at 36th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 27 -
October 18, 2015
Night Vision: Nocturnes in American Art, 1860-1960
This is the first major museum survey dedicated to scenes of the night in American art from 1860 to 1960—an era not yet illuminated by electricity to the beginning of the Space Age. Night Vision: Nocturnes in American Art will bring together 90 works in a range of media—including paintings, prints, drawings, and photographs—created by such leading American artists as Ansel Adams, Winslow Homer, Edward Hopper, Lee Krasner, Georgia O’Keeffe, Albert Ryder, John Sloan, Alfred Stieglitz, and Andrew Wyeth, among others. Featuring exceptional works from the Museum’s collection as well as loans from prestigious public and private collections across the United States, the exhibition will provide visitors with an opportunity to consider transformations in American art across generations and traditional stylistic confines. Organized by Bowdoin curator Joachim Homann, Night Vision will demonstrate the popularity of the theme with American artists of diverse aesthetic convictions and investigate how they responded to the unique challenges of picturing the night.

The works featured in Night Vision will reflect the broad range of subject matters that attracted artists to night scenes—including the reflections of moonlight on ocean waves, encounters in electrified urban streets, and firework celebrations. For some mid-nineteenth-century artists, such as Albert Bierstadt, paintings of the night offered the compelling artistic challenge of representing the natural elements of clouds, moon, and sky when shrouded in darkness, while at the same time providing rich opportunities for the symbolic use of light. Following the industrial revolution and emergence of electricity in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, American artists, such as Alfred Stieglitz, John Sloan, and Martin Lewis, began to consider new techniques in order to capture electrical sources of light and their effects on nighttime conditions. Across the range of works presented in Night Vision, visitors will see how reduced visual information and an altered perception in the dark tested artists’ ability to render shadow, light, and form. This lack of light ultimately resulted in less illustrative scenes and transformed the night into an arena for stylistic experimentation and the rise of abstraction in the early mid-twentieth century.

From June 28 through August 14, 2015, Bowdoin College students will give tours of the exhibition Tuesday through Sunday at 2:00pm.

Major programming related to the exhibition includes scholarly lectures by Barbara Haskell, Curator of painting and sculpture, Whitney Museum of American Art; Eleanor Harvey, Senior Curator, Smithsonian American Art Museum, and Alexander Nemerov. Students and volunteer docents will lead gallery tours. In addition, the BCMA is organizing film screenings, musical performances, and family day events.

KEYNOTE LECTURE:
June 27, 2015 | 5:00 p.m. | Kresge Auditorium, Visual Arts CenterKeynote Lecture: “Night Vision: Nocturnes in American Art, 1860-1960”

June 27, 2015 | 6:00 to 7:30 pm. | Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Opening reception celebrating the summer exhibition, Night Vision: Nocturnes in American Art, 1860-1960.

July 2, 2015 | 11:00 a.m. | Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Music at the Museum
Bowdoin International Music Festival faculty perform a selection of nocturnes in conjunction with the exhibition, Night Vision: Nocturnes in American Art, 1860–1960. RSVPs are requested.

July 16, 2015 | 12:00 noon | Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Gallery Conversation
Joachim Homann, curator, leads a discussion of Night Vision: Nocturnes in American Art, 1860-1960.

July 23, 2015 | 11:00 a.m. | Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Music at the Museum
Bowdoin International Music Festival faculty perform a selection of nocturnes in conjunction with the exhibition, Night Vision: Nocturnes in American Art, 1860–1960. RSVPs are requested.

July 30, 2015 | 12:00 noon | Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Gallery Conversation
Linda Docherty, catalogue essayist and associate professor of art history emerita, Bowdoin College, leads a discussion of Night Vision: Nocturnes in American Art, 1860-1960

August 13, 2015 | 12:00 noon | Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Gallery Conversation
Jane Brox, author of Brilliant: The Evolution of Artificial Light, leads a discussion of Night Vision: Nocturnes in American Art, 1860–1960.

August 20, 2015 | 12:00 noon | Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Gallery Conversation
Joachim Homann, curator, leads a discussion of Night Vision: Nocturnes in American Art, 1860-1960.

Tue - Sat 10am - 5pm
Thu 10am - 8:30pm
Sun 1pm - 5pm

Fully accessible, free & open to the public

Halford Gallery
Center Gallery
Becker Gallery
Focus Gallery
Bernard and Barbro Osher Gallery
Bowdoin College Museum of Art
9400 College Station
Brunswick, ME
Exhibit New England
June 30 -
October 29, 2015
A Renaissance Man : The Art of Fred Marcellino
The Carle is pleased to announce A Renaissance Man : The Art of Fred Marcellino, which opens June 30, 2015, and remains on view until October 29, 2015. The exhibition comprises over 90 works and shows the full range of Marcellino’s talent, from youthful Abstract-Expressionism through record cover and book jacket design to the crowning achievements of his career—illustrations for children’s books. As he noted about his picture-book art, "each picture is a link in a chain, and they all exist in counterpoint with the text. And although you want each picture to have impact, just like a jacket, the book illustration can also be much more subtle. It can be pondered and savored over a period of time. It's a very different discipline from what I was used to, but I must say it was love at first sight." Of special focus will be the art for Puss in Boots (1990), for which he won a Caldecott Honor award. The exhibition coincides with the 25th anniversary of the book’s publication. A 48-page soft-cover book by Nicholas Falletta, The Art of Fred Marcellino, will accompany the exhibition.

Tue. – Fri. 10am – 4pm
Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

The Eric Carle Museum
of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
July 01 -
November 08, 2015
Emmet Gowin: Photographs
Wed 10am — 5pm
Thu & Fri, 10am — 9pm
Sat & Sun 10am — 5pm

Closed Mon & Tue, New Year's Day, July 4, Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve & Christmas Day

Free admission
Parking $8 | Free for members

Gallery L11
Bloch Building
The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
4525 Oak Street
Kansas City, MO
Exhibit Midwest
July 01 -
October 31, 2015
Fantastic Worlds: Science and Fiction, 1780-1910
This exhibition explores the intersecting influences of science, innovation, industry, and the Victorian creative imagination through books from the Smithsonian Libraries and selected historical objects from Smithsonian museums.

The industrial revolution that began at the end of the 18th century paved the way for a period of dramatic change in America and Europe as advances in science, art, and industry forged a new world. This revolution was also a communications revolution: mechanized printing and book production, increased literacy, the first illustrated newspapers, and the penny post all changed the way information was consumed and shared. And the public was enthralled by the rapid invention and scientific discoveries that characterized the age. Science became spectacle, and such literary luminaries as Jules Verne, Mary Shelley, and Edgar Allan Poe responded, crafting fiction that explored the farthest reaches of the new scientific landscape and the startling possibilities this new knowledge uncovered.

10am – 5:30pm daily

Free admission

American History Museum
1st Floor, West Wing
Smithsonian Libraries Gallery
1400 Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 04 -
November 05, 2015
Warhol's Nature
Drawn primarily from the extensive collections of The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, this exhibition will explore the artist’s surprising lifelong engagement with nature as subject matter. Although well known for his responsiveness to popular culture and advertising, Warhol simultaneously explored the natural world through his work, depicting landscapes, flora, and fauna in innovative and surprising ways. Organized by theme, the exhibition includes works from every decade of the Pop icon’s long career, from his earliest drawings as a commercial illustrator through his later paintings of flowers and wildlife. Visitors will have the opportunity to experience well-known artworks like Warhol’s Self-Portrait in his infamous fright wig overlaid with camouflage, the iconic Flowers series of the 1960s, and an interactive installation of his inflatable Clouds. Photographs, documents, and personal objects once owned by Warhol will offer further insight into this understudied yet vitally important strain of the artist’s career.

Mon & Thu 10am - 6pm
Wed & Frd 10am - 9pm
Sat & Sun 10am - 6pm
Tue CLOSED

Summer bonus hour! From Memorial Day through Labor Day, Crystal Bridges’ galleries will open at 10 am every day (closed Tuesdays).

$8 adults
FREE Youth ages 18 & under
FREE for Members

See two exhibitions for one price July 25 through October 5! Your $8 ticket includes admission to BOTH Warhol’s Nature and JAMIE WYETH.

Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art
600 Museum Way
Bentonville, AR
Exhibit South
July 07 -
October 04, 2015
"Dr. Seuss's Boids and Beasties"
A selection of original drawings by beloved children's author Theodor Seuss Geisel, illustrating his whimsical and fantastical creatures.

Main floor, Geisel Library
The Library
UC San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive
La Jolla, CA
Exhibit West
July 10, 2015 -
January 03, 2016
Disney and Dali: Architects of the Imagination
Guest-curated by filmmaker Ted Nicolaou, this extraordinary, immersive, and enriching experience tells the story of the unlikely alliance between two of the most renowned innovators of the twentieth century: brilliantly eccentric Spanish Surrealist Salvador Dalí and American entertainment innovator Walt Disney. Presented through an interactive multimedia experience of original paintings, story sketches, conceptual artwork, objects, correspondences, archival film, photographs, and audio—many of which highlight work from Disney studio artists Mary Blair, Eyvind Earle, John Hench, Kay Nielsen, and more—this comprehensive exhibition showcases two vastly different icons who were drawn to each other through their unique personalities, their mutual admiration, and their collaboration on the animated short Destino. Although the film was not completed during their lifetimes, the friendship between these two great men nevertheless endured.

“The Walt Disney Family Museum, founded by Walt’s daughter, Diane Disney Miller, presents the life story of Diane's father, which story inspires visitors to heed their imaginations and persevere in pursuing their goals,” said The Walt Disney Family Museum’s Executive Director Kirsten Komoroske. “In keeping with this mission, the exhibitions at the museum feature dreamers, innovators, and collaborators. The museum’s next major exhibition unveils another aspect of Walt's story: the friendship between Walt and the influential and revolutionary artist, Salvador Dalí. The exhibition, co-organized with the Dalí Museum, not only further fulfills the mission of the museum, but also further solidifies the museum’s place among the many phenomenal fine art institutions in the San Francisco Bay Area.”

Open daily 10am–6pm, except every Tues, Jan 1, Thanksgiving & Dec 25

Last ticket sale and entry is 4:45pm

Diane Disney Miller Exhibition Hall
Walt Disney Family Museum
104 Montgomery Street
The Presidio
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
July 11, 2015 -
February 21, 2016
Unfinished Stories: Snapshots from the Peter J. Cohen Collection
Spanning the 20th century, the more than 100 found photographs in “Unfinished Stories” depict a century of image-making by private photographers. “A quick shot fired by a hunter without deliberate aim,” reads the original definition of a snapshot from the early 19th century. The term “snapshot,” popularized shortly after the invention of Kodak’s box camera in the 1880s, came to describe photographs of everyday life using a handheld camera. Speedy new technology boosted the ability to create a visual diary, commemorating events and personal moments, road trips and holidays. Now, more than a century later, these once ubiquitous and now historic, silver gelatin photographs are rapidly being replaced by Instagram and other digital forms of photography, hence a new appreciate for such photographs.

“Unfinished Stories” celebrates a century of snapshots from the Peter J. Cohen Collection of amateur photographs. An avid collector, Cohen rescued more than 50,000 lost, discarded, or disowned personal photographs, culled from flea markets, antique shops, galleries, eBay, and private dealers. As he sifted and sorted through his finds, Cohen discovered mesmerizing, often humorous, shots removed from their original context: People at Play, Photographers’ Shadows, Double Exposure, Couples, Oddities, and Hula Madness. These pictures reveal the lives of strangers through intimate exposures, telling a story, or as Cohen puts it, “a teeny part of a story that remains unfinished.”

“Unfinished Stories” celebrates unexpected discoveries in these compelling visual objects, each representative of what makes photography such a rich form of expression and a deep cultural symbol for everyone who’s had to stand still and say, “Cheese!”

Mon & Tue 10am – 4:45pm
Wed – Fri 10am – 9:45pm
Sat & Sun 10am – 4:45pm

Members free
Adults $25
Seniors (65+) $23
Students (18+) $23
Youths 7–17* FREE*
Children 6 & under FREE

Mary Stamas Gallery (Gallery 153)
MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, BOSTON
Avenue of the Arts
465 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
July 11, 2015 -
February 21, 2016
Yours Sincerely, John S. Sargeant. Through Nov. 15, 2015. Exhibit: Pastoral to Pop: 20th-Century Britain on Paper
Prints and drawings from a century of change by England’s great artists

This survey of more than 50 British prints and drawings from the 20th century features rarely seen works from the MFA’s collection as well as recent acquisitions and loans. Ranging from an 1890s drawing of Brittany by Post Impressionist Robert Bevan to a 1999 etching by Lucian Freud—perhaps the greatest figural artist of his generation—this selection presents a surprising mixture of subjects and styles. Highlights of the exhibition are streamlined color linocuts made by Grosvenor School artists Cyril Power, Sybil Andrews, and Lill Tschudi, while abstract works on view demonstrate the “Vorticist” style—a uniquely British variant of Futurism and Cubism. Other sections of the exhibition touch on landscape, architecture, and the music hall; differing depictions of the human figure (including works by Henry Moore and David Hockney); and the British Pop explosion of the 1960s.

Mon & Tues 10am – 4:45pm
Wed – Fri 10am – 9:45pm
Sat & Sun 10am – 4:45pm

Members FREE
Adults $25
Seniors (65+) $23
Students (18+) $23
Youths 7–17* FREE*
Children 6 & under FREE

Frances Vrachos Gallery (Gallery 144)
Museum of Fine Arts
Avenue of the Arts
465 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
July 11, 2015 -
June 26, 2016
The Gentle Lessons of Donkey-Donkey, Petunia, The Happy Lioness, and other Animal Pals from the Imagination of Roger Duvoisin
Roger Duvoisin’s remarkable children’s book illustrations have charmed and captivated generations of young readers, guiding them through some of life’s important lessons. The story of Donkey-donkey teaches children how to accept themselves – and the way they look. The silly goose Petunia thinks that carrying a book under her wing makes her wise; but after several mishaps, she realizes that she must learn to read in order to put wisdom into her mind and heart. A crocodile who befriends farmyard animals, and eventually the farmer and his wife, discovers that, “Life is so beautiful when we have so much in common with friends.”

Born in Geneva, Switzerland, in 1904, Roger Duvoisin came to the United States in the mid-1920s to work as a textile designer. In 1932, he created A Little Boy Was Drawing, his first children’s book, which he wrote and illustrated for his son. Duvoisin eventually became a celebrated illustrator of more than 140 children’s books, forty of which he also authored. Until his death in 1980, Duvoisin resided in New Jersey.

In addition to A Little Boy Was Drawing, the exhibition features original illustration drawings for some of Duvoisin’s beloved picture book classics for children, including Donkey-donkey: The Troubles of a Silly Little Donkey (1933); Caldecott Medal winner White Snow, Bright Snow (1947), authored by Alvin Tresselt; Petunia (1950); A for the Ark (1952); Nubber Bear (1966), authored by William Lipkind; The Old Bullfrog (1968) and The Web in the Grass (1972), both by Berniece Freschet; The Crocodile in the Tree (1972); Snowy and Woody (1979); and The Happy Lioness (1980), authored by Duvoisin’s wife Louise Fatio. The almost forty drawings in this display were selected from the more than 2,000 Duvoisin works in the Zimmerli’s extensive collection of American prints and drawings.

This family-friendly exhibition is open to the public on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays, as well as during first Tuesday evenings of the month.

Duvoisin Gallery
Zimmerli Art Museum
71 Hamilton Street
New Brunswick, NJ
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 14, 2015 -
March 01, 2016
Aubrey Beardsley: Artist and Aesthete
A focus on the illustrator and writer, Aubrey Beardsley (1872-1898). In a short life of intense and fevered activity, Beardsley produced many original and highly-finished black-and-white drawings for process block reproduction. His designs were frequently grotesque, morbid and erotic and include illustrations of Alexander Pope's Rape of the Lock (1895) and Oscar Wilde's Salome (1894). He was also art editor for The Yellow Book (1894–5) and, with Arthur Symons, produced The Savoy (1896). Beardsley was known for his elegance, charm and witty conversation and became a cult figure of the decadent aesthetic movement. He became embroiled in the scandal surrounding Oscar Wilde’s arrest for committing ‘indecent acts’ and in 1895 was sacked from the Yellow Book, after which he fled to France. Beardsley died of tuberculosis, which had plagued him since his youth, on 16 March 1898 aged only twenty-five.

Free & open to the public

Room 29: case display
National Portrait Gallery
St. Martin’s Place
London, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
July 16 -
December 20, 2015
Darkness and Light: Exploring the Gothic
Housed in the neo-Gothic grandeur of The John Rylands Library, Darkness and Light reveals how Gothic architecture and anatomy inspired and influenced a literary genre, and how the lasting legacy of Gothic can be found in art, films and subculture today.

From the fantastical to the macabre, this intriguing exhibition unearths Gothic treasures from the Library’s Special Collections to investigate subjects as varied as the role of women in the Gothic movement, advances in medical science and classic literature.

Amongst the fascinating items on display is Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto (1764), the first Gothic novel. With a Gothic medieval castle, doomed love and restless spectres of the past, it sets the scene for the genre and sits alongside a whole host of Gothic bestsellers including The Monk, Udolpho and Jekyll and Hyde.

The exhibition also showcases artwork by students from the University of Salford and a gallery of photographic portraits of 'Goths', celebrating diversity and inviting visitors to explore what Gothic means to them.

Alongside the exhibition, experience a ghostly Gothic tour of the Library or come along to screenings of classic Gothic films, including FW Murnau’s Nosferatu, in the striking Historic Reading Room.

Mon 12 noon - 5pm
Tue 10am - 5pm
Wed 10am - 5pm
Thu 10am - 5pm
Fri 10am - 5pm
Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 12 noon - 5pm

Free and open to the public

The John Rylands Library
150 Deansgate
Manchester, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
July 17 -
October 04, 2015
Be Enveloped ! artistry, mystery & history
Be Enveloped! seeks to engage visitors to experience envelopes in myriad ways.

:: As a functional structure – a manufactured object that envelops or encloses its contents securely and confidentially, for mailing and other usages;

:: As a vehicle for art and/or commerce, from advertising covers, illustrated envelopes, and collages, to identity systems and branding;

:: As a historical record or personal artifact, where the envelope may add significantly to the story told by its contents;

:: As a decorative object, keepsake, or collectible;

:: As an internationally recognized icon for personal communication – on stationery, postage stamps, and other merchandise;

:: As a literary device, where envelopes are central and inspirational– from Griffin and Sabine to The Jolly Postman and Flat Stanley.

Opening reception July 17th, 6 - 8pm

Unfolding the Envelope
The Companion bookazine is an ode to the envelope, presenting reflections from enthusiasts with diverse & delightful perspectives. Debuting at the opening at a favorable price.

San Francisco Center for the Book
375 Rhode Island Street
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
July 20, 2015 -
March 04, 2016
Fashioning Philadelphia - The Style of the City, 1720-1940
Home to modest Quakers, prosperous free blacks, well-heeled international transplants, and working classes of all sorts, Philadelphia was once the country's most cosmopolitan city. Observers remarked that our tastes were as refined as those of Paris and London.

In addition to being known for stylish residents, Philadelphia gained a reputation as a manufacturing powerhouse by the 19th century. Called the “Workshop of the World,” the city supported countless manufacturers producing goods used in the fashion industry. Tanneries, ironworks, and mills made the leather, metal, and cloth that a thriving community of shoemakers, tailors, and milliners fashioned into parasols, hoop skirts, shawls, and hats.

Philadelphia did not just make clothing and accessories, but also shaped American ideas about fashion. The 19th century’s most important fashion magazines, such as Godey’s Lady's Book, were published here and distributed across the country. Chestnut Street became world-renowned as one of the most fashionable retail corridors, where men like retail pioneer John Wanamaker situated their stores. This exhibition tells the largely unheralded story of the city's contributions to the early fashion industry, from the early-18th through the mid-20th century.

Special Opening Preview and Reception
Thursday, July 16, 2015
5:30 – 7:00pm

Louise Lux-Sions and Harry Sions Gallery
The Library Company of Philadelphia
1314 Locust Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 25 -
November 15, 2015
Yours Sincerely, John S. Sargent
John Singer Sargent comes to life through letters and lore

Behind the renowned paintings of John Singer Sargent lies another legacy—a treasure trove of letters, photographs, and sketches that document the artist’s world. Among the correspondence, more than a dozen letters from Sargent to Claude Monet illuminate his lifelong friendship and admiration for the French Impressionist master. Another note, carefully written in a neat round hand, describes a certain portrait as a “masterpiece”; it is signed Amélie Gautreau, an appreciative sitter best known today as Madame X.

In celebration of the recent gift to the MFA of The John Singer Sargent Archive, which establishes the Museum as the center for Sargent scholarship, this exhibition selected from the archive and the MFA’s collection, brings Sargent’s era to life, enhancing our understanding of the man and his work. The show features watercolors, prints,drawings, correspondence, and photographs arranged around several themes. Caricatures of Sargent by his friends and fellow artists Henry Tonks and Max Beerbohm add a dose of humor to our view of this hard-working artist, while sketches, props, and photographs of his studios illuminate his artistry and reveal the spaces of his labor.

Member Talk: "Yours Sincerely, John S. Sargent"
For Members Only - Ticket Required
August 13, 2015 6:30pm – 7:30pm
Harry and Mildred Remis Auditorium (Auditorium 161)

Mon & Tues 10am – 4:45pm
Wed – Fri 10am – 9:45pm
Sat & Sun 10am – 4:45pm

Members FREE
Adults $25
Seniors (65+) $23
Students (18+) $23
Youths 7–17* FREE*
Children 6 & under FREE

Edward and Nancy Roberts Family Gallery (Gallery LG26)
Museum of Fine Arts
Avenue of the Arts
465 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
August 04 -
November 29, 2015
Frank Reaugh: Landscapes of Texas and the American West
Artist, educator, inventor, and naturalist, Charles Franklin Reaugh (1860–1945), pronounced "Ray," is one of the Southwest's earliest and most distinguished artists. Working in the vein of American Impressionism, Reaugh devoted his career to visually documenting the vast, unsettled regions of the Southwest before the turn of the twentieth century.

Drawing on more than 200 artworks in the Ransom Center's Frank Reaugh collection, as well as other archives, museums, and private collections across the state, the exhibition examines Reaugh's mastery of the pastel medium and his sophisticated yet direct approach to the challenges of landscape painting, particularly en plein air (painting outdoors). While Reaugh's contributions have often been linked to the region, his work holds broad historical precedents.

Highlights include side-by-side comparisons of his small field sketches with larger studio works illustrating the same geographic location and "Twenty-four Hours with the Herd," Reaugh's epic series of mural-size pastels that served as the centerpiece of his performance work of the same title.

The exhibition offers a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for visitors to experience a historical survey of the most significant works created by an artist often referred to as "the Dean of (early) Texas Artists."

Mon - Wed & Fri 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 7pm
Sat & Sun Noon – 5pm

Free admission

Ransom Center
University of Texas Austin
21st & Guadalupe Streets
Austin, TX
Exhibit Southwest
August 07 -
November 15, 2015
Raw Material: Uncovering Chicago's Historical Collections
Chicago Collections will hold its first public exhibition at Chicago Public Library's Harold Washington Library Center. Our three month exhibition will highlight notable archives, manuscripts, and objects from our members' collections. We are excited to celebrate our collaboration with the Chicago community as Chicago Collections continues to grow.

The stories Chicagoans tell about themselves and their history are as diverse and dynamic as the city itself. But where do they find the resources and evidence to bring those stories to life? Raw Material: Uncovering Chicago's Historical Collections answers this question using a rich display of personal, cultural, and historical artifacts including photographs, letters, diaries, and other diverse items that tell stories linking Chicago’s past to the intimate, personal experiences of life in our city.

This exhibit will be accompanied by multiple lectures, artist talks, and educational projects.

Free & open to the public

Special Collections Exhibit Hall, 9th Floor
Harold Washington Library Center
Chicago Public Library
400 S. State Street
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
August 07 -
November 01, 2015
Animal Tales
An exhibition exploring animals on the page

From Aesop’s Fables to Ted Hughes’s Crow, the stories we tell about animals are often stories about us. This exhibition goes on the trail of animals on the page, asking why they have come to play such an important role in literature for adults and children alike.

From the earliest marks made by humans in caves to the modern-day internet full of cute cats, animals have been enduring media stars. Symbols of the sacred or the profane, the domesticated or the ferocious, animals have always fed our imagination helping us to make sense of the world and ourselves. Inspiring writers, poets, scientists and artists through the ages, a library can become the largest zoo in the world when you begin to track down the creatures lurking among the pages on the shelves.

Animal Tales explores what wild – and tamed – creatures say about us when they take on literary or artistic form and displays richly illustrated editions of traditional tales, from Anansi to Little Red Riding Hood. And be closer to nature with a soundscape based on the Library’s collection of sound recordings, with illustrations and poems by Mark Doty and Darren Waterston.

Entrance Hall
The British Library
96 Euston Road
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
August 08, 2015 -
February 07, 2016
From the Library: Photobooks After Frank
The publication of Robert Frank's The Americans marked a shift in the medium of photography. Traditionally, photographs were viewed as an objective representation of reality, but Frank demonstrated they could also serve as expressive channels to communicate a truth about the photographer's experience of the world. This focus installation explores the role of the photobook in the decades following Frank's seminal work and the ways in which it shaped the emergence of photography as a viable fine art.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 11am – 6pm

West Ground Floor Gallery 21
National Gallery of Art
National Mall (between 3rd & 9th Streets NW)
6th Street & Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
August 09 -
November 08, 2015
Castiglione: Lost Genius
Masterworks on Paper from the Royal Collection

Castiglione: Lost Genius—Masterworks on Paper from the Royal Collection features 90 of the finest drawings, etchings and monotypes by the master draftsman, painter, and printmaker Giovanni Benedetto Castiglione. A forgotten master from the Italian baroque, Castiglione was a self-proclaimed genius, whose artworks entered the Royal Collection in 1762. The exhibition explores Castiglione’s mastery of art and how he produced brilliant works despite his turbulent private life that prevented him from becoming more widely known.

Castiglione was not only a painter and draftsman, he was the revolutionary inventor of the monotype in the 1640s, experimenting with the medium centuries before subsequent artists such as Degas and Gauguin would during the late nineteenth century. This print method allowed Castiglione to make a print from one-off designs, allowing him to combine the brio and dash of his draftsmanship with his interest in printmaking.

Mon Closed
Tue–Thu 10am – 5pm
Fri 10am - 8pm
Sat–Sun 10am – 5pm

Hamilton Building - Level 1
Denver Art Museum
100 W. 14th Avenue Pkwy.
Denver, CO
Exhibit West
August 18 -
December 18, 2015
Will H. Bradley, An American Artist: Selections from the Gordon A. Pfeiffer Collection
American artist and illustrator Will H. Bradley (1868-1962) had a marked impact on fine and commercial graphic arts in the late-nineteenth and early-twentieth centuries. He contributed to the growth of various artistic movements within the United States and influenced developments in illustration and layout practices in the book and periodical arts. His 1894 design for Chap-Book, titled The Twins, has been called the first American Art Nouveau poster; this and other posters for the magazine brought him widespread recognition and popularity. In 1895, Bradley founded the Wayside Press in Springfield, Massachusetts, and published a monthly arts periodical, Bradley: His Book. He remained an active and important member of the graphic arts world for the rest of his long life.

Gordon A. Pfeiffer (University of Delaware, BE '56) had a forty-year career in banking, from which he retired as senior vice president of Mellon Bank. Throughout the book, library, and collecting worlds, Pfeiffer is known as a renowned a collector of books and ephemera. In 1977, he co-founded the Delaware Bibliophiles and has been an active member of the Board of the University of Delaware Library Associates since 1979, including serving as President from 1982-1985. This exhibition celebrates Gordon Pfeiffer's generous gift to the University of Delaware Library and highlights one of the world’s premier collections of the work of Will H. Bradley.

UD Library Special Collections
University of Delaware
181 South College Avenue
Newark, DE
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
August 19, 2015 -
June 26, 2016
Jazz: Print Series by Romare Bearden
Romare Bearden (American, 1911-1988) was one of the leading artists of the twentieth century. An artist, writer, and jazz lyricist, throughout his long career he depicted African-American life in his paintings, prints, and most notably in his collages.

Born in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, he matured as an artist in New York during the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s and 1930s. In 1979, he created a remarkable lithograph print series on jazz based on his paintings and monotypes. In this suite of six prints he captured the essence of this genre of music and his love of jazz and the blues. Art historian Gail Gelburd notes in her book on Bearden’s prints, A Graphic Odyssey: Romare Bearden as Printmaker, “It is the sound of jazz that gives these images their sounds. Behind the paintings [and these prints], you can hear the music of his friends, jazz musicians such as Earl (Fatha) Hines, Cab Calloway, and Duke Ellington.”

The subject of these prints—jazz musicians and performance halls—was a favorite of Bearden’s as well as many of his contemporaries who were influenced by the vibrant music scene in Harlem. As a child Bearden lived just a few blocks from the Savoy Ballroom, and for sixteen years he worked in an art studio above the landmark Apollo Theatre in Harlem. However, the connection between Bearden’s work and jazz goes beyond subject matter to include style and composition, incorporating such aspects as improvisation and call and response.

Bearden’s work is included in many important public collections including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, among others. He was the recipient of many awards and honors, most notably the National Medal of Arts presented by President Ronald Reagan in 1987.

Sun - Fri 1pm - 5pm
Sat Closed

The museums are now now closed for summer break: May 15 to August 18, 2015

Booth Lobby
Joel & Lila Harnett Museum of Art
Modlin Center for the Arts
28 Westhampton Way
University of Richmond
Richmond, VA
Exhibit South
August 19, 2015 -
January 08, 2016
Influence of Anxiety: Lovecraft, Bloch, Barlow, et al
This exhibition focuses on correspondence between Lovecraft and a number of budding young authors. Their recorded communication is both visual and literary, descriptive and didactic, light-hearted and severe. It illuminates the shared affinities and fears of those in his circle.

Main Exhibition Gallery, 1st floor
John Hay Library
20 Prospect Street
Providence, RI
Exhibit New England
August 20 -
November 22, 2015
JAMES ROSENQUIST: ILLUSTRIOUS WORKS ON PAPER, ILLUMINATING PAINTINGS
One of the most influential living American artists, James Rosenquist became well known in the 1960s as a leader in the American Pop art movement alongside contemporaries Andy Warhol, Roy Lichtenstein, and Claes Oldenburg. For more than five decades Rosenquist has created seminal work in a variety of media, employing printmaking, collage, drawing, and painting. This exhibition presents over 35 examples from the artist’s long career, including examples of his earliest abstractions from the 1950s to his exploration and evolution into Pop Art as well as recent works that epitomize his distinct and powerful style.

Iconic large scale prints and works on paper, like F-111 (North, West East South), 1974, and Space Dust, 1989, alongside monumental works like the 11 by 25 foot Geometry of Fire, 2011, are balanced with rare sketches, studies and collages that give unique insight into the artistic process.

Developed in collaboration with Oklahoma State Museum of Art and curated by Sarah C. Bancroft, co-curator of the artist’s 2003 retrospective at the Guggenheim Museum, Illustrious Works on Paper, Illuminating Paintings exemplifies the indelible impact Rosenquist has had, and continues to have, on American art.

Mon CLOSED
Tue – Sun 11am – 4:30pm
Thu until 8pm

Opening Reception: Thursday, September 10th 5-7pm

SUArt Galleries
Syracuse University Humanities Center for the College of Arts & Sciences
Shaffer Art Building
Syracuse, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
August 21 -
December 21, 2015
Covered with Vines: The Many Talents of Ludwig Bemelmans
In an old house in Paris that was covered with vines

Lived twelve little girls in two straight lines. . . .

The smallest one was Madeline.

Although she was the smallest of the little girls who lived under the care of Miss Clavel in that Parisian house, Madeline has grown up, in the years since her birth in 1939, to overshadow everything else her creator, Ludwig Bemelmans, accomplished during his long, varied, and highly productive career. Based on both the collection formed by Jean Kislak, a Madeline aficionado, and Penn's own Bemelmans collections, this exhibition displays printed books, manuscripts, and art to recover a Bemelmans now largely forgotten, while also celebrating Madeline.

In three parts devoted to Bemelmans as writer, Bemelmans as artist, and Bemelmans as creator of Madeline, we consider Ludwig Bemelmans's multiple careers. Restaurateur and hotelier, soldier, memoirist, short story writer, novelist, travel writer, script writer, cartoonist, illustrator, commercial artist, painter — all of Bemelmans's other personal and artistic endeavors, including even his other children's books, have disappeared beneath the towering success of Madeline. All deserve a second look. Neither Madeline as character nor Madeline as book came out of nothing. Penn's exhibition hopes to remove some of the vines that prevent a clearer view of the multi-talented artist who was her source.

Wednesday, October 14, 5:00 PM
Exhibition Remarks and Reception
Class of 1978 Orrery Pavilion, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
*Registration is required.

HOMECOMING WEEKEND
Saturday, November 7, 2015, 10:45-11:45 AM
Readings of Madeline Books
Goldstein Family Gallery, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
In conjunction with the exhibit Covered with Vines, Kislak Center Director Will Noel and exhibit curator Daniel Traister will read several selections from the beloved children's book collection Madeline. Milk and cookies will be available during this family friendly event.

Saturday, November 7, 2015, 4:00-6:00 PM
Homecoming Gallery Hop
Goldstein Family Gallery, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Join us for a special guided tour of Covered with Vines: The Many Talents of Ludwig Bemelmans during Penn's Homecoming Weekend Gallery Hop. Exhibit curator Daniel Traister will lead the tour.

Mon - Fri 10am - 5pm
Wed 10am - 8pm

Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Van Pelt Dietrich Library Center, 6th floor
Goldstein Family Gallery
3420 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
August 22, 2015 -
January 18, 2016
Celebrating W.B. Yeats at 150
2015 marks 150 years since the birth of Irish poet and Nobel laureate William Butler Yeats in 1865. This exhibition explores Yeats’ work as a noted poet and playwright as illuminated by artwork, rare books, and printed ephemera drawn from the University of Victoria’s Legacy Gallery and Special Collections and University Archives. A prolific author, Yeats’ writings can be traced not only in his books, but also through his contributions to magazines and to the theatre. Yeats’ first publication Mosada: A Dramatic Poem was originally published in the Dublin University Review and throughout his career Yeats’ writings were widely distributed through his contributions to magazines and journals. Yeats’ involvement in the theatre, most notably the Irish Literary Theatre (which became the Abbey Theatre) represented an important creative and political outlet for Yeats. In addition to penning plays for production, Yeats also participated in managing the theatre, from selecting plays to hiring (and firing) actors. The exhibition also features unique items documenting the artistry of Yeats’ family, including his father John Butler Yeats, brother Jack Butler Yeats, and sisters Susan Mary Yeats (Lily) and Elizabeth Corbet Yeats (Lollie), all of whom were artists of note.

Legacy Maltwood Gallery
Mearns Centre for Learning
McPherson Library
University of Victoria
3800 Finnerty Road
Victoria, BC, CANADA
Exhibit International
August 24 -
December 18, 2015
The Shape of Content in Christian Books, Broadsides, and Devotional Objects
From the late Middle Ages through the twentieth century, books produced for Christian worship, study, or private devotion have taken a great variety of shapes. Their many sizes, configurations, systems of organization, and special features have varied widely according to the requirements of their contents and the needs of their owners. Shorter texts intended for ephemeral purposes often appeared as single-sheet broadsides, while certain devotional objects functioned much like books yet conveyed their meaning in innovative ways. This exhibition explores how handwritten or printed examples of Christian texts from past centuries have transcended traditional expectations, bringing new meaning and enhanced understanding to their readers.

Mon – Fri 8:30am – 5pm

Bridwell Library
Perkins School of Theology
Southern Methodist University
6005 Bishop Blvd.
Dallas, TX
Exhibit Southwest
August 24 -
October 10, 2015
Comic Book Apocalypse: The Graphic World of Jack Kirby
Famed comics artist Jack Kirby, whose work launched The Avengers, X-Men, Captain America, and the Marvel Universe, is the focus of an exhibition at the California State University, Northridge Art Galleries. While focusing on Kirby’s later work, from about 1965 on, the exhibition will document his entire career, which lasted more than half a century and involved almost every major publisher in comic books. Comic Book Apocalypse is curated by Professor Charles Hatfield, founder of CSUN’s popular “Comics and Graphic Novels” course and the author Hand of Fire: The Comics Art of Jack Kirby.

Mon - Sat 12pm - 4pm
Thu 12pm - 8pm
Sun & Holidays CLOSED during exhibitions

Public Reception:
Sat, Aug 29th 4pm - 7pm

Curator Talk:
Mon, Aug 31st 10am

Panel Discussion:
Sat, Sep 26th 1pm

CSUN Art Galleries
18111 Nordhoff Street
Northridge, CA
Exhibit West
August 24 -
December 18, 2015
After Gutenberg: Print, Books, and Knowledge in Germany through the Long Sixteenth Century
Explore innovations in the dissemination of knowledge in Germany during the long sixteenth century. From the marriage of text and image on the printed page to the use of censorship and propaganda to the manuals of advice and instruction, witness the dynamic intellectual life of Germans between 1450 and 1650.

Mon - Fri 9am - 5pm

1st Floor Concourse (west end)
Rare Books & Special Collections
102 Hesburgh Library
Notre Dame, IN
Exhibit Midwest
August 27 -
November 01, 2015
Lyle, Lyle, Crocodile and Friends: The Art of Bernard Waber
Lyle, Lyle Crocodile and Friends: The Art of Bernard Waber is the first major exhibition to explore the life and career of children’s book writer and illustrator, Bernard Waber (1921-2013). Through over 90 original illustrations and other artifacts, including newly discovered sketches and manuscripts, the exhibit explores the whimsical and emotionally resonant world Waber created in a long career that spanned more than 30 picture books, including the much loved Lyle, Lyle Crocodile stories. Curated by children's book historian Leonard S. Marcus, this celebration of Waber's work and spirit in his hometown of Philadelphia is a fitting tribute.

Tue - Fri 10am - 5pm*
Sat - Sun 10am - 5:30pm

*From Memorial through Labor Days, the Museum stays open until 8:00pm on Wednesday evenings. Admission after 5:00 is pay-what-you-wish.
*On Saturday, September 26th the Museum will be open until 8:00pm for the Papal Visit and the World Meeting of Families.

Members Free
Adults $12
Seniors (ages 65 & up) $11
Youth (ages 13-21) $11
Children (ages 12& under) Free
Active Military (with ID) Free*

*From Memorial to Labor Days, we additionally offer free admission to immediate family members (spouse or children) of active military personnel.

National Museum of American Jewish History101 South Independence Mall
East Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
August 29, 2015 -
January 17, 2016
Paul Brown from the Permanent Collection
A special exhibition of works by American illustrator Paul Desmond Brown (1893 - 1958) from the NSLM permanent collection will be on view August 29, 2015 to January 17, 2016. Approximately 25 works, including original pencil and ink drawings, sketches, and watercolor, will be on display. Original pencil drawings from some of Brown’s most popular books Spills and Thrills (1933), Ups and Downs (1936), and Good Luck and Bad (1940) will be on view for the first time. The exhibition highlights Brown’s steeplechase images from the 1930s.

Wed 10am - 5pm
Thu 10am - 5pm
Fri 10am - 5pm
Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 1pm - 5pm

National Sporting Library & Museum
102 The Plains Road
Middleburg, VA
Exhibit South
September 01, 2015 -
January 30, 2016
Catholics in the New World A Selection of 16th - 18th Century Texts
Over 65 years before the first English settlers stepped off the boat in Jamestown, Virginia, the first Catholic books printed in the Americas rolled off the presses in Mexico City. Catholics in the New World presents 16th-18th century works from both sides of the Atlantic that document Catholics’ evolving relationship with the Americas. Highlights include the oldest surviving book printed in the Western hemisphere, Doctrina Breve, published in Mexico City in 1544; the oldest book published in South America, Doctrina Christiana, printed in Lima in 1584; an 18th-century Mexican book containing 2624 anagrams of the angel’s greeting to Mary; and prayer books and catechisms translated into Native American languages from across the Americas, including Aymara, Zapotec, and Montagnais.

Tue & Fri - Noon - 5pm
Wed & Thu — Noon - 8pm
Sat & Sun — Noon - 6pm
Mon - Closed

Adults: $10.00
Seniors (ages 65 & older): $8.00
Students & Children: $5.00
Children under 5: Free
Members: Free

We are pleased to offer Free Admission to this exhibition during the World Meeting of Families, September 22 - 25.

Rosenbach Museum & Library
2008-2010 Delancey Place
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 01, 2015 -
March 11, 2016
One Text, 16 Manuscripts: Magna Carta
First written in 1215, the ideas of liberty and human rights contained in and derived from England’s Magna Carta (the Great Charter) have persisted for 800 years. They have provided inspiration for developments in law now enshrined in constitutions and treaties across the world. The survival and resonance of those ideas is reflected in the manuscripts currently on display.

Tangible items like these manuscripts connect us with the past and allow us to approach the people who created, used and treasured these documents. Each manuscript tells a different story and raises many questions. Why have they survived when so many others did not? When did they become objects of veneration? Did earlier collectors value them for the same reasons we collect them now?

Come see these objects in person or explore our digitized copies of Magna Carta and other statutory compilations.

9am - 5pm

The Caspersen Room
Harvard Law School Library
1545 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
September 01, 2015 -
July 31, 2016
Simeon De Witt: Mapping the Revolution
This exhibition celebrates one of the university’s most distinguished alumni, Simeon De Witt, the fourteenth graduate of what was then known as Queen’s College and, because of the Revolutionary War, the only one in 1776. A native of Wawarsing, New York, De Witt studied at the college as New Brunswick became embroiled in Revolutionary conflict. When the British occupied much of the area and classes came to a halt DeWitt, along with many of his classmates, fled to New York City to join the Continental Army. De Witt was quickly recognized for his abilities and assigned to work with New Jersey resident Colonel Robert Erskine, the Continental Army’s Geographer and Surveyor. Under direct orders from General George Washington, Erskine and De Witt produced hand-drawn maps enabling the Continental Army to move throughout New Jersey. The maps they produced were of such fine quality that De Witt was promoted to Surveyor General after Erskine’s death in 1780.

After the war, De Witt was appointed Surveyor General of New York State and moved to Albany. He occupied the position for over fifty years to great accomplishment, producing detailed maps and atlases of the entire state. De Witt was a respected member of Albany society, and he was recognized with numerous honors, such as election to the Society of the Cincinnati, the nation’s oldest patriotic organization, founded by members of the Continental Army to promote the ideals of patriotism.

American Art Gallery
Jane Voorhees Zimmerli Art Museum
Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey
71 Hamilton Street
New Brunswick, NJ
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 05, 2015 -
January 03, 2016
Tiffany Glass: Painting with Color and Light
As a painter, Louis C. Tiffany was captivated by the interplay of light and color, and this fascination found its most spectacular expression in his glass “paintings.” Through the medium of opalescent glass, Tiffany could actually capture light in color and manipulate it to achieve impressionistic effects. Using new and innovative techniques and materials, Tiffany Studios created leaded-glass windows and lampshades in vibrant colors and richly varied patterns, textures, and opacities.

The objects on display are some of the most iconic and celebrated of Tiffany’s works. Chosen for their masterful rendering of nature in flowers or landscape scenes and for the subtle use of light and shading in decorative geometric patterns, they exemplify the rich and varied glass palette, sensitive color selection, and intricacy of design that was characteristic of Tiffany’s leaded-glass objects. This exhibition also highlights some of the key figures at the Tiffany Studios who made essential contributions to the artistry of the windows and lamps—chemist Arthur J. Nash and leading designers Agnes Northrop and Clara Driscoll.

Dr. Egon Neustadt, the founder of The Neustadt Collection, began acquiring Tiffany lamps in 1935. He went on to amass an almost encyclopedic collection, but perhaps his most significant acquisition came in 1967 when he purchased the flat and pressed glass leftover from the closing of the Tiffany Studios in the late 1930s. This collection contains some 275,000 pieces of glass and is the only holding of its kind. With both materials and objects, The Neustadt Collection of Tiffany Glass is uniquely positioned to fully explore Louis C. Tiffany’s legacy of painting with color and light.

Tue – Sun 10am – 5pm
Last house tour tickets sold at 3:15pm

Museum Store & Bookstore open Tue – Sun 10am – 5:30pm

Closed Thanksgiving Day & Christmas Day

Library open Mon – Fri 8:30am – 4:30pm
Closed holidays

Winterthur
5105 Kennett Pike (Route 52)
Winterthur, DE
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 08 -
December 15, 2015
THE POPE'S OTHER JOBS: JUDGE AND LAWGIVER
The Pope is universally known as the spiritual leader of the Roman Catholic Church. But it is often forgotten that for much of the papacy's history the Pope was the most important judicial and legislative authority in western Europe.

A new exhibition at the Yale Law Library, "The Pope's Other Jobs: Judge and Lawgiver," illustrates the Pope's legal responsibilities throughout history using rare books and a medieval manuscript from the Law Library's outstanding collection. It is curated by Anders Winroth, Forst Family Professor of History, Yale University, and Michael Widener, the Law Library's Rare Book Librarian. Winroth is one of the world's leading authorities on medieval canon law.

Mon - Fri 9am - 4pm

Rare Book Exhibition Gallery
Lillian Goldman Law Library, Level L2
Yale Law School
127 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
September 10 -
October 10, 2015
The Downtown Decade: NYC 1975-1985
RARE is pleased to present The Downtown Decade, a multi-genre overview of the intensely fertile and interconnected creative scene that developed on New York City's Lower East Side during the late 1970s and early 1980s. At a time when the city was on the brink of fiscal disaster and suffering daily internal chaos, a burgeoning artistic community emerged that would enduringly alter previously held perceptions of art, photography, literature, film, and music. On display will be original items both by and featuring many of the participants, including Rene Ricard, David Armstrong, Nan Goldin, the Lurie Brothers, Richard Prince, Cindy Sherman, Blondie, the Ramones, and more, as well as historical documentary material and a period soundtrack. Several special related events will also be held. Please check this page for updated information throughout the summer.

Opening Reception: Tuesday, September 15th, 6–8 pm

RARE
Glen Horowitz Bookseller
17 West 54th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 12, 2015 -
January 03, 2016
Age of Lawyers: The Roots of American Law in Shakespeare's Britain
In the 800th anniversary year of the Magna Carta, Age of Lawyers will offer a close-up look at the rapid increase of lawyers and legal actions in Shakespeare's Britain, from the law's impact on daily life to major political and legal disputes—some invoking the Magna Carta—that still influence American politics and government.

Age of Lawyers will give visitors the chance to explore many of the Folger legal manuscripts on display in further depth through newly digitized images and translated transcripts produced by a current Folger project, Early Modern Manuscripts Online (EMMO).

Age of Lawyers is in memory of Dr. Christopher Brooks (1948–2014).

Mon - Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun noon - 5pm

Free & open to the public

Folger Shakespeare Library
201 East Capitol Street SE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 16 -
November 21, 2015
Alice in a World of Wonderlands: The Translations of Lewis Carroll's Masterpiece
The Grolier Club
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 18, 2015 -
March 13, 2016
Dark Fields of the Republic: Alexander Gardner Photographs 1859- 1872
Alexander Gardner, known as the man who shot the Civil War, created dramatic and vivid photographs of battlefields, which included images of the recently dead. These shocking images continue to haunt the national imagination. After the war, Gardner went west, creating unforgettable pictures of western landscape and portraits of American Indians.

Also included in Dark Fields of the Republic are Gardner's portraits of President Lincoln and the other leading figures, military and civilian. His best known work, the "cracked plate"" photograph of Lincoln, is rarely on view, but will be so for this exhibition. The sitting on Feb. 5, 1865, was mere weeks before Lincoln's assassination in April, the glass plate cracked and Gardner created only one print, which will be on view, from it before throwing the negative away.

The next part of the show documents the course of American expansion as post-war settlers moved westward include landscapes and portraits of American Indians. Gardner's landscapes giving a sense of almost limitless horizons. Juxtaposed with his detailed portraits of Indian chiefs and tribal delegations, these photos have a specificity and gravity that is haunting, not least because we know their fate.

11:30am - 7pm daily
Closed December 25

National Portrait Gallery
Eighth and F Streets NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 18 -
December 31, 2015
Stagestruck City: Chicago's Theater Tradition and the Birth of the Goodman
Chicago’s heritage of live performance and popular amusement is almost as old as the city itself. In the second half of the nineteenth century, palatial theatres in the Loop catered to the appetites of an entertainment-hungry public. Vaudeville, burlesque, melodrama, musical comedy, Shakespeare, and opera dominated the scene, but there was also a developing desire for more “authentic” productions that might address the social, cultural, and economic issues of the modern world.

Stagestruck City explores how Chicagoans’ demands for more and for better entertainment led to the birth of the “little theatre” movement and, eventually, the Goodman. By the turn of the twentieth century, African American theater was prospering, shows first staged in Chicago were winning acclaim on Broadway, and little theatres were offering experimental works often performed by amateur actors. With the opening of the Goodman Theatre in 1925, the values of an insurgent collection of actors, writers, and directors were institutionalized more firmly in Chicago.

Through a selection of Newberry items such as colorful posters, programs, scripts, letters, and photographs, Stagestruck City traces the evolution of Chicago’s theater tradition, driven as it was by a combination of creative ambition and Second City angst.

Curator-led Exhibition Tours
Tue, Sept. 29, 6pm
Thu, Nov. 12, 6pm
Sat, Dec. 12, 11am

Free & open to the public

Smith Gallery
The Newberry
60 West Walton Street
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
September 18 -
October 31, 2015
SARA SHAOUL: STRANGE LABOR
Booklyn is pleased to present a solo-exhibition of artist Sara Shaoul’s multi-disciplinary work that explores the connection between the female body and socio-economic forces.

Also included in the exhibition is the work, “Erin Mahoney (Friend, Organizer, Activist)”, a 15 minute video from 2014 in which the artist’s friend, a union organizer, describes her experience of Occupy Wall Street while brushing out Shaoul’s tangled hair. The piece explores how ideology is expressed through intimate connection. As with much of Shaoul’s work, the video occupies the space between personal experience, research, “information,” lyrical moment, and perception, returning what can be distant politics into the space of personal and communal re/cognition.

Strange Labor is the second in a series of exhibitions considering artists whose work addresses socio-political concerns in a manner that is decidedly personal.

OPENING RECEPTION: Fri, Sept. 18th, 7-10pm

Booklyn Art Gallery
37 Greenpoint Avenue, 4th Fl, Suite E4G
Brooklyn, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 21 -
December 31, 2015
Poetic Associations: The Nineteenth-Century English Poetry Collection of Dr. Gerald N. Wachs
In the period between the French Revolution and the start of World War I, often called “the long nineteenth century,” English poetry enjoyed enormous popularity and respect. The Romantics and the Victorians, as we know them today, were celebrities and, often, close friends, part of a literary community that influenced their professional and personal lives. Dr. Gerald N. Wachs (1937-2013), working closely with his friend, bookseller Stephen Weissman of Ximenes Rare Books, collected their works, using as their guidebook the Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature (CBEL), the standard primary bibliography of English literature. They sought the finest copies, whenever possible ones that were presented by the author to other writers, friends, or family members. The resulting collection of nearly 900 titles, on deposit from the Estate of Gerald Wachs at the University of Chicago Library, illuminates the life and works of these enduring poets.

Mon - Fri 9am - 4:45pm
Sat 9am - 12:45pm while classes at the University of Chicago are in session.

The Special Collections Research Center will be CLOSED:
November 26th - 28th for Thanksgiving
and
Fri, December 25th for Christmas

Special Collections Research Center Exhibition Gallery
The Joseph Regenstein Library
1100 East 57th Street
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
September 21 -
December 19, 2015
The World of Walter Crane
The English artist Walter Crane (1845-1915) is best known for the colorful illustrations he created for a series of toy books – small, inexpensive books for children – that retold fairy tales or nursery rhymes or taught counting or the letters of the alphabet. He was also a prolific illustrator of other kinds of work, both texts of his own composition and works by others. In addition he painted in watercolor and oil, designed wallpapers, stained glass, and ceramics, and published books on the principles of design and decoration. In executing commissions for interior decoration he sometimes worked with his friends Edward Burne-Jones and William Morris, and he contributed the illustrations for one book printed at Morris’s Kelmscott Press. A practitioner and supporter of the Arts and Crafts Movement, he shared Morris’s socialist views on the nature of English society and the role that art and handicraft should play in society.

The exhibition explores these various aspects of Crane’s career using materials drawn from the Caroline Miller Parker Collection of Works by Walter Crane at Houghton Library. This collection, one of the largest and most important collections of works by Crane, includes not only his published works, but also paintings, manuscripts, sketchbooks, and large numbers of preparatory drawings for illustration. The collection, formed by Mrs. Parker, was given to Harvard by her husband. Augustin H. Parker (Harvard College, Class of 1897), who also endowed the Caroline Miller Parker Collection Fund that enables the library to continue acquiring works by or associated with Crane.

Exhibition opening reception: Sept. 30 at 6:30pm

Edison and Newman Room
Houghton Library
Harvard Yard
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
September 24 -
November 07, 2015
The 30th Anniversary of Thornwillow Press
The Grolier Club
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 24, 2015 -
February 26, 2016
Bawdy Bodies: Satires of Unruly Women
Characterized by comically grotesque figures performing lewd and vulgar actions, bawdy humor provided a poignant vehicle to target a variety of political and social issues in eighteenth-century Britain. Bawdy Bodies: Satires of Unruly Women explores the deployment of this humorous but derisive strategy towards the regulation of female behavior. The exhibition presents satirical images of women from a range of subject categories including the royal family, aging members of fashionable society, disparaged mothers, political activists, gamblers, medical wonders, artists, performers and intellectuals.

Wednesdays, 2 - 4:30pm

These exhibitions may also be viewed during tours of the Library by appointment

ASSOCIATED PROGRAMMING
Lecture and Workshops presented in connection with the exhibition

LECTURE: Rock, Paper, Scissors: Dimensionality and Neoclassical Aesthetics in the Art and Fashion of the 1790s.
Amelia Rauser
5:30, October 28, 2015
Sterling Memorial Library Lecture Hall

WORKSHOP: Workshops for Graduate Students
“We are an injured body”: Collectivity and the Female Body.
Jill Campbell
October 2, 2015
The Lewis Walpole Library, Farmington

Expressive Bodies in Eighteenth-Century Satirical Prints
Amelia Rauser, Professor of Art History, Franklin & Marshall College
October 30, 2015
The Lewis Walpole Library, Farmington

Free & open to the public

The Lewis Walpole Library
Yale University Libraries
154 Main Street
Farmington, CT
Exhibit New England
September 25, 2015 -
January 10, 2016
From New York to New Mexico: Masterworks of American Modernism from The Vilcek Foundation Collection
American art experienced radical change a century ago, as a group of innovative, highly-individualistic artists broke with past traditions to define a new art for this country, an art that expressed the energy, vitality, and singular identity of modern America. The artists who led that change are highlighted in this exhibition, featuring more than 60 masterworks from the 1910s to the post-War era by America’s most original abstract painters, including Georgia O’Keeffe, Marsden Hartley, Stuart Davis, Arthur Dove, and a dozen others.

America’s first generation of abstract artists challenged traditional norms of naturalistic image-making during the early decades of the 20th century. Rather than following long established preference for creating paintings that imitated the appearance of the visual world through conventions such as perspective, these artists sought to convey more immaterial concepts. Instead of using color or form to narrate a story or describe a particular person or place, Modernists used the language of art—lines, shapes, colors—expressively to communicate emotion and experience, much the way music can move the spirit in ways that descriptive words cannot. Often starting with observation, they created abstractions that distilled subjects down to essential elements. Locations and themes that were perceived to be uniquely American—New York’s dramatic skyline, the jagged coast of New England, or the diverse cultures and traditions of New Mexico—were translated into dazzling geometries and riotous colors.

The exhibition is divided into several sections, starting with “Nature’s Great Unfolding,” which includes the artists gathered around Alfred Stiegltiz and their shared interest in the spiritual power of nature. In the second section, “The Cubist Impulse,” are artists such as Andrew Dasburg and Stuart Davis who adopted the ideas and aesthetic of Cubism to American subjects. Three monumental cubist still lifes by Davis, reunited publicly for the first time in decades, are the highlight of this section.

The dynamic skyline of New York city, with its towering skyscrapers, as well as other aspects of life in the modern city are celebrated in the third section, “Man Made: Town and Country.” Looking west, the final section, “Our Western Roots,” explores how the American Southwest served as a spiritual and creative oasis for artists seeking a deeper connection to nature and a mythic past.

Drawn from the collections of the Vilcek Foundation, New York, and organized by the Philbrook Museum of Art in Tulsa, Oklahoma, this exhibition features the finest works from one of the country’s greatest collections of American modernism.

Museum Hours:
Sun 9am - 5pm
Mon 9am - 5pm
Tue 9am - 5pm
Wed 9am - 5pm
Thu 9am - 5pm
Fri 9am - 7pm
Sat 9am - 5pm

Georgia O’Keeffe Museum
217 Johnson Street
Sante Fe, NM
Exhibit Southwest
September 25, 2015 -
January 31, 2016
Ernest Hemingway: Between Two Wars
This exhibition, a partnership with Boston’s John F. Kennedy Library, explores many of the greatest novels and short stories of one of the most celebrated authors of the 20th century, Ernest Hemingway (1899–1961). From displays of letters, photographs, typescripts, first editions, and much more, visitors will learn about Hemingway’s creative process and influences, including the legendary Parisian expatriate social scene of the 1920s. Hemingway’s remarkable output during this period—including such novels as The Sun Also Rises, A Farewell to Arms, and For Whom the Bell Tolls—will be at the heart of the exhibition.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

$18 Adults
$12 Children (13–16)
$12 Seniors (65 and over)
$12 Students (with current ID)
Free to members & children 12 & under (must be accompanied by an adult)

Admission is free on Fridays from 7pm - 9pm

Admission to the McKim rooms only (Mr. Morgan's Library, Study, Rotunda, and Librarian's Office) is free during the following times:
Tue 3pm - 5pm
Fri 7pm - 9pm
Sun 4pm - 6pm

Admission is not required to visit the Morgan Shop, Morgan Dining Room, and Morgan Café.

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 27, 2015 -
January 03, 2016
Unhinged: Book Art on the Cutting Edge
This exhibition surveys recent directions in book art through 70 diverse works by 60 prominent artists in the field from across the country, including Great Britain and Australia. It explores the limitless potential of the book as an independent, creative medium through both intimately-scaled pieces and large installations. Many artists carve old volumes or twist their pages into unique, sculptural configurations. Others make their own books and experiment with a multitude of different formats: accordion, pop-up, tunnel, concertina, among others. Some artists reconfigure ancient book forms, such as the scroll or codex, to create unique forms. Books are often combined with other materials, both manufactured and natural, such as plastic, crystals, twigs, even meteorites, to astonishing effects.

Unhinged not only highlights myriad styles and processes, it also presents artists' personal experiences as well as messages about identity, human justice issues, and environmental concerns. From political statements to metaphysical ideas, book artists interpret their medium through expressive and sometimes humorous constructions. After visiting this exhibition, viewers will never look at a book in the same way again.

Whatcom Museum
121 Prospect Street
Bellingham, WA
Exhibit West
September 28 -
December 07, 2015
The Exhibition That Never Was: The Panama-Pacific International Exposition, the Book Club of California, and a Century of Fine Books
Since its founding in 1912, the Book Club of California has held to its commitment to promote and foster the art of the book, and this exhibition traces the evolution of that endeavor. On view will be a selection of books that likely would have been on display at the original PPIE—a snapshot of the book arts in San Francisco during the early twentieth century. The exhibition will also feature a century’s worth of items that each in its way relates to the history of our Club and its evolution as a haven for the appreciation of fine printing, binding, typography, illustration, literature, bibliography, and the history of the book in California and the West. All the books on display are drawn from the collections of the Book Club of California.


EXHIBITION OPENING: Sept. 28, 5 - 7pm
(Free & open to the public)
The program will begin with brief remarks by Book Club Librarian Henry Snyder, and feature historian Laura Ackley, who will present an illustrated talk, “A Whirlwind Tour of the PPIE,” which traces the history of the fair from its original concept in 1904 through its development and all the way to its gala opening in February 1915.

Free & open to the public

The Book Club of California
312 Sutter Street, Suite 500
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
September 28 -
December 19, 2015
Illumination – How the visual captures the imagination
This exhibition explores how technological developments generated new visual forms for artists, from the earliest printed books, sketches and objects. Drawing inspiration from universal themes of the natural and the divine, they then transformed people’s perceptions of art.

This helped to develop our understanding of visual culture — allowing us to see the visual as we have never seen it before.

Free admission, open to the public

Senate House Library, 4th Floor
Malet Street
Bloomsbury
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
September 28, 2015 -
February 19, 2016
The Songs of Songs
The Song of Songs, also known as the Song of Solomon or Canticles, is a book of the Bible that is more lyrical than other parts of the Bible, containing poems about love. For over a century, modern fine printers have been inspired by these expressions of joy and pain, producing beautiful editions that celebrate this classical text through a high level of craft, deluxe materials, illustration, and typography. This exhibition shows examples from Arts Library Special Collections and the Divinity Library that demonstrate a range of approaches in design, printing, and illustration.

Artist, printer, and publisher Robin Price is currently in production on her interpretation of The Song of Songs. She is working in collaboration with artist Barbara Benish, type designer Liron Lavi Turkenich, and vocal artist Victoria Hanna. Process materials from this new work are included in the exhibition. Robin Price and Barbara Benish will speak about their collaboration on this project on Tuesday, November 10, 2015, at 3pm in the Sterling Memorial Library lecture hall. After their presentation, join us to print keepsakes in The Bibliographical Press, also in Sterling Memorial Library, 130 Wall Street.

Mon - Fri 8:30am - 5pm

Free & open to the public

Robert B. Haas Family Arts Library
Yale University
180 York Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
October 02 -
December 12, 2015
Archive Bound
The Center for Book Arts
28 W 27th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 02 -
December 12, 2015
BUZZ SPECTOR: THE BOOK UNDER (DE-) CONSTRUCTION
MASTER FACULTY FELLOW / FEATURED ARTIST PROJECT

Buzz Spector is an internationally-known artist whose work makes frequent use of the book, both as subject and object, and is concerned with relationships between public history, individual memory, and perception. His work with altered found books dates back to 1981, and his collages incorporating dust jacket elements date from 1987.

Spector has received much recognition for his art, including a Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Fellowship in 1991, and three NEA individual artist fellowships. He received the distinguished teaching of art award from the College Art Association in 2013.

Mon - Fri 11am - 6pm
Sat 10am - 5pm

The Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 02 -
December 12, 2015
2015 SCHOLARS FOR ADVANCED STUDIES IN BOOK ARTS
FEATURED ARTIST PROJECT

Aron Cohen, Alaska Mc Fadden, and Tammy Nguyen each received a year-long scholarship to work at the Center for their commitment to the artistic endeavors in the book arts.

Mon - Fri 11am - 6pm
Sat 10am - 5pm

The Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 02, 2015 -
January 09, 2016
"Always Your Friend": Letters from Theodore Roosevelt to Henry Cabot Lodge, 1884-1918
One of the Society's most interesting collections of presidential papers consists of the extensive personal correspondence of Theodore Roosevelt and Henry Cabot Lodge. From 1884 until just before Roosevelt's death in 1919, the two friends and their spouses exchanged hundreds of letters, notes, telegrams, annotated copies of speeches, newspaper articles, and photographs. "Always Your Friend" highlights selections from this remarkable collection.

Mon - Sat 10am - 4pm

Free admission

Massachusetts Historical Society
1154 Boylston Street
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
October 02, 2015 -
January 09, 2016
Terra Firma: The Beginnings of the MHS Map Collection
As the MHS approaches its 225th year, Terra Firma celebrates the beginnings of one of its most diverse and interesting collections. Among the maps on display are landmarks of map publishing that include the first published map of New England, the first map of Massachusetts published in America, and a unique copy of the earliest separate map of Vermont, as well as maps of important battles and maps and atlases from the United States and beyond.

Mon - Sat 10am - 4pm

Free admission

Massachusetts Historical Society
1154 Boylston Street
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
October 03, 2015 -
January 24, 2016
Princeton's Great Persian Book of Kings
Composed more than 1,000 years ago by the Persian poet Firdausi, the Shahnama, or Book of Kings, narrates the story of Iran from the dawn of time to the 7th century A.D. This sweeping epic contains over 50,000 verses and countless tales of Iran’s ancient kings and heroes. Firdausi’s Shahnama has been a source of artistic inspiration in Persian culture for centuries and provides the essential basis for our understanding of the history of Persian painting as it developed from late medieval through early modern times.

Hundreds, if not thousands, of illustrated copies of the Shahnama survive today in collections worldwide, but Princeton University’s late 16th-century Peck Shahnama (named after its donor) is one of the finest intact volumes in the United States. The exhibition Princeton’s Great Persian Book of Kings, featuring all of the manuscript’s fifty illuminated and illustrated folios, will introduce the beauty and art historical importance of the Peck Shahnama to the public for the first time. The exhibition will be organized to follow the Shahnama narrative, structured around the mythical, the legendary, and the historical eras. As much a work of literature as of art, the Princeton Shahnama and its splendid miniatures will offer insight into Persian manuscript production and painting.

Guest curator Marianna Shreve Simpson, a specialist in the Islamic arts of the book, was previously curator of Islamic Near Eastern art at the Freer Gallery of Art and Arthur M. Sackler Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, and director of curatorial affairs and curator of Islamic art at the Walters Art Museum, Baltimore.

Tue, Wed, Fri, & Sat 10am - 5pm
Thu 10am - 10pm
Sun 1pm - 5pm

Free admission

McCormick Hall
Princeton University
Princeton, NJ
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 03, 2015 -
January 02, 2016
Poisonous Pages: Rare Botanical Books from the Stark Museum of Art
This exhibition highlights historic images of plants that harm. It features eleven rare botanical books from the sixteenth through nineteenth centuries. Each book is open to a page with a handsome woodcut or engraving that portrays a dangerous plant.

Tue - Sat 9am – 5pm
Sun & Mon CLOSED

Free Admission for Stark Cultural Venues Members
Adult (age:18-64) $6.00
Senior (age: 65 and up) $5.00
Student (w/current I.D.) $5.00
Youth (age: 10-17) $5.00
Child (age: 4-9) $2.00
Toddler (age: 3 & under) Free

Stark Museum of Art
712 Green Avenue
Orange, TX
Exhibit Southwest
October 07, 2015 -
January 10, 2016
Andrea del Sarto: The Renaissance Workshop in Action
From about 1515 until his death, Andrea del Sarto (1486–1530) ran the most successful and productive workshop in Florence, not only leaving his native city richly decorated with his art but also greatly influencing the art produced in the remainder of the century. By 1700, however, Andrea’s reputation had declined, not to be revived until the publication of monographs by Sydney Freedberg and John Shearman in 1963 and 1965, respectively. Although his oeuvre represents the essence of Florentine High Renaissance creativity and the magisterial beauty of his drawings is well known to scholars and collectors, he is less known to the general public. In 2015, audiences will experience the first major monographic exhibition on this artist ever to be presented in the United States (and the first in nearly thirty years shown anywhere).

Assembled from the J. Paul Getty Museum, the Louvre, the Uffizi, Palazzo Pitti, the National Gallery of Art, the British Museum, and other major institutions, this selection of nearly fifty drawings — red and black chalk figures, expressive heads, and compositional studies — and three related paintings will explore the important role of drawing in Andrea del Sarto’s paintings and offer an unprecedented display of the two media in concert. By showing drawings with their completed paintings and by bringing together works that relate to specific commissions, the exhibition will shed new light on the artist’s creative process.

Andrea del Sarto: The Renaissance Workshop in Action, organized by The Frick Collection and the J. Paul Getty Museum, opens in Los Angeles in summer 2015, prior to coming to New York in the fall of 2015. A richly illustrated scholarly catalogue written by an international team of Renaissance scholars and drawings experts will provide further focused investigation and appreciation of Andrea del Sarto’s working process.

Tue - Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

The Frick Collection
1 East 70th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 08, 2015 -
April 15, 2016
Black Utopias
The exhibition commemorates the 50th anniversary of the publication of The Autobiography of Malcolm X, the best-selling narrative of one of the most prominent men of the Civil Rights era.

This anniversary holds special significance for Syracuse University because the Libraries are home to the records of Grove Press, the avant-garde publisher of the Autobiography. Grove hailed the book as one of its “most important” publications. The first printing of 10,000 copies sold out before it was released in October 1965.

“Black Utopias” takes the personal transformations that form the narrative arc of Malcolm X’s Autobiography as the framework for exploring a range of utopian visions that have shaped Black American life. Although utopias are, by definition, the stuff of dreams, the examples presented in this exhibition are firmly rooted in historical experiences of subjugation, inequality, and injustice.

The exhibit will feature the handwritten letter that Malcolm X sent to Alex Haley during his pilgrimage to Mecca, as well as other unique and rare materials from the collections. It includes documents by little-known individuals and such prominent figures as W.E.B. Dubois, Langston Hughes, Madam C.J. Walker, James Ford, and Martin Luther King, Jr.

An opening reception will be held on October 15 from 5 to 7 p.m.

Other events associated with the exhibition include an exhibition tour and brownbag discussion with the curators on Friday, October 23 from noon – 1:30 p.m. and marathon community readings of The Autobiography of Malcolm X for Banned Books Week on September 29 from 2 to 6 p.m. in the Peter Graham Scholarly Commons in Bird Library, on September 30 from 11 a.m. to 12:30 p.m. in Coulter Library at Onondaga Community College, and on October 1 from 5 to 7 p.m. at Beauchamp Branch Library, located at 2111 South Salina St. in Syracuse.

Special Collections Research Center gallery
Bird Library, Sixth floor
222 Waverly Avenue
Syracuse University
Syracuse, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 08, 2015 -
April 15, 2016
Black Utopias
The Exhibition commemorates the 50th anniversary of the publication of The Autobiography of Malcolm X, the best-selling narrative of one of the most prominent men of the Civil Rights era.

This anniversary holds special significance for Syracuse University because the Libraries' Special Collections Research Center is home to the records of Grove Press, the avant-garde publisher of the Autobiography. Grove hailed the book as one of its "most important" publications. The first printing of 10,000 copies sold out before it was released in October 1965.

“Black Utopias” takes the personal transformations that form the narrative arc of Malcolm X’s Autobiography as the framework for exploring a range of utopian visions that have shaped Black American life. Although utopias are, by definition, the stuff of dreams, the examples presented in this exhibition are firmly rooted in historical experiences of subjugation, inequality, and injustice. They are at once visionary and modest endeavors to craft worlds of freedom, unity, power, equality, and beauty.

The exhibit will feature the handwritten letter that Malcolm X sent to Alex Haley during his pilgrimage to Mecca, as well as other unique and rare materials from the collections. It includes documents by little-known individuals and such prominent figures as W.E.B. Dubois, Langston Hughes, Madam C. J. Walker, James Ford, and Martin Luther King, Jr.

Special Collections Research Center
Syracuse University Libraries
222 Waverly Avenue
Syracuse, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 09, 2015 -
January 10, 2016
EH Shepard: An Illustrator's War
The first ever exhibition of E.H. Shepard's illustrations from the trenches of the Great War

See a different side to one of the greatest illustrators of the 20th century in this major exhibition of E.H. Shepard's war illustrations.

Best known for his drawings for Winnie the Pooh and The Wind in the Willows, as well as his regular work for Punch magazine, E.H. Shepard also produced a substantial body of work while serving as an officer in the Royal Artillery in the First World War.

This exhibition is the first to explore Shepard’s illustrations drawn in the trenches on the Western Front and in Italy, and includes over a hundred original artworks - many never seen before.

Visitors will discover this vital and fascinating chapter in Shepard's life and career through technical drawings, personal sketches from the pocket books he kept throughout the war, and unpublished illustrated correspondence - as well as personal items including his paintbox, articles of his uniform, his maps of the trenches, and photographs from his family collection.

EH Shepard: An Illustrator's War presents the breadth and variety of Shepard's wartime illustration, produced for a range of purposes. As well as recording his experiences, he continued to work as a commercial cartoonist, regularly sending work back from the trenches for Punch and other publications.

Shepard’s skills as a draughtsman were also put to use during his service. He made precise topographical drawings for strategic use by his battery – including one that measures 1.5 metres long and depicts sites of battle in the Italian mountains.

All of this work is placed within the context of Shepard’s lifelong illustration career, from his early work to the first rough sketches for Winne the Pooh.

The exhibition will accompany the publication of Shepard’s War, to be published by Michael O'Mara Books on 1 October.

House of Illustration
2 Granary Square
King's Cross
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
October 10, 2015 -
January 03, 2016
American Epics: Thomas Hart Benton and Hollywood
The first major exhibition on Thomas Hart Benton in more than 25 years, American Epics: Thomas Hart Benton and Hollywood reveals the fascinating but overlooked relationship between Benton's art, movie making and visual storytelling in 20th-century America.

Benton's early experiences on silent movie sets in Fort Lee, New Jersey—the first "Hollywood"—and later in Hollywood itself influenced his acute awareness of contemporary storytelling's shift toward movies and inspired his signature style of painting that melded centuries-old traditions with more recent movie-production techniques to tell stories that appealed to a broad range of Americans.

The exhibition brings together nearly 100 works by Benton including 50 paintings and murals, as well as a selection of his drawings, prints and illustrated books. It also presents rarely seen archival photographs, related ephemera, film clips and stills that highlight the allure of his paintings' cinematic content, composition and technical underpinnings.

Wed 10am — 5pm
Thu & Fri, 10am — 9pm
Sat & Sun 10am — 5pm

Closed Mon & Tue, New Year's Day, July 4, Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve & Christmas Day

This exhibition will be ticketed.
Parking $8 | Free for members

The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
4525 Oak Street
Kansas City, MO
Exhibit Midwest
October 11, 2015 -
May 01, 2016
Living for the Moment: Japanese Prints from the Barbara S. Bowman Collection
Over 100 prints are featured in this exhibition of transformative promised gifts of Japanese works to LACMA. Included are examples of rare early prints of the genre known as ukiyo-e (oo-key-o-eh, pictures of the floating world); superior works from the golden age of that art form at the end of the 18th century by Suzuki Harunobu, Kitagawa Utamaro, and Katsukawa Shunshō; and 19th-century prints by such great masters as Utagawa Hiroshige, Katsushika Hokusai, Utagawa Kuniyoshi, and others.

During the Edo period (1615–1868), commercially printed ukiyo-e showed the sensualist priorities of Japanese at a time when a shogunal government restricted nearly all aspects of life. Pictures of entertainers, from the brothels or the theaters, were favored subjects. Unconventional poetry appeared on a subgenre of ukiyo-e called surimono, which were privately published and distributed, often at the New Year. Unlike commercial prints, censored for their content and quality, surimono could be made with luxury materials, such as metallic pigments.

Mon, Tue, Thu 11am – 5pm
Wed Closed
Fri 11am – 8pm
Sat & Sun 10am - 7pm

This exhibition is included in General Admission.

Pavilion for Japanese Art and Ahmanson Building, Level 2
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
5905 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
October 13, 2015 -
January 03, 2016
Eat, Drink, and Be Merry: Food in the Middle Ages and Renaissance
The cultivation, preparation, and consumption of food formed a framework for daily labor and leisure in the Middle Ages and Renaissance. Illuminated manuscripts offer images of the chores that produced sustenance, cooking techniques, popular dishes, grand feasts, and diners of different social classes. Food had powerful symbolic meaning in Christian devotional practice as well as in biblical stories and saintly miracles, where it nourished both the body and the soul.

Tue – Fri & Sun 10am – 5:30pm
Sat 10am – 9pm
Closed Mondays
May 29 – August 28, 2015 open Fridays to 9pm

The Getty Center
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
October 14, 2015 -
March 27, 2016
Down the Rabbit Hole: Celebrating 150 Years of Alice in Wonderland
Follow us down the rabbit hole as we bring Wonderland to the heart of Philadelphia with a captivating exhibition and an exciting schedule of public programming exploring the many facets of this literary classic, including a pop-up display of the incredible original manuscript. Revisit the fun and fanciful characters you know and love, and learn the fascinating stories behind the story. ​​

The exhibition at the Rosenbach will immerse visitors in the imaginative world of Lewis Carroll through three distinctive parts:

Part One, Wonderland Rules: Alice at 150, will explore Alice's profound cultural legacy and the continuing impact of Carroll's famous work. Part Two, Alice in Philly-land, will shed light on the story of Alice and Philadelphia, including the internationally renowned purchase of the manuscript at auction by Philadelphia book dealer A.S.W. Rosenbach for a world-record price. Part Three, Why is a Raven like a Writing Desk? Lewis Carroll's Riddles, Puzzles and Games (running through May 15), will give visitors the opportunity to learn more about Carroll as a mathematician and puzzle lover, trying their hand at some of his mind-bending inventions in an interactive gallery.

Bringing the celebration beyond our walls and into the community, we have joined forces with a host of partner institutions for a series of programs from public croquet & live chess to film screenings and Reading Groups.

Tuesday — Noon - 5pm
Wednesday — Noon - 8pm
Thursday — Noon - 8pm
Friday — Noon - 5pm
Saturday — Noon - 6pm
Sunday — Noon - 6pm

Closed Mondays and National Holidays.

Rosenbach Members: Free
Adults: $10.00
Seniors (ages 65 & older): $8.00
Students & Children: $5.00
Children under 5: Free

Rosenbach Museum and Library
2008-2010 Delancey Place
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 14 -
24, 2015
Highlights from the Dobkin Family Collection of Feminism
RARE is pleased to present highlights from the Dobkin Family Collection of Feminism, a research collection documenting the struggles and achievements of women throughout history, with an emphasis on original 19th- and 20th-century material. Focusing primarily on American and British women, this unique and extensive archive contains works by both obscure and well-known figures, providing compelling contextualization through original correspondence, diaries, journals, files, annotated printed matter and inscribed and annotated association copies of books, as well as truly scarce books and rare survivals of fragile ephemera.

RARE
Glen Horowitz Bookseller
17 West 54th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 14, 2015 -
March 20, 2016
JACOB A. RIIS: REVEALING NEW YORK'S OTHER HALF
Jacob Riis (1849-1914) was a pioneering newspaper reporter and social reformer in New York at the turn of the 20th century. His then-novel idea of using photographs to illustrate the plight of the city’s poor—New York’s “other half”—established Riis as a forerunner of modern photojournalism. His photography was effective, and his work spurred legislation and new organizations that addressed housing conditions and more. Jacob A. Riis: Revealing New York’s Other Half features photographs by Riis and his contemporaries, as well as his handwritten journals and personal correspondence.

This is the first major retrospective of Riis’s photographic work in the U.S. since the City Museum’s seminal 1947 exhibition, The Battle with the Slum, and for the first time unites the Museum’s Jacob A. Riis Collection—the sole archive of Riis’s images—and the Jacob A. Riis Papers from the Library of Congress.

10:00am – 6:00pm

Suggested Admission
Adults: $14
Seniors, students: $10 (with ID)
School groups (reservations required): $5/person
Ages 19 and under: Free
Members: Free

Second floor
Museum of City of New York
1220 Fifth Avenue (at 103rd Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 14 -
24, 2015
“No gate, no lock, 
no bolt”: The Dobkin Family Collection of Feminist History
RARE is honored to present “No gate, no lock, no bolt”: The Dobkin Family Collection of Feminist History, an exhibition specially selected from this remarkable collection of archival material - unparalleled in private hands - to support Virginia Woolf’s ringing pronouncement in A Room of One’s Own: “Lock up your libraries if you like; but there is no gate, no lock, no bolt that you can set upon the freedom of my mind.”

The Dobkin Family Collection, built over a quarter-century by New York philanthropist Barbara Dobkin, was designed to uncover and preserve exceptional historical material – original letters and manuscripts, and rare printed pieces - that would aid in research and writing on the history of women's advancements. It currently houses thousands of items which chronicle women’s experience private and public, individual and aggregate – in such political and domestic realms as gender equality, suffrage, birth control, labor, education, the military, science, medicine, business, and literature.

Opening Reception: Wednesday, October 14th, 6–8 pm

RARE
Glenn Horowitz Bookseller
17 West 54th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 15, 2015 -
March 06, 2016
Earth Matters: Land as Material and Metaphor in the Arts in Africa
Offering a panoramic view of the arts of Africa, the major exhibition Earth Matters brings together approximately sixty exceptional works of art from the nineteenth century to the present. The exhibition focuses on the creative and visual ways in which individuals and communities negotiate relationships with their surrounding land and the world at large. The featured artworks the period from the arrival of colonial interests to the present day, exploring how profound and changing concepts of healing, the sacred, identity, memory, history, and sustainability have been formed in relation to the land. With its emphasis on uncompromising artistic vision, the exhibition links diverse media, including photography, painting, mixed-media assemblage, and time-based media, to reveal how artists have related to the land. Earth Matters features rare artistic treasures from the past, alongside works by internationally renowned and emerging talents from across the continent, including William Kentridge, George Osodi, Sammy Baloji, and Helga Kohl. The National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution, organized this exhibition

Lecture & Reception
Karen Milbourne will deliver a lecture about the exhibition on Thursday, October 22 at 4:30 p.m. in Beam Classroom, Visual Arts Center, Bowdoin College to celebrate the opening of the exhibition at the Bowdoin College Museum. Following the lecture, from 5:30 to 7:00 p.m. the Bowdoin College Museum of Art hosts a Fall Open House and invites the public to view the Earth Matters exhibition. Both events are open to the public free of charge.

Mon Closed
Tue - Sat 10am –5pm
Thu 10am – 8:30pm

Special Sunday hours: 12noon - 5pm (June 28 through October 18, 2015)

Free and open to the public

Boyd Gallery
Shaw Ruddock Gallery
Bowdoin College Museum of Art
9400 College Station
Brunswick, ME
Exhibit New England
October 16, 2015 -
January 09, 2016
The Unitarian Conscience: Letters & Publications from the George E. Nitzsche Unitariana Collection
In 2008, the MHS acquired the George E. Nitzsche Unitariana Collection from the Unitarian Society of Germantown in Philadelphia. To celebrate the sesquicentennial of the founding of the Germantown Society in 1865, the Society will display letters and publications from the collection that illustrate the engagement of eminent Unitarians and liberal religious thinkers in a wide range of 19th-century reform movements.

Mon - Sat 10am - 4pm

Free admission

Massachusetts Historical Society
1154 Boylston Street
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
October 16, 2015 -
February 16, 2016
West Africa: Word, Symbol, Song
Fascinating stories from the region’s 17 nations show how West Africans have harnessed the power of words to build societies, drive political movements, sustain religious belief and fight injustice.

Beautiful manuscripts, historic film and sound recordings, books, photographs, and woven and printed textiles offer a unique insight into a profound and engaging literary culture with centuries-old written heritage existing alongside ancient oral traditions.

Hear the myth of the founding of ancient Mali in recorded performance. See the influence of religion through colourful fabric and the saddlebag Qur’an. Celebrate writers and artists including Africa’s first Nobel prize winner, Wole Soyinka, and internationally acclaimed musician and human rights activist Fela Kuti.

A discount of 50% is available for groups of 6 or more buying full price tickets. This will be applied automatically when you reach the checkout page.

West Africa Tours

Join a tour of the exhibition led by one of our curators. Providing a unique insight into the collections on display, there is no additional charge for the exhibition. Book your combined exhibition and tour ticket and meet at the exhibition entrance 10 minutes before the tour start time.

West Africa learning programme

We offer a programme of workshops for primary, secondary and further education groups and teachers’ events inspired by the West Africa: Word, Symbol, Song exhibition.

PACCAR Gallery
The British Library
96 Euston Road
London, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
October 17, 2015 -
February 07, 2016
Antarctic Winter at Palace Green Library
This winter, our exhibitions consider the Polar Regions, focusing particularly on the discovery, exploration and ongoing work taking place in Antarctica.

This includes two spectacular exhibitions on loan from the Royal Geographical Society, alongside displays exploring how men and women from the North East of England have contributed to our understanding of this most recently discovered continent, from the work of Captain Cook to Durham University’s Climate Impacts Research Centre who are working in Antarctica today.


With Scott to the Pole

A Royal Geographical Society Touring Exhibition

Historic photographs of this ill-fated Antarctic expedition, taken by Herbert Ponting, tell an unforgettable tale both epic and human in scale. In 1910 Captain Robert Falcon Scott set out for the Antarctic, a journey from which he did not return. Having reached the South Pole, he died on the return journey along with his colleagues, just 17.5 km (11 miles) from the safety of a supply depot. Pontin’s images offer a poignant and revealing glimpse of life in a hostile environment and document everyday scenes, from the beauty of Antarctica’s landscapes to the men relaxing on the Terra Nova deck.

Antarctic Witness

A Royal Geographical Society Touring Exhibition

Chart the dramatic events of Ernest Shackleton’s Imperial Trans-Atlantic Expedition of 1914-16 and experience this extraordinary journey as seen through the eyes of Frank Hurley, official photographer to the expedition. Set against the majestic backdrop of the Antarctic, Hurley’s artistry as a photographer is revealed as he captures daily life on board the Endurance and later on the ice as Shackleton and his crew are left stranded after their ship meets a dramatic end. Shackleton’s efforts to rescue his crew are now legendary, partly due to Hurley’s amazing visual testimony, which is recorded in 120 glass plates that are now part of the Royal Geographical Society’s photographic archive. These incredible photographs, form the centrepiece of this dramatic exhibition in winter 2015, charting exploration, environments and climate change.

Palace Green Library
Palace Green
Durham, England, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
October 19, 2015 -
January 16, 2016
ALICE LIVE!
To commemorate the 150th anniversary of the publication of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, The New York Public Library for the Performing Arts, Dorothy and Lewis B. Cullman Center in Lincoln Center will present the free multimedia exhibition Alice Live! The exhibition will trace the history of Lewis Carroll’s beloved Alice stories in live performance from their first professional staging to the present day.

Alice Live! will begin with an examination of Lewis Carroll’s own enthusiasm for entertaining and theatergoing and document the first professional stage production of Alice in London in 1886. Early productions will be illustrated with playbills, advertisements, and photographs, and New York productions will feature prominently in the exhibition. Posters, photos, audio, and video from Alice productions through the years will show developments in costumes, composing, scenic design, acting style, and even theatrical marketing. Alice Live! will cover not just theatre but ballet, opera, music, and even versions of the stories performed on ice and underwater. The exhibit will also include special elements just for children and younger visitors.

Sun Closed
Mon 12:00pm - 8:00pm
Tue 12:00pm - 6:00pm
Wed 12:00pm - 6:00pm
Thu 12:00pm - 8:00pm
Fri 12:00pm - 6:00pm
Sat 12:00pm - 6:00pm

Dorothy & Lewis B. Cullman Center
New York Public Library for the Performing Arts
40 Lincoln Center Plaza
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 19, 2015 -
January 31, 2016
Printing Women: Three Centuries of Female Printmakers, 1570–1900
Physically demanding and technically challenging, printmaking has often been considered man’s labor. As the Library’s unusual collection by forward-thinking Henrietta Louisa Koenen (1830-1881) demonstrates, engravings, etchings, woodcuts and lithographs executed by female printmakers have been around almost as long as artists started creating prints in the late fifteenth century. From 1848 until 1861, she collected an astonishing array of sheets by women artists from the sixteenth to nineteenth centuries. Executed by experts and amateurs alike, these women pursued their craft as part of larger family workshops, as a means of self-realization and for the thrill of making and sharing pictures created in multiples.

Exhibited for the first time since 1901, the works from Henrietta Louisa Koenen’s collection include not only well-known artists like Angelica Kauffmann (1741-1807) and Maria Cosway (1760-1838), but also rare and unusual prints by the Marquise de Pompadour (1721-1764), Charlotte Napoleon (1802-1839), and Queen Victoria (1819-1901).

Sun Closed
Mon 12:00pm - 8:00pm
Tue 12:00pm - 6:00pm
Wed 12:00pm - 6:00pm
Thu 12:00pm - 8:00pm
Fri 12:00pm - 6:00pm
Sat 12:00pm - 6:00pm

Dorothy & Lewis B. Cullman Center
New York Public Library for the Performing Arts
40 Lincoln Center Plaza
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 23, 2015 -
February 07, 2016
Exceptional: Handmade Paper Beyond Substrate
Paper is often thought of as just the material art is created on. Exceptional explores handmade paper itself as a powerful messaging device.
Featured artists:
Islam Aly (Iowa City, IA)
Jocelyn Châteauvert (Charleston, SC)
Mandy Coppes-Martin (Johannesburg, South Africa)
Melissa Jay Craig (Chicago, IL)
Ann Marie Kennedy (Raleigh, NC)
Nnenna Okore (Chicago, IL)
Trisha Oralie Martin (Chicago, IL)

Mon – Sat 9:30am - 6:30pm
Tue open late: 9:30am - 9pm
Sun noon to 5pm

Free admission

Minnesota Center for Book Arts
1011 Washington Avenue S. #100
Minneapolis, MN
Exhibit Midwest
October 24, 2015 -
January 17, 2016
Collecting for the Boston Athenaeum in the 21st Century: Maps & Charts
The Boston Athenæum will exhibit maps and charts from its rich cartographic collection. Those on exhibition will date from the seventeenth to the twentieth centuries. Most of these materials have been acquired since 2004; and therefore, are relatively recent additions to our collection. Some of the highlights will include a very scarce chart of Casco Bay by J.F.W. DesBarres, a rare French edition of a classic map of the Americas by Petrus Bertius, published in the mid-seventeenth century, and a beautiful example of one of the earliest charts to focus on the New England coastline by J. van Keulen.

Mon - Thu 9am - 8pm
Fri 9am - 5:30pm
Sat 9am - 4pm
Sun 12pm - 4pm

Members free
non-members $5.00

Boston Athenaeum
10½ Beacon Street
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
October 27, 2015 -
January 10, 2016
Audubon to Warhol: The Art of American Still Life
The first survey of American still life in three decades, Audubon to Warhol: The Art of American Still Life will feature some 120 oil paintings, watercolors, and works in other media representing the finest accomplishments in the genre from its beginnings in the early 1800s to the Pop Art era of the 1960s.

Taking a fresh approach to the subject to reveal the genre’s astonishing variety, the exhibition will be divided into four chronological sections that mirror still life’s periodic resurgence in the United States. Each era was characterized by a prevailing way of seeing and relating to objects: describing, indulging, discerning, and animating. Under these rubrics, visitors will be invited to appreciate still life as a reflection of American identity and culture through time.

Still life is generally an art of intimacy, intended for display in homes and other private settings. From the perfect serenity of tabletop compositions created by Raphaelle Peale (1774–1825), to the trompe l’oeil illusions of William Michael Harnett (1848–1892), to the explosive floral abstractions of Arthur B. Carles (1882–1952), still lifes provoke the senses and reward close looking. The exhibition will employ theatrical displays and interactive technologies to encourage substantive, personal encounters with the works.

The genre has a special connection to our region: Philadelphia artists first defined American still-life practice and remained at its forefront well into the twentieth century. This exhibition is the first to explore this distinctive aspect of American still-life painting.

A fully illustrated catalogue, with essays by four leading scholars, will accompany the exhibition.

Mon Closed *
Tue – Sun 10am – 5pm
Wed & Fri evenings: Open until 8:45pm

*Holiday Hours
Closed: 4th of July, Thanksgiving Day, & Christmas Day

Open normal hours on the following holidays:
New Year’s Day
Martin Luther King Jr. Day
Presidents’ Day
Memorial Day
Labor Day
Columbus Day

Access for two consecutive days to Museum’s main building, Perelman Building, Rodin Museum, and historic houses Mount Pleasant and Cedar Grove

Adults: $20
Seniors (65 & over): $18
Students (with valid ID): $14
Youth (13–18): $14
Children (12 & under): Free
Members (Join): Free

First Sunday of Every Month and Every Wednesday after 5:00 p.m.: Pay What You Wish
What does Pay What You Wish mean? We ask that it starts at a penny but support us with whatever amount you wish.

★ The Philadelphia Museum of Art is proud to participate in Blue Star Museums, and is offering free admission to all active duty military personnel and their families from Memorial Day, May 25, 2015, through Labor Day, September 7, 2015.

Dorrance Special Exhibition Galleries, 1st floor
Philadelphia Museum of Art
6th St. and the Benjamin Franklin Pkwy.
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 29 -
December 05, 2015
Rick Meyerowitz's National Lampoon
RARE is very pleased to present an exhibition of original work created by artist Rick Meyerowitz for the late, lamented satirical magazine, National Lampoon. Meyerowitz was involved in the periodical from the initial issues in 1970 until its near demise in 1991, and created some of its most indelible illustrations, including the Mona Gorilla, the Dodosaurs, the Birds of Israel, and the famous Animal House poster, as well as hundreds of topical political and cultural caricatures. Among the pieces on display will be both finished artwork and related process drawings, typescripts, printed magazines, and Lampoon ephemera. Several special events will also be held. Please check this page for updated information throughout the summer and early fall.

RARE
Glen Horowitz Bookseller
17 West 54th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 29 -
November 20, 2015
Collecting Disneyland: An Exhibition & Auction
Opening reception: Thursday, October 29th

Tue - Sat: 10am - 6pm

Auction: Saturday, November 21st
An exclusive sale of Disneyland
memorabilia from some of the
finest collections around the world.

Van Eaton Galleries
13613 Ventura Blvd.
Sherman Oaks, CA
Exhibit West
October 30, 2015 -
February 28, 2016
Pathmakers: Women in Art, Craft, and Design, Midcentury and Today
This exhibition presents dynamic women designers and artists from the mid-20th century and today making groundbreaking commercial and industrial designs, maintaining craft traditions, and incorporating new aesthetics into fine art.

In the 1950s and ’60s, an era when painting, sculpture, and architecture were dominated by men, women had considerable impact in alternative materials such as textiles, ceramics, and metals. Pioneers in these fields—including Ruth Asawa, Edith Heath, Sheila Hicks, Karen Karnes, Dorothy Liebes, Alice Kagawa Parrott, Lenore Tawney, and Eva Zeisel—had tremendous influence as designers, artists, and teachers.

Their artistic practices varied widely—some exhibited in New York City galleries, others took part in the regional handicraft scene in Santa Fe, New Mexico, and still others collaborated with corporations such as General Motors. The exhibition also illustrates parallels between women creating work in the United States and Scandinavia, where craft often served as a pathway to Modernist innovation.

Contemporary female artists and designers whose work builds upon that of their midcentury counterparts are also featured—Polly Apfelbaum and Michelle Grabner are represented by installations centered on woven and knitted patterns, while Anne Wilson’s work focuses on the processes of textile manufacture. Magdalene Odundo and Christine Nofchissey McHorse adapt traditional techniques and absorb influences from global sources. Furniture and fixture designers Vivian Beer, Front Design, and Hella Jongerius have also expanded the repertoire of making, while Gabriel A. Maher looks at the ways gender is constructed by the clothes we wear.

Mon – Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

National Museum of Women in the Arts
1250 New York Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 30, 2015 -
January 18, 2016
Graphic Passion: Matisse and the Book Arts
World renowned for his paintings, sculptures, drawings, and cut-outs, Henri Matisse (1869–1954) also embraced the printed book as a means of artistic expression. Between 1912 and his death in 1954, he was engaged in nearly fifty book illustration projects, many produced with his direct involvement in page layout, typography, lettering, ornament, and cover design. He planned these publications with his characteristic vigilance and zeal, seeking a perfect fusion of image and text. Some thirty of these modern masterpieces will be on view for the first time together in this landmark exhibition exploring the decisive role book production played in Matisse’s career.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic