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October 27, 2017 -
September 30, 2019
Headlines of History: Historic Newspapers of St. Louis and the World Through the Centuries at the St. Louis Mercantile Library Association
October 27, 2017 Members' Opening and Bixby Book Club Halloween Party

Join us on Friday October 27 from 6-9pm as we celebrate the opening of the special exhibition Headlines of History: Historic Newspapers of St. Louis and the World Through the Centuries at the St. Louis Mercantile Library Association.

University of Missouri–St. Louis
1 University Blvd.
St. Louis, MO
Exhibit Midwest
May 25, 2018 -
September 30, 2020
ENDURING IDEALS: ROCKWELL, ROOSEVELT, & THE FOUR FREEDOMS
The first comprehensive traveling exhibition devoted to Norman Rockwell's iconic depictions of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Four Freedoms: Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Worship, Freedom of Want, and Freedom of Fear.

Rockwell, Roosevelt, & the Four Freedoms explores the indelible odyssey of humanity’s greatest ideals.

The notion of the Four Freedoms has inspired dozens of national constitutions across the globe, yet Franklin D. Roosevelt’s declaration that the United States was willing to fight for Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Worship, Freedom from Want, and Freedom from Fear—now considered a sublime moment in rhetorical history—did not turn out to be the immediate triumph envisioned by the President. As the nation found itself sliding ever closer to direct involvement in World War II, the underlying meaning of his words captured surprisingly little attention among Americans. Following his January 6, 1941, Annual Message to Congress, government surveys showed that only half of Americans were aware of FDR’s Four Freedoms and that less than a quarter could identify them correctly. Moreover, many had no clear idea why the United States was being called upon to enter the war.

It would take the continuous efforts of the White House, the Office of War Information, and scores of patriotic artists to give the Four Freedoms new life. Most prominent among those was Norman Rockwell, whose images became a national sensation in early 1943 when they were first published in The Saturday Evening Post. Roosevelt’s words and Rockwell’s artworks soon became inseparable in the public consciousness, with millions of reproductions publicizing the Second War Loan Drive bringing the Four Freedoms directly into American homes and workplaces. When Eleanor Roosevelt convinced United Nations delegates to include these ideals in its postwar statement of human rights, FDR’s words—now forever entwined with Rockwell’s images—achieved immortality.

Born amid the turmoil of World War II, the Four Freedoms have since become one of its greatest legacies, a testament to the paramount importance of human rights and dignity. Brought forward by one of America’s greatest presidents and immortalized by one of its most beloved artists more than seventy-five years ago, the Four Freedoms continue to inspire, resonating across generations as strongly today as they did in their time.

CO-PRESENTING MAY 25, 2018 - SEPTEMBER 2, 2018:
ROOSEVELT HOUSE (REIMAGINING THE FOUR FREEDOMS)

OCTOBER 13, 2018 - JANUARY 13, 2019:
THE HENRY FORD MUSEUM
20900 Oakwood Blvd.
DEARBORN, MI


FEBRUARY 9, 2019 - MAY 6, 2019:
THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MUSEUM AND THE TEXTILE MUSEUM
701 21st Street, NW
WASHINGTON, DC


JUNE 4, 2019 - OCTOBER 27, 2019:
Le Mémorial de Caen
Esplanade Général Eisenhower
CS 55026
14050 Caen Cedex 4
CAEN, FRANCE


DECEMBER 15, 2019 - MARCH 22, 2020:
MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, HOUSTON
1001 Bissonnet
HOUSTON, TEXAS


FALL 2020:
NORMAN ROCKWELL MUSEUM
9 Glendale Rd / Rte 183
STOCKBRIDGE, MA


The New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West
at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 15, 2018 -
June 02, 2019
Daguerreotypes: Five Decades of Collecting
The 2018 installation of the Daguerreian Gallery celebrates the National Portrait Gallery’s golden anniversary by highlighting fifty years of daguerreotype collecting by the museum. Included will be portraits of such iconic figures as activist and reformer Dorothea Dix, entrepreneur and showman P. T. Barnum with Tom Thumb, Seneca Chief Governor Blacksnake, U.S. Navy Commodore Matthew C. Perry, and artist Alfred Waud.

Daily 11:30am - 7pm

Free admission

National Portrait Gallery
8th and F Streets NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 29, 2018 -
August 31, 2019
Baseball Americana
Americans had been playing baseball long before they agreed on the rules or even settled on how to spell it.

Base-Ball (1787)
base-ball (1799)
base ball (1818)
Base Ball (1845)
baseball (1899)

They didn't always call it baseball either—in some places it was known simply as "town ball" or, more generically, "round ball." No matter what form it has taken, baseball—and its close fraternal twin, softball—has endured. But it hasn't stayed the same in anyone's lifetime. Former major leaguer and announcer Bob Uecker, on hearing the phrase "emotional distress" to describe poor hitting, observed, "When I played, they didn't use fancy words like that. They just said I couldn't hit."

Baseball Americana features items from the Library of Congress collections and those of its lending partners to consider the game then and now—as it relates to players, teams, and the communities it creates. Although baseball has stayed true to many of its customs, it has also broken with tradition through the invention, competition, and financial interests that still make it the most played sport in the country.

8:30am - 4:30pm

South Gallery, 2nd Floor
Library of Congress Jefferson Building
10 First Street SE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 09, 2018 -
April 20, 2019
Crossing Boundaries: Art // Maps
When the imaginative journeys of contemporary artists incorporate elements from a cartographer’s toolkit, these borrowings can add narrative, semi-narrative or abstract depth to a work of art. To offer comparison and commentary to encourage exploration of each artwork, maps from several centuries have been selected from the collection of the Norman B. Leventhal Map & Education Center at the Boston Public Library. Our intention in presenting these juxtapositions is to cross the traditional boundaries of art and cartography to stimulate fresh appreciation of both media.

Mon - Thu 10am - 7pm
Fri & Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 1pm - 5pm

Norman B. Leventhal Map & Education Center
Boston Public Library
700 Boylston Street
Copley Square
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
October 19, 2018 -
April 28, 2019
Gift of a Lifetime: Treasures from Chester Beatty’s Collection
Celebrating the 50th anniversary of Sir Alfred Chester Beatty’s magnificent bequest, Gift of a Lifetime presents a choice selection of masterpieces from this unique collection. An internationally successful mining magnate and generous philanthropist, Beatty was one of the most prolific and discerning collectors of his generation. From his early years in New York, through his career in London and travels overseas, Beatty acquired rare books, manuscripts and decorative arts of the highest quality and rarity from Europe, the Middle East and Asia.

Following his retirement, Beatty brought these collections to Ireland, later placing them in trust to the nation on his death in 1968. From objects of the greatest beauty crafted for powerful rulers to treasures tracing the history of world religions, the artworks drawn together in this exhibition and accompanying catalogue capture the breadth and wonder of this exceptional legacy: a gift to the nation, for Ireland to share with the world.

Mar to Oct: Mon - Fri 10am - 5pm
Nov to Feb: Tue - Fri 10am - 5pm
(Closed Mondays)

Sat 11am - 5pm (All year)
Sun 1pm - 5pm (All year)

Closed 1 January; Good Friday; 24, 25 and 26 December; and Monday public holidays.

Free admission

Chester Beatty Library
Dublin Castle
Dublin, IRELAND
Exhibit International
October 26, 2018 -
April 07, 2019
Structured Visions: The Photographs of Ralston Crawford
Fascinated by the purified geometry of man-made things, Ralston Crawford (1906–1978) worked in a consistently formal, or abstract, manner across a variety of mediums. His photographs provide an essential look at a vital era of abstraction in American art, and at the cultural scenes and subjects from which that creative sensibility arose.

Crawford used the camera as a tool of both documentary and artistic expression. Some photographs served as studies for later paintings or prints. Most, however, were created and appreciated purely as photographs. His subjects ranged from urban and industrial themes to ships and sailing, jazz, the people and culture of New Orleans, bullfighting and religious processions in Spain, and the destructive power of the atomic bomb.

Wed 10am - 5pm
Thu - Fri 10am - 9pm
Sat - Sun 10am - 5pm
Mon - Tue CLOSED

The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
4525 Oak Street
Kansas City, MO
Exhibit Midwest
November 02, 2018 -
May 27, 2019
Betye Saar: Keepin’ It Clean
Contemporary artist Betye Saar has shaped the development of assemblage art in the United States, particularly as a device to illuminate social and political concerns. A key figure in the Black Arts Movement and the feminist art movement of the 1960-70s, Saar’s distinct vision harmonizes the personal and the political. Over the years, Saar has transformed the representation of African Americans in American culture by recycling and reclaiming derogatory images such as Aunt Jemimas, Uncle Toms, sambos, and mammies to confront the continued racism in American society and create representations of strength and perseverance. This exhibition focuses on one facet of her work—washboards—created between 1997 and 2017.

Tue - Thu, & Sat 10am - 6pm
Fri 10am - 8pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West
(at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 04, 2018 -
August 18, 2019
Eye to I: Self-Portraits from 1900 to Today
Drawing primarily from the National Portrait Gallery’s vast collection of self-portraits, this exhibition will explore how American artists have chosen to portray themselves since the beginning of the last century. As people are confronted each day with “selfies” via social media and as they continue to examine the fluidity of contemporary identity, this is an opportune time to reassess the significance of self-portraiture in relation to the country’s history and culture. The exhibition will feature more than 75 works by artists such as Josef Albers, Patricia Cronin, Imogen Cunningham, Elaine de Kooning, Edward Hopper, Joan Jonas, Jacob Lawrence, Alice Neel, Louise Nevelson, Diego Rivera, Lucas Samaras, Fritz Scholder, Roger Shimomura, Shahzia Sikander and Martin Wong. “Eye to I: Self-Portraits from 1900 to Today” is curated by Brandon Brame Fortune, chief curator, National Portrait Gallery. This exhibition concludes the Portrait Gallery’s 50th anniversary celebrations, and an expanded, illustrated companion book will be published in spring 2019.

11:30am - 7am daily

Free admission

National Portrait Gallery
8th and F Streets NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 07, 2018 -
May 01, 2019
Lawrence of Oxford
The exhibition marks the culmination of two years’ intensive collecting around one of Magdalen’s most celebrated Old Members, T.E. Lawrence (better known as ‘Lawrence of Arabia’). It is a little-known fact that Lawrence was elected to a Senior Demyship at Magdalen in late 1910, and trained as an archaeologist on a British Museum dig in northern Syria as a member of the College until 1914 when the war broke out.

Wednesdays 2pm - 4:30pm
Private viewings and group tours can be arranged by appointment.

A series of events have been programmed to run concurrently with the exhibition (all events start at 5.30pm, and will take place in the Summer Common Room unless stated otherwise)

5 November 2018 (Magdalen College Auditorium)
Grand Opening, with talks by curators Dr Rory McCarthy and Daryl Green

21 January 2019
Lecture by Juliet Desplat (Head, Modern Overseas Intelligence and Security Records, The National Archives)

18 February 2019
Lecture by Emma Sky, OBE (Jackson Institute for Global Affairs, Yale University)

7 March 2019
Lecture by Anthony Sattin (journalist and author of Young Lawrence)

2 May 2019
Special Guest closing lecture (T.B.A.)

Old Library
Magdalen College
University of Oxford
Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
November 08, 2018 -
April 14, 2019
A Peculiar Paradise: Florida Photographs by Nathan Benn
On assignment for National Geographic, Nathan Benn photographed across the State of Florida at the dawn of the 1980s a time made famous by Miami’s narcotics-related crime wave and influx of newcomers from the Caribbean. After nearly 40 years, Benn has revisited his Florida archives. A Peculiar Paradise exhibits nearly 100 photographs, as well as artifacts related to his 20-year career at National Geographic. His pictures feature, among other topics, Miami’s Little Havana neighborhood, extreme affluence, nightlife, immigration, work cultures, tourist attractions, remarkable Floridians, Dundee’s 5th Street Gym, and the narcotics war. Come experience Benn’s images reflecting a dynamic and unique time in Florida’s history.

A former president of Magnum Photos, Nathan Benn was born and raised in Miami, and currently resides in Santa Fe, NM and New York City.

In conjunction with the exhibition, powerHouse Books will release a 200-page volume of Nathan Benn’s Florida photographs in November 2018.

Tue – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm
Mon CLOSED

Opening Reception: Nov 8th

Children (Under 6) Free
Children (6-12) $5
Seniors & Students (with ID) $8
Adults $10
Research Center One-Month Pass $10

HistoryMiami
101 West Flagler Street
Miami, FL
Exhibit South
November 10, 2018 -
May 27, 2019
Frank E. Schoonover: American Visions
Frank E. Schoonover’s (1877-1972) legendary adventure paintings were inspired by the belief that artists should live what they paint—an adage often repeated by his noted teacher, illustrator Howard Pyle, and absorbed by his fellow student and friend, N.C. Wyeth. This exhibition will explore the breadth of this important Golden Age artist’s career, beginning with Schoonover’s art school experiences as a student in Pyle’s classes at the newly founded Drexel Institute of Art, Science, and Industry in Philadelphia, beginning in 1896, and his time at the Chadds Ford Summer School in 1899, where he honed his skills among other gifted Pyle pupils. The artist’s historical book illustrations and dramatically staged adventure paintings will illuminate the depth of his own wanderlust. Schoonover made daring excursions to Canada and Alaska—during one such trip, in 1903, he traveled 1,200 miles almost entirely by snowshoe, dogsled, and canoe.

He lived among the Blackfeet Indians of the northern plains, and with Alaskan Eskimos to experience, first-hand, the world portrayed in Jack London’s To Build a Fire, a short story about a protagonist who ventures out in the sub-zero tundras of the Yukon Territory accompanied only by his dog. The artist’s wilderness experiences would inspire his art throughout his career, making authentic portrayals of the far reaches of America possible.

The exhibition will feature Schoonover’s paintings for such classic stories as Kidnapped, Robinson Crusoe, Swiss Family Robinson, and Ivanhoe, as well as illustrations for the novels of Zane Grey, which included Open Range, Avalanche, Rustlers of Silver Ridge, and Valley of Wild Horses, among others. During his long career, he illustrated more than two hundred books, and created memorable portrayals of Clarence Edward Mulford’s Hopalong Cassidy to the delight of the character’s many ardent fans. Schoonover’s long teaching career will also be examined, as will his role in establishing the Delaware Art Museum and obtaining seminal Pyle works for its collection. Eighty original paintings, drawings, and studies will be on view, as will archival photographs and examples of the artist’s daybooks and personal effects.

Open 7 days a week year-round
Weekdays: 10am - 4pm
Weekends & holidays: 10am - 5pm

Members: FREE
Kids 18 and under FREE
Adults $20
Seniors (65+): $18
Veterans: $17
College students with ID: $10

Norman Rockwell Museum
9 Route 183
Stockbridge, MA
Exhibit New England
November 12, 2018 -
June 30, 2020
Magnificent Obsessions
The impulse to collect is human. We collect for many reasons: to gather information about the world, to preserve the past, or to follow our interests and desires. For some, it is a lifelong pursuit.

Pioneering collectors have long shaped Smithsonian Libraries. Each had their own unique passions, from hot-air balloons to seashells, from Japanese prints to world’s fairs. Together, these diverse collections form a vast network of knowledge.

Smithsonian Libraries continues to build upon the work of these curious collectors. We preserve historic treasures and everyday items to provide a window onto the past. We seek out new sources and collections to advance research and scholarship. And we share our collections with the world to inspire curiosity and spark new ideas. Like a modern day cabinet of curiosity, Smithsonian Libraries collections span eras and disciplines, enabling discovery, inspiring creativity, and illuminating history.

Our collections are living and breathing. What will we collect next?

10am - 5:30pm
(summer hours may vary)

Smithsonian Libraries Exhibition Gallery
Smithsonian National Museum of
American History
14th Street & Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 29, 2018 -
August 04, 2019
Reimagining Captain Cook Pacific perspectives
250 years ago James Cook left England on the first of three expeditions to the Pacific Ocean. A skilful navigator, he visited many places new to Europeans and his voyage accounts were widely read and celebrated. Today, his legacy is sometimes debated. In the Pacific, Islanders continue to remember the encounters that occurred, reimagining them in artworks which reflect on their impact.

This exhibition explores these Pacific perspectives and displays the work of contemporary Pacific artists, alongside objects collected on the voyages themselves. Michel Tuffery’s powerful painting Cookie in the Cook Islands, imagines how Cook might have been transformed by his Pacific experiences. Lisa Reihana’s Taking Possession, Lono, shows Captain Cook and his men about to hoist the British flag on a Polynesian island, raising questions about what each group might have understood by the idea of ‘taking possession’. An imposing Tahitian costume worn at ceremonies to mark the death of a chief, is on display for the first time in many decades. Collected on Cook’s second voyage and one of only a handful still in existence, it has been extensively conserved.

As commemorations abound on this major anniversary, this exhibition considers some of the complexities of Cook’s legacy in the Pacific, from New Zealand to Vanuatu and from Australia to the islands of Hawaii.

Open daily 10.00 – 17.30
Fridays: open until 20.30*
* except Good Friday

Please note: the gallery will be closed to the public on April 10th, 2019

Free admission

Room 91
The British Museum
Great Russell Street
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
December 11, 2018 -
April 28, 2019
Spectacular Mysteries: Renaissance Drawings Revealed
Comprising spectacular drawings from the Getty collection and rarely-seen works from private collections, this exhibition reveals the detective work involved in investigating master drawings. Many Italian Renaissance drawings tell stories of their creation and the purposes they served, yet sometimes even the most seemingly simple question - who drew it? - is a mystery. Discover what we know and don't know, what we'd like to know, and what we may never discover about these intriguing works of art and their world.

10am – 5:30pm
Saty 10am – 9pm
Mon CLOSED

Free admission

Getty Center
J. Paul Getty Museum
1200 Getty Center Drive
N. Sepulveda Blvd. & Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
December 14, 2018 -
May 20, 2019
Monuments of Early Greek Printing
An exhibition of some of the earliest and most important publications printed in Greek.

The influence of Greek language and literature on modern culture is as profound as it is underappreciated. The widespread use of Latin throughout much of European history tends to obscure the Greek origins of seminal literature, but much of the scripture, history, and mythology with which people are familiar today originated in Greek texts.

Many landmark Greek publications from the early decades of printing today reside in North Texas, including the first printings in Greek of the New Testament, Homer, and Aristotle. This exhibition offers a glimpse into the richness and significance of materials accessible for study and appreciation at Bridwell Library Special Collections.

Entry Hall
Bridwell Library at Perkins School of Theology
Southern Methodist University
6425 Boaz Lane
Dallas, TX
Exhibit Southwest
January 15 -
May 17, 2019
THE BOOK AS PLACE: VISIONS OF THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT
This exhibition of artists' books centers on ideas about the built environment and has been curated by Berkeley based book artist Julie Chen for UC Berkeley’s Environmental Design Library. Featuring works by 25 artists including Robbin Ami Silverberg, Clifton Meador, Inge Bruggeman, Karen Kunc, Sarah Bryant and Barbara Tetenbaum, the exhibition explores the built environment through text, image, materials and the architectural capabilities of book structures.

1pm - 5pm

Raymond Lifchez and Judith Lee Stronach Exhibition Cases
Volkmann Reading Room
Environmental Design Library
University of California
210 Wurster Hall
Berkeley, CA
Exhibit West
January 17 -
May 23, 2019
Instruction and Delight: Children’s Games from the Ellen and Arthur Liman Collection
By the beginning of the eighteenth century in Britain, parents and teachers had begun to wholeheartedly embrace a suggestion from the philosopher John Locke (1632–1704) that “Learning might be made a Play and Recreation to Children.” The material culture of this period and the subsequent generation reveal a significant shift in thinking, as adults found fresh value in childhood and in play for its own sake. British publishers leapt at the chance to design books and games for both instruction and delight. This small display will celebrate the recent gift of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century children’s games and books to the Center by Ellen and Arthur Liman, Yale JD 1957.

Tue 10am – 5pm
Wed 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 5pm
Fri 10am – 5pm
Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun noon – 5pm
Mon CLOSED

Free admission

Yale Center for British Art
1080 Chapel Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
January 18 -
April 21, 2019
Bibliomania; or Book Madness: A Bibliographical Romance
This exhibition takes its name from the history of “arrant book-lovers” written by Thomas Frognall Dibdin in 1842. It follows these lovers of the book through four case studies, observing the powerful and often unexpected relationships of books with their readers, owners, authors, collectors, and creators.

Every Book in the World! explores the passionate collecting and printing history of the legendary nineteenth-century bibliomaniac Thomas Phillipps, whose vast collection of manuscripts and early printed books filled an English country house and required more than a century of public auctions and sales to disperse.

Collated & Perfect, organized in conjunction with the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin, traces the history of the collation statement and the obsession with finding a more perfect text, from eighteenth-century book collector Thomas Rawlinson through Charlton Hinman, editor of the first folio edition of Shakespeare’s plays (1968).

Habits Ancient and Modern: Surface and Depth in the Pillone Library Volumes traces the history of the library assembled by Antonio and Odorico Pillone in Italy in the sixteenth century, and Odorico’s decision to have the fore-edges of many of these volumes painted by Cesare Vecellio, a distant cousin of Titian.

The Whole Art of Marbling explores the many-faceted art of paper marbling, drawing on some of the choicest examples in the Beinecke’s collection to illuminate the art’s history, techniques, patterns, and practitioners, from its origins in the East and advancement over the Silk Road to the European continent.

PANEL DISCUSSIONS:
January 23, panel discussion, 5 pm: Ann Rosalind Jones and Andrew Brown on the Pillone Library

February 5, panel discussion, 5 pm: Perfect: Thinking about the Ideal Copy, with exhibition curators Kathryn James and Aaron T. Pratt, with Peter Stallybrass and David Scott Kastan

LECTURES:
February 6, lecture, 5 pm; opening reception, 6 pm: The Duc de Berry (1340-1416) and the Origins of Bibliomania, by Christopher de Hamel, author of Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts

February 7, lecture, 5 pm: Sir Thomas and I: A Poor Comparison, by Toshiyuki Takamiya, Professor Emeritus, Keio University

March 27, lecture, 5 pm: Sidney Berger on paper marbling

April 10, lecture, 5 pm: The Painted Book: Cesare Vecellio and the Pillone Library, by Andrew Brown

Mon 10am - 7pm
Tue - Thu 9am - 7pm
Fri 9am - 5pm
Sat (Exhibitions only) 12pm - 5pm
Sun (Exhibitions only) 12pm - 4pm

Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library
121 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
January 18 -
April 06, 2019
The Life, Writings, and Influence of Herman Melville, Author of Moby-Dick
For the 200th anniversary of Herman Melville’s birth, this exhibition will highlight the many facets of his work, illustrating how he has been perceived and repurposed over the past 200 years.

Drawing on the Newberry’s huge collection of Melville’s works, gathered during the work of editing the definitive 15-volume Northwestern-Newberry Edition of The Writings of Herman Melville, the exhibition will invite viewers to explore Melville’s interests in democracy, spirituality, Indigeneity, morality, sexuality, labor, nature, and human consciousness. It will contextualize his works as the product of a period of spectacular growth, rapid change, horrifying trauma, and grave injustice in the United States, and also demonstrate the ways his work continues to resonate for artists and writers today.

Mon, Fri & Sat 8:15am – 5pm
Tue - Thu 8:15am – 7:30pm
Sun CLOSED

Free and open to the public

Roger J. Trienens Galleries
The Newberry 60 West Walton Street
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
January 25 -
May 12, 2019
Tolkien: Maker of Middle-earth
“In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit.” With these words the Oxford professor J.R.R. Tolkien ignited a fervid spark in generations of readers. From the children’s classic The Hobbit to the epic The Lord of the Rings, Tolkien’s adventurous tales of hobbits and elves, dwarves and wizards have introduced millions to the rich history of Middle-earth. Going beyond literature, Tolkien’s Middle-earth is a world complete with its own languages and histories. Tolkien: Maker of Middle-earth celebrates the man and his creation. The exhibition will be the most extensive public display of original Tolkien material for several generations. Drawn from the collections of the Tolkien Archive at the Bodleian Library (Oxford), Marquette University Libraries (Milwaukee), the Morgan, and private lenders, the exhibition will include family photographs and memorabilia, Tolkien’s original illustrations, maps, draft manuscripts, and designs related to The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 26 -
July 21, 2019
Caravans of Gold, Fragments in Time: Art, Culture, and Exchange across Medieval Saharan Africa
Journey to a medieval world with Africa at its center.

Travel with the Block Museum along routes crossing the Sahara Desert to a time when West African gold fueled expansive trade and drove the movement of people, culture, and religious beliefs.

Caravans of Gold is the first major exhibition addressing the scope of Saharan trade and the shared history of West Africa, the Middle East, North Africa, and Europe from the eighth to sixteenth centuries. Weaving stories about interconnected histories, the exhibition showcases the objects and ideas that connected at the crossroads of the medieval Sahara and celebrates West Africa’s historic and underrecognized global significance.

Caravans of Gold draws on recent archaeological discoveries, including rare fragments from major medieval African trading centers like Sijilmasa, Gao, and Tadmekka. These “fragments in time” are seen alongside works of art that invite us to imagine them as they once were. They are the starting point for a new understanding of the medieval past and for seeing the present in a new light.

Presenting more than 250 artworks spanning five centuries and a vast geographic expanse, the exhibition features unprecedented loans from partner institutions in Mali, Morocco, and Nigeria, many of which will be seen in North America for the first time.

The Block Museum exhibition will travel to The Aga Khan Museum in Toronto (Sept. 21, 2019 – Feb. 23, 2020) and then to the National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institute (April 8 – Nov. 29, 2020)

Tue, Sat, & Sun 10am - 5pm
Wed, Thu, & Fri 10am - 8pm
Mon CLOSED

Main Gallery
Block Museum of Art
Northwestern University
40 Arts Circle Drive
Evanston, IL
Exhibit Midwest
January 27 -
April 21, 2019
All Roads Lead to Rome: 20th-Century Tourism in Italy

For centuries Italy reigned as an essential stop for wealthy people taking the “Grand Tour.” In the wake of the 1922 Fascist Revolution, Benito Mussolini began promoting Italy as not merely a place to marvel over ancient Roman ruins, but also as an impressive testament to the achievements of the Fascist state. All Roads Lead to Rome presents material from The Wolfsonian’s library—including tourist brochures, menu covers, photographs, exhibition catalogs, chapter vignette proofs by the Futurist artist Fortunato Depero, and a unique watercolor sketch book by costume designer Albert Wainwright—that touted Italy as a travel destination to foreign and domestic tourists by offering visions of the glory of Rome, ancient and modern.

Mon, Tue, Thu, & Sat 10am – 6pm
Wed CLOSED
Fri 10am – 9pm (free 6pm – 9pm)
Sun noon – 6pm

Members: FREE
Adults: $12
Seniors, students with ID, & children 6–18: $8
Children under 6: FREE
Students, faculty, & staff of the State University System of Florida: FREE

The Wolfsonian–FIU
1001 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, FL
Exhibit South
January 28 -
April 26, 2019
Nature on the Page: The Print and Manuscript Culture of Victorian Natural History
This exhibition, featuring materials from the Fisher's Victorian natural history collection. showcases both the collecting and manuscript practices of naturalists and how books - in some instances, encased the specimens themselves.

Fern-fever, orchidelirium, the seaweed craze: for Victorians, natural history was a pleasurable pursuit sometimes bordering on a psychological disorder. At more than a thousand volumes, the Fisher Library's Victorian natural history collection provides a unique opportunity to trace the ways in which the medium of print stimulated and sustained the nineteenth-century appetite for natural history. This exhibition showcases both the collecting and manuscript practices of naturalists and how books, in some instances, encased the specimens themselves. A special focus here is women practitioners of natural history -- as authors of and contributors to published works, and as artists and collectors. On display will be copies of some of the most popular natural history works of the day: J.G. Wood's Common Objects of the Country - and some of the most beautiful and rare: James Bateman's Orchidaceae of Mexico and Guatemala. Weighing more than 38 lbs, Bateman's work is considered the largest book published with lithographic plates.

Mon - Fri 9am - 5pm
Sat & Sun CLOSED

Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library
120 St. George Street
Toronto, ON, CANADA
Exhibit International
January 30 -
May 12, 2019
Monumental Journey: The Daguerreotypes of Girault de Prangey
The Daguerreotypes of Girault de Prangey will present masterpieces of early 19th-century photography by one of its unsung pioneers. A trailblazer of the newly invented daguerreotype process, Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey (1804–1892) traveled throughout the Eastern Mediterranean from 1842 to 1845, producing more than one thousand daguerreotypes—the largest known extant group from this period and the earliest surviving photographs of Greece, Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, and Jerusalem, and among the first depicting Italy. Featuring approximately 120 of his daguerreotypes, supplemented by examples of his graphic work—watercolors, paintings, and his lithographically illustrated publications—the exhibition will be the first in the United States devoted to Girault, and the first to focus on his Mediterranean journey. Many of the sites depicted have been permanently altered by urban planning, climate change, or conflict.

Sun – Thu 10am – 5:30pm*
Fri & Sat 10am – 9pm*

*Galleries are cleared 15 minutes before closing.

Floor 2, The Charles Z. Offin Gallery, Karen B Cohen Gallery,
and Noel Levine Gallery, Galleries 691–693
The Met Fifth Avenue
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 30 -
August 30, 2019
Women Get the Vote: A Historic Look at the 19th Amendment
The legendary crusade for women's suffrage began in 1848 at a historic meeting in Seneca Falls, New York, and culminated in 1920 when the country ratified the Susan B. Anthony Amendment. It was a battle led by some of the most remarkable women of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Over the long span of the nineteenth century, growing numbers of women joined the suffrage movement, claiming basic rights for themselves and generations to come in the face of threats including mob violence, arrest, and imprisonment. Campaigns were marked by both successes and reverses, often intersecting with the abolitionist movement before and during the Civil War. Nevertheless, suffragists persisted until victory was theirs.

In Women Get the Vote, selections from the Library’s holdings bring to light the literature from a social and political revolution that reverberates down to the present day. Books, archival materials, and rare treasures on display include the early suffragist publication Votes for Women Broadside; Mary Wollstonecraft's 1792 A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, and the 1882 edition of History of Woman Suffrage, edited by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage. Also featured are biographies of Alice Paul, the British suffragist Emmeline Pankhurst, and legendary abolitionists Frederick Douglass and Sojourner Truth.

Women Get the Vote also showcases the activities of two Library members engaged in the struggle: Mrs. John Winters Brannan, the daughter of newspaper editor Charles A. Dana, who was sentenced to imprisonment at the Occoquan Workhouse in Lorton, Virginia for picketing the White House, and Rosalie Gardiner Jones, known for her fiery views on women’s rights.

Mon & Fri 9am - 5pm
Tue, Wed & Thu 9am - 8pm
Sat & Sun 11am - 5pm

Reception: January 29th
And we're seeking members' loans for a one-night display. We encourage you to look in closets, cupboards, and attic trunks for suffrage memorabilia, including posters, banners, pins, books, photographs and letters. Blow off the dust and bring them to us.

2nd floor, The Peluso Family Exhibition Gallery
The New York Society Library
53 East 79th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 01 -
July 14, 2019
An Earthly Paradise: William Morris & The Thames
This new exhibition illustrates the rich and little-known story of William Morris’ deep connections to the Thames. We bring together a unique selection of works, with loans from the V&A, The William Morris Gallery, British Library, and many more. Highlights include Morris’ Thames series of textiles alongside his original hand-drawn designs, a signed copy of News from Nowhere, and his personal fishing tackle and spectacles. Materials from the Morris & Co. workshop illustrate the production process, while socialist pamphlets that Morris penned and published demonstrate his deep commitment to socialism in later life.

The influence of the Thames and its tributaries flowed through William Morris’ life and work. The river provided the setting for his leisure time spent angling and boating, inspiration for his designs and writing, and the ideal water conditions for the manufacture of his textiles. One notable Thames boat trip from his London home via Henley to his rural retreat in Oxfordshire was so moving that it inspired his socialist utopia novel, News from Nowhere.

Explore the Thames through Morris’ eyes: a beautiful retreat from urban excess and the capitalism he despised, a valuable resource continuing the river’s working heritage, and a rich source of creative inspiration. Step from the exhibition straight out onto the riverbank and find your own earthly paradise.

11am - 4pm

River & Rowing Museum
Mill Meadows
Henley on Thames
Oxfordshire, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
February 01 -
July 19, 2019
Gabriel García Márquez: The Magic of a Global Writer
In 1965, Gabriel García Márquez was a Colombian writer living in Mexico City and mostly unknown beyond Mexican and Colombian literary circles. For almost two decades he struggled to become a full-time fiction writer. In 1967, the publication of One Hundred Years of Solitude and its ensuing international success transformed its author into one of the most celebrated writers of the twentieth century. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1982.

Drawing primarily on the García Márquez Collection at the Ransom Center, the exhibition, comprising approximately 150 items including numerous documents never seen in public before, will explain to visitors how García Márquez became a literary star and a classic writer. Throughout his life, García Márquez repeatedly thanked his family and friends for their support. Woven throughout the exhibition, correspondence, photos, and videos, will illustrate how García Márquez's intimate circle supported his literary career.

Mon - Wed & Fri 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 7pm
Sat & Sun Noon – 5pm

Admission is free, but donations are encouraged

Harry Ransom Center
The University of Texas at Austin
300 West 21st Street (21st & Guadalupe Streets)
Austin, TX
Exhibit Southwest
February 02 -
June 30, 2019
Small Inventions: Artist’s Books by Charles Hobson
Small Inventions celebrates the Museums’ acquisition of 29 works by San Francisco artist Charles Hobson as a gift of collector Marian Kinney. Over the past three decades, Hobson has been a proponent of the book as a hybrid work of art and as a tool for visually communicating complex ideas. His process calls for expanding the definition of what can be called a book and devising a unique form for each volume in relation to its content. His books become physical embodiments of their textual concepts, engaging the reader as an active collaborator and transforming reading into a participatory rather than passive activity. The artist incorporates surprising physical objects into these books to illuminate unexpected relationships. About this exhibition, he says, “I’m hopeful that the viewer might see how much an artist’s book is conceived and driven to fruition by finding just the right invention.”

Tue – Sun 9:30am – 5:15pm

Legion of Honor museum
Lincoln Park
100 34th Avenue
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
February 02 -
May 04, 2019
Long Live the Book!
Celebrate the book in all its forms and formats!

Folded, stitched, stapled or glued: the book is alive and well in 2019, and so is bookbinding. Long Live the Book! samples contemporary bookbinding from the purely commercial to boldly artistic. While bookbinders still use many of the tools and processes from the Middle Ages, modern technology has added new materials and high-speed automation to the bookbinder’s workbench. Bookbinding changes, yet remains the same.

Tue - Sat 10am - 4pm

American Bookbinders Museum
355 Clementina Street
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
February 02 -
May 05, 2019
Hollar’s Encyclopedic Eye: Prints from the Frank Raysor Collection
One of the most prolific printmakers of the Baroque period, Wenceslaus Hollar (Bohemian, 1607–1677) rose up out of obscurity in one of Europe’s most turbulent eras to amass an astounding body of work. Underrated during his lifetime, Hollar produced up to 2,500 etchings in a prodigious 50-year career. The breadth and virtuosity of his works have inspired artists for centuries, and yet his name and profile are only now on the rise. Drawn exclusively from the Frank Raysor Collection, a promised gift to VMFA, this exhibition presents over 200 Hollar prints—remarkable for their range of subjects, stunning details, and rare visual records of 17th-century Europe.

Hollar lived through the Thirty Years’ War, the English Civil War, the Commonwealth, and the Restoration, and these events affected him personally and found their way into his art. He was at times Catholic and at times Protestant. He lived throughout Europe and even traveled to Tangier toward the end of his life. While he knew great fortune and received patronage from leading figures of the day, he died in poverty.

Born to a noble family, Hollar likely learned the rudiments of printmaking from court artist Aegidius Sadeler II. He soon began a lifelong practice of making copies after works by great artists such as Albrecht Dürer, Leonardo da Vinci, and others. Retained by Thomas Howard, Earl of Arundel and one of the finest connoisseurs of all time, Hollar gathered material for some of the epoch’s most accomplished topographical prints, most notably The Long View of Prague. In 1636, Hollar began producing fascinating scenes of modern life in allegorical guise as well as differing costumes of women, including a rare native Woman of Virginia. In Antwerp, Hollar created three series (Insects, Muffs, and Shells) that revealed his virtuosity as a master of etched illusion. Back in London, he etched scenes of the city before and after the Great Fire of 1666.

As one of the least known but one of the most prolific and “modern” artists of the Baroque period, Hollar is well represented in the Frank Raysor Collection, which rivals those held by the British Museum and the Queen’s Collection. The Raysor Collection, as a promised gift, makes VMFA one of the world’s five major Hollar repositories.

Daily: 10am – 5pm
Thu & Fri until 9pm

Free admission

Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (VMFA)
200 N. Blvd.
Richmond, VA
Exhibit South
February 04 -
May 30, 2019
Legally Binding: Fine and Historic Bindings from the Yale Law Library
Many of the historic volumes in the Lillian Goldman Law Library are significant not only for their texts, but for their extraordinary bindings. Over thirty of these are featured in this exhibition; selected for their beauty, craftsmanship, functionality, and historical significance.

"These bookbindings tell stories about the people who owned them, read them, or sold them at some point in their long histories," write Laird and Widener. "The bindings reflect the time and place of their creation, and reveal attitudes about the legal texts they continue to protect. They also illustrate chapters in the history of book binding."

The examples date from the Middle Ages to the late nineteenth century, and from across Europe and the Americas. They include bindings prepared for students, lawyers, public officials, noblemen, wealthy magnates, a book collector, an Italian cardinal, a chained library in England, the tourist trade in China, the Queen Regent of Spain, the English diarist John Evelyn, and a palace of the Tsar of Russia.

"Legally Binding" is the latest in a series of exhibitions that examine law books as physical artifacts, and the relationships between their forms and content.

10am - 6pm daily
and open to Yale affiliates until 10pm

Rare Book Exhibition Gallery
Level L2 of the Yale Law School
Lillian Goldman Law Library
127 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
February 04, 2019 -
January 01, 2020
Patrick Bronte: In Sickness and In Health
The Brontë siblings are as famous for their deaths as they are for their novels and poetry, and tragically Patrick Brontë outlived all his children, as well as his wife. Our 2019 exhibition explores how illness, poor health and death plagued his life.

Although tragic, the Brontë deaths were unremarkable in an over-crowded village where 46% of children died before reaching
the age of six. The average life expectancy was twenty-five years, which corresponded with that of some of the unhealthiest districts of London. Patrick campaigned relentlessly for improvements to public health, but sadly, these came too late to benefit
his own family. As a minister, Patrick was expected to have an informed knowledge on how best to advise and assist those of his parishioners who couldn’t afford medical treatment. His medical text books, which will be collectively on display for the first time, provide us with an insight into his determination to aid the sick and document his own fascinating discoveries.

Highlights of the exhibition include the handkerchief used by Anne Brontë and spotted with blood from her infected lungs; Patrick’s medical manuals heavily annotated with his own experiences; Charlotte’s pillbox, which still has pills inside; Patrick’s tobacco pipe and the extensive collection of spectacles owned by the Brontë family. Thanks to a loan from Thackray Medical Museum, we will also display the type of ophthalmic instruments which would have been used to perform Patrick’s cataract surgery and a laudanum bottle, similar to those bought by Branwell from the apothecary in Haworth.

April to October: 10am - 5.30pm
November to March: 10am - 5pm

Free with admission to the Museum

Brontë Parsonage Museum
Church Street
Haworth
Keighley
West Yorkshire, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
February 06 -
April 28, 2019
Woven Words: Decoding the Silk Book
Woven Words: Decoding the Silk Book highlights a little-known but magnificent rare book from the Walters’ collection—a 19th-century prayer book woven entirely from silk on a Jacquard loom. Visitors will discover a surprising and fascinating connection between the creation of the Silk Book and the computers that shape our modern world. Along with the Silk Book itself, the exhibition includes a group of handwritten books that contain trade secrets of the Jacquard loom. Tablets in the gallery will display the fully digitized Silk Book and a video that demonstrates how the Jacquard loom works.

Wed – Sun 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 9pm
Mon & Tue CLOSED

The Walters Art Museum
600 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, MD
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 07 -
August 04, 2019
The World Exists To Be Put On A Postcard
artists' postcards from 1960 to now

Artists have subverted the common postcard for decades. While the artists’ postcard began as a child of the Conceptual and Fluxus movements of the 1960s, it quickly broadened as an artistic medium to highlight political and social issues, such as feminism, anti-war protest and the fight against AIDS.

In this, the first major museum display of artists’ postcards, discover both the politics and playfulness of this unique collection of 300 postcards recently gifted to the British Museum by the artists’ postcard expert Jeremy Cooper - ranging from feminist artists such as Lynda Benglis and Hannah Wilke, to Yoko Ono and John Lennon’s anti-Vietnam War is Over postcard and the original invitation to Andy Warhol’s Holy Cow! Silver Clouds!! Holy Cow! exhibition.

Open daily 10.00 – 17.30
Fridays: open until 20.30*
* except Good Friday

Free admission

Room 90
The British Museum
Great Russell Street
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
February 09 -
May 06, 2019
ENDURING IDEALS: ROCKWELL, ROOSEVELT, & THE FOUR FREEDOMS
The first comprehensive traveling exhibition devoted to Norman Rockwell's iconic depictions of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Four Freedoms: Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Worship, Freedom of Want, and Freedom of Fear.

Rockwell, Roosevelt, & the Four Freedoms explores the indelible odyssey of humanity’s greatest ideals.

The notion of the Four Freedoms has inspired dozens of national constitutions across the globe, yet Franklin D. Roosevelt’s declaration that the United States was willing to fight for Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Worship, Freedom from Want, and Freedom from Fear—now considered a sublime moment in rhetorical history—did not turn out to be the immediate triumph envisioned by the President. As the nation found itself sliding ever closer to direct involvement in World War II, the underlying meaning of his words captured surprisingly little attention among Americans. Following his January 6, 1941, Annual Message to Congress, government surveys showed that only half of Americans were aware of FDR’s Four Freedoms and that less than a quarter could identify them correctly. Moreover, many had no clear idea why the United States was being called upon to enter the war.

It would take the continuous efforts of the White House, the Office of War Information, and scores of patriotic artists to give the Four Freedoms new life. Most prominent among those was Norman Rockwell, whose images became a national sensation in early 1943 when they were first published in The Saturday Evening Post. Roosevelt’s words and Rockwell’s artworks soon became inseparable in the public consciousness, with millions of reproductions publicizing the Second War Loan Drive bringing the Four Freedoms directly into American homes and workplaces. When Eleanor Roosevelt convinced United Nations delegates to include these ideals in its postwar statement of human rights, FDR’s words—now forever entwined with Rockwell’s images—achieved immortality.

Born amid the turmoil of World War II, the Four Freedoms have since become one of its greatest legacies, a testament to the paramount importance of human rights and dignity. Brought forward by one of America’s greatest presidents and immortalized by one of its most beloved artists more than seventy-five years ago, the Four Freedoms continue to inspire, resonating across generations as strongly today as they did in their time.


JUNE 4, 2019 - OCTOBER 27, 2019:
Le Mémorial de Caen
Esplanade Général Eisenhower
CS 55026
14050 Caen Cedex 4
CAEN, FRANCE


DECEMBER 15, 2019 - MARCH 22, 2020:
MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, HOUSTON
1001 Bissonnet
HOUSTON, TEXAS


FALL 2020:
NORMAN ROCKWELL MUSEUM
9 Glendale Rd / Rte 183
STOCKBRIDGE, MA


THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MUSEUM AND THE TEXTILE MUSEUM
701 21st Street, NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 09 -
July 14, 2019
The Rise of Everyday Design: The Arts and Crafts Movement in Britain and America
See more than 200 items including books, drawings, furniture, decorative arts objects, photographs, and flyers, broadsides and advertising ephemera that offer a new and detailed look at the history of the Arts and Crafts movement.

The Arts and Crafts movement occupied a central place in discussions about modern life in Britain and America from the late 1840s to the early 1920s and beyond. Arts and Crafts reformers were concerned with the daily realities of the industrial age, and used design to envision and promote a new and improved way of living.

Discover how theorists and makers—like John Ruskin and William Morris (along with lesser known figures like Lucy Crane) in Britain and Candace Wheeler, Alice and Elbert Hubbard, and Gustav Stickley in America—spread their ideas through books, retail showrooms, and world's fairs, and how Arts and Crafts objects, which were originally handmade and costly, came to be manufactured and sold to the everyday consumer.

Items on display from the Ransom Center's collections will include hand-drawn designs and sketches by Ruskin and Morris, a first edition copy of Owen Jones's Grammar of Ornament, books and marketing materials of the Kelmscott and Roycroft presses, stained glass designs by Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Edward Burne-Jones, and plates from Frank Lloyd Wright's Wasmuth portfolio. These items will be paired with photographs, furniture, and decorative arts objects from the University's Alexander Architectural Archives, the Dallas Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and private collections.

Opening on the 200th anniversary of John Ruskin's birth, the exhibition will show how the Arts and Crafts idea made its way into everyday homes, transforming the lives of ordinary people in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and remaining influential to this day.

Mon - Wed, & Frid 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 7pm
Sat & Sun Noon – 5pm

Free admission

Harry Ransom Center
300 W. 21st Street (21st & Guadalupe Streets)
Austin, TX
Exhibit Southwest
February 09 -
July 08, 2019
Celia Paul
An exhibition of seven paintings by contemporary British artist Celia Paul (born 1959), the eponymously titled “Celia Paul” is curated by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Hilton Als, staff writer and theater critic for The New Yorker and associate professor of writing at Columbia University. Featuring work selected by Als in collaboration with the artist as a testament to their transatlantic friendship, “Celia Paul” focuses on Paul’s recent paintings, which address the themes of memory, family, and the inner lives of women. The exhibition was the inaugural installment in 2018 of a trilogy at the Yale Center for British Art; the next two exhibitions in the series there will focus on the work of Lynette Yiadom-Boakye in 2019 and Njideka Akunyili Crosby in 2020.

10am - 5pm

Huntington Art Gallery
The Huntington Library, Art Collections, & Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
February 11 -
June 08, 2019
"Genius of Genre: The Pen Names and Personas of Flann O’Brien”
Spring exhibit on the Irish author best known for his cult classic novel, The Third Policeman. “Genius of Genre: The Pen Names and Personas of Flann O’Brien”

Flann the novelist. Myles the columnist. Brother Barnabas the student. Brian O’Nolan (1911-1966) wrote in many genres under many guises, in both English and Irish, confounding contemporaries with his incomparable genius and satirical wit.

Using original manuscripts, letters, books, and artifacts from Burns Library’s unrivaled collection of O’Nolan’s papers and personal library, the exhibit will unmask the most enigmatic and elusive literary figure to emerge from 20th-century Ireland next to James Joyce.

The exhibit will also feature new and original works by Irish artists David and Eddie O’Kane, who have been creating and exhibiting Flann-inspired drawings, paintings, and animated and live-action videos at the biennial International Flann O’Brien Society conferences and other venues. An opening reception on February 12 will include curator-led viewings of the exhibit beginning at 4:30pm and a presentation by the O’Kanes at 5:15pm, followed by opportunities for conversation and more exhibit viewing. All are welcome.

The exhibit will be complemented by podcast and iBook projects created by students from professor Joseph Nugent’s Fall 2018 course, “From Page to Pod: Making Literature Public.”

9am - 5pm

John J. Burns Library
Boston College Libraries
140 Commonwealth Avenue
Chestnut Hill, MA
Exhibit New England
February 14 -
July 07, 2019
Jan Tschichold and the New Typography
Graphic Design Between the World Wars

Tracing the revolution in graphic design in the 1920s, this exhibition displays materials assembled by typographer and designer Jan Tschichold (1902–1974) in Weimar Germany. Published in Berlin in 1928, Tschichold’s book Die Neue Typographie was one of the key texts of modern design, partly due to its grasp of Constructivist ideas and new print technology, but equally, because it was a manual for practicing designers. In the years leading up to its publication, Tschichold struck up a correspondence with many European artist-designers, including Kurt Schwitters, El Lissitzky, László Moholy-Nagy, Herbert Bayer, Piet Zwart, and Ladislav Sutnar, among others. In the course of this, Tschichold exchanged and acquired many examples of their design work, some pieces now quite famous (such as El Lissitzky’s Pro dva kvadrata [The Story of Two Squares], 1920) while other items are modest and ephemeral, such as tourist brochures, handbills, headed notepaper, product catalogues, and magazine advertisements. This collection, purchased by Philip Johnson and donated to the Museum of Modern Art, will form the basis of this exhibition, tracing the development of the new ideas that revolutionized graphic design in the 1920s.

Tue, Fri – Sun 11am – 5pm
Wed, Thu 11am – 8pm

Bard Graduate Center Galery
18 West 86th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 14 -
July 14, 2019
Love & Resistance: Stonewall 50
The Stonewall Riots were a flash point in LGBTQ history. After the riots that took place at the Stonewall Inn in June 1969, the LGBTQ civil rights movement went from handfuls of pioneering activists to a national movement mobilizing thousands under the banner of Gay Liberation.

This exhibition illustrates this history through the photographs of Kay Tobin Lahusen and Diana Davies, two pioneering photojournalists, who captured the pivotal events of this era and changed the ways that LGBTQ people perceived themselves. Featured alongside these images are other items from the Library’s vast archival holdings in LGBTQ history, including ephemera, periodicals, and more.

Sun 1pm – 5pm
Mon, Thu - Sat 10am – 6pm
Tue & Wed 10am – 8pm

Rayner Special Collections Wing
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
476 Fifth Avenue (42nd St & Fifth Ave)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 15 -
May 05, 2019
Mort Gerberg Cartoons: A New Yorker's Perspective
Artist Mort Gerberg grew up with a pencil in his hand, creating cartoons from the time he was a young boy in his native Brooklyn. Illustrated with a sensitivity and humor that have made him beloved by his audiences, his work has been featured in major publications, including the New Yorker and Saturday Review. The 100 cartoons on view in this exhibition cover a range of topics, such as life in New York City, women, youth, old age, and politics. Curated by Marilyn Satin Kushner, curator and head, Department of Prints, Photographs, and Architectural Collections.

Tue – Thu 10am – 6pm
Fri 10am – 9pm
Sat 10am – 6pm
Sun 10am – 5pm
Mon CLOSED

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West (at Richard Gilder Way / 77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 16, 2019 -
December 31, 2020
John James Audubon’s The Birds of America
Today only about 200 complete sets of The Birds of America exist. The Museum’s set, bound in four leather portfolios, was acquired by the State of North Carolina in 1848 and kept for more than a century at the State Library before being transferred to the Museum. The hand-colored engravings were recently conserved and rebound. In the new Audubon Gallery, the NCMA presents Audubon’s work in special cases designed for each of the enormous “double elephant” volumes, with hydraulic lifts that allow staff access so that the pages can be turned periodically to display a new selection of birds.

Tue – Thu 10am – 5pm
Fri 10am – 9pm
Sat & Sun 10am – 5pm
Closed Mondays & some holidays

NORTH CAROLINA MUSEUM OF ART
2110 Blue Ridge Road
Raleigh, NC
Exhibit South
February 17 -
May 12, 2019
A Passionate Muse: The Art of Leonard Baskin
Sculptor, printmaker, and illustrator, Leonard Baskin (1922-2000) was well known for his spirited visual fantasy and storytelling. He also cast his eye on the modern world, with sometimes-biting commentary on the ills of society, woven into religious or mythological scenes. This exhibition focuses on his independent prints, many of them monumental, that examine his often cynical, often hopeful view of human nature.

Tue – Sun 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 9pm

FREE for Crocker members
Adults $12
Seniors, college students, & military $8
Youth (6–17) $6
Children (5 & younger) FREE
Every third Sunday is Pay What You Wish Day, sponsored by Western Health Advantage

Crocker Art Museum
216 O Street
Sacramento, CA
Exhibit West
February 18 -
May 20, 2019
Wise Men Fished Here
A Centennial Exhibition in Honor of the Gotham Book Mart, 1920 - 2020.

In 2008, the University of Pennsylvania was gifted the contents of the Gotham Book Mart, the legendary New York City bookstore founded by Frances Steloff in 1920. To mark the 100th anniversary of the store’s founding, the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts will host an exhibition in honor of Frances Steloff and her famous bookshop. For decades the Gotham Book Mart was, as Steloff prosaically put it, “the headquarters of the avant-garde.” The exhibition will explore the shop’s role in assembling, publishing, and promoting groundbreaking experimental writers, as well as its later years under the ownership of Steloff's hand- chosen successor, Andreas Brown, focusing on Brown’'s passion for postcards and collaborations with graphic artist, Edward Gorey .

For the past eight years, Penn Libraries curators and staff have unpacked and processed over 200,000 items and unveiled one hundred and fifty linear feet of archival materials. From this mass of "stuff", Curator David McKnight has, with the assistance of Katherine Aid and Camille Davis, selected 300 pieces ranging in date from 1900 to 2000. Drawing upon the collection’s vast array of material evidence—books, periodicals, manuscripts and ephemera -—the exhibition will narrate the history of the shop from its earliest beginnings to its to its demise in 2005. A catalog of the exhibition is in preparation.


CONFERENCE: February 28 – March 1, 2019
LOCATION: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books & Manuscripts, Class of 1978 Pavilion

The 2018 Jay Kislak Conference:
A two- day and half day conference on the theme of Modernism - Materiality - Meaning. Responding to the growing interest in the concept of the modernist book store, the conference will provide a framework to explore the role of the Gotham Book Mart within the larger context of the printing arts, non-commercial publishing, retailing, and the marketing of modernism; as well as, examining the important role of little magazines and small presses; other topics will include Surrealism; the New York poetry scene; the Beats; Edward Gorey, and much more. The conference will be preceded by a film festival inspired by the Gotham Book Mart promotion of Modernist film. Other events will include a poetry reading, panels and workshops.

Gallery Hours:
Mon - Fri 9am - 5pm
Wed 9am - 8pm

Free & open to the public

Goldstein Family & Kamin Galleries
Van Pelt - Dietrich Library Center
3420 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 20 -
April 27, 2019
Alphabet Magic: Gudrun & Hermann Zapf and the World They Designed
2018 marked the 100th anniversary of the birth of both Hermann Zapf and Gudrun Zapf von Hesse. Hermann Zapf’s contribution to type design and calligraphy is immeasurable. His typographic work alone has greatly expanded the language of letterforms through ubiquitous fonts such as Palatino, Optima, and Zapfino (to name a few). Zapf’s typefaces have become among the most used – and most admired – of all time and he is arguably the most important type designer of the 20th century.

No less important, though perhaps less well known, is his work in typography and book design.
Zapf has also been at the forefront of type technology. His Marconi alphabet design was the first typeface ever created specifically for digital typography.

Also noteworthy is Zapf’s calligraphic art. It first became widely disseminated in his writing manual Pen and Graver (1949), and has since been seen in numerous books and exhibitions, and has been a major influence on generations of calligraphers.

In 1951 Hermann Zapf married Gudrun von Hesse. She is a master in her own right and across several disciplines. In addition to a remarkable career in the fields of calligraphy and type design, she is recognized as one of the finest bookbinders of the 20th and 21st centuries.

This retrospective commemorates the 100th birthdays and influential work and careers of Hermann Zapf and Gudrun Zapf von Hesse.

The show draws mainly on two collections: The Melbert B. Cary Jr. Graphic Arts Collection at the Rochester Institute of Technology, where Dr. Steven K. Galbraith is curator, and the private collection of Jerry Kelly, a leading calligrapher, book designer, type designer and typographer, who has co-curated the show with Dr. Galbraith.

A major biography of Hermann Zapf and a complete checklist of the exhibition will be published to coincide with the show. In addition, a film on the work of Gudrun and Hermann Zapf, “Alphabet Magic,” will be screened during the run of the exhibition.

Mon – Sat 10am - 5pm

Free & open to the public

Ground floor Gallery
The Grolier Club
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 24 -
May 12, 2019
From Today, Painting Is Dead: Early Photography in Britain and France
The Barnes Foundation to Present Survey of Experimental Early Photography

For its second survey of photography, the Barnes Foundation is presenting nearly 250 early photographs—most of which have never been exhibited before—created by British and French photographers between the 1840s and 1880s. Curated by Thom Collins, executive director and president of the Barnes, From Today, Painting Is Dead: Early Photography in Britain and France is drawn from the private collection of Michael Mattis and Judy Hochberg and spans the invention of the daguerreotype to photography on paper and beyond.

Wed – Mon 11am – 5pm
Tue CLOSED

Press preview: Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Barnes Foundation
2025 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy.
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 28 -
June 15, 2019
Five Hundred Years of Women’s Work: The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection
Women’s work. The phrase usually conjures up domestic duties or occupations largely associated with women—such as teaching, nursing, or housekeeping. The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection upends those associations. By bringing together materials from across the centuries, Baskin reveals what has been hidden—that Western women have long pursued a startling range of careers and vocations and that through their work they have supported themselves, their families, and the causes they believed in. The Lisa Unger Baskin Collection is now part of Duke’s Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture. This exhibition provides a first glimpse of the diversity and depth of the collection, revealing the lives of women both famous and forgotten and recognizing their accomplishments.

Wed, Feb 27th:
Exhibition Preview at 5pm
Mary Duke Biddle Room
Stone Family Gallery & Trent History of Medicine Room

Reception at 5:30pm
Ahmadieh Family Commons
Rubenstein Library, 2nd Floor

Program 6pm
Gothic Reading Room
Rubenstein Library
West Campus

A Conversation with Lisa Unger Baskin, featuring Naomi Nelson, Associate University Librarian and Director, Rubenstein Library, with introductory remarks by Edward Balleisen, Vice Provost for Interdisciplinary Studies

Mary Duke Biddle Room, Sperling Family Exhibit Cases, Michael & Karen Stone Family Gallery, & The Josiah Charles Trent History of Medicine Room
Duke University
411 Chapel Drive
Durham, NC
Exhibit South
March 01 -
June 15, 2019
The Word Embodied: Scripture as Creative Inspiration in Twentieth-Century Book Arts
An exhibition of livres d’artistes, artists’ books, and fine press editions of the Bible.

Twentieth-century printers and artists developed aesthetic principles that articulated the power of the book to influence the reader’s experience of a text. They endeavored not simply to copy or illustrate Scripture but to embody it in a meaningful form. Whether austere or exuberant in design, these books were conceived to give countenance to the spirit within. This exhibition explores the book as a creative expression with special attention paid to artistic philosophies, the inspiration behind specific works, the roles of illustration and letterform, and the significant achievements of women in the book arts.

“The Artist and the Book”: Panel Discussion and Reception
On Tuesday, March 19, 2019, 4:00—6:30 pm Bridwell Library will host a reception and panel discussion featuring guest speakers Anna Lovatt, Assistant Professor of Art History at SMU and Catherine Craft, Curator at the Nasher Sculpture Center. The panel will commence at 4:30 pm. Exhibition curator R. Arvid Nelsen will offer guided tours.

The Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Galleries
Bridwell Library
Perkins School of Theology
Southern Methodist University
6425 Boaz Lane
Dallas, TX
Exhibit Southwest
March 02 -
May 10, 2019
Lacock Abbey: Birthplace of Photography on Paper
Photography on paper was born in 1839 in England at Lacock Abbey. A new exhibition of photographs juxtaposes the work of its inventor William Henry Fox Talbot (1800-1877) with the contemporary work of Hiroshi Sugimoto, Abelardo Morell, and Mike Robinson. Lacock Abbey: Birthplace of Photography on Paper will be on view at Hans P. Kraus Jr. Fine Photographs from March 2 through May 10, 2019. The exhibition, which pays tribute to Talbot’s beloved ancestral home in Wiltshire, features architectural exteriors and interiors, still lifes, portraits, and tree studies by Talbot, complemented by interpretations from three contemporary artists, who have been inspired by his pioneering photographs.

Among the highlights of the exhibition is one of the earliest examples of Talbot’s calotype negative process, Stable roofline, northeast courtyard, Lacock Abbey, a salt print from September 1840, made the year after he announced his invention to the world. This apparently unique print has never before been exhibited. (This is confirmed by The William Henry Fox Talbot Catalogue Raisonné, which was just released by the Bodleian Libraries.) Set in Lacock’s northeast courtyard, this spectral image of shows Talbot’s innate compositional talent emphasizing the geometric proportions of his home.

Talbot demonstrated that photography could serve as a bridge between the ancient and modern worlds with his Bust of Patroclus, 1842. The plaster bust of Patroclus, defender of Achilles, was one of Talbot’s most frequently used subjects. Unlike a person, a plaster cast remains steady during the long exposures and experiments with lighting. This boldly sculpted, highly reflective head modulated light and shadow in an infinite number of ways from a wide variety of angles. Talbot’s brush strokes around the border of this exceptional salt print identify this as an early print coated by hand. Later prints appeared in Talbot’s The Pencil of Nature, the first commercially-published photographically-illustrated book (1844-1846). The print on view was made from the same calotype negative as was later used in The Pencil. Art historians are indebted to Talbot, because his invention allowed scholars to study objects in photographic reproduction.

Mon - Fri 12pm - 6pm

A reception for the exhibition is being held on Saturday, March 2nd, 3pm, in conjunction with the first ADAA Upper East Side Gallery Walk.

Hans P. Kraus Jr. Fine Photographs
962 Park Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 04 -
December 16, 2019
Writing Women’s Rights: “The pen in their hands”
In the library we have a display of writers from Bathsua Makin (c.1600-c.1673) to Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797) who took on issues of equality, gender difference, biology as destiny, women in politics, education and equal pay. Issues we think as intrinsically modern have their origins in the long eighteenth century. Long before the Suffragists and Suffragettes, long before feminist movements and #MeToo, the pen was in these eighteenth-century women’s hands!

11am – 4.30pm
Last entry 4pm

Chawton House
Alton
Hampshire, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
March 04 -
December 16, 2019
Jane Austen’s Reading
The main exhibition at Chawton House in 2019 focuses on Jane Austen’s reading; both books she had access to and those that influenced her writing.

The books exhibited are all held at Chawton House and come from either our early women writers collection of works or from the Knight book collection. At one time, the Knight collection was owned by Jane Austen’s brother Edward, who was adopted into the Knight family, and as such it was a library known to and used by Jane Austen herself.

Highlights of the exhibition include the copy of a novel we believe Jane Austen read, a first edition of Northanger Abbey and Persuasion, and an opportunity to learn more about the new Godmersham Park virtual library.

11am – 4.30pm
Last entry 4pm

Chawton House
Alton
Hampshire, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
March 05 -
May 19, 2019
A Matter of Size: Miniature Texts & Bindings, from the collection of Patricia J. Pistner
Size does matter. In this collection of diminutive books and bindings the size restriction ranges from a grand height of 4 inches to less than 1 millimeter. Spanning 4,500 years, on view are 275 miniature examples of cuneiform tablets and other antiquities, mediaeval manuscripts, early printed books, and contemporary artists’ books and design bindings representing a variety of artistic styles. The tiny tomes are from the extensive collection of Patricia J. Pistner and have been selected by Jan Storm van Leeuwen and Ms. Pistner

Mon – Sat 10am - 5pm

Free & open to the public

2nd floor Gallery
The Grolier Club
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 05 -
June 16, 2019
The Tale of Genji: A Japanese Classic Illuminated
A major international loan exhibition focusing on the artistic tradition inspired by Japan’s most celebrated work of literature will go on view at The Metropolitan Museum of Art beginning March 5, 2019. Bringing together more than 120 works of art from 32 public and private collections in Japan and the United States—including National Treasures and Important Cultural Properties, most of which have never left Japan—The Tale of Genji: A Japanese Classic Illuminated explores the tale’s continuing influence on Japanese art since it was written around the year 1000 by the noblewoman Murasaki Shikibu (ca. 978–ca. 1014). Often referred to as the world’s first novel, The Tale of Genji has captivated readers for centuries through its sophisticated narrative style, humor and wit, and unforgettable characters, beginning with the “radiant prince” Genji, whose life and loves are the focus of the story.

The Tale of Genji: A Japanese Classic Illuminated will present the most comprehensive introduction to the visual world of Genji ever shown outside Japan. It will feature nearly one thousand years of Genji-related art—an astonishing range of works including paintings, calligraphy, silk robes, lacquerware, a palanquin for a shogun’s bride, and popular art such as ukiyo-e prints and contemporary manga—and provide viewers with a window into the mysterious and even exotic world of the Heian imperial court (794–1185) that was created by the legendary authoress.

Sun – Thu 10am – 5:30pm*
Fri & Sat 10am – 9pm*

*Galleries are cleared 15 minutes before closing.

Galleries 223–32, Floor 2
The Sackler Wing,
The Met Fifth Avenue
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 12 -
June 09, 2019
Oscar Rejlander: Artist Photographer
Often referred to as the “father of art photography,” Oscar G. Rejlander has been praised for his early experiments with combination printing; for his collaboration with Charles Darwin; and for his influence on the work of Julia Margaret Cameron and Lewis Carroll. This groundbreaking exhibition is the first major retrospective on Rejlander, highlighting new research and a selection of works brought together for the first time.

Open 10 am–5:30 pm
Saturday 10 am–9 pm
Closed Mondays

Free admission

The Getty Center
N. Sepulveda Blvd. & Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
March 19 -
April 19, 2019
Pablo Picasso
Exhibition of Limited Edition linocuts, etchings and lithographs, ceramics and books signed by Picasso.

Mon - Sat 10am – 6pm

Peter Harrington Gallery - London
100 Fulham Road
Chelsea
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
March 21, 2019 -
February 09, 2020
Thinking 3D: Leonardo to the present
For centuries, artists and scientists have wrestled with how to convey three-dimensional objects on the page. Using some of the Bodleian Libraries’ finest books, manuscripts, prints and drawings, Thinking 3D tells the story of the development of three-dimensional communication over the last 500 years.

The exhibition shows how new techniques, developed from the Renaissance onwards, revolutionized the way that ideas in the fields of anatomy, architecture, astronomy and geometry were relayed and ultimately how this has influenced how we perceive the world today. Timed to celebrate the 500th anniversary of the death of Leonardo da Vinci, the exhibition shows how Leonardo and his contemporaries made great strides in the realistic depiction of 3D forms. Thinking 3D explores technological advances up to the present day including 3D modelling, photography and stereoscopy; and also highlights the works of modern practitioners and researchers in Oxford.

The exhibition will be accompanied by a range of smaller exhibitions and events across Oxford in 2019 as part of the Thinking 3D research project.

Mon - Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 11am - 5pm

Free admission

Treasury, Weston Library
Bodleian Library
Broad Street
Oxford, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
March 21 -
July 24, 2019
We the People: American Prints from Between the World Wars
Explore prints depicting the good times, hard times, and war-time experiences of everyday Americans in the 1930s and 1940s.

Despite the hardships of the Great Depression, American printmaking blossomed during the 1930s. Government relief programs provided artists of all backgrounds new opportunities to collaborate and experiment. Meanwhile, print clubs and art associations made their works available to the broader public.

People of all classes could see themselves in works of art that reflected their own lives: at work, at play, and at home. Explore these democratic works created by American artists for the American people.

This exhibition celebrates two recent gifts of modern American prints from Hersh and Fern Cohen to the Philadelphia Museum of Art.

Tue – Sun 10am – 5pm
Wed & Fri open until 8:45pm
Mon CLOSED except some holidays*

* Holiday Hours
Open New Year’s Day, Martin Luther King Jr. Day, Presidents’ Day, Memorial Day, Labor Day & Columbus Day

Closed 4th of July

Adults: $20
Seniors (65 & over): $18
Students (with valid ID): $14
Youth (13–18): $14
Children (12 & under): Free
Members: Free

Korman Galleries 121–123
Philadelphia Museum of Art
2600 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy.
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 23 -
June 16, 2019
Copies, Fakes and Reproductions: Printmaking in the Renaissance
Artistic training in the Renaissance involved drawing, or copying, from nature, from antique sculptures and from the work of other acclaimed artists. While Raphael and Michelangelo were painting for the Popes in Rome, skilled printmakers such as Marcantonio Raimondi and Giorgio Ghisi were widely disseminating the painters’ famous compositions through the relatively new medium of engraving. Not all artists, however, wanted their creations reproduced by others. This exhibition will present works which showcase the various intentions behind copies, ranging from collaborations between designers and printmakers to the unauthorized copies of Albrecht Dürer’s woodcuts, which resulted in a landmark legal decision against image piracy.

Tue - Fri 10am - 5pm
Sat 11am - 5pm
Sun 1pm - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

Third Thursday of every month
10am - 9pm

Blanton Museum of Art
The University of Texas at Austin
200 E. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.
Austin, TX
Exhibit Southwest
March 28 -
August 30, 2019
To the Moon: The Science of Apollo
July 20, 2019, marks the 50th anniversary of Neil Armstrong’s and Buzz Aldrin’s first steps on the moon. Five additional Apollo missions sent 10 more astronauts to the lunar surface where they gathered rock samples and conducted scientific experiments. The exhibition, To the Moon, will relive Project Apollo and the behind-the-scenes story of how science got to and from the moon.

West Gallery – “The Science of Apollo”

Visitors to the west gallery will explore each of the six Apollo missions that successfully landed on the lunar surface. Using NASA images, mission reports, technical reports, and other material from the Library’s collection, topics will include: geological features of the landing sites, the science experiments deployed by the astronauts, and Apollo’s scientific legacy.

Alcove – “Go for TLI”

At 8:30 p.m. on December 21, 1968, Mission Control in Houston informed the Apollo 8 crew that they were “go for TLI,” trans-lunar injection, the engine burn that would take the spacecraft on a trajectory to the moon. For the first time in history, humans left earth orbit. Visitors to the alcove will learn how NASA engineers accomplished the feat of getting spacecraft and astronauts to and from the lunar surface, beginning with the lunar-orbit rendezvous decision made in 1962 to the “all up” testing of the Saturn V rocket, and the ultimate triumph of Project Apollo with the safe return of every astronaut.

East Gallery: “Mapping the Moon: A History of Lunar Cartography”

Visitors to the east gallery will view rare books from the Library’s History of Science collection that range from the 17th century to the 1960s. Books on display will include Galileo’s 1610 Sidereus Nuncius to works by Johannes Hevelius, Robert Hooke, Tobias Mayer, William Pickering, Gerard Kuiper, among many others. The gallery will conclude with images and maps from NASA’s and the Soviet Union’s unmanned lunar probes of the 1960s.

Mon – Fri 9am -5pm
2nd Sat of each month 10am - 2pm

Free admission

William N. Deramus III Cosmology Theater
Linda Hall Library
5109 Cherry Street
Kansas City, MO
Exhibit Midwest
March 29 -
September 15, 2019
YINKA SHONIBARE MBE: THE AMERICAN LIBRARY
The American Library by Yinka Shonibare MBE is a celebration of the diversity of the American population and acts as an instigator of discovery and debate. The six thousand books in this art installation are covered in the artist’s signature Dutch wax printed cotton textile. These fabrics were originally based on Indonesian batik textiles, made in the Netherlands and sold in West Africa. Since the 1960s this fabric has been celebrated as a symbol of African identity. The mixed origins of the fabric make it a perfect metaphor for the multicultural identity embedded in the history of the United States.

On the spines of many of these books are, printed in gold, the names of people who immigrated, or whose antecedents immigrated to the United States. On other books are the names of African Americans who relocated or whose parents relocated out of the American South during the Great Migration. These names include W. E. B. Du Bois, Maria Goeppert Mayer, Steve Jobs, Bruce Lee, Ana Mendieta, Joni Mitchell, Toni Morrison, Barack Obama, Steven Spielberg, Carl Stokes, Donald Trump and Tiger Woods. These people have all made a significant contribution to aspects of American life and culture and represent every field from science to activism, music, philosophy, art, and literature. Most of these people have also experienced varying degrees of discrimination and hardship during and after their or their family’s relocation. A further set of books within the library features the names of people who have spoken out against immigration, equality or diversity in America.

Free with general admission

1927 Galleries 1 & 2
Speed Art Museum
2035 South Third Street
Louisville, KY
Exhibit South
March 29 -
July 27, 2019
Walt Whitman: America's Poet
Two hundred years after his birth, Walt Whitman remains one of America's most influential writers, arguably our national poet. His life's work, Leaves of Grass, is a perennial best-seller, and Whitman himself has attained the status of cultural icon, his name nearly a byword for notions of inclusivity, equality, sensuality, and the value of the individual.

Drawing from collections across the Library, Walt Whitman: America's Poet examines many of the individuals, beliefs, and experiences that shaped Whitman's work while also noting his literary legacy and continuing cultural impact.

Sun 1pm - 5pm
Mon, Thu - Sat 10am - 6pm
Tue & Wed 10am - 8pm

Sue and Edgar Wachenheim III Gallery
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
476 Fifth Avenue (42nd Street & Fifth Avenue)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 31 -
June 23, 2019
Nancy Spero: Paper Mirror
A celebrated figure in the cultural life of New York City, Spero produced a radical body of work that confronted oppression and inequality while challenging the aesthetic orthodoxies of contemporary art. Among the first feminist artists, Spero drew on archetypal representations of women from diverse cultures and times in an attempt to reframe history itself from a perspective that she termed “woman as protagonist.” Organized by Julie Ault, Paper Mirror brings together more than 100 works made over six decades in the first major museum exhibition in the U.S. since the artist’s death.

12pm - 6pm

The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) PS1
22-25 Jackson Avenue at 46th Avenue
Long Island City, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 01 -
August 30, 2019
Power in My Hand: Women Poets, Women Artists, and Social Change
A shared yearning for free expression has animated an enduring solidarity between women poets and artists. Using words and images, brimming with passion and determination, they communicate with and inspire one another across geographic boundaries and historic eras. Such devotion is evident in Muriel Rukeyser’s honor poem for the German artist Käthe Kollwitz and in Judy Chicago’s Dinner Party homage to Emily Dickinson. The critic Lucy Lippard has argued that “making poetry out of politics, making art from lives lived outside of power, and making politics out of that art and poetry—these are the three solid dimensions, the third power of the women’s liberation movement.” This collection of printed poems, artists’ books and art objects celebrates these creative and social bonds.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

National Museum of Woman in the Arts
1250 New York Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 05 -
October 27, 2019
Revolutionary Reflections: French Memories of the War for America
The American Revolution marked the beginning of an age of democratic revolutions that swept over France and challenged the old order throughout the Atlantic world. French officers who served in the American War of Independence, whether as idealistic volunteers or resolute soldiers of their king, were caught up in the turmoil of their generation. Their journals, memoirs and portraits, brought together in an exhibition drawn largely from the collections of the Institute, reflect their impressions of Revolutionary America and their memories of service to king and country and to the cause of American independence.

Tue - Sat 10am - 4pm
Sun 12pm - 4pm

The American Revolution Institute of the Society of the Cincinnati
Anderson House
2118 Massachusetts Avenue NW (between 21st & 22nd streets)
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 07 -
August 04, 2019
Toulouse-Lautrec and the Stars of Paris
The invention of celebrity in 19th-century France

Aristide Bruant snarls. Loïe Fuller swirls on stage in the “serpentine dance.” The critic Édouard Dujardin eyes Jane Avril as they listen to the vulgar songs of Yvette Guilbert. These are celebrities of 19th-century Paris made famous by Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec, who captured the spectacle of the fin de siècle in evocative posters, prints, and paintings.

“Toulouse-Lautrec and the Stars of Paris” explores the celebrity culture of Lautrec’s time and the artist’s fascination with the personal lives of les stars as well as the roles that they played. With expressive lines and brazen colors, Lautrec depicted the defining gestures, costumes, and expressions of spectacular performers, many of whom were his personal friends and habitués of Montmartre, the focus of Parisian nightlife and a haven for acrobatic dancers and destitute students, reprobate aristocrats and middle-class pleasure-seekers.

The exhibition includes more than 200 works and is composed of thematic sections highlighting Lautrec’s formal innovations, such as dramatic lighting effects and color combinations; the changing artistic and social landscapes of Paris, with scenes of the city by day and by night; cafés, cabarets, and theaters; and celebrities of the age. The display also incorporates works by Lautrec’s contemporaries Edgar Degas, Honoré Daumier, Pierre Bonnard, Édouard Vuillard, and others—presenting him in the context of his heroes, peers, and followers. Organized by the MFA in partnership with the Boston Public Library, the exhibition draws on both institutions’ rich holdings, and includes key loans of paintings and graphic arts from public and private collections.

Mon, Tue, Sat & Sun 10am – 5pm
Wed - Fri 10am – 10pm

Members Free
Adults $25
Seniors (65+) $23
Children 6 and under Free
Youths 7–17* Free / $10*
Students (18+)** $23**

*Youths 7–17 admitted free weekends, weekdays after 3 pm, and Boston public school holidays; otherwise admission for youths is $10.
**Participants in the University Membership program receive free admission. NH and ME resident students also receive free admission.

Ann and Graham Gund Gallery (Gallery LG31)
Avenue of the Arts
465 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
April 12 -
14, 2019
International Exhibition of Rare Book & Art Object
150 booksellers and 50 fine-art experts convene to offer timeless riches in the form of written, printed or illustrated works on paper on the on hand, and some of the most beautiful fine art objects, all endowed with their own personal history, on the other.

Each year a guest institution presents some of the treasures from its collections.

Guest of Honor 2019: THE FORNEY LIBRARY

The Rare Book Fair assembles all the actors who make up the book chain : the engraving and photographic department of the National Library of France (BnF), the second-hand booksellers, a familiar site along the banks of the Seine in Paris, associations of book-lovers and book-binders, French book towns and villages. In addition the Fair offers a rich cultural programme with guided tours, exhibitions, signings, paper-making demonstrations and initiation to the world of book collecting for all.

Manuscripts, incunabula, first editions, scientific or popular works, fine bindings, antique or modern engravings... all this to attract specialists and the general public alike.

A rich and varied programme, with ample scope for our 20,000 visitors who can plunge into the world of learning, art and pleasure beneath the glass dome of the Grand Palais, a historical monument and symbolic venue for numerous cultural events.

11:00 - 20:00

Admission: 10 €

Grand Palais
Avenue Winston Churchill
Paris, FRANCE
Exhibit International
April 13, 2019 -
January 05, 2020
A Monument to Shakespeare
The Architecture of the Folger Shakespeare Library

Henry Clay Folger and his wife Emily wanted to create a monument to Shakespeare in the U.S. Capitol. This would be their gift to the American people, an architectural presence on Capitol Hill, and an anchor to the nation’s cultural mile. This exhibition shows how Henry, and after his death, his wife Emily, worked with architect Paul Philippe Cret to create a marble building that looks like a book, and speaks to the hope that Washington DC would become a cultural center.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun noon – 5pm

Folger Shakespeare Library
201 East Capitol Street, SE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 26 -
August 27, 2019
Writing: Making Your Mark
Follow the remarkable evolution of writing from ancient Egyptian hieroglyphs carved in stone and early printed text such as William Caxton’s edition of The Canterbury Tales, to the art of note-taking by some of history’s greatest minds, and onwards to the digital communication tools we use today.

Marvel at centuries of human innovation as writing enabled progress and opened doors to expression and art. Items as diverse as James Joyce’s annotated copy of Ulysses and a 60,000-strong petition against Bengali partition, sit alongside Burmese tattooing instruments and a new take on typography by the Russian artist El Lissitzky to illustrate how writing allows us to enact change and make a lasting creative mark of our own.

Our interactive exhibition gives you the chance to reflect on works of genius that wouldn’t exist without the writing traditions of civilisations past. Be dazzled by gold-laden Japanese calligraphy. Study Mozart’s musical flourishes. Pore over Alexander Fleming’s pioneering notebook. Each of these written records carries the history of writing in their every stroke.

Finally, reflect on writing’s future and the role you’ll play in an increasingly digital world. Will we abandon pens and keyboards for voice and video messaging, or continue to carry the traditions of ancient times with us? Consider what sort of writer you are and leave us with some final words of your own.

9:30am - 18:00pm

PACCAR 1
The British Library
96 Euston Road
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
April 30 -
July 21, 2019
The Wondrous Cosmos in Medieval Manuscripts
The cosmos—full of shining stars and orbiting planets—inspired study and devotion among scientists, theologians, and artists alike during the Middle Ages. The belief in angels, demons, and spirits moreover materialized in wondrous works of art, especially on the pages of illuminated manuscripts. Awe-inspiring cosmic phenomena informed every aspect of one’s physical, mental, and spiritual well-being in the premodern world. This exhibition invites you to explore the complexity of the celestial realm in medieval European faith and science traditions.

Sun - Fri 10am – 5:30pm
Sat 10am – 9pm
Mon CLOSED

Free admission

Getty Center
N. Sepulveda Blvd. & Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West