Email Us Your Event
Jump to events in:
View by Month
March 2018
S M T W T F S
        1 2 3
4 5 6 7 8 9 10
11 12 13 14 15 16 17
18 19 20 21 22 23 24
25 26 27 28 29 30 31

 

Follow us on TwitterLike us on Facebook
Auction Guide
Advertise with Us
Exhibit Calendar

View Event Calendar


sort by
Date
Event
sort by
sort by
June 17, 2017 -
June 04, 2018
Double Take: Daguerreian Portrait Pairs
Highlighting the depth of the National Portrait Gallery’s early photography collection, this exhibition will showcase fourteen daguerreotypes—two portraits each—of seven subjects: George Bancroft, Jenny Lind, Zachary Taylor, Frederick Douglass, Jefferson Davis, Daniel Webster, and John Quincy Adams. Only one loan—a daguerreotype of John Quincy Adams from the National Museum of American History—will supplement the Gallery’s collection.

By featuring two portraits of each famous sitter, the exhibition will encourage visitors to consider the ways in which various daguerreotypists approached the same subject and how different the results could be. In addition to discussing the early history of portrait photography, the accompanying text will compare images made for public consumption with those produced as personal keepsakes. Ann Shumard, senior curator of photographs, curates this installation.

11:30am - 7pm daily
Closed December 25th

Free admission

First floor
National Portrait Gallery
8th & F Streets NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 30, 2017 -
May 20, 2018
One Life: Sylvia Plath
“One Life: Sylvia Plath” is the first exploration of the poet and writer’s life in an art and history museum. The exhibition reveals how Plath shaped her identity visually as she came of age as a writer in the 1950s. Visitors will get a look into Plath’s personal life and her dualistic nature she explained as her “brown-haired” and “platinum” personalities. Through personal letters, her own artwork, family photographs and relevant objects, this exhibition highlights Plath’s struggle to understand her own self and to navigate the societal pressures placed on young women during her time. Her Smith College thesis, “The Magic Mirror: A Study of the Double in Two of Dostoevsky’s Novels,” suggests that she took an academic approach to studying her own dualities.

The exhibition features a carefully selected array of images and objects from the Plath archives at Smith College and the University of Indiana’s Lilly Library, two collections that have never been brought together before in a museum exhibition. Dorothy Moss, associate curator of painting and sculpture at the Portrait Gallery, is curator of this show, joined by guest co-curator Karen Kukil, associate curator of rare books and manuscripts at Smith College.

11:30am - 7pm daily
Closed Dec 25th

Free admission

First floor
National Portrait Gallery
8th and F Streets NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 15, 2017 -
June 15, 2018
'Easy Vehicles of Kn​owledge for an Enlightened and Free People'
Am​erican Periodicals in the Watkinson, 1750-1950

Guest Curator Leonard Banco, M.D.,
Trustee of the Watkinson and collector of rare Americana

Trinity College
300 Summit Street
Hartford, CT
Exhibit New England
September 28, 2017 -
May 15, 2018
The Dream Machine: The Beat Generation & the Counterculture, 1940–1975
An exhibition of materials celebrating the contributions of the Beat writers, poets, and artists.

The exhibition draws from collections in the Stuart A. Rose Manuscript, Archives, and Rare Book Library. Related events, open to the public at no charge, include three events with Beat poet Anne Waldman (registration requested).

The Beat Generation emerged as a key part of the U.S. counterculture in the years following World War II. The exhibition showcases the Beat spirit of exploration and experimentation around practicing politics, making art, and building community.

Materials on display will include photographs, correspondence, first editions of seminal works, and early poem and prose drafts. Some of the materials are from the Rose Library’s Raymond Danowski Poetry Library, a significant collection of 20th century English-language poetry and literature. The Rose Library also holds several collections of Jack Kerouac materials.

Level 3, Schatten Gallery
Emory’s Woodruff Library
Emory University
540 Asbury Circle
Atlanta, GA
Exhibit South
September 30, 2017 -
May 28, 2018
The German Woodcut: Christiane Baumgartner
“The German Woodcut: Christiane Baumgartner” celebrates the recent acquisition of Transall (2002), a monumental woodcut by German printmaker Christiane Baumgartner. In her contemporary depictions of motion and speed, Baumgartner combines the newest and fastest means of reproduction (photography and video) with the oldest and slowest (woodcut), fusing the precision of digital technology to the traditional and the handmade. At 14 feet in length, Transall is among her most ambitious works and a milestone of 21st-century printmaking. The enormous image of military cargo planes on a tarmac is based on a found photograph that Baumgartner transferred to her woodblock and carved by hand over a period of 10 months. In addition to Transall, the exhibition presents four other woodcuts by Baumgartner, including a four-part series capturing cars on the Autobahn as they approach an overpass (Schkeuditz I-IV, 2005), and a depiction of Allied bombers over Germany, based on a video still from a World War II documentary (Trails I-II, 2008). Of special note is the portfolio 1 Sekunde (2004), a set of 25 woodcuts that together represent a single second of video that Baumgartner shot of a blurred wooded landscape captured from the open window of a moving car.

Mon & Tue 10am – 5pm
Wed – Fri 10am – 10pm
Sat & Sun 10am – 5pm

Members Free
Adults $25
Seniors (65+) $23
Children 6 & under Free
Youths 7–17* Free*
Students (18+)** $23**

*For youths ages 7–17, admission is free during weekdays after 3 pm, weekends, and Boston public school holidays; otherwise admission for youths is $10.

**Participants in the University Membership program receive free admission. NH and ME resident students also receive free admission.

Frances Vrachos Gallery (Gallery 144)
Museum of Fine Arts - Boston
Avenue of the Arts
465 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
October 04, 2017 -
April 22, 2018
The Vietnam War
This fall, the New-York Historical Society presents a groundbreaking exhibition on one of the most controversial events of the 20th century: the Vietnam War. Populating a 3,000-square-foot gallery with interpretive displays, digital media, artwork, artifacts, photographs, and documents, the exhibit will provide an enlightening account of the causes, progression, and impact of the war. Spanning the duration of U.S. involvement in Indochina from 1945 to 1975, the narrative will incorporate a wide range of perspectives that covers both the home front and the war front.

Displays will feature such topics as the Cold War, the draft, military campaigns initiated by both sides, the growth of the antiwar movement, the role of the president, and the loss of political consensus. Throughout the exhibition, visitors will explore themes of patriotism, duty, and citizenship. Key objects will include a troopship berthing unit, vibrant antiwar posters, artwork by Vietnam vets, a Viet Cong bicycle, the Pentagon Papers, and news and film clippings. Long overdue in the realm of public history, the exhibit will not only provide a chronological and thematic analysis of the Vietnam War but also inspire a fuller, more diverse conversation about the war. The exhibition is curated by Marci Reaven, vice president, history exhibits.

Tue - Thu, & Sat 10am - 6pm
Fri 10am - 8pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon - CLOSED

New-York Historical Society Museum & Library
170 Central Park West
at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 07, 2017 -
March 03, 2018
Drawn from Nature & on Stone: The Lithographs of Fitz Henry Lane
Drawn from Nature & on Stone will be the first ever comprehensive exhibition focusing on 19th century American artist Fitz Henry Lane (1804–1865) as a printmaker. Georgia Barnhill, Andrew W. Mellon Curator of Graphic Arts Emeritus at the America Antiquarian Society in Worcester, MA, is serving as guest curator and worked closely with the Cape Ann Museum in organizing this special show. The exhibition, exhibition catalog and related programming are being organized in connection with Fitz Henry Lane Online, a catalogue raisonné and resource tool created by the Cape Ann Museum.

Fitz Henry Lane has long been recognized as one of America’s most important marine painters of the mid-19th century; in addition to those paintings preserved in the collection of the Cape Ann Museum — the single largest collection of Lane’s works in the world — examples of his oils are featured in major art museums across the country. Lane’s success as a printmaker, however, and his life-long fascination with the medium is something that is not widely recognized. With this exhibition, the Museum will investigate this important part of Lane’s career, exploring the intersection of his work in oil and in print and his success at creating illustrations for sheet music, business cards and stationery, advertising materials and book illustrations. The exhibition will also spotlight a series of views Lane created of towns and cities throughout the region including Gloucester; Boston; Norwich, Connecticut; Castine, Maine; and Baltimore. In total, Lane is thought to have had a hand in the production of approximately 65 lithographs and perhaps more.

Drawn from Nature & on Stone will feature lithographs from the Cape Ann Museum’s own holdings and from collections throughout the region including the American Antiquarian Society, the Boston Athenaeum, The New York Public Library and the Library of Congress. The exhibition will offer scholars and lay people alike the opportunity to explore the intersection of Lane’s work as a printmaker and a painter, to learn more about the art of lithography and to consider the enduring effects printing has on American culture from the early 19th century through today.

Programming related to Drawn from Nature & on Stone will explore Fitz Henry Lane’s life and career in detail and against the backdrop of 19th century printmaking culture in America. A symposium will be held on Saturday, October 28 at which six scholars working in fields related to printmaking will present their research to the public. Their presentations will explore such diverse topics as how race and race relations were portrayed in printing in the period following the issuance of the Emancipation Proclamation in January 1863; the role women artists and artisans played in printmaking during the 19th century; and how the rise of industrialization in towns such as Lowell and Lawrence, Massachusetts, affected the careers of Fitz Henry Lane and other printers. The symposium will be held in the Cape Ann Museum’s auditorium and will be a day-long event. Dr. John Wilmerding, retired curator, deputy director, trustee and chairman of the National Gallery of Art and one of this nation’s leading scholars in American art, will be an honored guest for the gathering.

Tue - Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 1pm - 4pm
Mon CLOSED

Closed on major holidays:
Thanksgiving, Christmas, & New Years Day

Adults: $12.00
Cape Ann residents, seniors & students: $10.00
Museum members & youth (18 and under): FREE

Cape Ann Museum
27 Pleasant Street
Gloucester, MA
Exhibit New England
October 14, 2017 -
April 01, 2018
A HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY
This rotation provides an overview of the history of photography through images that include photographers, photographic apparatus, and/or photographic objects. Made by a wide range of photographers, the objects on view begin with John Moffat’s 1865 portrait of William Henry Fox Talbot and culminate in Gillian Wearing’s 2013 work Me As Talbot, a self-portrait that mimics a portrayal of Talbot with his mousetrap camera. Curated by Jamie M. Allen, associate curator of photography, this installation depicts how photographers have referred to the medium, and to themselves, in their image-making.

Tue – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 11am – 5pm

Adults $15
Seniors (65+) $13
Students (with ID) $5
Ages 5-17 $5
Ages 4 & under Free
Members Free

History of Photography Gallery
Eastman Museum
900 East Avenue
Rochester, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 16, 2017 -
March 02, 2018
Ian Fleming: From Bibliophile to Bond
Ian Fleming (1908-1964) is well known today as the literary creator of master spy James Bond, but long before Bond, Fleming was a collector of rare books, and his collection, along with his specially-bound corrected typescripts of the Bond novels and the first published editions, are housed in the Lilly Library at Indiana University in Bloomington. Fleming's collection, which was remarkable both in its conception and scope, focused on nineteenth- and twentieth-century “books that had started something,” from landmarks in science and technology to instructional volumes on sports and games. Books from Ian Fleming’s personal collection are now on exhibit at the Lilly Library, alongside typescripts and early editions of the James Bond novels.

The Lilly Library
Indiana University
1200 E Seventh Street
Bloomington, IN
Exhibit Midwest
October 24, 2017 -
May 15, 2018
Peter Koch Printer: A Forty-year Retrospective
Peter Koch Printer: A Forty-year Retrospective, an exhibition of limited edition books, portfolios, and prints by longtime Bay Area letterpress printer, designer, and publisher Peter Rutledge Koch, will open May 24, 2017, in the

10am - 6pm

Free & open to the public

Bing Wing
Green Library
Stanford University
Stanford, CA
Exhibit West
October 24, 2017 -
August 31, 2018
The New York World of Willa Cather
Willa Cather is better known for her elegiac novels about the Great Plains, but New York City exercised a profound influence on her creative life. Of signal importance was the New York Society Library, a valuable hidden resource for Cather. This is the first exhibition to showcase the Pulitzer Prize-winning author’s relationship to the Library and to the city where she lived off and on for most of her adult life.

Treasures displayed from the Library’s collections will include:

*Charging cards listing the books checked out by Cather and her lifelong companion Edith Lewis during their twenty-year membership

*an essay by Truman Capote describing his humorous meeting with Cather at the Library during a 1942 snowstorm

*first editions of My Mortal Enemy (1926); Song of the Lark (1915); and The Troll Garden (1905)

*titles Cather consulted while writing Sapphira and the Slave Girl (1940)

The exhibition catalog contains an introduction by curator Harriet Shapiro, an essay by Andrew Jewell, editor of the Willa Cather Archive, and photographs of Cather from Wyoming to New York City. It describes the landmarks of Cather’s urban world—her Washington Square and Park Avenue homes and the office of muckraking McClure’s Magazine, where Cather was managing editor—and their influence on books from Song of the Lark to My Mortal Enemy.

Mon & Fri 9am - 5pm
Tue, Wed & Thu 9am - 8pm
Sat & Sun 11am - 5pm

CLOSED:
Thu, Nov 23 & Fri, Nov 24 for Thanksgiving.

The Assunta, Ignazio, Ada & Romano Peluso Exhibition Gallery
The New York Society Library
53 East 79th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 27, 2017 -
September 30, 2019
Headlines of History: Historic Newspapers of St. Louis and the World Through the Centuries at the St. Louis Mercantile Library Association
October 27, 2017 Members' Opening and Bixby Book Club Halloween Party

Join us on Friday October 27 from 6-9pm as we celebrate the opening of the special exhibition Headlines of History: Historic Newspapers of St. Louis and the World Through the Centuries at the St. Louis Mercantile Library Association.

University of Missouri–St. Louis
1 University Blvd.
St. Louis, MO
Exhibit Midwest
November 03, 2017 -
March 11, 2018
Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence
Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence showcases hand-drawn and engraved maps from the 18th and early 19th centuries that illuminate the tremendous changes—geographic, political, and economic—that occurred before, during, and just after the Revolutionary War. The exhibition features rarely displayed manuscripts and printed maps from New-York Historical’s own premier collection, including the original manuscript surveys of Robert Erskine, Geographer and Surveyor General of the Continental Army, and his successor Simeon De Witt. Also on display will be John Jay’s personal copy of John Mitchell’s Map of the British and French Dominions in North America (1755) to which hand-drawn red lines representing proposed boundaries were added during the negotiations of the Treaty of Paris, 1782 - 1783.

Tue - Thu, & Sat 10am - 6pm
Fri 10am - 8pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

New-York Historical Society Museum & Library
170 Central Park West (at Richard Gilder Way / 77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 11, 2017 -
May 28, 2018
Never Abandon Imagination: The Fantastical Art of Tony DiTerlizzi
Known for his multi-million bestselling book series The Spiderwick Chronicles, DiTerlizzi is celebrated the world over for his images of such fantasy creatures as fairies, trolls, sprites, and goblins.

Never Abandon Imagination showcases over 200 original paintings and drawings, starting from DiTerlizzi’s work in tabletop games, such as Dungeons and Dragons and Magic: The Gathering, to his many imaginative children’s books, in addition to early artwork from his childhood and college years. The exhibition highlights the artist’s influences and artistic process.

Just as his early work on Dungeons and Dragons and Magic: The Gathering is treasured by devoted fans of the gaming genre, DiTerlizzi’s award-winning books—such as The Spiderwick Chronicles; Kenny and the Dragon; The Spider and the Fly; The Story of Diva and Flea, and The WondLa Trilogy—have inspired a new generation of young readers.

DiTerlizzi has influenced fans and fellow creators alike. “Tony’s work has a distinct flair, a love for monsters if you will,” notes filmmaker Guillermo del Toro. “His creatures have the charm of [Jim] Henson or [Arthur] Rackham but they carry with them hints of their own ecosystem. He stands alone as a creator of worlds and a weaver of tales.”

With an artistic style influenced by legendary illustrators Norman Rockwell, Arthur Rackham, and Brian Froud, DiTerlizzi’s exhibition shows how those visionaries shaped his own magical tales. The exhibit has been organized by the Norman Rockwell Museum’s Jesse Kowalski, who adds that the Museum is “proud to present the work of this superb illustrator, who is keeping this cherished artistic tradition alive.”

November – April: open daily:
Weekdays: 10am - 4pm
Weekends & holidays: 10am - 5pm

Members: FREE
Kids 18 and under FREE
Adults $20
Seniors (65+): $18
Veterans: $17
College students with ID: $10

Norman Rockwell Museum
9 Route 183
Stockbridge, MA
Exhibit New England
November 19, 2017 -
April 01, 2018
Treasures from the Collection A 15 Year Celebration
In its short fifteen-year history, The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art has welcomed into its permanent collection more than 7,300 objects ranging from vintage picture-book art to modern day illustrations. In honor of its anniversary, the Museum will present highlights from its holdings in the exhibition.

The exhibition features 96 artworks representing a range of time periods and media, from Harry Bingham Neilson's 1898 pen-and-ink drawing for Life's Book of Animals to Ekua Holmes's 2015 paper collage for Voice of Freedom: Fannie Lou Hamer, Spirit of the Civil Rights Movement. Iconic picture-book characters Peter Rabbit, The Very Hungry Caterpillar, Eloise, and Shrek will delight guests young and old.

Artists represented in the exhibition include Don Freeman, Trina Shart Hyman, Dorothy Lathrop, Leo Lionni, Arnold Lobel, David Macaulay, James Marshall, Petra Mathers, Wendell Minor, Jerry Pinkney, Uri Shulevitz, William Steig, Simms Taback, Tony DiTerlizzi, Chris Van Allsburg, Mo Willems, Garth Williams, Paul O. Zelinsky, and Lisbeth Zwerger, among others.

Members Opening Reception:
November 18, 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm
Join authors Angela DiTerlizzi and Heidi Stemple as they host a night of trivia fun about the Museum and its remarkable collection. Enjoy gourmet pizza and local craft beers, great prizes and abundant laughs!

Tue - Fri 10am - 4pm
Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 12pm - 5pm
Open Mondays in July & August & during MA school vacation weeks.

$9 for adults
$6 for children under 18
$22.50 for a family of four

The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
November 19, 2017 -
May 28, 2018
Stephen Shore
Stephen Shore encompasses the entirety of the artist’s work of the last five decades, during which he has conducted a continual, restless interrogation of image making, from the gelatin silver prints he made as a teenager to his current engagement with digital platforms.

One of the most significant photographers of our time, Stephen Shore (American, b. 1947) has often been considered alongside other artists who rose to prominence in the 1970s by capturing the mundane aspects of American popular culture in straightforward, unglamorous images. But Shore has worked with many forms of photography, switching from cheap automatic cameras to large-format cameras in the 1970s, pioneering the use of color before returning to black and white in the 1990s, and in the 2000s taking up the opportunities of digital photography, digital printing, and social media.

The artist’s first survey in New York to include his entire career, this exhibition will both allow for a fuller understanding of Shore’s work, and demonstrate his singular vision—defined by an interest in daily life, a taste for serial and often systematic approaches, a strong intellectual underpinning, a restrained style, sly humor, and visual casualness—and uncompromising pursuit of photography’s possibilities.

10:30am - 5:30pm
Open until 9pm Fri & Sat, thru Dec 30th

The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street
Manhattan, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 20, 2017 -
March 23, 2018
Hard to Define: Artists’ Books from the Collection
“What are artists’ books?” is a common question and can be hard to answer. Some look like books, but others don’t. Some are made from paper; others aren’t. Some have words; others don’t. But all artists’ books combine form and content in a way that conveys information. On view are selected artists’ books that are, by turns, magical, strange, awe-inspiring, confusing, or humorous.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

Adults: $10.00
Visitors 65 & over: $8.00
Students: $8.00
NMWA members: Free
Youth 18 & under: Free

National Museum of Women in the Arts
1250 New York Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 23, 2017 -
April 19, 2018
Fragments of note: the afterlives of medieval manuscripts
The exhibition will examine the numerous medieval manuscript fragments held at Magdalen, largely medieval books that have been dismantled in the early modern period and re-used as binding waste or covers. The main exhibition will take a particular focus on fragments featuring musical notation and will be complemented by a selection of contemporary watercolour, collage, and paper-pulp relief works by fine artist Janet Boulton.

Open every Thursday from 2pm

Open to the public with admission ticket to College

Old Library
Magdalen College
Oxford, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
December 01, 2017 -
April 22, 2018
Designing English
Graphics on the medieval page

This exhibition will illustrate the graphic design of handwritten manuscripts and inscriptions for the first thousand years of English, across the Middle Ages.

Showcasing the Bodleian Library's rich holdings of medieval manuscripts in English, ranging from Old English picture books or notes scratched into herbals, through fragments of medieval songs scribbled on spare pages, to masterpieces framed with illustrations and gold, or new page designs for practical tasks, such as manuals for handling swans. It will cover the experiences of both the makers and the users of writing: how craftspeople planned and made books, and how readers responded to their designs.

To show the likeness to modern craft, Designing English will be shown for the first two months alongside Redesigning the medieval book: a display of contemporary book arts inspired by the exhibition, through a workshop and competition.

Mon - Sat 10am-5pm
Sun 11am - 5pm

Admission free, no booking required

ST Lee Gallery
Weston Library
Bodleian Library
Broad Street
Oxford, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
December 02, 2017 -
March 01, 2018
American Abstraction: The Print Revival of the 1960s and ‘70s
The early 1960s marked a significant turning point in American printmaking: the rise of communal studios provided new avenues for creative and technical exchanges between artists. Since the early 1940s, when Stanley William Hayter transplanted his Atelier 17 from Paris to New York, American artists were becoming familiar with a wide range of printmaking techniques. By the latter twentieth century, printmakers such as Tatyana Grossman, founder of ULAE (Universal Limited Art Editions), and June Wayne, who founded the Tamarind Workshop in Los Angeles, greatly enlarged and successfully marketed the printmaking enterprise.

These new-style printmakers began to take on some of the responsibilities of publishers and dealers, helping to streamline the production and distribution of artists’ prints. Artists formerly rooted in the solitary studio practices of Abstract Expressionist painting began to collaborate regularly with master printmakers (some, like Robert Motherwell, even going as far as to establish their own workshops). In California, the emergence of collaborative presses helped to rescue lithography from virtual extinction—which in turn made abstract prints readily available to American collectors.

The works in American Abstraction: The Print Revival of the 1960s and '70s, most of which are drawn from the splendid gift of Judith and Stephen Wertheimer to the Bruce Museum, include prints produced by Ernest de Soto of The Collectors Press Lithography Workshop and Irwin Hollander of Hollander’s Workshop. From vibrant biomorphic forms and primitive marks to lively calligraphic gestures and bold color-field patterning, the works in American Abstraction suggest the evolution of abstract art in printmaking during two exciting decades of the post-war moment.

Tue - Sun 10am - 5pm
Doors close 1/2 hour before closing, last admission 4:30pm
Closed Mondays & major holidays

Adults $10.00
Students (5-22 w/ valid ID) $8.00
Seniors (65 & up) $8.00
Museum members & children under 5 Free

Free individual admission on Tuesday

Bruce Museum
1 Museum Drive
Greenwich, CT
Exhibit New England
December 09, 2017 -
April 08, 2018
Winnie-the-Pooh: Exploring a Classic
This multi-sensory and playful exhibition explores the magical world of Winnie-the-Pooh - one of the most adored fictional characters of all time.

Through around 230 works from 1920 to the present day, including sketches, proofs, letters, photographs, cartoons, ceramics and fashion, this exhibition reveals the factors contributing to the enduring success and popularity of Winnie-the-Pooh.

Daily: 10.00 – 17.30
Last ticketed entry 16.00

Friday: 10.00 – 21.30
Last ticketed entry 20.00

Gallery 38
Victoria and Albert Museum
Cromwell Road
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
December 12, 2017 -
May 13, 2018
The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art Presents: Eighty Years of Caldecott Books
The Caldecott Medal, an annual award bestowed upon "the most distinguished American picture book for children," is one of the most prestigious prizes in children's literature. Next month, The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art will celebrate the 80th anniversary of the distinguished award in the exhibition Eighty Years of Caldecott Books.

First conferred in 1938, the Caldecott Medal is named in honor of nineteenth-century British illustrator Randolph Caldecott, acknowledged as the father of the modern picture book for his lively drawing style and sense of humor. Each year the Association for Library Service to Children (ALSC)--a division of the American Library Association--selects the fifteen members that form the Caldecott committee. This group reads, critiques, and discusses hundreds of picture books before voting on a winner.

Eighty Years of Caldecott Books presents a chronological look at the winning titles from 1938 to the present. It also represents The Carle's first book-focused exhibition. "While we always have books available for visitors to read in our galleries, the books in this exhibition are the art objects themselves. As first editions, they are valuable historical artifacts," says Ellen Keiter, the Museum's chief curator. Keiter organized the exhibition with Barbara Elleman, former editor-in-chief of Book Links, published by the American Library Association and, Distinguished Scholar of Children's Literature at Marquette University. While these rare books cannot be handled, guests will be able to read copies available in the Museum's Reading Library.

The exhibition will change on February 12, 2018 when the ALSC announces the winner of the 2018 Caldecott Medal and a new book is added to the display. In the interim, guests can cast their votes in the gallery for the book they believe should win the coveted honor. Online visitors to the Museum's website can vote too.

"Eighty Years of Caldecott Books is a celebration of artistic achievement," says Keiter. "We have included original illustrations from several winning titles, many drawn from The Carle's permanent collection." On view are three artworks by Marcia Brown, one from each of her three Caldecott Medal books: Cinderella, or The Little Glass Slipper (1955), Once a Mouse (1962) and Shadow (1983). [Brown won an unprecedented three Caldecott Medals, a feat matched only by David Wiesner.] The other artists and artworks on display are: Ed Emberley, Drummer Hoff (1968), Uri Shulevitz, The Fool of the World and the Flying Ship (1969), Arnold Lobel, Fables (1981), Chris Van Allsburg, The Polar Express (1986), David Macaulay, Black and White (1991), Emily Arnold McCully, Mirette on the High Wire (1993), Paul O. Zelinsky, Rapunzel (1998), Simms Taback, Joseph Had a Little Overcoat (2000), Mordicai Gerstein, The Man Who Walked Between the Towers (2004), and Javaka Steptoe, Radiant Child: The Story of Young Artist Jean-Michel Basquiat (2017).

Tue - Fri 10am - 4pm
Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 12pm - 5pm

Open Mondays in July & August & during MA school vacation weeks.

$9 for adults
$6 for children under 18
$22.50 for a family of 4

The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
December 12, 2017 -
April 08, 2018
Winnie-the-Pooh: Exploring a Classic
This multi-sensory and playful exhibition explores the magical world of Winnie-the-Pooh – one of the most adored fictional characters of all time.

Experience the timeless and universal appeal of this much-loved bear and discover the story behind the creative partnership of A.A. Milne and E.H. Shepard, brought to life through sketches, letters, photographs, cartoons, ceramics and fashion.

Daily: 10.00 – 17.30
Last ticketed entry 16.00

Friday: 10.00 – 21.30
Last ticketed entry 20.00

Admission £8.00

Gallery 38
Victoria and Albert Museum
Cromwell Road
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
January 05 -
April 28, 2018
Rethinking Enlightenment: Forgotten Women Writers of Eighteenth Century France
The French Enlightenment is famous for its intellectual innovations, but it is remembered largely as a male endeavor. However, recent scholars have shown that French women were active in all genres, from novels to physics. Despite systemic sexism, these writers produced literary and academic works that were neglected in their own times as in ours.
“Rethinking Enlightenment” showcases Houghton Library’s remarkable holdings of texts by eighteenth-century French women. Beyond describing how these writers critiqued their society, the exhibition demonstrates their active participation in the philosophical and artistic development of modern France. For scholars of the Enlightenment to anyone interested in women’s history, it is a timely reminder of the forgotten figures in intellectual history.

Lowell Room
Houghton Library
Harvard Yard
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
January 14 -
March 18, 2018
ALPHONSE MUCHA: MASTER OF ART NOUVEAU
Exhibition examines how Mucha exploited the advertising poster to create a new movement in art. His work helped shape the aesthetics of French art at the turn of the twentieth century and formed the cornerstone of the international Art Nouveau movement.

Member Opening: January 13 at 2 pm

Mon CLOSED
Tue 10am – 5pm
Wed 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 5pm
Fri 10am – 5pm
Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

The Hyde Collectio
161 Warren Street
Glens Falls, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 15 -
July 15, 2018
Ed Emberley: Better You Than Me
Exhibition includes an array of inventive artwork from the artist's personal archive of hand drawn sketches, woodblock prints, mockups, and first edition books. Better You Than Me is comprised of a specially-curated selection from the first retrospective of Emberley's work that was presented by the Worcester Art Museum in 2016 and 2017, along with never-before-exhibited drawings and prints.

Tue – Sun 11am - 5pm
Thu 11am – 9pm
Closed Mondays

Mary S. & David C. Corbin Foundation Gallery
Akron Art Museum
One South High
Akron, OH
Exhibit Midwest
January 16 -
April 14, 2018
Landmarks: Maps as Literary Illustration
Maps enjoy a long tradition as a mode of literary illustration, orienting readers to worlds real and imagined. Presented in conjunction with the bicentenary of the Harvard Map Collection, this exhibition brings together over sixty landmark literary maps, from the 200-mile-wide island in Thomas More’s Utopia to the supercontinent called the Stillness in N. K. Jemisin’s 'The Fifth Season'. Visitors will traverse literary geographies from William Faulkner’s Yoknapatawpha County to Nuruddin Farah’s besieged Somalia; or perhaps escape the world’s bothers in Pooh’s Hundred Acre Wood. At this intersection of literature and cartography, get your bearings and let these maps guide your way.

Edison and Newman Room
Houghton Library
Harvard Yard
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
January 17 -
July 15, 2018
Before/On/After: William Wegman and California Conceptualism
This exhibition will survey Conceptual art as it developed in Southern California in the 1970s. It is occasioned by the artist William Wegman's extraordinary recent gift to the Museum of 174 short videos that he made between 1970 and 1999—his entire career in this medium. A 90-minute selection of videos from this gift will be shown, accompanied by photographs and drawings by Wegman as well as drawings, prints, and photographs by his contemporaries in Southern California such as John Baldessari, Vija Celmins, Douglas Huebler, Ed Ruscha, and others.

Wegman took up video while studying painting at the University of Wisconsin. Like many artists using the then-new medium, Wegman appreciated video, like photography, for its lo-fi reproducibility and anti-artistic qualities—and unlike film, where the negative must be developed and processed before viewing, video was like a sketchbook that allowed revision in real time.

It wasn't until he moved to Southern California in 1970 that his video production took off. Although he only lived in Los Angeles for three years, Wegman found his method: short, staged vignettes using everyday items in which expectations are reversed, puns and homonyms are pursued to absurd conclusions. The artist's key early collaborator for most of these short videos was his pet Weimaraner Man Ray, who enthusiastically participates in the goings on. In contrast to other early adopters of video, Wegman eschewed an aesthetic of boredom for humorous improvised scenarios in which he deflated the pretensions of painting and sculpture while also lampooning the pieties and self-seriousness of Conceptual Art—at a time when it was being codified and institutionalized. Beneath the slacker humor, however, are poignant points about failure and the reversal of expectations that chime with work by fellow West Coast Conceptualist friends and fellow travelers also featured in the exhibition.

Sun – Thu 10am – 5:30pm*
Fri & Sat 10am – 9pm*
*Galleries are cleared 15 minutes before closing.

Gallery 851
The Met Fifth Avenue
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 19 -
July 08, 2018
Hung Liu In Print
Hung Liu In Print invites viewers to explore the relationship between the artist’s multi-layered paintings and the palpable, physical qualities of her works on paper. To make her prints, Liu (b. 1948) uses an array of printing and collage techniques, developing highly textured surfaces, veils of color, and screens of drip marks that transform the figures in each composition. Describing printmaking as “poetry,” she emphasizes the spontaneity of the layering process, which allows each image to build organically with each successive layer.

Before immigrating to California in 1984, Liu grew up during Mao Zedong’s Cultural Revolution in China, where she worked alongside fieldworkers and trained as a painter. Adapting figures from historical Chinese photographs, Liu reimagines antique depictions of laborers, refugees, and prostitutes. Her multifaceted oeuvre probes the human condition and confronts issues of culture, identity, and personal and national history.

Best known as a painter, Liu ably translates the “weeping realism” that characterizes her canvases into the medium of prints. This focus exhibition highlights selected prints from the collection of the National Museum of Women in the Arts as well as the artist’s related tapestry designs.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

Adults: $10.00
Visitors 65 & over: $8.00
Students: $8.00
NMWA members: Free
Youth 18 & under: Free

National Museum of Women in the Arts
1250 New York Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 19 -
April 15, 2018
The Art of Collaboration
Featuring the Children's Books of Russell & Lillian Hoban
Richard Wright's Native Son on Stage & Screen
Studies in Creativity

The Art of Collaboration explores the excitement and power of separate elements combining to make things that are new, beautiful, strange, and memorable. Drawn from the Betsy Beinecke Shirley Collection of American Children’s Literature, the James Weldon Johnson Memorial Collection of African American Arts and Letters, and the Yale Collection of American Literature, this exhibition considers exemplary works and the archival stories of their making, revealing the creative—and sometimes destructive—tensions that are parts of artistic collaboration. The works on view—including plays, children’s books, novels, performance artworks, films, photographs, and more—demonstrate that collaboration itself is an art form. “+ The Art of Collaboration” comprises three discrete exhibitions, each installed in a separate section of the library’s exhibition space. Cases on the ground floor consider the much-beloved work of a husband-and-wife team in “The Children’s Books of Russell and Lillian Hoban.” A story of the complexity of collaborative adaptation is explored in the curved cases at the top of each staircase in “Richard Wright’s Native Son on Stage and Screen.” The jewel-box vitrines on the mezzanine feature 18 instances of American literary and artistic collaboration spanning more than 100 years in “Studies in Creativity.”

Mon 10am - 7pm
Tue - Thu 9am - 7pm
Fri 9am - 5pm
Sat (Exhibitions only) 12pm - 5pm
Sun (Exhibitions only) 12pm - 4pm

Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library
121 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
January 19 -
March 31, 2018
OUR ANTHROPOCENE: ECO-CRISES
The Earth has existed for billions of years. Ice Ages have come and gone. Life forms have evolved and evaporated. During recent millennia, however, and particularly since the industrial revolution, Earth’s human inhabitants have increasingly shaped the natural history of our planet, through such factors as agriculture, construction, mining, and manufacturing. So profound have been the changes we have wrought that this epoch recently has been accepted as constituting a geological era, the Anthropocene. Today we suffer the accelerated effects of our impact. Climate change is causing devastating hurricanes, droughts, fires, floods, and erosion. These affect the habitats of flora and fauna as well as human environments and productivity, migration and conflict. Toxins, pollutants, and trace elements contaminate ecosystems and food supplies. Humans have precipitated the Earth’s sixth phase of mass extinction. The artists in this exhibition respond to the ecological crises of our Anthropocene, which we ignore at the peril of our own ecocide.

Artists Include: Alma Collective (Christoph Both-Asmus/Owanto/Robbin Ami Silverberg/Andreas Wengel/Hervé Youmbi), Thomas Baensch/Karin Dürr/Caroline Röckelein/Zoe Zin Moe, Sammy Baloji, Julie Dodd, Stephan Erasmus, Nuno Henrique, Daniel Knorr, Guy Laramée, Gideon Mendel, Barbara Milman, Heidi Neilson, Tara O’Brien, Sara Parkel, Susan Reynolds, Ian Van Coller, Shu-Ju Wang, Käthe Wenzel, Thomas Parker Williams, Michelle Wilson, Philip Zimmermann

Mon - Fri 11am - 6pm
Sat 10am - 5pm

Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 19 -
March 31, 2018
EMILY McVARISH: LAST YEAR AT DARK
Featuring McVarish’s most recent works, Lessons of Darkness and Last Year at Kew Gardens, this exhibition explores the space between books and other time-based media through typographic interpretation of musical form, sequential page composition, and filmed text. Source materials for the two books, as well as concrete translations of their texts into other formats, sketch a looping process of borrowed forms recast. Sources on display include Couperin’s 1714 Leçons de ténèbres, Hooker’s 1858 guide to Kew Gardens, and Robbe-Grillet’s 1962 screenplay for Last Year at Marienbad. Process documents and resulting projects show vocal lines becoming scores for textual and typographic composition and printed lines as moving image.

Mon - Fri 11am - 6pm
Sat 10am - 5pm

Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th St, 3rd Flr
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 19 -
June 03, 2018
Collecting the Women’s Marches
On January 21, 2017, hundreds of thousands rallied at the Women’s March on Washington for diverse issues including women’s rights, racial equality, and the environment. Counting more than 500 sister marches across the United States, it was the largest single-day protest in the nation’s history. As part of its History Responds program, the New-York Historical Society collected a range of artifacts, including signs, sashes, pussyhats, and colorful props, to document the moment. One year later, Collecting the Women’s Marches highlights some of the political and visual themes that emerged, as well as the efforts of individuals and groups that worked behind the scenes. An adjunct display of protest clothing by Olek (Agata Oleksiak), an artist who works in crochet, and Brick x Brick, a public art performance group, will be on view. Curated by Rebecca Klassen, assistant curator of material culture.

Tue - Thu, & Sat 10am - 6pm
Fri 10am - 8pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West
at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 20 -
June 03, 2018
Patriotic Persuasion: American Posters of the First World War
The exhibition features a selection of works donated to the Bruce Museum by Beverly and John W. Watling III.

The United States involvement in World War I lasted only a brief twenty months, from April 1917 to November 1918, but the nation’s military and propaganda strategies were of enormous consequence.

The variety of approaches which government agencies used to encourage wide-spread participation in the war effort was impressive, from the allure of artist Howard Chandler Christie’s young woman who, in a1917 poster, seductively proclaimed, “I WANT YOU FOR THE NAVY,” to the inquisitional tone of a war loan poster of the next year: “Are you 100% American? Prove it! Buy U.S. Government Bonds.” In the era of radio and film’s infancy, posters remained an essential medium for the public’s dreamlife, capable of nightmarish manipulation: in one of the iconic wartime posters from the Watling donation, artist Joseph Pennell in 1918 powerfully imagined a partially destroyed Statue of Liberty and New York City aflame in the background, with the plea, “That Liberty Shall Not Perish from the Earth/Buy Liberty Bonds/Fourth Liberty Loan.”

Featuring these works, as well as numerous other posters that combine image and text in ingenious, surprising, and sometimes disturbing combination, “Patriotic Persuasion” marks the centennial of American participation in the First World War. It is organized by Kenneth E. Silver, Bruce Museum Adjunct Curator of Art and Elizabeth Smith, Zvi Grunberg Resident Fellow at the Bruce Museum (2017-2018).

Tue - Sun 10am - 5pm
Doors close 1/2 hour before closing,
Last admission 4:30pm

Closed Mondays and major holidays: New Years Day, Easter, Independence Day

Bruce Museum
1 Museum Drive
Greenwich, CT
Exhibit New England
January 22 -
September 01, 2018
You Say You Want a Revolution: Remembering the 60s
Discover the counterculture of the 1960s and 70s in this comprehensive exhibition at the Library’s Stephen A. Schwarzman Building at 42nd Street. Part of a citywide celebration of the 1960s, this exhibition explores the breadth and significance of this pivotal era—from communal living and forays into expanded consciousness to tensions around race, politics, sexuality, and the environment. Items on display, drawn exclusively from the Library’s collections, include Timothy Leary’s notes on acid trips, footage of the Woodstock music festival, and posters used in protest against the Vietnam War.

Sun 1pm – 5pm
Mon, & Thu - Sat 10am – 6pm
Tue & Wed 10am – 8pm

Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
NY Public Library
476 Fifth Avenue (42nd St & Fifth Ave)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 24 -
March 16, 2018
FACING THE CAMERA
The exhibition presents nineteenth-century portraits by Duchenne de Boulogne, Julia Margaret Cameron, Lewis Carroll, J. B. Greene, Hill & Adamson, Nadar, and Vallou de Villeneuve, among others. Contemporary work by Adam Fuss and Vera Lutter is also included. Both are inspired by the early photographers and their work resonates with that of their forerunners

Portraiture is the most expressive application of the photographic art form. Since the dawn of photography artists have sought ways to capture the human likeness. Once achieved, photography has since challenged the ascendancy of the painted portrait.

The exhibition includes three rare 1862 albumen prints from glass negatives made circa 1856 by pioneering neurologist and physiologist Duchenne de Boulogne (1806-1875), the first scientist to explain that facial expressions were connected to human emotions through discrete muscle actions. The results of Duchenne’s experiments and collaboration with photographer Adrien Tournachon, illustrated in Mécanisme de la physionomie humaine, occupy a distinct place at the intersection of art and science.

Mon - Fri 12pm - 6pm

Open to the public

Hans P. Kraus Jr. Fine Photographs
962 Park Avenue (at 82nd Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 25 -
March 10, 2018
“A Conversation Larger Than the Universe”: Science Fiction and the Literature of the Fantastic from the Collection of Henry Wessells.
The first science fiction exhibition at the Grolier Club, "A Conversation Larger Than the Universe" displays books (many signed or inscribed by their authors), magazines, manuscripts, letters, and artwork dating from the mid-eighteenth century to the present.

2nd Floor Gallery
The Grolier Club
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 26 -
April 29, 2018
Now and Forever: The Art of Medieval Time
What time is it? The question seems simple, and with a watch on your wrist or a cell phone in your hand, the answer is easy. In the Middle Ages, however, the concept of time could be approached in many different ways, with vastly different tools.

Drawing upon the rich holdings of the Morgan’s collection of medieval and Renaissance illuminated manuscripts, Now and Forever explores how people told time in the Middle Ages and what they thought about it. The manuscripts range in date from the eleventh to the sixteenth centuries and come from all the major countries of Europe.

The exhibition begins with the quirks of the medieval calendar, exploring sacred feasts, the mysteries of Golden Numbers, the utility of Dominical Letters, and how the Middle Ages inherited the Roman Calendar of Julius Caesar. Visitors will engage with the complexities of time as defined by liturgical celebrations and their two overlapping systems of temporale (feasts of time) and sanctorale (feasts of saints), systems that still influence the way we tell time today. Now and Forever also explores how time beyond the grave preoccupied medieval people for whom life on earth was a mere dress rehearsal for the main event—the afterlife.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 26 -
May 20, 2018
Peter Hujar: Speed of Life
With Speed of Life, the Morgan presents the first in-depth retrospective of the New York-based photographer Peter Hujar (1934–1987). Drawn from the extensive holdings of the artist’s work at the Morgan and from nine other collections, the exhibition and its catalog explore the artist’s full career, from his beginnings in the mid-1950s to his central role in the East Village art scene three decades later.

The exhibition opens at the Morgan in January 2018 after appearing at Fundacion MAPFRE, Barcelona, Spain, and the Fotomuseum The Hague, the Netherlands. The tour concludes in 2018 at the Berkeley Art Museum & Pacific Film Archive.

Hujar’s sharp, serene, square-format photographs confer gravity on the object of his attention, granting it an eternal moment’s pause within the rush of passing time. Hujar focused on the spark of encounter between himself and his subject, be it a goose, a lover, an underground theatrical performer, the dappled surface of the Hudson River, or the placid features of his own face.

In early adulthood Hujar worked as a studio assistant to magazine professionals and spent years in Italy with two successive partners, artists Joseph Raffael and Paul Thek. His short career in fashion photography ended in 1971, when Hujar decided the hustle of magazine work “wasn’t right for me.” After moving into a loft above a theater at Twelfth Street and Second Avenue in 1973, Hujar pursued a bohemian life of poverty, taking paying jobs only when necessary and focusing on the subjects that compelled him. In his book Portraits in Life and Death (1976) Hujar combined intimate portraits of his downtown coterie (painters, performers, choreographers, and writers) with studies of mummies in the Palermo Catacombs. Briefly a lover and then a mentor to the young artist David Wojnarowicz, in his final seven years Hujar continued chronicling a creative Downtown subculture running out of time in a fast-changing city.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 27 -
May 28, 2018
The Medieval World at Our Fingertips: Manuscript Illuminations from the Collection of Sandra Hindman
This exhibition of nearly 30 manuscript illuminations travels through 400 years of the Middle Ages and across numerous countries in western Europe. Although often tiny in scale, these exquisite fragments from choir books, books of hours, and religious narratives offer a fascinating microcosm of medieval Europe, a world that extended from the sacred context of the great Gothic cathedrals to the cosmopolitan culture of the sunlit Italian courts.

This impressive and wide-ranging collection was assembled over a lifetime by Sandra Hindman. A noted medieval manuscript scholar and the founder of Les Enluminures, Hindman has generously given approximately one third of the exhibition’s illuminations to the Art Institute. The presentation celebrates her recent gift while also documenting her own journey as an innovative and imaginative teacher and student of the medieval book.

A richly illustrated book by Christopher de Hamel accompanies the exhibition. Hamel, a renowned authority on illuminated manuscripts, uses the Hindman miniatures as a starting point for reflections on the world of the Middle Ages.

Open daily 10:30–5:00
Thursday until 8:00

Free Thursday Evenings
General admission is free to Illinois residents every Thursday from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m. throughout the year.

Galleries 204–204A
The Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
January 29 -
July 15, 2018
Vaudeville!
For more than a century, vaudeville was the most popular form of American entertainment and one of the country's largest cultural exports. Performances on the vaudeville stage included comic sketches, acrobatics, animal tricks, magic, blackface performance, celebrity appearances, early film, and more. Shows featuring immigrant acts, racial stereotypes, and frequent appeals to nationalism defined a complex and often problematic sense of American identity at the turn of the 19th century.

Explore vaudeville's influences from Roman mimes to the saloons of the American frontier. Learn what life on the road was like for the thousands of entertainers who traveled around the country performing in theatres that were part of a vast network of venues, and witness the mid-century revival of vaudeville's relevance in musical theatre, radio, film, television, and the internet. See artifacts related to some of Vaudeville's best-known performers—Harry Houdini, Mae West, W. C. Fields, Bert Williams, George M. Cohan, Burns & Allen, Tony Pastor, the Nicholas Brothers, Barbette, and more.

The exhibition features the Ransom Center's extensive holdings of Harry Houdini, Tony Pastor, and Florenz Ziegfeld, among others, to show the development of vaudeville's highly organized form and its long-lasting impact on contemporary film, television, and comedy.

Mon, Tue, Wed, & Fri 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 7pm
Sat & Sun Noon – 5pm

Free admission

The Harry Ransom Center
21st and Guadalupe Streets
Austin, TX
Exhibit Southwest
January 30 -
April 08, 2018
Outcasts: Prejudice and Persecution in the Medieval World
Medieval manuscripts preserve stories of faith, romance, and knowledge, but their luxurious illuminations can reveal disturbing narratives as well. Often created for the privileged classes, such books nevertheless provide glimpses of the marginalized and powerless and reflect their tenuous place in society. Attitudes toward women, Jews and Muslims, the poor, those perceived as socially divergent, and foreign peoples beyond European borders can be discerned through caricature and polemical imagery as well as marks of erasure and censorship.

Tue – Thu & Sun 10am – 5:30pm
Fri & Sat 10am – 9pm
Closed Mondays

Parking lot opens 9:30 a.m.

Holiday closure:
January 1

Free admission

The Getty Center
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
February 01, 2018 -
January 01, 2019
BRONTË 200 - MAKING THUNDER ROAR: EMILY BRONTË
Emily's Bicentenary Exhibition

Emily Brontë is one of the greatest writers in English literature, and yet very little is actually known about her. What we do know survives as fragments of information from the people who knew her best, while years of fascination by her biographers have introduced speculation and myth to fill the gaps in our knowledge. To mark the bicentenary of Emily Brontë’s birth, this exhibition invites a number of well-known Emily admirers to share their own fascination with her life and work. Specially commissioned contributions from Maxine Peake, Lily Cole and Helen Oyeyemi amongst others result in a thoughtprovoking selection of Emily’s possessions, writing and artwork as well as some of the well-loved household objects she used daily. These personal responses to Emily acknowledge the gaps in our understanding about this intriguing writer, but also encourage fresh perspectives on her life and work.

Daily 10am - 5pm

Free with admission to the Museum

Brontë Parsonage Museum
Church Street
Haworth, Keighley
West Yorkshire, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
February 01 -
May 04, 2018
The Thomas J. Harrison Bible Collection
This exhibition highlights Bibles from the collection of Thomas J. Harrison (1885–1963). Born in Fayetteville, Arkansas, Harrison moved with his family to Pryor, Oklahoma, as a young boy and resided there for the remainder of his life. Active in the civic and cultural affairs of Pryor, he served as mayor as well as city treasurer. His contributions also included supporting the establishment and development of the city’s public library.

Harrison began collecting Bibles in the 1940s, eventually acquiring over three hundred works. Particularly engaged with the history of the English Bible, he gathered first editions and later printings documenting the sequence of texts culminating in the 1611 King James Version and the English-language biblical tradition that followed in the United Kingdom and the United States. Complementing these interests, he also acquired rare Bibles in biblical, Native American, and world vernacular languages produced between the thirteenth and twentieth centuries.

In the decade prior to his death, Mr. Harrison was in regular correspondence with Decherd Turner, the first Bridwell Library Director. Turner visited Harrison and expressed much admiration and interest in the collection. Through an arrangement with The Thomas J. and Bea L. Harrison Trust, Bridwell Library became the depository for the collection in 1964. The Harrison Trust generously supported the collection by funding the acquisition of rare Bibles through 1995, at which time the trust dissolved and the collection officially transferred to Bridwell Library. Harrison’s vision for the collection continues to develop with funds from an endowment created by the trust.

Harrison holdings include a remarkable seventeenth-century Chinese Torah scroll, medieval manuscripts, incunabula, early editions in biblical languages, polyglot and diglot Bibles, European and world vernacular translations, English and American imprints, and modern fine press editions. These Bibles are presented regularly to visitors and classes, engaging students and scholars interested in the dissemination of biblical texts and the continuing impact of the Bible throughout the centuries.

Free admission

The Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Galleries
Bridwell Library
Southern Methodist University
6005 Bishop Blvd.
Dallas, TX
Exhibit Southwest
February 02 -
May 13, 2018
Tennessee Williams: No Refuge but Writing
One of the greatest American playwrights of the twentieth century, Tennessee Williams (1911–1983) was a master of language and a tireless craftsman. This exhibition focuses on Williams’s career during the years 1939–1957, when he authored such masterpieces as The Glass Menagerie, A Streetcar Named Desire, and Cat on a Hot Tin Roof. The show examines his creative process and his involvement with the production of his plays, along with their reception and lasting impact. Uniting his original drafts, private diaries, and personal letters with paintings, photographs, production stills, and other objects, the exhibition tells the story of one man’s struggle for self-expression and how it changed the landscape of American drama.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 02 -
April 30, 2018
Catching the Light :: Bookworks from Southern California
Catching the Light offers examples of the mature work of selected book artists from Santa Barbara to San Diego. Charting a rigorous course - the braiding of intuition, craft and art.

Opening Reception :: February 2, 2018 from 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Book Talk :: Fri :: March 23, 2018 from 6:00pm - 8:00pm

Free admission

San Francisco Center for the Book
375 Rhode Island Street
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
February 03 -
May 07, 2018
Journeys with ‘The Waste Land’
Journeys with 'The Waste Land' is a major exhibition exploring the significance of T.S. Eliot’s poem The Waste Land through the visual arts.

In 1921, T.S. Eliot spent a few weeks in Margate at a crucial moment in his career. He arrived in a fragile state, physically and mentally, and worked on The Waste Land sitting in the Nayland Rock shelter on Margate Sands. The poem was published the following year, and proved to be a pivotal and influential modernist work, reflecting on the fractured world in the aftermath of the First World War as well as Eliot’s own personal crisis.

Presenting over 60 artists, and almost 100 objects, the exhibition includes works by Fiona Banner, Cecil Collins, Tacita Dean, Elisabeth Frink, Patrick Heron, Edward Hopper, Barbara Kruger, Helen Marten, Henry Moore, Paul Nash, Paula Rego, John Smith and JMW Turner. The exhibition explores how contemporary and historical art can enable us to reflect on the poem’s shifting flow of diverse voices, references, characters and places.

The exhibition is the culmination of a three year project designed to develop a pioneering approach to curating. Local residents, coming together as the Waste land Research Group, have developed the entire exhibition. Journeys with 'The Waste Land' is consequently the result of many months the group have spent discussing personal connections between art, poetry and life.

Tue - Sun 10am - 5pm

Free admission

Turner Contemporary
Location
Rendezvous
Margate
Kent, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
February 05 -
May 16, 2018
A Raging Wit: The Life & Legacy of Jonathan Swift
In honor of the 350th anniversary* of Jonathan Swift's birth, this exhibition, based on the collections of the Penn Libraries, will explore the many facets of Swift's life and legacy through an examination of his many voices; his complicated relationships with both men and women; his ever-evolving politics; his many travels, whether by foot, horse, or ship, or in solely his imagination; and his views on the role of religion in society. It will examine how these influences manifested themselves in his writings and in the world's reaction to his words.

The Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts at the University of Pennsylvania Libraries holds a number of collections relating to Jonathan Swift, including the Teerink Collection (early editions of Swift's works), the Denison Collection (illustrated editions of Gulliver's Travels), and a collection of books known to have been read by Swift or been part of his library. The Swift's Library and Reading Collection, as well as an oil portrait of Swift and various Swift-related manuscripts and publications, including many Dublin imprints, were the gift of the independent Swift scholar Archibald Elias.

Jonathan Swift in the 21st Century
Conference: February 22-24, 2018

Mon - Fri 9am - 5pm
Sat & Sun, by prior arrangement

Free & open to the public

Class of 1978 Orrery Pavilion
Goldstein Family Gallery
Van Pelt-Dietrich Library, sixth floor
3420 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 07 -
October 07, 2018
Of Two Minds
Creative Couples in Art and History

Ferdinand and Isabella; Olivier and Leigh: a true marriage of minds admits no impediment. When two extraordinary talents devote their lives not only to one another but to their craft, they bring the world some of its best and brightest creations.

Of Two Minds: Creative Couples in Art and History explores the art and achievements of romantic couples from the powerful royalty of the 16th century to cinema stars of Old Hollywood to local artists creating together today. Whether richer or poorer, in sickness or in health, in traditional marriages or same-sex partnerships, these power couples of the past and present collaborated, supported, or even taught one another their crafts. They include well-known collaborators, such as printmakers William and Catherine Blake, and lesser-known (and less legally recognized) couples such as Charles Ricketts and Charles Haslewood Shannon, who designed artwork for Oscar Wilde’s books and plays, and Violet Oakley and Edith Emerson, award-winning artists and prominent Philadelphia educators. The creations on display include objects of beauty—including illustrated books, etchings, and fine silver—and articles of knowledge, figured in maps, zoological prints, and political documents.

By exploring the processes of invention and influences behind these creations, Of Two Minds not only challenges the notion that creativity and authorship are solo endeavors, but shines light on the many different ways these artists lived, loved, and created together.

Tue & Fri 12pm - 5pm
Wed & Thu 12pm - 8pm
Sat & Sun 12pm - 6pm
Mon CLOSED

The Rosenbach
2008-2010 Delancey Place
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 09 -
May 06, 2018
Pen to Paper: Artists’ Handwritten Letters from the Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art
Just as putting pen to paper to create a line in a drawing is an artistic act, so is writing a letter.

Pen to Paper, a selection from the Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art, reveals the beauty and intimacy of the craft of letter writing. From casually jotted notes to elaborately decorated epistles, Pen to Paper explores the handwriting of celebrated artists such as Berenice Abbott, Alexander Calder, Mary Cassatt, Frederic Edwin Church, Thomas Eakins, Howard Finster, Harriet Hosmer, Jacob Lawrence, Robert Motherwell, Claes Oldenburg, Georgia O’Keeffe, Jackson Pollock, John Singer Sargent, James McNeill Whistler, and many others.

Tue – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 1pm – 5pm

Florence Griswold Museum
96 Lyme Street
Old Lyme, CT
Exhibit New England
February 10 -
June 10, 2018
Gloria Stoll Karn: Pulp Romance
Talented artist Gloria Stoll Karn is recognized for her contributions to the pulp fiction industry during the 1940s, one of very few female illustrators working in the field to create illustrations and covers for popular romance and dime store magazines. This exhibition explore the artist’s short but prolific career, and her unexpected journey in a world previously assigned to male artists. From 1941 to 1949, Stoll Karn’s art appeared on the covers and pages of many Popular Publication magazines, including Black Mask, Dime Mystery, Detective Tales, New Detective, All-Story Love, New Love, Love Book, Love Short Stories, Love Novels, Romance, and Thrilling Love, as well Argosy. The artist, now in her nineties, continues to create art for her own enjoyment, exploring a range of themes and styles.

November – April: open daily:
Weekdays: 10am - 4pm
Weekends & holidays: 10am - 5pm

Members: FREE
Kids 18 and under FREE
Adults $20
Seniors (65+): $18
Veterans: $17
College students with ID: $10

Norman Rockwell Museum
9 Route 183
Stockbridge, MA
Exhibit New England
February 10 -
May 06, 2018
Gorey’s Worlds
A peed into the peculiar mind of Edward Gorey

“I’m inspired by practically anything visual or verbal—or even real life.” – Edward Gorey

For more than 50 years, Edward Gorey’s spare pen and ink drawings illustrating tales of hapless children, kohl-eyed swooning maidens, and whimsical creatures have delighted and amused audiences. Gorey’s Worlds is the first museum exhibition to explore the artistic inspiration of the famed American artist and author by presenting his personal art collection alongside art of his own creation.

Gorey’s Worlds is centered on his personal art collection, which he chose to bequeath to the Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art, the only public institution to receive his legacy. Gorey held the institution in high regard for reasons including a shared connection to the ballet and famed choreographer George Balanchine, whose histories date back to 1933 at the Wadsworth Atheneum. When Gorey lived in New York City, he attended nearly every performance of the New York City Ballet under Balanchine’s direction from 1953-1983, and he frequently stopped in Hartford when traveling between the city and his Cape Cod house in Yarmouth Port.

This pioneering exhibition explores Gorey, his work, and the artists Gorey admired and collected. Works range in style, era, and media—from 19th-century prints and drawings to contemporary art from the 1970s and 1980s. Through 73 works on paper by Édouard Manet, Charles Meryon, Eugène Atget and Albert York and others, as well as anonymous folk art, visitors will step into Gorey’s imagination by viewing the art he collected alongside his own sketches, drawings, prints, and art books. Rarely seen portraits and personal effects, such as his distinctive fur coats and metal jewelry, further bring Gorey himself to life.

Wed, Thu & Fri 11am – 5pm
Sat & Sun 10am – 5pm

Exhibition Tours
Saturdays & Sundays at 2:30pm
February 17 – May 6, 2018

Wadsworth Atheneum Museum of Art.
600 Main Street
Hartford, CT
Exhibit New England
February 14 -
May 28, 2018
William Eggleston: Los Alamos
The American photographer William Eggleston (born 1939) emerged in the early 1960s as a pioneer of modern color photography. Now, 50 years later, he is arguably its greatest exemplar. This exhibition will feature a landmark gift to The Met by Jade Lau of the artist's most notable portfolio, Los Alamos. Comprising 75 dye transfer prints from color negatives made between 1965 and 1974, the series has never been shown in its entirety in New York City and includes the artist's first color photograph (Untitled, Memphis, 1965) of a young clerk pushing a train of shopping carts at a supermarket in Memphis, Tennessee.

GALLERY TALK
Exhibition Tour—William Eggleston: Los Alamos
Wed, Feb 21st 10:30 – 11:30am
Free with Museum admission

Galleries 691–693
The Met Fifth Avenue
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 22 -
May 20, 2018
Fra Anglico: Heaven on Earth
Renaissance master Fra Anglico transformed the history of western art with his breathtaking paintings. Heaven on Earth reunites the Gardner's magnificent Assumption and Dormition of the Virgin, acquired by Isabella in 1899 and the first Fra Angelico to reach the United States, with its three companions from the Museo di San Marco, Florence. Conceived as a set of jewel-like reliquaries for the Florentine church of Santa Maria Novella, they tell the story of the Virgin Mary's life. This exhibition invites you to explore Fra Angelico's ground-breaking narrative art, marvel at his peerless creativity, and immerse youself in the material splendor of his craftsmanship.

Mon, Wed, Fri - Sun 11am - 5pm
Closed Tue
Thu 11am - 9pm

Hostetter Gallery
Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum
25 Evans Way
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
February 22 -
May 11, 2018
Bon à Tirer: Prints & Monotypes from the Center Street Studio Archives
Exhibition features prints by contemporary artists that were printed by James Stroud, artist, master printer, and founder/director of Center Street Studio in Milton, Massachusetts, since the Studio’s establishment in 1984. The Joel and Lila Harnett Print Study Center, University of Richmond Museums, has been acquiring these prints since 1998 as part of the Center Street Studio Archives in the Harnett Print Study Center permanent collection.

This selection highlights the remarkable collaboration between the master printer and the artist that has been the hallmark of the Center Street Studio since its beginning, producing hundreds of prints of extraordinary quality by artists of national and international reputation. The wealth of artworks and documentation contained in the Archives is utilized as a primary source for both research and exhibition at the University Museums. As the repository of the Studio’s ongoing artistic production, the Harnett Print Study Center provides students, scholars, artists, and the community with an important resource for contemporary printmaking.

Sun - Fri 1pm - 5pm

Free & open to the public

Joel and Lila Harnett Museum of Art
Modlin Center for the Arts
University of Richmond
28 Westhampton Way
Richmond, VA
Exhibit South
February 23 -
March 16, 2018
TALKING AT THE COURT, ON THE STREET, IN THE BEDROOM: VERNACULAR MANUSCRIPTS IN THE MIDDLE AGES
The thirty-six manuscripts included in this exhibition provide viewers unique access to the authentic, spontaneous vision of people in medieval France, Italy, Germany, the Low Counties, and Britain. As award-winning author Christopher de Hamel writes in the introduction “There is one way in which manuscripts are different from all other works of art: they can talk … Shared language is the basis of all communication, and manuscripts can actually speak to us.”

OPENING & RECEPTION
Thu, Feb 22nd 6pm - 8pm

EXHIBITION
Feb 23rd - March 16th
Tue - Sat 10am - 6pm

LES ENLUMINURES
23 East 73rd Street, 7th floor Penthouse
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 23 -
July 08, 2018
The Codex and Crafts in Late Antiquity
The transition from roll to codex as the standard format of the book is one of the most culturally significant innovations of late antiquity, the period between the 3rd and 8th centuries AD.

The Codex and Crafts in Late Antiquity examines the structural, technical, and decorative features of the major types of codices—the wooden tablet codex, the single-gathering codex, and the multigathering codex. Along with surviving artifacts and iconographic evidence, handmade replicas are used to explore the craft processes applied in the making of these early books. The exhibition presents the codex as an innovation, rather than an invention, that evolved using techniques already widely employed by artisans and craftspeople in the creation of everyday items such as socks and shoes, revealing that the codex was a fascinating, yet practical, development.

Tue, Fri – Sun 11am – 5pm
Wed, Thu 11am – 8pm

BARD GRADUATE CENTER GALLERY
18 West 86th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 24 -
June 03, 2018
Beyond Words: Book Illustration in the Age of Shakespeare
The printed images in early modern books are a visual delight, but many also add key information and a different or unique perspective. Curated by Caroline Duroselle-Melish, the Folger's curator of early modern books and prints, Beyond Words includes more than 80 illustrated books and prints from the Folger collection from the 15th to 18th centuries—many of which have rarely been displayed before. Video and period illustrations show how images were made and printed. Astoundingly, Beyond Words even includes the woodcut and copper plate from which two of the prints were produced.

The richly varied illustrations open a window on the early modern age, from contemporary events and observations of daily life to allegorical figures, guides to dancing and sewing and other how-to books, and much more. Among several insightful portraits is a print of an Ethiopian abbot—a rare image of an African scholar of the time. Another picture shows us sunflowers from Peru, with Aztec-language labels. Still another illustrates the ideas of the real-life French alchemist Nicolas Flamel.

Including printed images in books was costly. Still, the prints helped to sell books, as they do today, and often provided vital information. Frontispieces introduced books to potential buyers, and other images offered useful explanations, sometimes paired with text that was printed on or near the pictures. The use of color could simply be appealing or it could be a key element in understanding the meaning of the image. Many images, of course, presented purely visual information that could not be expressed in words, from observations of animals and plants to detailed maps and diagrams.

Beyond Words includes works by many European artists, among them Wenceslaus Hollar, Marcantonio Raimondi, and Hans Baldung Grien. It also has an especially strong Dutch presence, reflecting the publishing role of Amsterdam and Antwerp. Among the Dutch materials are an illustrated "college catalog" for the University of Leiden; works by the Dutch artists Theodor de Bry, Romeyn de Hooghe, and Crispijn van de Passe; and observations of nature by the Dutch merchant Antoni van Leeuwenhoek, made with the microscope he perfected. Beyond Words also has two works by the Flemish engraver Martin Droeshout, including his portrait of Shakespeare in the 1623 First Folio—one of the best-known book illustrations of the early modern age.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun noon – 5pm

Folger Shakespeare Library
201 East Capitol Street SE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 27 -
May 27, 2018
Paper Promises: Early American Photography
Paper Promises demonstrates the importance of photographic reproduction in shaping and circulating perceptions of America and its people during a critical period of political tension and territorial expansion. The exhibition traces mid-nineteenth-century experimentation with and exploitation of photography on paper, chronicling the ways in which concern about manipulation and duplication of paper photographs became tempered by enthusiasm for the social connectivity they offered. Rare photographs and negatives are featured alongside iconic images from the formative years of photography in the United States.

Tue – Thu & Sun 10am – 5:30pm
Fri & Sat 10am – 9pm
Closed Mondays

Parking lot opens 9:30 a.m.

Free admission

The Getty Center
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
February 27 -
May 27, 2018
New Orleans, the Founding Era
In commemoration of the city’s 300th anniversary in 2018, The Historic New Orleans Collection will provide a multifaceted exploration of the city’s first few decades and its earliest inhabitants with New Orleans, the Founding Era, an original exhibition and bilingual companion catalog.

The Founding Era will bring together a vast array of rare artifacts from THNOC’s holdings and from institutions across Europe and North America to tell the stories of the city’s early days, when the city consisted of little more than hastily assembled huts and buildings.

Beginning with the region’s Native American tribes, through the waves of European arrival and the forced migration of enslaved African people, the exhibition will reflect on the complicated and often conflicted meanings the settlement’s development held for individuals, empires and indigenous nations.

The display will feature works on paper, ethnographic and archaeological artifacts, scientific and religious instruments, paintings, maps and charts, manuscripts and rare books. These original objects will be complemented by large-scale reproductions and interactive items.

More than 75 objects will be on loan from organizations in Spain, France, Canada and around the United States. A number of items, like a pair of 18th-century Native American bear-paw moccasins from the Musée du quai Branly in Paris and pieces of 15th-century Mississippian pottery from the University of Mississippi, have rarely traveled beyond their home institutions.

Digital interactives will include a gallery of photographs from archaeological digs at a variety of French Quarter sites, a game quizzing visitors on supplies needed for a new home in the settlement and a 1731 inventory of enslaved Africans and African-descended people living on a West Bank plantation.

Tue – Sat 9:30am – 4:30pm
Sun 10:30am – 4:30pm

The Historic New Orleans Collection
Merieult House
533 Royal Street
New Orleans, LA
Exhibit South
March 04 -
May 28, 2018
Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings
For more than forty years, Sally Mann (b. 1951, Lexington, Virginia) has made experimental, elegiac, and hauntingly beautiful photographs that span a broad body of work including figure studies, still lifes, and landscapes. Sally Mann: A Thousand Crossings explores how her relationship with the South has shaped her work. Some 115 photographs, many of which have not been exhibited or published previously, offer both a sweeping overview of Mann’s artistic achievement and a focused exploration on the continuing influence of the South on her work. Mann’s powerful and provocative work is organized into five sections: Family, The Land, Last Measure, Abide with Me, and What Remains. The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalog with essays that explore the development of Mann’s art; her family photographs; the landscape as repository of personal, cultural, and racial memory; and her debt to 19th-century photographers and techniques.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 11am – 6pm

Ground Floor
National Gallery of Art West Building West Building
6th Street and Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 22 -
May 26, 2018
"Westward the Course of Empire”: Exploring and Settling the American West from the Collection of J. C. McElveen.
The exhibit will feature some maps and travel narratives from the 17th and 18th Centuries, but the focus of the exhibit will be on exploring and mapping the American West in the 19th Century, from Lewis & Clark to the Pacific Railroad Surveys.

2nd Floor Gallery
The Grolier Club
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic