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October 27, 2017 -
September 30, 2019
Headlines of History: Historic Newspapers of St. Louis and the World Through the Centuries at the St. Louis Mercantile Library Association
October 27, 2017 Members' Opening and Bixby Book Club Halloween Party

Join us on Friday October 27 from 6-9pm as we celebrate the opening of the special exhibition Headlines of History: Historic Newspapers of St. Louis and the World Through the Centuries at the St. Louis Mercantile Library Association.

University of Missouri–St. Louis
1 University Blvd.
St. Louis, MO
Exhibit Midwest
March 06, 2018 -
February 03, 2019
Sappho to Suffrage: women who dared
Pirates and poets; suffragettes and explorers - this exhibition celebrates the achievements of women who dared to do the unexpected. Sappho to Suffrage showcases some of the Bodleian's most remarkable and treasured items.

Mon - Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 11am - 5pm

Free admission

Related LECTURE: July 25th 5.00pm — 6.00pm
Speaker: Professor Patricia Fara
Lecture Theatre
Weston Library

Treasury, Weston Library
Bodleian Library
Broad Street
Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
May 11, 2018 -
March 10, 2019
Black Out: Silhouettes Then and Now
Silhouettes—cut paper profiles—were a hugely popular and democratic form of portraiture in the 19th century, offering virtually instantaneous likenesses of everyone from presidents to those who were enslaved. The exhibition “Black Out: Silhouettes Then and Now” explores this relatively unstudied art form by examining its rich historical roots and considering its forceful contemporary presence. The show features works from the Portrait Gallery’s extensive collection of silhouettes, such as those by Auguste Edouart, who captured the likenesses of such notable figures as John Quincy Adams and Lydia Maria Child, and at the same time, the exhibition reveals how contemporary artists are reimagining silhouettes in bold and unforgettable ways.

Highlights of the historical objects include a double-silhouette portrait of a same-sex couple and a rarely seen life-size silhouette of a nineteen-year-old enslaved girl, along with the bill of her sale from 1796. The featured contemporary artists are Kara Walker, who makes panoramic silhouettes of plantation life and African American history; Canadian artist Kristi Malakoff, who cuts paper to make life-size sculptures depicting a children’s Maypole dance; MacArthur-prize-winner Camille Utterback, who will present an interactive digital work that reacts to visitors’ shadows and movements; and Kumi Yamashita, who “sculpts” light and shadow with objects to create mixed-media profiles of people who are not there. With both historical and contemporary explorations into the silhouette, Black Out reveals new pathways between our past and present, particularly with regard to how we can reassess notions of race, power, individualism, and even, our digital selves.

Daily 11:30am - 7pm

Free admission

National Portrait Gallery
8th and F Streets NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 25, 2018 -
September 30, 2020
ENDURING IDEALS: ROCKWELL, ROOSEVELT, & THE FOUR FREEDOMS
The first comprehensive traveling exhibition devoted to Norman Rockwell's iconic depictions of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Four Freedoms: Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Worship, Freedom of Want, and Freedom of Fear.

Rockwell, Roosevelt, & the Four Freedoms explores the indelible odyssey of humanity’s greatest ideals.

The notion of the Four Freedoms has inspired dozens of national constitutions across the globe, yet Franklin D. Roosevelt’s declaration that the United States was willing to fight for Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Worship, Freedom from Want, and Freedom from Fear—now considered a sublime moment in rhetorical history—did not turn out to be the immediate triumph envisioned by the President. As the nation found itself sliding ever closer to direct involvement in World War II, the underlying meaning of his words captured surprisingly little attention among Americans. Following his January 6, 1941, Annual Message to Congress, government surveys showed that only half of Americans were aware of FDR’s Four Freedoms and that less than a quarter could identify them correctly. Moreover, many had no clear idea why the United States was being called upon to enter the war.

It would take the continuous efforts of the White House, the Office of War Information, and scores of patriotic artists to give the Four Freedoms new life. Most prominent among those was Norman Rockwell, whose images became a national sensation in early 1943 when they were first published in The Saturday Evening Post. Roosevelt’s words and Rockwell’s artworks soon became inseparable in the public consciousness, with millions of reproductions publicizing the Second War Loan Drive bringing the Four Freedoms directly into American homes and workplaces. When Eleanor Roosevelt convinced United Nations delegates to include these ideals in its postwar statement of human rights, FDR’s words—now forever entwined with Rockwell’s images—achieved immortality.

Born amid the turmoil of World War II, the Four Freedoms have since become one of its greatest legacies, a testament to the paramount importance of human rights and dignity. Brought forward by one of America’s greatest presidents and immortalized by one of its most beloved artists more than seventy-five years ago, the Four Freedoms continue to inspire, resonating across generations as strongly today as they did in their time.

CO-PRESENTING MAY 25, 2018 - SEPTEMBER 2, 2018:
ROOSEVELT HOUSE (REIMAGINING THE FOUR FREEDOMS)

OCTOBER 13, 2018 - JANUARY 13, 2019:
THE HENRY FORD MUSEUM
20900 Oakwood Blvd.
DEARBORN, MI


FEBRUARY 9, 2019 - MAY 6, 2019:
THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MUSEUM AND THE TEXTILE MUSEUM
701 21st Street, NW
WASHINGTON, DC


JUNE 4, 2019 - OCTOBER 27, 2019:
Le Mémorial de Caen
Esplanade Général Eisenhower
CS 55026
14050 Caen Cedex 4
CAEN, FRANCE


DECEMBER 15, 2019 - MARCH 22, 2020:
MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, HOUSTON
1001 Bissonnet
HOUSTON, TEXAS


FALL 2020:
NORMAN ROCKWELL MUSEUM
9 Glendale Rd / Rte 183
STOCKBRIDGE, MA


The New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West
at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 15, 2018 -
June 02, 2019
Daguerreotypes: Five Decades of Collecting
The 2018 installation of the Daguerreian Gallery celebrates the National Portrait Gallery’s golden anniversary by highlighting fifty years of daguerreotype collecting by the museum. Included will be portraits of such iconic figures as activist and reformer Dorothea Dix, entrepreneur and showman P. T. Barnum with Tom Thumb, Seneca Chief Governor Blacksnake, U.S. Navy Commodore Matthew C. Perry, and artist Alfred Waud.

Daily 11:30am - 7pm

Free admission

National Portrait Gallery
8th and F Streets NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 29, 2018 -
August 31, 2019
Baseball Americana
Americans had been playing baseball long before they agreed on the rules or even settled on how to spell it.

Base-Ball (1787)
base-ball (1799)
base ball (1818)
Base Ball (1845)
baseball (1899)

They didn't always call it baseball either—in some places it was known simply as "town ball" or, more generically, "round ball." No matter what form it has taken, baseball—and its close fraternal twin, softball—has endured. But it hasn't stayed the same in anyone's lifetime. Former major leaguer and announcer Bob Uecker, on hearing the phrase "emotional distress" to describe poor hitting, observed, "When I played, they didn't use fancy words like that. They just said I couldn't hit."

Baseball Americana features items from the Library of Congress collections and those of its lending partners to consider the game then and now—as it relates to players, teams, and the communities it creates. Although baseball has stayed true to many of its customs, it has also broken with tradition through the invention, competition, and financial interests that still make it the most played sport in the country.

8:30am - 4:30pm

South Gallery, 2nd Floor
Library of Congress Jefferson Building
10 First Street SE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
August 07, 2018 -
February 03, 2019
Art of Three Faiths: A Torah, a Bible, and a Qur’an
One of the most elaborately illuminated copies of the first five books of the Hebrew Bible created in the Middle Ages, the Rothschild Pentateuch is the first Hebrew manuscript to be added to the collection of the Getty Museum. Its acquisition allows the Getty for the first time to represent the medieval art of illumination in sacred texts of the three Abrahamic religions—Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, founded in that order. These religions trace their belief in the singular God to a common patriarch, the figure of Abraham (Ibrahim). Practitioners of all three religions have been called people of the book for their shared belief in the primacy of the divine word as conveyed through sacred scripture. Copies of the Torah, Christian Bible, and Qur’an are among the most beautifully illuminated manuscripts of the Middle Ages, represented in this exhibition by three remarkable examples.

Open daily 10am – 5:30pm
Closed Monday

Free admission

The Getty Center
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
August 18, 2018 -
March 03, 2019
Pre-Modern Bibles: From the Dead Sea Scrolls to the Complutensian Polyglot Bible
Biblical texts have changed in their format, in modes of interpretation, and in ways of presentation over the millennia. Included in this exhibition is the largest collection of original and facsimile biblical manuscripts ever assembled in West Texas.

The exhibition illustrates the evolution of the physical Bible, the development of scholarly methods of biblical analysis, and the refinement of multiple ways to convey biblical learning, often to people of limited literacy. The highlight of the exhibition is the creation, in Spain at the end of the Middle Ages, of the Complutensian Polyglot Bible with its elaborate multilingual printing press fonts.

The Complutensian Polyglot can be traced back to a university in north-central Spain, the Universidad Complutense at Alcalá de Henares which relocated to Madrid during the 19th century.

This renaissance university was the creation of Cardinal Francisco Ximénes (1436‒1517), a former hermit who became the chaplain of Christopher Columbus's patroness Queen Isabella of Castille. Ximénes was a statesmen and reformer who believed that a proper understanding of the Bible could lead to a reformed Christianity. To that end he diverted whatever funds he could gather into his new university whose major project would be to create an edition of the Bible that, thanks to the new printing press technology, could make the word of God available in all the major biblical source languages.

The first part of the exhibit will attempt to show how the material Bible came to exist as it does. The second part of the exhibit attempts to reveal not only the sophistication of pre-modern biblical scholarship but also how it relates to academic traditions today.

The final section of the exhibition will be devoted to the Complutensian Polyglot Bible, whose pages are laid out to include bible passages in four columns in different languages: Hebrew, Greek, Latin, and Aramaic. The Complutensian Polyglot Bible will be presented as the culmination of a long tradition of themes related to multilingual, cross cultural, biblical scholarship, which will and demonstrate how the future was transformed by the technology of the printing press.

The exhibition features a variety of bibles and their colorful illuminations that focus on biblical scholarship over 1,000 years and its relationship to the development of western civilization in the middle ages.

Mon Closed
Tue - Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 1pm - 5pm

Free admission

Museum of Texas Tech University
Texas Tech University
3301 4th Street
Lubbock, TX
Exhibit Southwest
August 23, 2018 -
March 31, 2019
Half the Picture: A Feminist Look at the Collection
Featuring more than 100 works from our collection, Half the Picture: A Feminist Look at the Collection explores a wide range of art-making, focusing on enduring political subjects—encompassing gender, race, and class—that remain relevant today. The exhibition’s intersectional feminist framework highlights artworks, in a plurality of voices, that aim to rally support or motivate action on behalf of a cause, or to combat stereotypes and dominant narratives. (This exhibition contains sexually explicit content. Viewer discretion is advised.)


Half the Picture draws its title from a 1989 Guerrilla Girls poster that declares, "You’re seeing less than half the picture without the vision of women artists and artists of color." Spanning almost one hundred years, the exhibition focuses on historical and contemporary work by more than fifty artists who combine message and medium to engage with political and social issues. Often radical and inspiring, these artists advocate for their communities, their beliefs, and their hopes for equality amid popular or state-supported opposition.

The exhibition showcases pointed artworks by Vito Acconci, Beverly Buchanan, Sue Coe, Renee Cox, Nona Faustine, Harmony Hammond, the Guerrilla Girls, Käthe Kollwitz, An-My Lê, Yolanda López, Park McArthur, Zanele Muholi, Philip Pearlstein, Wendy Red Star, Joan Semmel, Dread Scott, Nancy Spero, Betty Tompkins, Andy Warhol, the Artists’ Poster Committee of Art Workers Coalition, and Taller de Gráfica Popular, among many others.

Mon & Tue CLOSED
Wed, Fri - Sun 11am – 6pm
Thu 11am – 10pm

Elizabeth A. Sackler Center for Feminist Art, 4th Floor
Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway
Brooklyn, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 01, 2018 -
February 28, 2019
In Conversation: Will Wilson and Edward Curtis
In this free, focus exhibition that complements the temporary exhibition Art for a New Understanding: Native Voices, 1950s to Now, contemporary photographer Will Wilson (Diné) presents an authentic, twenty-first century depiction of Indigenous culture through his photography, even allowing his subjects to choose the pose, clothing, props, and context of each photograph. This exhibition will also feature photographs from Edward Curtis, who traveled throughout the western United States between 1907 and 1930 to photograph traditions and cultures of Native American peoples. The photographs of Wilson and Curtis in conversation offer a chance to see different depictions of Native peoples and to think critically about how they have been portrayed in photography over the past century.

Sat & Sun 10am - 6pm
Mon 11am - 6pm
Wed - Fri 11am - 9pm

Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art
600 Museum Way
Bentonville, AR
Exhibit South
September 07, 2018 -
March 03, 2019
Black Citizenship in the Age of Jim Crow
The exhibition explores the struggle for full citizenship and racial quality that unfolded in the 50 years after the Civil War. When slavery ended in 1865, a period of Reconstruction began, leading to such achievements as the Fourteenth and Fifteenth Amendments to the Constitution. By 1868, all persons born in the United States were citizens and equal under the law. But efforts to create an interracial democracy were contested from the start. A harsh backlash ensued, ushering in a half century of the “separate but equal” age of Jim Crow.

Opening to mark the 150th anniversary of the ratification of the Fourteenth Amendment, the exhibition is organized chronologically from the end of the Civil War to the end of World War I and highlights the central role played by African Americans in advocating for their rights. It also examines the depth and breadth of opposition to black advancement. Art, artifacts, photographs, and media will help visitors explore these transformative decades in American history, and understand their continuing relevance today. Curated by Marci Reaven, vice president of history exhibitions, and Lily Wong, assistant curator.

Tue - Thu, & Sat - 10am - 6pm
Fri 10am - 8pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West
(at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 08, 2018 -
March 24, 2019
The Very Hungry Caterpillar Turns 50
This exhibition celebrates The Very Hungry Caterpillar, from its humble origins to one of the most iconic children’s books of all time. Published in 1969, the first edition was produced in Japan since printers in the U.S. could not affordably carry out the complex project of die-cut holes and irregularly-sized pages. With it, Carle transformed the traditional picture book into an interactive object, “a book you can play with, a toy you can read.”

A copy of The Very Hungry Caterpillar is sold somewhere in the world every thirty seconds! It has been translated into 62 languages, most recently Mongolian. Over the years, Carle has come to realize that his story is one of hope. “Like the caterpillar,” says Carle, “children will grow up and spread their wings.”

Tue – Fri 10am – 4pm
Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm
Mon CLOSED

Adult $9
Youth (1-18), Student, Teacher, & Senior $6
Family (2 adults & 2 youth) $22.50

West Gallery
The Eric Carle Museum
of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
September 08, 2018 -
February 03, 2019
Fantasies and Fairy Tales
Fantasies and Fairy Tales explores the role of fantasy and the recurrence of popular fairy tales, myths, and legends in the graphic arts in the years around 1900, incorporating select earlier examples as well as more recent works. Artists pushed the limits of their imaginations for different purposes. Fantasy was used to examine individual emotional and mental states, to visualize spiritual transcendence, and as a springboard for aesthetic experimentation and abstraction. Fairy tales, a public and shared form of fantasy, offered artists familiar narratives and characters they could use to explore individual fears and desires or collective hopes and dreams. Some works in this exhibition evoke a sense of terror and dread, while others offer a romantic vision of an invented or idealized past or focus on the enchantment of the world around us. In all these works, artists present a particular way of seeing that exceeds naturalistic representation.

Mon, Tue, Thu 11am – 5pm
Wed CLOSED
Fri 11am – 8pm
Sat & Sun 10am – 7pm

Los Angeles County Museum of Art
5905 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
September 14, 2018 -
February 16, 2019
Lola Álvarez Bravo: Picturing Mexico
This exhibition presents nearly fifty photographs by Lola Álvarez Bravo (1903–93), who played a critical role in Mexico’s modernist wave through her work as a photographer, educator, and curator. Picturing Mexico focuses on her personal artistic practice from the 1930s to the 1970s, when Álvarez Bravo traveled across the country producing iconic portraits of her fellow artists as well as lesser-known compositions that emphasize abstract form, pattern, and the play of light and shadow. Her pictures of people at work and at leisure, of buildings new and old, and of a diverse array of landscapes bring to life an era of profound transformation from the perspective of one of Mexico’s pioneering female photographers.

Wed, Thu & Sat 10am – 5pm
Fri, 10am – 8pm

Free admission

Pulitzer Arts Foundation
3716 Washington Blvd.
Saint Louis, MO
Exhibit Midwest
September 28, 2018 -
March 17, 2019
Between Worlds: The Art of Bill Traylor
This exhibition is the first major retrospective ever organized for an artist born into slavery, and the most comprehensive look at Bill Traylor’s work to date.

Bill Traylor (ca. 1853–1949) is regarded today as one of the most important American artists of the twentieth century. A black man born into slavery in Alabama, he was an eyewitness to history: the Civil War, Emancipation, Reconstruction, Jim Crow segregation, the Great Migration, and the steady rise of African American urban culture in the South. Traylor would not live to see the civil rights movement, but he was among those who laid its foundation. Starting around 1939—by then in his late eighties and living on the streets of Montgomery—Traylor made the radical steps of taking up pencil and paintbrush and attesting to his existence and point of view. The paintings and drawings he made are visually striking and politically assertive; they include simple yet powerful distillations of tales and memories as well as spare, vibrantly colored abstractions. When Traylor died in 1949, he left behind more than one thousand works of art.

The simplified forms of Traylor’s artwork belie the complexity of his world, creativity, and inspiring bid for self-definition in a segregated culture. Between Worlds: The Art of Bill Traylor situates Traylor as the only known artist enslaved at birth to make a significant body of drawn and painted work. His compelling imagery charts the crossroads of radically different worlds—rural and urban, black and white, old and new—and reveals how one man’s visual record of African American life gives larger meaning to the story of his nation.

Open Daily 11:30am – 7pm

Free admission

Smithsonian American Art Museum
8th Street & F Street NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 28, 2018 -
March 03, 2019
Ai Weiwei: Life Cycle
Marciano Art Foundation is pleased to announce the third MAF Project in the Theater Gallery, a solo exhibition of Chinese artist Ai Weiwei.

This exhibition is Ai’s first major institutional exhibition in Los Angeles and will feature the new and unseen work Life Cycle (2018) – a sculptural response to the global refugee crisis. The exhibition will also present iconic installations Sunflower Seeds (2010) and Spouts (2015) within the Foundation’s Theater Gallery.

On view for the first time in the Black Box, Life Cycle (2018) references the artist’s 2017 monumental sculpture Law of the Journey, Ai’s response to the global refugee crisis, which used inflatable, black PVC rubber to depict the makeshift boats used to reach Europe. In this new iteration, Life Cycle depicts an inflatable boat through the technique used in traditional Chinese kite-making, exchanging the PVC rubber for bamboo.

Suspended around the boat installation are figures crafted from bamboo and silk. In 2015, Ai began creating these figures based on mythic creatures from the Shanhaijing, or Classic of Mountains and Seas. The classic Chinese text compiles mythic geography and myth; versions of the Shanhaijing have existed since the 4th century B.C. These works are crafted in Weifang, a Chinese city in Shandong province with a tradition of kite-making dating back to the Ming dynasty (1368–1644).

Windows (2015), which hangs along the perimeter of the Black Box, draws from Chinese mythology, the tales and illustrations of the Shanhaijing, the history of 20th-century art, and the life and works of the artist. The vignettes feature a dense mix of biographical, mythological, and art historical references to craft a contemporary story. Similar to chapters in a book, or acts in a play, the various scenes include the mythological creatures of the Shanhaijing alongside bamboo versions of Ai’s earlier works, such as Template and Bang, and homages to Marcel Duchamp and Jasper Johns. A central theme running through the ten vignettes is freedom of speech and Ai’s efforts in defending it. Motifs recurring in Ai’s practice—the bicycle, the alpaca, symbols of state surveillance and control—are repeated and multiplied.

Thu 11am – 5pm
Fri 11am – 5pm
Sat 10am – 6pm
Sun 11am – 5pm
Mon, Tue & Wed CLOSED

Free admission

The Marciano Art Foundation
4357 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
October 09, 2018 -
April 20, 2019
Crossing Boundaries: Art // Maps
When the imaginative journeys of contemporary artists incorporate elements from a cartographer’s toolkit, these borrowings can add narrative, semi-narrative or abstract depth to a work of art. To offer comparison and commentary to encourage exploration of each artwork, maps from several centuries have been selected from the collection of the Norman B. Leventhal Map & Education Center at the Boston Public Library. Our intention in presenting these juxtapositions is to cross the traditional boundaries of art and cartography to stimulate fresh appreciation of both media.

Mon - Thu 10am - 7pm
Fri & Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 1pm - 5pm

Norman B. Leventhal Map & Education Center
Boston Public Library
700 Boylston Street
Copley Square
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
October 19, 2018 -
February 19, 2019
Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms
A landmark exhibition on the history, art, literature and culture of Anglo-Saxon England

Spanning six centuries, from the eclipse of Roman Britain to the Norman Conquest, highlights from the British Library’s outstanding collection of Anglo-Saxon manuscripts will be presented alongside a large number of exceptional loans at Anglo-Saxon Kingdoms, our major exhibition opening in autumn 2018.

The Codex Amiatinus, one of three giant single-volume Bibles made at the monastery at Wearmouth-Jarrow in the north-east of England in the early eighth century and taken to Italy as a gift for the Pope in 716, will be returning to England for the first time in more than 1300 years, on loan from Biblioteca Medicea Laurenziana in Florence. It will be displayed with the St Cuthbert Gospel, also made at Wearmouth-Jarrow around the same time, and acquired by the British Library in 2012.

We will be displaying a number of major objects from the Staffordshire Hoard, found in 2009, including the pectoral cross and the inscribed gilded strip, on loan from Birmingham and Stoke-on-Trent City Councils. Bringing together the four principal manuscripts of Old English poetry for the first time, the British Library’s unique manuscript of Beowulf will be displayed alongside the Vercelli Book on loan from the Biblioteca Capitolare in Vercelli, the Exeter Book on loan from Exeter Cathedral Library, and the Junius Manuscript on loan from the Bodleian Library.

The exhibition will also include Domesday Book, which records unparalleled evidence of the English landscape and the Anglo-Saxons’ sophisticated tax-collection system. Domesday Book will be on loan from the National Archives.

PACCAR Gallery
The British Library
96 Euston Road
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
October 19, 2018 -
February 17, 2019
Blue Prints: The Pioneering Photographs of Anna Atkins
Anna Atkins (1799–1871) came of age in Victorian England, a fertile environment for learning and discovery. Guided by her father, a prominent scientist, Atkins was inspired to take up photography, and in 1843 began making cyanotypes—a photographic process invented just the year before—in an effort to visualize and distribute information about her collection of seaweeds. With great daring, creativity, and technical skill, she produced Photographs of British Algae: Cyanotype Impressions, the first book to be illustrated with photographs, and the first substantial application of photography to science. Ethereal, deeply hued, and astonishingly detailed, the resulting images led her and her friend Anne Dixon to expand their visual inquiry to flowering plants, feathers, and other subjects. This exhibition draws upon more than a decade of careful research and sets Atkins and her much-admired work in context, shedding new light on her productions and showcasing the distinctive beauty of the cyanotype process, which is still used by artists today.

Sun 1pm – 5pm
Mon, Thu - Sat 10am – 6pm
Tue & Wed 10 AM–8 PM

Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
476 Fifth Avenue (42nd St & Fifth Ave)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 19, 2018 -
April 28, 2019
Gift of a Lifetime: Treasures from Chester Beatty’s Collection
Celebrating the 50th anniversary of Sir Alfred Chester Beatty’s magnificent bequest, Gift of a Lifetime presents a choice selection of masterpieces from this unique collection. An internationally successful mining magnate and generous philanthropist, Beatty was one of the most prolific and discerning collectors of his generation. From his early years in New York, through his career in London and travels overseas, Beatty acquired rare books, manuscripts and decorative arts of the highest quality and rarity from Europe, the Middle East and Asia.

Following his retirement, Beatty brought these collections to Ireland, later placing them in trust to the nation on his death in 1968. From objects of the greatest beauty crafted for powerful rulers to treasures tracing the history of world religions, the artworks drawn together in this exhibition and accompanying catalogue capture the breadth and wonder of this exceptional legacy: a gift to the nation, for Ireland to share with the world.

Mar to Oct: Mon - Fri 10am - 5pm
Nov to Feb: Tue - Fri 10am - 5pm
(Closed Mondays)

Sat 11am - 5pm (All year)
Sun 1pm - 5pm (All year)

Closed 1 January; Good Friday; 24, 25 and 26 December; and Monday public holidays.

Free admission

Chester Beatty Library
Dublin Castle
Dublin, IRELAND
Exhibit International
October 20, 2018 -
February 24, 2019
Lost Treasures of Strawberry Hill
This exhibition brings back to Strawberry Hill some of the most important masterpieces in Horace Walpole’s famous and unique collection for a once-in-a-lifetime exhibition. Horace Walpole’s collection was one of the most important of the 18th century. It was dispersed in a great sale in 1842. For the first time in over 170 years, Strawberry Hill can be seen as Walpole conceived it, with the collection in the interiors as he designed it, shown in their original positions.

Mon – Fri 12pm - 6pm (Late opening until 10pm on Fridays)
Sat & Sun 11am - 6pm
Final entry one hour before closing.

Strawberry Hill House & Garden
268 Waldegrave Road
Twickenham, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
October 22, 2018 -
March 01, 2019
In the School of Wisdom: Persian Bookbinding, ca. 1575-1890
Following the introduction of lacquer-painting in the 15th century, bookbindings became a rejuvenated site for creative expression in Iran. ‘In the School of Wisdom’ presents over thirty examples, representing the diversity of the art as it developed from the late Safavid to Qajar eras and contextualizing it within a changing landscape of libraries and book culture.

9am - 9pm

Rare Book & Manuscript Library (6th Floor East)
Chang Octagon Exhibition Room
Columbia University Libraries
Butler Library
535 W. 114 Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 24, 2018 -
February 24, 2019
EDWARD BURNE-JONES
The last of the Pre-Raphaelites, Burne-Jones is synonymous with a refined and spiritualised style of beauty

From being an outsider in British art, and spending much of his life in isolation, Burne-Jones (1833–1898) became a key figure in the art world at the end of the 19th century and a pioneer of the symbolist movement.

He challenged society by disengaging his art from the modern world, offering a parallel universe based on myth, legend and the Bible. Working in a wide range of materials, he pioneered a radical new approach to narrative in works created for both public and intimate settings.

This exhibition is London’s first major retrospective of the artist's work for over 40 years, and showcases 150 works in different media, including painting, stained glass and tapestry, all of which foreground Burne-Jones's belief in the redemptive power of art.

Members free

Mon - Sun 10.00 – 18.00

Tate Britain
Millbank
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
October 26, 2018 -
April 07, 2019
Structured Visions: The Photographs of Ralston Crawford
Fascinated by the purified geometry of man-made things, Ralston Crawford (1906–1978) worked in a consistently formal, or abstract, manner across a variety of mediums. His photographs provide an essential look at a vital era of abstraction in American art, and at the cultural scenes and subjects from which that creative sensibility arose.

Crawford used the camera as a tool of both documentary and artistic expression. Some photographs served as studies for later paintings or prints. Most, however, were created and appreciated purely as photographs. His subjects ranged from urban and industrial themes to ships and sailing, jazz, the people and culture of New Orleans, bullfighting and religious processions in Spain, and the destructive power of the atomic bomb.

Wed 10am - 5pm
Thu - Fri 10am - 9pm
Sat - Sun 10am - 5pm
Mon - Tue CLOSED

The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
4525 Oak Street
Kansas City, MO
Exhibit Midwest
October 26, 2018 -
March 10, 2019
Napoleon: Power and Splendor
Napoleon: Power and Splendor marks the first exploration of the majesty and the artistic, political and ideological significance of Napoleon’s imperial court from Napoleon’s self-appointment as First Consul in 1799 to his abdication in 1814. The Imperial Household was a key institution during Napoleon’s reign. It was responsible for the daily lives of the Imperial family and the day-to-day existence of former general Bonaparte, who became Emperor Napoleon.

The exhibition aims to re-create the ambiance and capture the spirit that prevailed in the French court during the Empire. A selection of works, most of which have never before been exhibited in North America, will reveal the power and splendor of the Imperial Household and its role in fashioning a monarchic identity for the new emperor, his family and loyal entourage.

Wed 10am - 5pm
Thu - Fri 10am - 9pm
Sat - Sun 10am - 5pm
Mon - Tue CLOSED

$18 Admission

The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
4525 Oak Street
Kansas City, MO
Exhibit Midwest
October 29, 2018 -
March 24, 2019
Clouds and Gold Dust: Decorated Papers from the Ettinghausen Collection
One of the distinctive features of manuscripts from Iran, Ottoman Turkey, and Mughal and Deccani India is the frequent use of decorative techniques in the borders and even on the written surface of the book's pages. Clouds and Gold Dust: Decorated Papers from the Ettinghausen Collection will present works on paper, enhanced with marbling, gold sprinkling, stenciled designs, and decoupage, alone or in combination with one another or with illumination. Ranging from the fifteenth to the twentieth century, the thirty-three folios on view reveal an endless variety of patterns and embellishments, surrounding elegantly penned poetic verses and, eventually, forming freestanding images.

Sun – Thu 10am – 5:30pm
Fri & Sat 10am – 9pm

Adults $25
Seniors (65 & over) $17
Students $12
Members & Patrons Free
Children (under 12) Free

Gallery 458
The Met Fifth Avenue
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 02, 2018 -
May 27, 2019
Betye Saar: Keepin’ It Clean
Contemporary artist Betye Saar has shaped the development of assemblage art in the United States, particularly as a device to illuminate social and political concerns. A key figure in the Black Arts Movement and the feminist art movement of the 1960-70s, Saar’s distinct vision harmonizes the personal and the political. Over the years, Saar has transformed the representation of African Americans in American culture by recycling and reclaiming derogatory images such as Aunt Jemimas, Uncle Toms, sambos, and mammies to confront the continued racism in American society and create representations of strength and perseverance. This exhibition focuses on one facet of her work—washboards—created between 1997 and 2017.

Tue - Thu, & Sat 10am - 6pm
Fri 10am - 8pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West
(at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 03, 2018 -
March 31, 2019
The Little House: Her Story
2017 marked the 75th anniversary of the publication of the children’s book The Little House, written and illustrated by Virginia Lee Burton (1909–1968). In recognition of that milestone, for the past two years the Cape Ann Museum has been pleased to collaborate with Gallery A4 at the Takenaka Corporation in Tokyo, Japan, creating an exhibition exploring Burton’s extraordinary career and legacy. The Sawyer Free Library in Gloucester, the University of Minnesota, the Burton-Demetrios family and the Tokyo Children’s Library also contributed to the project. The exhibition that resulted from this partnership featured archival material and a model of the little house at the center of Burton’s story. After being on display at Gallery A4 the exhibition traveled to a handful of other venues around Japan including Spiral, a multi-purpose cultural center in Minami-Aoyama. The exhibition was greeted enthusiastically by large crowds at each site. Now, a year later, the model of Virginia Lee Burton’s Little House that was at the center of the exhibition is on its way to America where it will soon be on display at the Cape Ann Museum.

The Cape Ann Museum is pleased and honored to have been given this rare opportunity to engage in cross cultural dialogue on salient topics such as these and thanks its partners—and dear friends—in Japan for their generosity and kindness.

Tue - Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 1pm - 4pm
CLOSED on Mondays & these holidays:
Thanksgiving, Christmas & New Years Day. On Dec 24th & Dec 31st the Museum closes at 1pm.

Adults: $12.00
Cape Ann residents, seniors & students: $10.00
Museum members & youth (18 & under): FREE

Cape Ann Museum
27 Pleasant Street
Gloucester, MA
Exhibit New England
November 04, 2018 -
August 18, 2019
Eye to I: Self-Portraits from 1900 to Today
Drawing primarily from the National Portrait Gallery’s vast collection of self-portraits, this exhibition will explore how American artists have chosen to portray themselves since the beginning of the last century. As people are confronted each day with “selfies” via social media and as they continue to examine the fluidity of contemporary identity, this is an opportune time to reassess the significance of self-portraiture in relation to the country’s history and culture. The exhibition will feature more than 75 works by artists such as Josef Albers, Patricia Cronin, Imogen Cunningham, Elaine de Kooning, Edward Hopper, Joan Jonas, Jacob Lawrence, Alice Neel, Louise Nevelson, Diego Rivera, Lucas Samaras, Fritz Scholder, Roger Shimomura, Shahzia Sikander and Martin Wong. “Eye to I: Self-Portraits from 1900 to Today” is curated by Brandon Brame Fortune, chief curator, National Portrait Gallery. This exhibition concludes the Portrait Gallery’s 50th anniversary celebrations, and an expanded, illustrated companion book will be published in spring 2019.

11:30am - 7am daily

Free admission

National Portrait Gallery
8th and F Streets NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 04, 2018 -
February 18, 2019
Gordon Parks: The New Tide, Early Work 1940–1950
During the 1940s American photographer Gordon Parks (1912–2006) grew from a self-taught photographer making portraits and documenting everyday life in Saint Paul and Chicago to a visionary professional shooting for Ebony, Vogue, Fortune, and Life. For the first time, the formative decade of Parks’s 60-year career is the focus of an exhibition, which brings together 150 photographs and ephemera—including magazines, books, letters, and family pictures. The exhibition will illustrate how Parks’s early experiences at the Farm Security Administration, Office of War Information, and Standard Oil (New Jersey) as well as his close relationships with Roy Stryker, Langston Hughes, Richard Wright, and Ralph Ellison, helped shape his groundbreaking style. A fully illustrated catalog, with extensive new research and previously unpublished images, will accompany the exhibition.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 11am – 6pm

Free admission

West Building, Ground Floor, Outer Tier
National Gallery of Art
6th & Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 07, 2018 -
May 01, 2019
Lawrence of Oxford
The exhibition marks the culmination of two years’ intensive collecting around one of Magdalen’s most celebrated Old Members, T.E. Lawrence (better known as ‘Lawrence of Arabia’). It is a little-known fact that Lawrence was elected to a Senior Demyship at Magdalen in late 1910, and trained as an archaeologist on a British Museum dig in northern Syria as a member of the College until 1914 when the war broke out.

Wednesdays 2pm - 4:30pm
Private viewings and group tours can be arranged by appointment.

A series of events have been programmed to run concurrently with the exhibition (all events start at 5.30pm, and will take place in the Summer Common Room unless stated otherwise)

5 November 2018 (Magdalen College Auditorium)
Grand Opening, with talks by curators Dr Rory McCarthy and Daryl Green

21 January 2019
Lecture by Juliet Desplat (Head, Modern Overseas Intelligence and Security Records, The National Archives)

18 February 2019
Lecture by Emma Sky, OBE (Jackson Institute for Global Affairs, Yale University)

7 March 2019
Lecture by Anthony Sattin (journalist and author of Young Lawrence)

2 May 2019
Special Guest closing lecture (T.B.A.)

Old Library
Magdalen College
University of Oxford
Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
November 08, 2018 -
April 14, 2019
A Peculiar Paradise: Florida Photographs by Nathan Benn
On assignment for National Geographic, Nathan Benn photographed across the State of Florida at the dawn of the 1980s a time made famous by Miami’s narcotics-related crime wave and influx of newcomers from the Caribbean. After nearly 40 years, Benn has revisited his Florida archives. A Peculiar Paradise exhibits nearly 100 photographs, as well as artifacts related to his 20-year career at National Geographic. His pictures feature, among other topics, Miami’s Little Havana neighborhood, extreme affluence, nightlife, immigration, work cultures, tourist attractions, remarkable Floridians, Dundee’s 5th Street Gym, and the narcotics war. Come experience Benn’s images reflecting a dynamic and unique time in Florida’s history.

A former president of Magnum Photos, Nathan Benn was born and raised in Miami, and currently resides in Santa Fe, NM and New York City.

In conjunction with the exhibition, powerHouse Books will release a 200-page volume of Nathan Benn’s Florida photographs in November 2018.

Tue – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm
Mon CLOSED

Opening Reception: Nov 8th

Children (Under 6) Free
Children (6-12) $5
Seniors & Students (with ID) $8
Adults $10
Research Center One-Month Pass $10

HistoryMiami
101 West Flagler Street
Miami, FL
Exhibit South
November 09, 2018 -
February 01, 2019
The Artist Book Foundation presents Stephen Schaub: Recent Works
In Stephen Schaub's monumental artwork, rather than experiencing a literal place or a linear story, viewers encounter something akin to the fragmentation of a memory or the illogic of a dream. The images may be evocative, lyrical, and -- at times -- haunting.

In the creation of the negative, overlapping frames and multiple-exposures are used to evoke an almost cinematic sense of time and motion. Images are printed using handmade surfaces such a Amate paper from Mexico, and Kinwashi paper from Japan. Schaub is interested in the way these historic materials may merge with content and vice versa, surface and imagery blending into one, each informing the other. Because each artwork is created in this fashion, these places exist nowhere so much as they do within the mind of the viewer.

Mon - Fri 10am - 5pm
Sat by appt.

Louis & Susan Meisel Gallery, Bldg. 13
The Artist Book Foundation
1327 Mass MoCA Way
North Adams, MA
Exhibit New England
November 10, 2018 -
May 27, 2019
Frank E. Schoonover: American Visions
Frank E. Schoonover’s (1877-1972) legendary adventure paintings were inspired by the belief that artists should live what they paint—an adage often repeated by his noted teacher, illustrator Howard Pyle, and absorbed by his fellow student and friend, N.C. Wyeth. This exhibition will explore the breadth of this important Golden Age artist’s career, beginning with Schoonover’s art school experiences as a student in Pyle’s classes at the newly founded Drexel Institute of Art, Science, and Industry in Philadelphia, beginning in 1896, and his time at the Chadds Ford Summer School in 1899, where he honed his skills among other gifted Pyle pupils. The artist’s historical book illustrations and dramatically staged adventure paintings will illuminate the depth of his own wanderlust. Schoonover made daring excursions to Canada and Alaska—during one such trip, in 1903, he traveled 1,200 miles almost entirely by snowshoe, dogsled, and canoe.

He lived among the Blackfeet Indians of the northern plains, and with Alaskan Eskimos to experience, first-hand, the world portrayed in Jack London’s To Build a Fire, a short story about a protagonist who ventures out in the sub-zero tundras of the Yukon Territory accompanied only by his dog. The artist’s wilderness experiences would inspire his art throughout his career, making authentic portrayals of the far reaches of America possible.

The exhibition will feature Schoonover’s paintings for such classic stories as Kidnapped, Robinson Crusoe, Swiss Family Robinson, and Ivanhoe, as well as illustrations for the novels of Zane Grey, which included Open Range, Avalanche, Rustlers of Silver Ridge, and Valley of Wild Horses, among others. During his long career, he illustrated more than two hundred books, and created memorable portrayals of Clarence Edward Mulford’s Hopalong Cassidy to the delight of the character’s many ardent fans. Schoonover’s long teaching career will also be examined, as will his role in establishing the Delaware Art Museum and obtaining seminal Pyle works for its collection. Eighty original paintings, drawings, and studies will be on view, as will archival photographs and examples of the artist’s daybooks and personal effects.

Open 7 days a week year-round
Weekdays: 10am - 4pm
Weekends & holidays: 10am - 5pm

Members: FREE
Kids 18 and under FREE
Adults $20
Seniors (65+): $18
Veterans: $17
College students with ID: $10

Norman Rockwell Museum
9 Route 183
Stockbridge, MA
Exhibit New England
November 11, 2018 -
February 03, 2019
Graphic Revolution: American Prints 1960 to Now
Graphic Revolution: American Prints 1960 to Now examines the transformational decade of the 1960s through the early 21st century, and the emergence of the creative synergies between the artists, publishers, printers, dealers, and collectors who have been critical to the development of American art during that time.

The explosion of printmaking activity that began in the United States in the 1960s stands out for the radical spirit of exploration and experimentation that amplified the possibilities of contemporary art. Often in collaboration with technically proficient and market-savvy printers and publishers, artists have long been reimagining what a print can be and using printmaking to push the boundaries of historical and popular imagery by engaging with contemporary issues and new technologies. The inventive options an artist has to choose from today range from the hand-made to the digital, from two-dimensional prints to books and multi-media objects.

Drawing from the Saint Louis Art Museum’s notable collection of post–World War II American prints and the holdings of private collections in St. Louis, the exhibition features more than 110 works by a diverse group of artists whose visual imagery helped define the spirit of their time. Notable highlights include works by Andy Warhol, Robert Rauschenberg, Louise Bourgeois, Bruce Conner, Barbara Kruger, Luis Jimenez, Edgar Heap of Birds, Julie Mehretu, and many more. Together, these individuals established a fertile setting for artists of diverse perspectives to make new work, examples of which are put into dialogue with each other throughout the exhibition.

EXPLORE LAB
Don’t miss the Graphic Revolution hands-on gallery midway through the exhibition. Browse popular magazines from the 1960s-2000s, explore a decade-by-decade timeline featuring key artworks and notable world events, and add your own personal event to the timeline.

Tue – Sun 10am – 5pm
Fri 10am – 9pm
Mon CLOSED

Members always free.
Adults: $14
Seniors & Students: $12
Children (6-12): $6
Children (5 & under): Free; ticket required
Free on Fridays: Subject to availability

Main Exhibition Galleries, East Building
Saint Louis Art Museum
One Fine Arts Drive
Forest Park
Saint Louis, MO
Exhibit Midwest
November 12, 2018 -
June 30, 2020
Magnificent Obsessions
The impulse to collect is human. We collect for many reasons: to gather information about the world, to preserve the past, or to follow our interests and desires. For some, it is a lifelong pursuit.

Pioneering collectors have long shaped Smithsonian Libraries. Each had their own unique passions, from hot-air balloons to seashells, from Japanese prints to world’s fairs. Together, these diverse collections form a vast network of knowledge.

Smithsonian Libraries continues to build upon the work of these curious collectors. We preserve historic treasures and everyday items to provide a window onto the past. We seek out new sources and collections to advance research and scholarship. And we share our collections with the world to inspire curiosity and spark new ideas. Like a modern day cabinet of curiosity, Smithsonian Libraries collections span eras and disciplines, enabling discovery, inspiring creativity, and illuminating history.

Our collections are living and breathing. What will we collect next?

10am - 5:30pm
(summer hours may vary)

Smithsonian Libraries Exhibition Gallery
Smithsonian National Museum of
American History
14th Street & Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 17, 2018 -
February 17, 2019
Winslow Homer: Photography & the Art of Painting
A little-recognized aspect of the work of Winslow Homer—one of America’s most iconic artists—is the relationship between his painting and photography, and the role of the relatively new medium on his approach to image making. In 2014, the Bowdoin College Museum of Art (BCMA) was given an English-made camera that once belonged to Winslow Homer. This object was a catalyst for Winslow Homer: Photography and the Art of Painting.

Winslow Homer: Photography and the Art of Painting will examine the roles photography played in Homer’s evolving artistic practice. As a young artist for Harper’s Weekly during the Civil War, Homer utilized photographs as source material for some of his drawings. Alexander Gardner’s famous photograph of Lincoln’s first inauguration, for example, provided Homer with the pictorial information he needed to construct his own detailed view of the event. For his Civil War paintings, such as Sharpshooter (oil on canvas, 1863), graphic war photography helped him to think more deeply about what he’d seen, and about how to combine personal sight and engagement with a wide range of sources for composition development.

After the Civil War, Homer traveled to locations in the eastern United States that were becoming popular as tourist destinations--the White Mountains of New Hampshire, the Catskills and Adirondacks of New York, and Cape Ann in Massachusetts. He was introduced to a new type of photography—imagery to promote tourism. These images captured a moment in time and effects like glare, blur and shadow that the eye might not perceive. The strikingly sunlit wagon-wheel spokes Homer painted in The White Mountain Wagon (oil on panel, ca. 1869), for example, suggest that he understood that photographic images could provide fresh, immediate perspectives that he could incorporate into his paintings.

During the last three decades of his life, he often created compositions of the same subject in different mediums including printmaking and photography, a cross-fertilization that came from his long interest in probing the way things look and the challenge of portraying them realistically. To paint The Artist’s Studio in an Afternoon’s Fog (oil on canvas, 1894), Homer borrowed certain elements—the cropping, the blur of the background, and the flatness of the composition—from photographic views of his studio, yet the painting, based on a unique optical experience, is an artistic creation reflective of myriad decisions. To Homer, paintings had the potential to make a subject more clearly understood than by sight alone and photography could complement and expand his desire to accurately depict what he saw.

Throughout his career, Homer was conscious of the public persona he projected through photographs of himself. The exhibition also considers a series of portrait photographs by Bautain Studio, Napoleon Saroney, Peter Juley and others which served to illustrate the artist’s increasingly growing reputation.

Winslow Homer: Photography and the Art of Painting is drawn from the BCMA’s incomparable holdings of Homer’s art and archival materials, and from more than twenty major lending institutions, including the Addison Gallery of American Art, the Cooper Hewitt National Design Museum, the New Britain Museum of American Art, the Portland Museum of Art, and the Wadsworth Atheneum. The exhibition will feature approximately fifty photographs created or collected by Homer and approximately fifty paintings, prints, watercolors, and drawings from all major periods of the artist’s career. A selection of the artist’s Civil War-themed images and work from his activity in the Adirondacks, England and Prout’s Neck will be considered in relation to Homer’s interaction with photography. A catalogue published by Yale University Press will accompany the exhibition.

Open daily 9:30am – 5pm

$18 adults
$15 seniors (65+)
$6 students with ID & children ages 6-18
Free for children ages five & under & members of the Brandywine Conservancy & Museum of Art

Brandywine River Museum of Art
1 Hoffman's Mill Road
Chadds Ford, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 17, 2018 -
March 24, 2019
Fernand Leger's Cirque & the Livre D’Artiste
Published in Paris in 1950, Cirque was a collaboration between French modernist painter Fernand Léger and book publisher Tériade. It is one in a series of twenty-seven such projects conceived by the publisher between 1943 and 1975. Known as livres d’artiste, these finely printed, large-format books pair handwritten text with original artwork from some of the twentieth century’s most prominent artists. Cirque represents a small subset within this genre, a specialty of Tériade’s, which brings together original images and an original text, both the work of Léger. The project serves as a visual and poetic summary of Léger’s interest in the circus as a venue of entertainment and freedom, as well as a reflection by the artist near the end of his life on the themes that occupied his career.

Wed - Sun 11am - 5pm
Wed Open until 8pm

Museum Members FREE
Adults $5
Seniors (62+) $3
K-12 (18 & under) FREE
University/College students FREE
UO Faculty/Staff FREE

Jordan Schnitzer Museum of Art
University of Oregon
1430 Johnson Lane
Eugene, OR
Exhibit West
November 21, 2018 -
February 02, 2019
A City for Corduroy Don Freeman's New York
The New York work of an artist who created a children's classic.

The adventures of Corduroy, the stuffed bear in green overalls, have been delighting children and adults for half a century—ever since Don Freeman’s children’s classic was published in 1968. But few know about Freeman’s long career as an artist who documented New York. A City for Corduroy: Don Freeman’s New York presents the gamut of Freeman’s New York work, from his lively and humane depictions of ordinary New Yorkers and the city in the 1930s, to his illustrated scenes of the Broadway backstage, to his children’s books inspired by the city, including not just the Corduroy books but also Pet at the Met and Hattie the Backstage Bat. The exhibition features drawings, paintings, publications, and prints, as well as the artist’s original studies and sketches of Corduroy and other characters.

Open Daily 10am – 6pm

Museum of the City of New York
1220 Fifth Avenue (at 103rd Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 26, 2018 -
March 17, 2019
Cats on the Page
Cats and their capers are celebrated in rhymes and stories familiar to us from childhood. Whether raising a smile, solving a crime, wreaking magical havoc or even performing in theatre, cats take centre stage in this free exhibition.

Exuberant and playful? Or more mysterious and threatening? Cats come to life in books, manuscripts and artwork to captivate and inspire. Renew your acquaintance with familiar favourites including Mog, Winnie and Wilbur, and T S Eliot’s Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats, while meeting some new friends from around the world. As they prowl the pages, these feline characters are sure to delight all ages – and especially anyone who loves cats!

An unmissable offering for families, the exhibition features a reading corner complete with books, a family trail and sound recordings.

9:30am - 5pm

Free admission

Entrance Hall
The British Library
96 Euston Road
London, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
November 29, 2018 -
August 04, 2019
Reimagining Captain Cook Pacific perspectives
250 years ago James Cook left England on the first of three expeditions to the Pacific Ocean. A skilful navigator, he visited many places new to Europeans and his voyage accounts were widely read and celebrated. Today, his legacy is sometimes debated. In the Pacific, Islanders continue to remember the encounters that occurred, reimagining them in artworks which reflect on their impact.

This exhibition explores these Pacific perspectives and displays the work of contemporary Pacific artists, alongside objects collected on the voyages themselves. Michel Tuffery’s powerful painting Cookie in the Cook Islands, imagines how Cook might have been transformed by his Pacific experiences. Lisa Reihana’s Taking Possession, Lono, shows Captain Cook and his men about to hoist the British flag on a Polynesian island, raising questions about what each group might have understood by the idea of ‘taking possession’. An imposing Tahitian costume worn at ceremonies to mark the death of a chief, is on display for the first time in many decades. Collected on Cook’s second voyage and one of only a handful still in existence, it has been extensively conserved.

As commemorations abound on this major anniversary, this exhibition considers some of the complexities of Cook’s legacy in the Pacific, from New Zealand to Vanuatu and from Australia to the islands of Hawaii.

Open daily 10.00 – 17.30
Fridays: open until 20.30*
* except Good Friday

Please note: the gallery will be closed to the public on April 10th, 2019

Free admission

Room 91
The British Museum
Great Russell Street
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
November 30, 2018 -
February 02, 2019
Ansel Adams: Landscapes of the American West
One of the most famous photographers of all time, Ansel Adams is particularly renowned for his striking images of the American wilderness. Adams placed great value upon technical mastery of his craft, carefully evaluating gradations of light in the image, manipulating degree of exposure, and constantly experimenting with new techniques. Along with contemporaries Imogen Cunningham and Edward Weston, Adams founded the group f/64, devoted to what they termed "straight photography," as opposed to staged or embellished images. Adams was also pivotal in the establishment of the Department of Photography at the Museum of Modern Art.

Mon - Fri 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 5pm

Atlas Gallery
49 Dorset Street
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
December 01, 2018 -
March 03, 2019
Pressed for Time: Botanical Collecting as Genteel Pastime or Scientific Pursuit?
The exhibition explores the hobby and profession of plant collecting around the turn of the nineteenth century. Starting in the 1820s, botanical collecting became a hugely popular outdoor activity for both amateurs and professionals. Plant collecting was an acceptable activity for women, children, and gentlemen alike.

For decades, amateurs and academics respected each other as colleagues, publishing articles in the same journals, exchanging specimens, and considered one another peers. But by 1900, a divide developed between the two camps that fractured the former collaborative spirit.

As botanists moved toward academic and scholarly work, local clubs of amateur enthusiasts carried on the tradition of collecting and pressing plants as a hobby. Highlighting amateur collectors in Connecticut from 1885 – 1944, this exhibition presents beautiful and fragile historical herbarium specimens.

These pressed and dried plants were carefully mounted on paper sheets for both study and pleasure. The process preserved valuable biological information, making these artful arrangements useful for decades after collection.

Examples of specimens from seven different collectors help to illustrate the diverse personalities who collected and preserved the local flora. Some collected for purely scientific reasons; others to enjoy like-minded company and relaxing walks in nature.

Today, these striking specimens are often admired for their aesthetics. While framed antique herbarium sheets are now popular home décor, this trend disassociates them from scientific use.

Many of these antique pressings are still beneficial to science by providing information such as distribution through time and the effects of climate change, habitat destruction, and invasive species. Historical and modern botanical specimens can also provide genetic material for taxonomic research, allow for investigation of past chemical usage, and aid in teaching plant identifications.

“What we hope visitors will learn from this exhibition is that the era during which these botanical specimens were collected was a moment in time that can never be recreated,” says Timothy Walsh, Collections Manager and the Curator of the exhibition. “Leisure time abounded, distractions were fewer, and people had a closer relationship with the natural world. Fortunately, we have these marvelous records from days past to learn from and to enjoy.”

Pressed for Time draws primarily from the Museum’s own collections, but also includes specimens generously on loan from the Wilton Garden Club and Greenwich Historical Society.

Tue - Sun 10am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

Doors close 1/2 hour before closing, & last admission 4:30pm

Bantle Lecture Gallery
Bruce Museum
1 Museum Drive
Greenwich, CT
Exhibit New England
December 07, 2018 -
February 02, 2019
French Book Arts: Manuscripts, Books, Bindings, Prints, & Documents, 12th–21st Century, from the Collections of the Grolier Club
The first public exhibition of the 135th season celebrates a thousand years of French Book Arts, simultaneously launching the Grolier Club’s dramatically renovated main exhibition hall.

The Grolier Club has maintained a strong Francophile tradition since its founding in 1884, beginning with its name. The Grolier Club was named for Jean Grolier, the Renaissance collector who was renowned for his patronage of scholars and printers, for the magnificent bindings he commissioned, and for a generous habit of sharing his library with friends.

Drawn from the Grolier’s permanent collections, the objects on display range from a magnificent 12th-century manuscript of Gregory the Great’s commentary on Job to recent artists’ books and designer bookbindings. Highlights include manuscript and printed illuminated Books of Hours, early printed books, bindings from seven centuries, a letter from Jefferson to his Parisian bookseller, portrait prints of the great and the good, commemorative medals, and documents. Our patron saint, Jean Grolier, the “Prince of Bibliophiles,” is honored with five of his books and three documents. The libraries of such important figures as Madame Pompadour, Marie Antoinette, Count Hoym, Jean-Baptiste Colbert, and Adolf Hitler are represented.

Mon – Sat 10am - 5pm

Free & open to the public

Ground floor Gallery
The Grolier Club
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
December 08, 2018 -
March 17, 2019
El Grabado: Contemporary Cuban Printmaking
This exhibition presents over 70 prints by thirty-three Cuban artists who have all worked, at one time or another, at the Taller Experimental de Gráfica de Habana – the oldest, continuously running print workshop in Cuba. The Taller was established in 1962 by muralist Orlando Suarez with the help of Che Guevara, who was then Cuba’s Minister of Industry. From its inception, the workshop has focused on connecting artists with traditional printmaking techniques and fostering a dynamic artistic community based on the sharing and exchange of ideas, experimentation, and art criticism. This supportive community has allowed Cuban artists a relative freedom of expression, even amid the country’s larger political and cultural issues. It continues to be one of the most important workshops in Cuba.

Sun 1pm - 5pm
Mon Closed
Tue - Wed 10am - 6pm
Thu 10am - 8pm
Fri - Sat 10am - 6pm

Opening Reception:
Dec 7th 5:30pm - 7:00pm

Eldredge, Spratlen, and Armstrong Galleries
Springfield Art Museum
1111 E. Brookside Drive
Springfield, MO
Exhibit Midwest
December 11, 2018 -
April 28, 2019
Spectacular Mysteries: Renaissance Drawings Revealed
Comprising spectacular drawings from the Getty collection and rarely-seen works from private collections, this exhibition reveals the detective work involved in investigating master drawings. Many Italian Renaissance drawings tell stories of their creation and the purposes they served, yet sometimes even the most seemingly simple question - who drew it? - is a mystery. Discover what we know and don't know, what we'd like to know, and what we may never discover about these intriguing works of art and their world.

10am – 5:30pm
Saty 10am – 9pm
Mon CLOSED

Free admission

Getty Center
J. Paul Getty Museum
1200 Getty Center Drive
N. Sepulveda Blvd. & Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
December 13, 2018 -
February 24, 2019
Ansel Adams in Our Time
Seeing Ansel Adams through a contemporary lens

“Ansel Adams in Our Time” traces the iconic visual legacy of Ansel Adams (1902–1984), presenting some of his most celebrated prints, from a symphonic view of snow-dusted peaks in The Tetons and Snake River, Grand Teton National Park, Wyoming (1942) to an aerial shot of a knotted roadway in Freeway Interchange, Los Angeles (1967). The exhibition looks both backward and forward in time: his black-and-white photographs are displayed alongside prints by several of the 19th-century government survey photographers who greatly influenced Adams, as well as work by contemporary artists whose modern-day concerns centered on the environment, land rights, and the use and misuse of natural resources point directly to Adams’ legacy.

While crafting his own modernist vision, Adams was inspired by precursors in government survey and expedition photography such as Carleton Watkins (1829–1916), Eadweard Muybridge (1830–1904), Timothy O’Sullivan (1840-1882) and Frank Jay Haynes (1853–1921), who worked with large bulky cameras and glass-plate negatives and set off into the wilderness carrying their equipment on mules. In some cases, Adams replicated their exact views of the Yosemite Valley, Canyon de Chelly, and Yellowstone, producing images that would become emblematic of the country’s national parks. In Clearing Winter Storm, Yosemite National Park (about 1937), pictured above, the granite crags of the Yosemite Valley are wreathed in clouds after a sudden storm. Executed with unrivaled sensitivity and rigorous exactitude, the artist’s photographs popularized the notion that the American West was a pristine, and largely uninhabited, wilderness.

“Ansel Adams in Our Time” also brings Adams forward in time, juxtaposing his work with that of contemporary artists such as Mark Klett (born 1962), Trevor Paglen (born 1974), Catherine Opie (born 1961), Abelardo Morell (born 1948), Victoria Sambunaris (born 1964), and Binh Danh (born 1977). The more than 20 present-day photographers in the exhibition have not only been drawn to some of the same locations, but also engaged with many of the themes central to Adams’ legacy: desert and wilderness spaces, Native Americans and the Southwest, and broader issues affecting the environment: logging, mining, drought and fire, booms and busts, development, and urban sprawl.

Adams’ stunning images were last on view at the MFA in a major exhibition in 2005; this new, even larger presentation places his work in the context of the 21st century, with all that implies about the role photography has played—and continues to play—in our changing perceptions of the land. The Adams photographs in the exhibition are drawn from the Lane Collection, one of the largest and most significant gifts in MFA history.

Mon – Tue 10am – 5pm
Wed – Fri 10am – 10pm
Sat & Sun 10am – 5pm

Member Preview Sep 16 - 21, 2018

Gallery LG31
Ann and Graham Gund Gallery
Avenue of the Arts
Museum of Fine Arts
465 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
December 14, 2018 -
March 15, 2019
Medical Marvels: Treasures from the Health Sciences Library
In 1929, the historical collection of the University of Otago’s Health Sciences (formerly Medical) Library was established with the donation of the famed Monro Collection. The some 450 volumes were owned by Alexander Monro, father (primus), son (secundus), and grandson (tertius), who were successively Professors of Anatomy at the University of Edinburgh, 1720-1846.

Wonderful though the Monro Collection is, it comprises but a fraction of the total Health Sciences Library’s Historical Collections, some 100,000 plus volumes. These include 18th, 19th, and 20th century books and manuscripts, as well as the unique Preventive Medicine Dissertations.

This exhibition, Medical Marvels, highlights treasures from this Historical Collection, from pharmacy and phrenology, to dentistry and disease. Of particular note is the anatomical flap book by Johann Remmelin, printed in Holland in 1667; a second edition of Andreas Vesalius’s The Fabric of the Body, printed in 1555; and Bernhard Albinus’s Tables of the Skeleton and Muscles of the Human Body, printed in 1746. Other noteworthy items include works by medicos Edward Jenner, John Hunter, Francis Glisson, Thomas Willis, and William Smellie. For those interested in the history of medicine, the exhibition is a feast.

This exhibition reflects scholarly engagement. Many of the books have been chosen by University of Otago academic staff, students, and librarians, who have used the books for their own research.

We are particularly indebted to Professor Terence Doyle, Department of Medicine, and Professor Barbara Brookes, History Department. The first is an avid user of the historical collection; the second highlighted the importance of the Preventive Medicine dissertations.

Mon - Fri 8:30am - 5:pm

Special Collections, de Beer Gallery, 1st floor
Central University Library
Information Services Bldg.
University of Otago
65 Albany Street
Dunedin, NEW ZEALAND
Exhibit International
December 14, 2018 -
February 03, 2019
raw
MCBA’s Artist Cooperative annual exhibition, raw: a journey of discovery from material to realization. This exhibition explores the intersection of ideas, objects, and emotions, featuring work by 11 co-op members: Wendy Fernstrum, Georgia A. Greeley, Marvel Grégoire, Karen Kinoshita, Monica Edwards Larson, Raven Miller, Paul Nylander, Bridget O’Malley, S. Quire, CB Sherlock, and Emily Umentum. Artistic methods represented include handmade lace paper, photogravure prints, monotype, intaglio, chapbooks, experimental books, and broadsides.

Opening Reception:
Thu, Jan 10th 6pm - 8pm

Mon – Sat 9:30am - 6:30pm
Tue 9:30am - 9pm
Sun noon - 4pm

Free & open to the public

Open Book building, 1st floor
Minnesota Center for Book Arts
1011 Washington Avenue S., Suite 100
Minneapolis, MN
Exhibit Midwest
December 14, 2018 -
May 20, 2019
Monuments of Early Greek Printing
An exhibition of some of the earliest and most important publications printed in Greek.

The influence of Greek language and literature on modern culture is as profound as it is underappreciated. The widespread use of Latin throughout much of European history tends to obscure the Greek origins of seminal literature, but much of the scripture, history, and mythology with which people are familiar today originated in Greek texts.

Many landmark Greek publications from the early decades of printing today reside in North Texas, including the first printings in Greek of the New Testament, Homer, and Aristotle. This exhibition offers a glimpse into the richness and significance of materials accessible for study and appreciation at Bridwell Library Special Collections.

Entry Hall
Bridwell Library at Perkins School of Theology
Southern Methodist University
6425 Boaz Lane
Dallas, TX
Exhibit Southwest
January 15 -
May 17, 2019
THE BOOK AS PLACE: VISIONS OF THE BUILT ENVIRONMENT
This exhibition of artists' books centers on ideas about the built environment and has been curated by Berkeley based book artist Julie Chen for UC Berkeley’s Environmental Design Library. Featuring works by 25 artists including Robbin Ami Silverberg, Clifton Meador, Inge Bruggeman, Karen Kunc, Sarah Bryant and Barbara Tetenbaum, the exhibition explores the built environment through text, image, materials and the architectural capabilities of book structures.

1pm - 5pm

Raymond Lifchez and Judith Lee Stronach Exhibition Cases
Volkmann Reading Room
Environmental Design Library
University of California
210 Wurster Hall
Berkeley, CA
Exhibit West
January 16 -
February 23, 2019
Two American Poets: Wallace Stevens and William Carlos Williams, from the collection of Alan Klein
Illuminating the parallel and overlapping careers and relationships of Wallace Stevens and William Carlos Williams, the exhibition juxtaposes the two poets with unique material on view for the first time. It provides a remarkable opportunity to better understand the overlapping careers of Stevens and Williams, their development as poets, the progression of their reputations and the development of American modernism.

Wallace Stevens and William Carlos Williams are widely recognized as two of the towering giants of mid-twentieth-century American poetry, but are rarely thought of together despite their mutual admiration and personal relationship spanning over forty years. Almost exact contemporaries, they met in New York in 1914 at a formative point in their development as poets. These collections of Stevens and Williams – about 250 items assembled over the past twenty years – include fascinating and unique items ranging from each of Stevens’s and Williams’s school days in the 1890s throughout their lives until shortly before Williams’s death in 1963.

Mon – Sat 10am - 5pm

Free & open to the public

2nd floor Gallery
The Grolier Club
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 17 -
February 02, 2019
HOLY HOAXES: A BEAUTIFUL DECEPTION. CELEBRATING WILLIAM VOELKLE'S COLLECTING
William Voelkle, Curator Emeritus of Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts at the Morgan Library and Museum, retired in September after fifty years at this illustrious institution. The present exhibition celebrates one of "Bill's" life-long passions - the collection of fakes and forgeries he assembled over nearly five decades. His role in establishing the fame of the Spanish Forger is well-known from the 1978 exhibition (and monograph) on this artist at the Morgan, making the Spanish Forger one of the only forgers in history to benefit from a one-man show at a major museum.

Works exhibited are widely diverse. In addition to the Spanish Forger, they include illuminations sold as "real" but unmasked as fakes by Bill or other of his art-historian colleagues. One such is a majestic Romanesque leaf of Christ in Majesty. There are German panel paintings, Coptic leaves once regarded as the earliest Coptic manuscript with notation (now known to be fake); Italian, French, and Flemish forgeries; Indian (by the Erotica Master), Islamic, and Mexican forgeries. The exhibition will consider the sometimes-fine line between copies and forgeries.

NOTHING IS FOR SALE (WHAT PRICE CAN ONE PUT ON A "BEAUTIFUL DECEPTION"!)

Tue - Sat 10am - 6pm

Special Events:
January 20, January 23, and January 26.
(topics and times to be announced)

Les Enluminures - New York
23 East 73rd Street, 7th floor
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 17 -
May 23, 2019
Instruction and Delight: Children’s Games from the Ellen and Arthur Liman Collection
By the beginning of the eighteenth century in Britain, parents and teachers had begun to wholeheartedly embrace a suggestion from the philosopher John Locke (1632–1704) that “Learning might be made a Play and Recreation to Children.” The material culture of this period and the subsequent generation reveal a significant shift in thinking, as adults found fresh value in childhood and in play for its own sake. British publishers leapt at the chance to design books and games for both instruction and delight. This small display will celebrate the recent gift of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century children’s games and books to the Center by Ellen and Arthur Liman, Yale JD 1957.

Tue 10am – 5pm
Wed 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 5pm
Fri 10am – 5pm
Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun noon – 5pm
Mon CLOSED

Free admission

Yale Center for British Art
1080 Chapel Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
January 18 -
April 21, 2019
Bibliomania; or Book Madness: A Bibliographical Romance
This exhibition takes its name from the history of “arrant book-lovers” written by Thomas Frognall Dibdin in 1842. It follows these lovers of the book through four case studies, observing the powerful and often unexpected relationships of books with their readers, owners, authors, collectors, and creators.

Every Book in the World! explores the passionate collecting and printing history of the legendary nineteenth-century bibliomaniac Thomas Phillipps, whose vast collection of manuscripts and early printed books filled an English country house and required more than a century of public auctions and sales to disperse.

Collated & Perfect, organized in conjunction with the Harry Ransom Center, University of Texas, Austin, traces the history of the collation statement and the obsession with finding a more perfect text, from eighteenth-century book collector Thomas Rawlinson through Charlton Hinman, editor of the first folio edition of Shakespeare’s plays (1968).

Habits Ancient and Modern: Surface and Depth in the Pillone Library Volumes traces the history of the library assembled by Antonio and Odorico Pillone in Italy in the sixteenth century, and Odorico’s decision to have the fore-edges of many of these volumes painted by Cesare Vecellio, a distant cousin of Titian.

The Whole Art of Marbling explores the many-faceted art of paper marbling, drawing on some of the choicest examples in the Beinecke’s collection to illuminate the art’s history, techniques, patterns, and practitioners, from its origins in the East and advancement over the Silk Road to the European continent.

PANEL DISCUSSIONS:
January 23, panel discussion, 5 pm: Ann Rosalind Jones and Andrew Brown on the Pillone Library

February 5, panel discussion, 5 pm: Perfect: Thinking about the Ideal Copy, with exhibition curators Kathryn James and Aaron T. Pratt, with Peter Stallybrass and David Scott Kastan

LECTURES:
February 6, lecture, 5 pm; opening reception, 6 pm: The Duc de Berry (1340-1416) and the Origins of Bibliomania, by Christopher de Hamel, author of Meetings with Remarkable Manuscripts

February 7, lecture, 5 pm: Sir Thomas and I: A Poor Comparison, by Toshiyuki Takamiya, Professor Emeritus, Keio University

March 27, lecture, 5 pm: Sidney Berger on paper marbling

April 10, lecture, 5 pm: The Painted Book: Cesare Vecellio and the Pillone Library, by Andrew Brown

Mon 10am - 7pm
Tue - Thu 9am - 7pm
Fri 9am - 5pm
Sat (Exhibitions only) 12pm - 5pm
Sun (Exhibitions only) 12pm - 4pm

Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library
121 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
January 18 -
April 06, 2019
The Life, Writings, and Influence of Herman Melville, Author of Moby-Dick
For the 200th anniversary of Herman Melville’s birth, this exhibition will highlight the many facets of his work, illustrating how he has been perceived and repurposed over the past 200 years.

Drawing on the Newberry’s huge collection of Melville’s works, gathered during the work of editing the definitive 15-volume Northwestern-Newberry Edition of The Writings of Herman Melville, the exhibition will invite viewers to explore Melville’s interests in democracy, spirituality, Indigeneity, morality, sexuality, labor, nature, and human consciousness. It will contextualize his works as the product of a period of spectacular growth, rapid change, horrifying trauma, and grave injustice in the United States, and also demonstrate the ways his work continues to resonate for artists and writers today.

Mon, Fri & Sat 8:15am – 5pm
Tue - Thu 8:15am – 7:30pm
Sun CLOSED

Free and open to the public

Roger J. Trienens Galleries
The Newberry 60 West Walton Street
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
January 18 -
March 30, 2019
Politics of Place
From the mechanisms of colonialism, to intractable wars, displacement has become a catalyst to a contemporary discourse surrounding belonging, homeland and nationhood. Politics of Place highlights artist books, mainly from Australia and North America, both new world territories that share parallel histories, to explore the longstanding issues centered in indigeneity, enslavement, conflict-caused immigration. These issues reflect the undercurrent of political motives and decisions often decentering and ignoring the voices of those displaced.

Artists and Authors include: Sue Anderson, Julie Barratt, Aileen Bassis, Neda, Parastoo and Maryam Bahrami, Doug Beube, Tia Blassingame, Bonney Djuric, Jas Duke, Noga Freiberg, Colette Fu, Anne Gilman, Parra Girls, Adam Golfer, Lyall Harris, Gwen Harrison, Claudia, Heinermann, Michal Iwanowski, Murtaza Ali Jafari, Ann Kalmbach, Tatana Kellner, Peter Rutledge Koch, Taller Lenateros, Jason Lujan, Peter Lyssiotis, Clyde McGill, Vivienne Mehes, Gideon Mendel, Mohammed , Tammy Nguyen, Iviva Olenick, Lefteris Olympios, Fakhruddin Rajai, Madina and Yalda Sayer, Indre, Michael Serpytyte, Patricia Silva, Anne Twigg, Juana Valdes, Judy Watson, Philip Zimmermann, Debra Magpie Earling, Lily Hibberd Dominique Malaquais, Paul Mason and Sonya Winterber.

Mon - Fri 11am - 6pm
Sat 10am - 5pm

Meet the artists and curators at the opening reception on January 18th at 6:30pm, and the Roundtable discussions on January 25 and February 28, 2019 at 6:30pm.

The Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 19 -
March 31, 2019
First Chefs: Fame and Foodways from Britain to the Americas
Just like today, getting food from farm to table in the early modern British world was hard work. And just like today, most of that hard work went unrecognized.

First Chefs tells the stories of the named and unnamed heroes of early modern food culture, and juxtaposes the extravagance of an increasingly cosmopolitan and wealthy upper class against the human cost of its pleasures: the millions of enslaved women, children, and men, servants, gardeners, street criers, and laborers who toiled to feed themselves and many others.

First Chefs combines the Folger's unparalleled collection of food-related manuscripts and books with objects and archaeological finds from George Washington’s Mount Vernon, Preservation Virginia's Jamestown Rediscovery Foundation, the Winterthur Museum, Garden, and Library, the Library of Congress, and the Frontier Culture Museum.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun noon – 5pm

Free admission

Folger Shakespeare Library
201 E. Capitol Street SE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 19 -
February 17, 2019
Thinking inside the box
A display of boxes, bags, and satchels used for carrying books at different times and places – inspired by the Bodleian's recent acquisition of a book-coffer from fifteenth century medieval Paris.

Mon - Fri 8.30am - 5pm
Sat 9am - 5pm
Sun 11am - 5pm

Free admission


MORE EVENTS:

Feb 2nd: Thinking inside the box - activity day
Precious books need protection, particularly in transit, so intricate - or robustly practical - boxes were created to carry books across cultures. This activity day showcases a mysterious medieval box recently purchased by the Bodleian with the support of the Art Fund.

Meet expert curators and find out more about some of the unusual boxes, satchels, and wrappings that cocoon the Bodleian's books. Explore the cutting-edge technology behind creating modern boxes for library and museum objects, watch an artist demonstrate the technique of traditional wood engraving, and create your own miniature matchbox book.

Blackwell Hall
Weston Library
Broad Street
Oxford, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
January 25 -
May 12, 2019
Tolkien: Maker of Middle-earth
“In a hole in the ground there lived a hobbit.” With these words the Oxford professor J.R.R. Tolkien ignited a fervid spark in generations of readers. From the children’s classic The Hobbit to the epic The Lord of the Rings, Tolkien’s adventurous tales of hobbits and elves, dwarves and wizards have introduced millions to the rich history of Middle-earth. Going beyond literature, Tolkien’s Middle-earth is a world complete with its own languages and histories. Tolkien: Maker of Middle-earth celebrates the man and his creation. The exhibition will be the most extensive public display of original Tolkien material for several generations. Drawn from the collections of the Tolkien Archive at the Bodleian Library (Oxford), Marquette University Libraries (Milwaukee), the Morgan, and private lenders, the exhibition will include family photographs and memorabilia, Tolkien’s original illustrations, maps, draft manuscripts, and designs related to The Hobbit, The Lord of the Rings, and The Silmarillion.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 26 -
February 02, 2019
Masters Drawings New York
Established in 2006, Masters Drawings New York (MDNY) is the pre-eminent event for exhibiting and celebrating old master through contemporary drawings in the United States. Dealers from the United States and Europe showcase their highest quality drawings.

Scheduled for the last week of January, the event coincides with the major Old Master auctions and scholarly events focused on drawings. It is a week dedicated to historic art, where collectors, scholars, museum curators and dealers travel to New York from around the world to view artwork and participate in the events around the city.

Daily 11am - 6pm
Sun, Jan 27th 2pm - 6pm

Preview day: Fri, Jan 25th 4pm - 8pm

Galleries along Madison Avenue on
the Upper East Side
Manhattan, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 26 -
July 21, 2019
Caravans of Gold, Fragments in Time: Art, Culture, and Exchange across Medieval Saharan Africa
Journey to a medieval world with Africa at its center.

Travel with the Block Museum along routes crossing the Sahara Desert to a time when West African gold fueled expansive trade and drove the movement of people, culture, and religious beliefs.

Caravans of Gold is the first major exhibition addressing the scope of Saharan trade and the shared history of West Africa, the Middle East, North Africa, and Europe from the eighth to sixteenth centuries. Weaving stories about interconnected histories, the exhibition showcases the objects and ideas that connected at the crossroads of the medieval Sahara and celebrates West Africa’s historic and underrecognized global significance.

Caravans of Gold draws on recent archaeological discoveries, including rare fragments from major medieval African trading centers like Sijilmasa, Gao, and Tadmekka. These “fragments in time” are seen alongside works of art that invite us to imagine them as they once were. They are the starting point for a new understanding of the medieval past and for seeing the present in a new light.

Presenting more than 250 artworks spanning five centuries and a vast geographic expanse, the exhibition features unprecedented loans from partner institutions in Mali, Morocco, and Nigeria, many of which will be seen in North America for the first time.

The Block Museum exhibition will travel to The Aga Khan Museum in Toronto (Sept. 21, 2019 – Feb. 23, 2020) and then to the National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institute (April 8 – Nov. 29, 2020)

Tue, Sat, & Sun 10am - 5pm
Wed, Thu, & Fri 10am - 8pm
Mon CLOSED

Main Gallery
Block Museum of Art
Northwestern University
40 Arts Circle Drive
Evanston, IL
Exhibit Midwest
January 27 -
April 21, 2019
All Roads Lead to Rome: 20th-Century Tourism in Italy

For centuries Italy reigned as an essential stop for wealthy people taking the “Grand Tour.” In the wake of the 1922 Fascist Revolution, Benito Mussolini began promoting Italy as not merely a place to marvel over ancient Roman ruins, but also as an impressive testament to the achievements of the Fascist state. All Roads Lead to Rome presents material from The Wolfsonian’s library—including tourist brochures, menu covers, photographs, exhibition catalogs, chapter vignette proofs by the Futurist artist Fortunato Depero, and a unique watercolor sketch book by costume designer Albert Wainwright—that touted Italy as a travel destination to foreign and domestic tourists by offering visions of the glory of Rome, ancient and modern.

Mon, Tue, Thu, & Sat 10am – 6pm
Wed CLOSED
Fri 10am – 9pm (free 6pm – 9pm)
Sun noon – 6pm

Members: FREE
Adults: $12
Seniors, students with ID, & children 6–18: $8
Children under 6: FREE
Students, faculty, & staff of the State University System of Florida: FREE

The Wolfsonian–FIU
1001 Washington Avenue
Miami Beach, FL
Exhibit South
January 28 -
April 26, 2019
Nature on the Page: The Print and Manuscript Culture of Victorian Natural History
This exhibition, featuring materials from the Fisher's Victorian natural history collection. showcases both the collecting and manuscript practices of naturalists and how books - in some instances, encased the specimens themselves.

Fern-fever, orchidelirium, the seaweed craze: for Victorians, natural history was a pleasurable pursuit sometimes bordering on a psychological disorder. At more than a thousand volumes, the Fisher Library's Victorian natural history collection provides a unique opportunity to trace the ways in which the medium of print stimulated and sustained the nineteenth-century appetite for natural history. This exhibition showcases both the collecting and manuscript practices of naturalists and how books, in some instances, encased the specimens themselves. A special focus here is women practitioners of natural history -- as authors of and contributors to published works, and as artists and collectors. On display will be copies of some of the most popular natural history works of the day: J.G. Wood's Common Objects of the Country - and some of the most beautiful and rare: James Bateman's Orchidaceae of Mexico and Guatemala. Weighing more than 38 lbs, Bateman's work is considered the largest book published with lithographic plates.

Mon - Fri 9am - 5pm
Sat & Sun CLOSED

Thomas Fisher Rare Book Library
120 St. George Street
Toronto, ON, CANADA
Exhibit International
January 30 -
May 12, 2019
Monumental Journey: The Daguerreotypes of Girault de Prangey
The Daguerreotypes of Girault de Prangey will present masterpieces of early 19th-century photography by one of its unsung pioneers. A trailblazer of the newly invented daguerreotype process, Joseph-Philibert Girault de Prangey (1804–1892) traveled throughout the Eastern Mediterranean from 1842 to 1845, producing more than one thousand daguerreotypes—the largest known extant group from this period and the earliest surviving photographs of Greece, Egypt, Syria, Lebanon, Turkey, and Jerusalem, and among the first depicting Italy. Featuring approximately 120 of his daguerreotypes, supplemented by examples of his graphic work—watercolors, paintings, and his lithographically illustrated publications—the exhibition will be the first in the United States devoted to Girault, and the first to focus on his Mediterranean journey. Many of the sites depicted have been permanently altered by urban planning, climate change, or conflict.

Sun – Thu 10am – 5:30pm*
Fri & Sat 10am – 9pm*

*Galleries are cleared 15 minutes before closing.

Floor 2, The Charles Z. Offin Gallery, Karen B Cohen Gallery,
and Noel Levine Gallery, Galleries 691–693
The Met Fifth Avenue
1000 Fifth Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 30 -
August 30, 2019
Women Get the Vote: A Historic Look at the 19th Amendment
The legendary crusade for women's suffrage began in 1848 at a historic meeting in Seneca Falls, New York, and culminated in 1920 when the country ratified the Susan B. Anthony Amendment. It was a battle led by some of the most remarkable women of the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

Over the long span of the nineteenth century, growing numbers of women joined the suffrage movement, claiming basic rights for themselves and generations to come in the face of threats including mob violence, arrest, and imprisonment. Campaigns were marked by both successes and reverses, often intersecting with the abolitionist movement before and during the Civil War. Nevertheless, suffragists persisted until victory was theirs.

In Women Get the Vote, selections from the Library’s holdings bring to light the literature from a social and political revolution that reverberates down to the present day. Books, archival materials, and rare treasures on display include the early suffragist publication Votes for Women Broadside; Mary Wollstonecraft's 1792 A Vindication of the Rights of Woman, and the 1882 edition of History of Woman Suffrage, edited by Elizabeth Cady Stanton, Susan B. Anthony, and Matilda Joslyn Gage. Also featured are biographies of Alice Paul, the British suffragist Emmeline Pankhurst, and legendary abolitionists Frederick Douglass and Sojourner Truth.

Women Get the Vote also showcases the activities of two Library members engaged in the struggle: Mrs. John Winters Brannan, the daughter of newspaper editor Charles A. Dana, who was sentenced to imprisonment at the Occoquan Workhouse in Lorton, Virginia for picketing the White House, and Rosalie Gardiner Jones, known for her fiery views on women’s rights.

Mon & Fri 9am - 5pm
Tue, Wed & Thu 9am - 8pm
Sat & Sun 11am - 5pm

Reception: January 29th
And we're seeking members' loans for a one-night display. We encourage you to look in closets, cupboards, and attic trunks for suffrage memorabilia, including posters, banners, pins, books, photographs and letters. Blow off the dust and bring them to us.

2nd floor, The Peluso Family Exhibition Gallery
The New York Society Library
53 East 79th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 01 -
July 14, 2019
An Earthly Paradise: William Morris & The Thames
This new exhibition illustrates the rich and little-known story of William Morris’ deep connections to the Thames. We bring together a unique selection of works, with loans from the V&A, The William Morris Gallery, British Library, and many more. Highlights include Morris’ Thames series of textiles alongside his original hand-drawn designs, a signed copy of News from Nowhere, and his personal fishing tackle and spectacles. Materials from the Morris & Co. workshop illustrate the production process, while socialist pamphlets that Morris penned and published demonstrate his deep commitment to socialism in later life.

The influence of the Thames and its tributaries flowed through William Morris’ life and work. The river provided the setting for his leisure time spent angling and boating, inspiration for his designs and writing, and the ideal water conditions for the manufacture of his textiles. One notable Thames boat trip from his London home via Henley to his rural retreat in Oxfordshire was so moving that it inspired his socialist utopia novel, News from Nowhere.

Explore the Thames through Morris’ eyes: a beautiful retreat from urban excess and the capitalism he despised, a valuable resource continuing the river’s working heritage, and a rich source of creative inspiration. Step from the exhibition straight out onto the riverbank and find your own earthly paradise.

11am - 4pm

River & Rowing Museum
Mill Meadows
Henley on Thames
Oxfordshire, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
February 01 -
July 19, 2019
Gabriel García Márquez: The Magic of a Global Writer
In 1965, Gabriel García Márquez was a Colombian writer living in Mexico City and mostly unknown beyond Mexican and Colombian literary circles. For almost two decades he struggled to become a full-time fiction writer. In 1967, the publication of One Hundred Years of Solitude and its ensuing international success transformed its author into one of the most celebrated writers of the twentieth century. He was awarded the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1982.

Drawing primarily on the García Márquez Collection at the Ransom Center, the exhibition, comprising approximately 150 items including numerous documents never seen in public before, will explain to visitors how García Márquez became a literary star and a classic writer. Throughout his life, García Márquez repeatedly thanked his family and friends for their support. Woven throughout the exhibition, correspondence, photos, and videos, will illustrate how García Márquez's intimate circle supported his literary career.

Mon - Wed & Fri 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 7pm
Sat & Sun Noon – 5pm

Admission is free, but donations are encouraged

Harry Ransom Center
The University of Texas at Austin
300 West 21st Street (21st & Guadalupe Streets)
Austin, TX
Exhibit Southwest
February 02 -
June 30, 2019
Small Inventions: Artist’s Books by Charles Hobson
Small Inventions celebrates the Museums’ acquisition of 29 works by San Francisco artist Charles Hobson as a gift of collector Marian Kinney. Over the past three decades, Hobson has been a proponent of the book as a hybrid work of art and as a tool for visually communicating complex ideas. His process calls for expanding the definition of what can be called a book and devising a unique form for each volume in relation to its content. His books become physical embodiments of their textual concepts, engaging the reader as an active collaborator and transforming reading into a participatory rather than passive activity. The artist incorporates surprising physical objects into these books to illuminate unexpected relationships. About this exhibition, he says, “I’m hopeful that the viewer might see how much an artist’s book is conceived and driven to fruition by finding just the right invention.”

Tue – Sun 9:30am – 5:15pm

Legion of Honor museum
Lincoln Park
100 34th Avenue
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
February 02 -
May 04, 2019
Long Live the Book!
Celebrate the book in all its forms and formats!

Folded, stitched, stapled or glued: the book is alive and well in 2019, and so is bookbinding. Long Live the Book! samples contemporary bookbinding from the purely commercial to boldly artistic. While bookbinders still use many of the tools and processes from the Middle Ages, modern technology has added new materials and high-speed automation to the bookbinder’s workbench. Bookbinding changes, yet remains the same.

Tue - Sat 10am - 4pm

American Bookbinders Museum
355 Clementina Street
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
February 02 -
May 05, 2019
Hollar’s Encyclopedic Eye: Prints from the Frank Raysor Collection
One of the most prolific printmakers of the Baroque period, Wenceslaus Hollar (Bohemian, 1607–1677) rose up out of obscurity in one of Europe’s most turbulent eras to amass an astounding body of work. Underrated during his lifetime, Hollar produced up to 2,500 etchings in a prodigious 50-year career. The breadth and virtuosity of his works have inspired artists for centuries, and yet his name and profile are only now on the rise. Drawn exclusively from the Frank Raysor Collection, a promised gift to VMFA, this exhibition presents over 200 Hollar prints—remarkable for their range of subjects, stunning details, and rare visual records of 17th-century Europe.

Hollar lived through the Thirty Years’ War, the English Civil War, the Commonwealth, and the Restoration, and these events affected him personally and found their way into his art. He was at times Catholic and at times Protestant. He lived throughout Europe and even traveled to Tangier toward the end of his life. While he knew great fortune and received patronage from leading figures of the day, he died in poverty.

Born to a noble family, Hollar likely learned the rudiments of printmaking from court artist Aegidius Sadeler II. He soon began a lifelong practice of making copies after works by great artists such as Albrecht Dürer, Leonardo da Vinci, and others. Retained by Thomas Howard, Earl of Arundel and one of the finest connoisseurs of all time, Hollar gathered material for some of the epoch’s most accomplished topographical prints, most notably The Long View of Prague. In 1636, Hollar began producing fascinating scenes of modern life in allegorical guise as well as differing costumes of women, including a rare native Woman of Virginia. In Antwerp, Hollar created three series (Insects, Muffs, and Shells) that revealed his virtuosity as a master of etched illusion. Back in London, he etched scenes of the city before and after the Great Fire of 1666.

As one of the least known but one of the most prolific and “modern” artists of the Baroque period, Hollar is well represented in the Frank Raysor Collection, which rivals those held by the British Museum and the Queen’s Collection. The Raysor Collection, as a promised gift, makes VMFA one of the world’s five major Hollar repositories.

Daily: 10am – 5pm
Thu & Fri until 9pm

Free admission

Virginia Museum of Fine Arts (VMFA)
200 N. Blvd.
Richmond, VA
Exhibit South
February 03 -
March 24, 2019
The Printed World: Masterpieces of Seventeenth-Century Printmaking
The Baroque was an intensely exciting period in human history. Its art reflects new discoveries and ways of thinking about mankind’s relation to the expanding world, now comprising the Americas, and new tendencies in religious, philosophical, scientific and political thought. This focused but wide-ranging exhibition demonstrates the role the graphic arts played in disseminating and shaping the seventeenth-century worldview. Eleven thematic sections examine how both well-known artists such as Rembrandt but also lesser-known but equally vital names depicted such major subjects as portraits, landscapes and cityscapes, subjects from contemporary history and antiquity, as well as pure creations of the human imagination.

Selected from the Frank Raysor Collection and the Harnett Print Study Center Collection, the exhibition features works by more than thirty artists, such as Jan Both (Dutch, 1618-1652), Jacques Callot (French, 1592-1635), Stefano della Bella (Italian, 1610-1664), Hendrick Goudt (Dutch, 1583-1648), Wenceslaus Hollar (Bohemian, 1607-1677), Claude Lorrain (French, 1604-1682), and Jacob van Ruisdael (Dutch, 1628-1682).

Sun - Fri 1pm - 5pm

Free & open to the public

Joel & Lila Harnett Museum of Art
University of Richmond
410 Westhampton Way
Richmond, VA
Exhibit South
February 04 -
May 30, 2019
Legally Binding: Fine and Historic Bindings from the Yale Law Library
Many of the historic volumes in the Lillian Goldman Law Library are significant not only for their texts, but for their extraordinary bindings. Over thirty of these are featured in this exhibition; selected for their beauty, craftsmanship, functionality, and historical significance.

"These bookbindings tell stories about the people who owned them, read them, or sold them at some point in their long histories," write Laird and Widener. "The bindings reflect the time and place of their creation, and reveal attitudes about the legal texts they continue to protect. They also illustrate chapters in the history of book binding."

The examples date from the Middle Ages to the late nineteenth century, and from across Europe and the Americas. They include bindings prepared for students, lawyers, public officials, noblemen, wealthy magnates, a book collector, an Italian cardinal, a chained library in England, the tourist trade in China, the Queen Regent of Spain, the English diarist John Evelyn, and a palace of the Tsar of Russia.

"Legally Binding" is the latest in a series of exhibitions that examine law books as physical artifacts, and the relationships between their forms and content.

10am - 6pm daily
and open to Yale affiliates until 10pm

Rare Book Exhibition Gallery
Level L2 of the Yale Law School
Lillian Goldman Law Library
127 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
February 06 -
April 28, 2019
Woven Words: Decoding the Silk Book
Woven Words: Decoding the Silk Book highlights a little-known but magnificent rare book from the Walters’ collection—a 19th-century prayer book woven entirely from silk on a Jacquard loom. Visitors will discover a surprising and fascinating connection between the creation of the Silk Book and the computers that shape our modern world. Along with the Silk Book itself, the exhibition includes a group of handwritten books that contain trade secrets of the Jacquard loom. Tablets in the gallery will display the fully digitized Silk Book and a video that demonstrates how the Jacquard loom works.

Wed – Sun 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 9pm
Mon & Tue CLOSED

The Walters Art Museum
600 N. Charles Street
Baltimore, MD
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 07 -
August 04, 2019
The World Exists To Be Put On A Postcard
artists' postcards from 1960 to now

Artists have subverted the common postcard for decades. While the artists’ postcard began as a child of the Conceptual and Fluxus movements of the 1960s, it quickly broadened as an artistic medium to highlight political and social issues, such as feminism, anti-war protest and the fight against AIDS.

In this, the first major museum display of artists’ postcards, discover both the politics and playfulness of this unique collection of 300 postcards recently gifted to the British Museum by the artists’ postcard expert Jeremy Cooper - ranging from feminist artists such as Lynda Benglis and Hannah Wilke, to Yoko Ono and John Lennon’s anti-Vietnam War is Over postcard and the original invitation to Andy Warhol’s Holy Cow! Silver Clouds!! Holy Cow! exhibition.

Open daily 10.00 – 17.30
Fridays: open until 20.30*
* except Good Friday

Free admission

Room 90
The British Museum
Great Russell Street
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
February 09 -
May 06, 2019
ENDURING IDEALS: ROCKWELL, ROOSEVELT, & THE FOUR FREEDOMS
The first comprehensive traveling exhibition devoted to Norman Rockwell's iconic depictions of Franklin Delano Roosevelt's Four Freedoms: Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Worship, Freedom of Want, and Freedom of Fear.

Rockwell, Roosevelt, & the Four Freedoms explores the indelible odyssey of humanity’s greatest ideals.

The notion of the Four Freedoms has inspired dozens of national constitutions across the globe, yet Franklin D. Roosevelt’s declaration that the United States was willing to fight for Freedom of Speech, Freedom of Worship, Freedom from Want, and Freedom from Fear—now considered a sublime moment in rhetorical history—did not turn out to be the immediate triumph envisioned by the President. As the nation found itself sliding ever closer to direct involvement in World War II, the underlying meaning of his words captured surprisingly little attention among Americans. Following his January 6, 1941, Annual Message to Congress, government surveys showed that only half of Americans were aware of FDR’s Four Freedoms and that less than a quarter could identify them correctly. Moreover, many had no clear idea why the United States was being called upon to enter the war.

It would take the continuous efforts of the White House, the Office of War Information, and scores of patriotic artists to give the Four Freedoms new life. Most prominent among those was Norman Rockwell, whose images became a national sensation in early 1943 when they were first published in The Saturday Evening Post. Roosevelt’s words and Rockwell’s artworks soon became inseparable in the public consciousness, with millions of reproductions publicizing the Second War Loan Drive bringing the Four Freedoms directly into American homes and workplaces. When Eleanor Roosevelt convinced United Nations delegates to include these ideals in its postwar statement of human rights, FDR’s words—now forever entwined with Rockwell’s images—achieved immortality.

Born amid the turmoil of World War II, the Four Freedoms have since become one of its greatest legacies, a testament to the paramount importance of human rights and dignity. Brought forward by one of America’s greatest presidents and immortalized by one of its most beloved artists more than seventy-five years ago, the Four Freedoms continue to inspire, resonating across generations as strongly today as they did in their time.


JUNE 4, 2019 - OCTOBER 27, 2019:
Le Mémorial de Caen
Esplanade Général Eisenhower
CS 55026
14050 Caen Cedex 4
CAEN, FRANCE


DECEMBER 15, 2019 - MARCH 22, 2020:
MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, HOUSTON
1001 Bissonnet
HOUSTON, TEXAS


FALL 2020:
NORMAN ROCKWELL MUSEUM
9 Glendale Rd / Rte 183
STOCKBRIDGE, MA


THE GEORGE WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY MUSEUM AND THE TEXTILE MUSEUM
701 21st Street, NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 09 -
July 14, 2019
The Rise of Everyday Design: The Arts and Crafts Movement in Britain and America
See more than 200 items including books, drawings, furniture, decorative arts objects, photographs, and flyers, broadsides and advertising ephemera that offer a new and detailed look at the history of the Arts and Crafts movement.

The Arts and Crafts movement occupied a central place in discussions about modern life in Britain and America from the late 1840s to the early 1920s and beyond. Arts and Crafts reformers were concerned with the daily realities of the industrial age, and used design to envision and promote a new and improved way of living.

Discover how theorists and makers—like John Ruskin and William Morris (along with lesser known figures like Lucy Crane) in Britain and Candace Wheeler, Alice and Elbert Hubbard, and Gustav Stickley in America—spread their ideas through books, retail showrooms, and world's fairs, and how Arts and Crafts objects, which were originally handmade and costly, came to be manufactured and sold to the everyday consumer.

Items on display from the Ransom Center's collections will include hand-drawn designs and sketches by Ruskin and Morris, a first edition copy of Owen Jones's Grammar of Ornament, books and marketing materials of the Kelmscott and Roycroft presses, stained glass designs by Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Edward Burne-Jones, and plates from Frank Lloyd Wright's Wasmuth portfolio. These items will be paired with photographs, furniture, and decorative arts objects from the University's Alexander Architectural Archives, the Dallas Museum of Art, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, and private collections.

Opening on the 200th anniversary of John Ruskin's birth, the exhibition will show how the Arts and Crafts idea made its way into everyday homes, transforming the lives of ordinary people in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, and remaining influential to this day.

Mon - Wed, & Frid 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 7pm
Sat & Sun Noon – 5pm

Free admission

Harry Ransom Center
300 W. 21st Street (21st & Guadalupe Streets)
Austin, TX
Exhibit Southwest
February 09 -
July 08, 2019
Celia Paul
An exhibition of seven paintings by contemporary British artist Celia Paul (born 1959), the eponymously titled “Celia Paul” is curated by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Hilton Als, staff writer and theater critic for The New Yorker and associate professor of writing at Columbia University. Featuring work selected by Als in collaboration with the artist as a testament to their transatlantic friendship, “Celia Paul” focuses on Paul’s recent paintings, which address the themes of memory, family, and the inner lives of women. The exhibition was the inaugural installment in 2018 of a trilogy at the Yale Center for British Art; the next two exhibitions in the series there will focus on the work of Lynette Yiadom-Boakye in 2019 and Njideka Akunyili Crosby in 2020.

10am - 5pm

Huntington Art Gallery
The Huntington Library, Art Collections, & Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
February 11 -
June 08, 2019
"Genius of Genre: The Pen Names and Personas of Flann O’Brien”
Spring exhibit on the Irish author best known for his cult classic novel, The Third Policeman. “Genius of Genre: The Pen Names and Personas of Flann O’Brien”

Flann the novelist. Myles the columnist. Brother Barnabas the student. Brian O’Nolan (1911-1966) wrote in many genres under many guises, in both English and Irish, confounding contemporaries with his incomparable genius and satirical wit.

Using original manuscripts, letters, books, and artifacts from Burns Library’s unrivaled collection of O’Nolan’s papers and personal library, the exhibit will unmask the most enigmatic and elusive literary figure to emerge from 20th-century Ireland next to James Joyce.

The exhibit will also feature new and original works by Irish artists David and Eddie O’Kane, who have been creating and exhibiting Flann-inspired drawings, paintings, and animated and live-action videos at the biennial International Flann O’Brien Society conferences and other venues. An opening reception on February 12 will include curator-led viewings of the exhibit beginning at 4:30pm and a presentation by the O’Kanes at 5:15pm, followed by opportunities for conversation and more exhibit viewing. All are welcome.

The exhibit will be complemented by podcast and iBook projects created by students from professor Joseph Nugent’s Fall 2018 course, “From Page to Pod: Making Literature Public.”

9am - 5pm

John J. Burns Library
Boston College Libraries
140 Commonwealth Avenue
Chestnut Hill, MA
Exhibit New England
February 13, 2019
Victorian Visionary: John Ruskin and the Realization of the Ideal
Best known as an artist and art historian, John Ruskin (1819-1900) became an outspoken social critic of the Industrial Age and a champion of diverse progressive causes, ranging from affordable housing to land conservation. To mark the bicentenary of his birth, this exhibition explores Ruskin’s vision of a better world through original artwork, autograph letters, association copies, and illustrated books, in addition to other primary resources recently donated to Houghton Library by R. Dyke Benjamin, Harvard Class of 1959.

9am - 7pm

Open to the public

VIEWING & RECEPTION: Wed, Feb 13th 6:30pm - 7:30pm
Houghton Library

LECTURE: Wed, Feb 13th, 5:30pm
On Ruskin's educational ideals by Sara Atwood
Lamont Library, Forum Room

Edison & Newman Room
Houghton Library
Harvard Yard
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
February 14 -
July 07, 2019
Jan Tschichold and the New Typography
Graphic Design Between the World Wars

Tracing the revolution in graphic design in the 1920s, this exhibition displays materials assembled by typographer and designer Jan Tschichold (1902–1974) in Weimar Germany. Published in Berlin in 1928, Tschichold’s book Die Neue Typographie was one of the key texts of modern design, partly due to its grasp of Constructivist ideas and new print technology, but equally, because it was a manual for practicing designers. In the years leading up to its publication, Tschichold struck up a correspondence with many European artist-designers, including Kurt Schwitters, El Lissitzky, László Moholy-Nagy, Herbert Bayer, Piet Zwart, and Ladislav Sutnar, among others. In the course of this, Tschichold exchanged and acquired many examples of their design work, some pieces now quite famous (such as El Lissitzky’s Pro dva kvadrata [The Story of Two Squares], 1920) while other items are modest and ephemeral, such as tourist brochures, handbills, headed notepaper, product catalogues, and magazine advertisements. This collection, purchased by Philip Johnson and donated to the Museum of Modern Art, will form the basis of this exhibition, tracing the development of the new ideas that revolutionized graphic design in the 1920s.

Tue, Fri – Sun 11am – 5pm
Wed, Thu 11am – 8pm

Bard Graduate Center Galery
18 West 86th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 14 -
July 14, 2019
Love & Resistance: Stonewall 50
The Stonewall Riots were a flash point in LGBTQ history. After the riots that took place at the Stonewall Inn in June 1969, the LGBTQ civil rights movement went from handfuls of pioneering activists to a national movement mobilizing thousands under the banner of Gay Liberation.

This exhibition illustrates this history through the photographs of Kay Tobin Lahusen and Diana Davies, two pioneering photojournalists, who captured the pivotal events of this era and changed the ways that LGBTQ people perceived themselves. Featured alongside these images are other items from the Library’s vast archival holdings in LGBTQ history, including ephemera, periodicals, and more.

Sun 1pm – 5pm
Mon, Thu - Sat 10am – 6pm
Tue & Wed 10am – 8pm

Rayner Special Collections Wing
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
476 Fifth Avenue (42nd St & Fifth Ave)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 15 -
May 05, 2019
Mort Gerberg Cartoons: A New Yorker's Perspective
Artist Mort Gerberg grew up with a pencil in his hand, creating cartoons from the time he was a young boy in his native Brooklyn. Illustrated with a sensitivity and humor that have made him beloved by his audiences, his work has been featured in major publications, including the New Yorker and Saturday Review. The 100 cartoons on view in this exhibition cover a range of topics, such as life in New York City, women, youth, old age, and politics. Curated by Marilyn Satin Kushner, curator and head, Department of Prints, Photographs, and Architectural Collections.

Tue – Thu 10am – 6pm
Fri 10am – 9pm
Sat 10am – 6pm
Sun 10am – 5pm
Mon CLOSED

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West (at Richard Gilder Way / 77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 16, 2019 -
December 31, 2020
John James Audubon’s The Birds of America
Today only about 200 complete sets of The Birds of America exist. The Museum’s set, bound in four leather portfolios, was acquired by the State of North Carolina in 1848 and kept for more than a century at the State Library before being transferred to the Museum. The hand-colored engravings were recently conserved and rebound. In the new Audubon Gallery, the NCMA presents Audubon’s work in special cases designed for each of the enormous “double elephant” volumes, with hydraulic lifts that allow staff access so that the pages can be turned periodically to display a new selection of birds.

Tue – Thu 10am – 5pm
Fri 10am – 9pm
Sat & Sun 10am – 5pm
Closed Mondays & some holidays

NORTH CAROLINA MUSEUM OF ART
2110 Blue Ridge Road
Raleigh, NC
Exhibit South
February 17 -
May 12, 2019
A Passionate Muse: The Art of Leonard Baskin
Sculptor, printmaker, and illustrator, Leonard Baskin (1922-2000) was well known for his spirited visual fantasy and storytelling. He also cast his eye on the modern world, with sometimes-biting commentary on the ills of society, woven into religious or mythological scenes. This exhibition focuses on his independent prints, many of them monumental, that examine his often cynical, often hopeful view of human nature.

Tue – Sun 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 9pm

FREE for Crocker members
Adults $12
Seniors, college students, & military $8
Youth (6–17) $6
Children (5 & younger) FREE
Every third Sunday is Pay What You Wish Day, sponsored by Western Health Advantage

Crocker Art Museum
216 O Street
Sacramento, CA
Exhibit West
February 18 -
May 20, 2019
Wise Men Fished Here
A Centennial Exhibition in Honor of the Gotham Book Mart, 1920 - 2020.

In 2008, the University of Pennsylvania was gifted the contents of the Gotham Book Mart, the legendary New York City bookstore founded by Frances Steloff in 1920. To mark the 100th anniversary of the store’s founding, the Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts will host an exhibition in honor of Frances Steloff and her famous bookshop. For decades the Gotham Book Mart was, as Steloff prosaically put it, “the headquarters of the avant-garde.” The exhibition will explore the shop’s role in assembling, publishing, and promoting groundbreaking experimental writers, as well as its later years under the ownership of Steloff's hand- chosen successor, Andreas Brown, focusing on Brown’'s passion for postcards and collaborations with graphic artist, Edward Gorey .

For the past eight years, Penn Libraries curators and staff have unpacked and processed over 200,000 items and unveiled one hundred and fifty linear feet of archival materials. From this mass of "stuff", Curator David McKnight has, with the assistance of Katherine Aid and Camille Davis, selected 300 pieces ranging in date from 1900 to 2000. Drawing upon the collection’s vast array of material evidence—books, periodicals, manuscripts and ephemera -—the exhibition will narrate the history of the shop from its earliest beginnings to its to its demise in 2005. A catalog of the exhibition is in preparation.


CONFERENCE: February 28 – March 1, 2019
LOCATION: Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books & Manuscripts, Class of 1978 Pavilion

The 2018 Jay Kislak Conference:
A two- day and half day conference on the theme of Modernism - Materiality - Meaning. Responding to the growing interest in the concept of the modernist book store, the conference will provide a framework to explore the role of the Gotham Book Mart within the larger context of the printing arts, non-commercial publishing, retailing, and the marketing of modernism; as well as, examining the important role of little magazines and small presses; other topics will include Surrealism; the New York poetry scene; the Beats; Edward Gorey, and much more. The conference will be preceded by a film festival inspired by the Gotham Book Mart promotion of Modernist film. Other events will include a poetry reading, panels and workshops.

Gallery Hours:
Mon - Fri 9am - 5pm
Wed 9am - 8pm

Free & open to the public

Goldstein Family & Kamin Galleries
Van Pelt - Dietrich Library Center
3420 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 20 -
April 27, 2019
Alphabet Magic: Gudrun & Hermann Zapf and the World They Designed
2018 marked the 100th anniversary of the birth of both Hermann Zapf and Gudrun Zapf von Hesse. Hermann Zapf’s contribution to type design and calligraphy is immeasurable. His typographic work alone has greatly expanded the language of letterforms through ubiquitous fonts such as Palatino, Optima, and Zapfino (to name a few). Zapf’s typefaces have become among the most used – and most admired – of all time and he is arguably the most important type designer of the 20th century.

No less important, though perhaps less well known, is his work in typography and book design.
Zapf has also been at the forefront of type technology. His Marconi alphabet design was the first typeface ever created specifically for digital typography.

Also noteworthy is Zapf’s calligraphic art. It first became widely disseminated in his writing manual Pen and Graver (1949), and has since been seen in numerous books and exhibitions, and has been a major influence on generations of calligraphers.

In 1951 Hermann Zapf married Gudrun von Hesse. She is a master in her own right and across several disciplines. In addition to a remarkable career in the fields of calligraphy and type design, she is recognized as one of the finest bookbinders of the 20th and 21st centuries.

This retrospective commemorates the 100th birthdays and influential work and careers of Hermann Zapf and Gudrun Zapf von Hesse.

The show draws mainly on two collections: The Melbert B. Cary Jr. Graphic Arts Collection at the Rochester Institute of Technology, where Dr. Steven K. Galbraith is curator, and the private collection of Jerry Kelly, a leading calligrapher, book designer, type designer and typographer, who has co-curated the show with Dr. Galbraith.

A major biography of Hermann Zapf and a complete checklist of the exhibition will be published to coincide with the show. In addition, a film on the work of Gudrun and Hermann Zapf, “Alphabet Magic,” will be screened during the run of the exhibition.

Mon – Sat 10am - 5pm

Free & open to the public

Ground floor Gallery
The Grolier Club
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 24 -
May 12, 2019
From Today, Painting Is Dead: Early Photography in Britain and France
The Barnes Foundation to Present Survey of Experimental Early Photography

For its second survey of photography, the Barnes Foundation is presenting nearly 250 early photographs—most of which have never been exhibited before—created by British and French photographers between the 1840s and 1880s. Curated by Thom Collins, executive director and president of the Barnes, From Today, Painting Is Dead: Early Photography in Britain and France is drawn from the private collection of Michael Mattis and Judy Hochberg and spans the invention of the daguerreotype to photography on paper and beyond.

Wed – Mon 11am – 5pm
Tue CLOSED

Press preview: Wednesday, February 20, 2019

Barnes Foundation
2025 Benjamin Franklin Pkwy.
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic