In The News

The Library of Congress announced yesterday the winner of its first annual Library of Congress Lavine/Ken Burns Prize for Film is Flannery, a film about National Book Award-winner Flannery O’Connor. Directed by Loyola University professor Elizabeth Coffman and Jesuit priest Mark Bosco, the documentary chronicles the life of the Georgia author known for her provocative, Southern Gothic

The American Library Association (ALA) released the longlist for its 2020 Andrew Carnegie Medals for Excellence in Fiction and Non-Fiction. The list includes 49 titles (24 fiction, 25 nonfiction), and we’re pleased to report that one of our contributors, Holly George-Warren, is among the honored authors.

Back in August, Alex Johnson filed this report for us about the rise of bookish podcasts in the United Kingdom, leaving us to wonder whether there’s a similar move afoot stateside.

Bibliophilic radio shows have come and gone over the years. Some of you may recall “The Book Guys” radio show

By now many of you will have heard the exciting news that scholars Jason Scott-Warren and Claire M.S. Bourne have identified John Milton as the annotator of the Free Library of Philadelphia’s copy of the First Folio.

Last week, the J. Paul Getty Trust in Los Angeles announced a bold initiative to raise awareness of the world’s cultural heritage through education, research, and conservation. Titled Ancient Worlds Now: A Future for the Past, the $100-million endeavor will be shared among various projects, exhibitions, seminars around the

Las Vegas is home to more than glitzy casinos and pawn shops: the city can now claim a robust special collections program at nearby University of Nevada Las Vegas (UNLV), thanks in part to a $5-million endowment recently established by alumna Beverly Rogers.

The endowment will fund the Beverly Rogers Rare

This year’s winner of the Alice Award has been announced: Southbound: Photographs of and about the New South. Southbound contains fifty-six photographers’ visions of the South over the first decades of the twenty-first century.  It was published to accompany an exhibition at

Earlier this year the UK’s Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport announced an export ban on the notebooks of nineteenth-century geologist Sir Charles Lyell, Charles Darwin’s mentor. A total of 294 notebooks and manuscripts, which had been kept in the family until now, contain

The Waukegan Public Library in Waukegan, Illinois, unveiled a 12-foot statue of Ray Bradbury last Thursday, August 22, on what would have been the late author’s 99th birthday. The stainless steel sculpture, titled “Fantastical Traveler,” is much like the man himself: brilliant and bursting with creative energy. It features Bradbury riding a rocket ship

The National Gallery of Art (NGA) in Washington, D.C. announced last week its acquisition of one of the most important photographic works of the American Civil War and the nineteenth century: Alexander Gardner’s Photographic Sketch Book of the War (1866). Gardner, who ran Mathew Brady’s D.C.