July 2011 Archives

Ingres at the Morgan Library

New York, NY, July 28, 2011—Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres (1780-1867) is among an elite group of nineteenth-century French masters whose style is almost instantly recognizable. Arguably the greatest portraitist of his time, Ingres was a brilliant draftsman, and his drawings have long been prized along with his paintings. Beginning on September 9, The Morgan Library & Museum will present seventeen superb drawings and three letters by Ingres from its collection, together with one exceptional loan, in a focused exhibition in the Clare Eddy Thaw Gallery. Running through November 27, the show spans Ingres's career and provides visitors with an intimate look at a draftsman who is indisputably one of the greatest in French history. 



Ingres's Neoclassicism has often been framed in opposition to the Romanticism of Eugène Delacroix and Théodore Géricault, as well as other artists associated with France's Revolutionary Era. This view tends to obscure a freshness and originality that Ingres shared with his contemporaries. Happily for visitors to the Morgan, the Ingres exhibition will run concurrently with David, Delacroix, and Revolutionary France: Drawings from the Louvre, which will feature a further ten sheets by the artist among the more than seventy drawings from the Louvre chronicling the period book-ended by the Revolution of 1789 and the establishment of the Second Empire in 1852—largely encompassing the years of Ingres's career.

"The Morgan is delighted to present this exceptional group of drawings by an artist whose influence was widespread in his day and continued into the twentieth century," said William M. Griswold, director of The Morgan Library & Museum. "Ingres was famous for his devotion to a classical style, yet a number of modern artists, such as Matisse and Picasso, were profoundly indebted to him. We are especially pleased to present this exhibition in the context of the larger show of drawings from the Louvre, allowing visitors to see Ingres in the broad sweep of his time." 



The show will chronicle the major phases of the artist's career, beginning with Portrait of a Boy of ca. 1793-4, which he executed when he was a thirteen- or fourteen-year-old student at the Académie Royale in Toulouse. When Ingres entered the Paris studio of Jacques-Louis David in 1797, he abandoned the fine modeling of graphite and sensitivity to minute detail that characterize this early drawing. Also on view is a preparatory drawing for Oedipus and the Sphinx of 1808, which dates from the period when the artist was a pensionnaire at the Villa Medici in Rome. Like many of his fellow foreign artists in Rome, Ingres explored and sketched local monuments such as St. Peter's, the Palazzo Barberini, and Santa Maria Maggiore. An extraordinary cityscape, View of Santa Maria Maggiore of ca. 1813-14, was likely executed in a sketchbook that Ingres carried with him to a preferred vantage point on the Esquiline Hill. He precisely rendered the church facade, but merely outlined the baroque sculptures and the procession leading away from the entrance.



In the years following his studies, Ingres established an important studio on Rome's Via Gregoriana where he worked on imperial commissions and painted and drew portraits of French occupation officials and their families. Portrait of Hippolyte Devillers of 1812 features the Director of Probate and Estates who moved to Rome the previous year and sat for Ingres on at least three occasions. Pictured as a bachelor at the age of forty-seven, Devillers appears somewhat nervous and delicate, as if he has not quite gained confidence in his new office. One of the most iconic drawings to be included in the exhibition is Ingres's Portrait of Monsieur Guillaume Guillon Lethière of 1815, which depicts the new Director of the French Academy in Rome in all his convivial pomposity. The delicate and naturalistic shading of Lethière's round face juxtaposed to the rapid and jagged lines of his collar clearly demonstrate why Ingres is considered an unparalleled master of portraiture. 



The Morgan Library & Museum is internationally renowned for its extensive collection of literary and historical manuscripts, and the Ingres exhibition will include not only drawings but also three revelatory letters by the artist. In one poignant example, written to Marie-Anne-Julie Forestier, Ingres's fiancée, the artist laments his intense homesickness during his first days in Rome. He writes, "I lie down from nine at night until six in the morning, I do not sleep, I roll around in my bed, I cry, I think continuously of you . . ." Nine months later, Ingres would break his engagement, blaming his unwillingness to return to Paris after the negative reviews his paintings had received at the Salon. 



Ingres once told a pupil that if he placed a sign above his studio door, it would read Ecole de Dessin (School of Drawing). The centerpiece of the exhibition is the large-scale graphite and black chalk Odalisque and Slave of 1839, which likely served as the model for the engraved version of the subject. The epitome of exoticism and orientalism, this exquisite drawing is emblematic of the erotic tales of Arabia that had captured the imagination of nineteenth-century Paris. 



The Morgan Library & Museum

The Morgan Library & Museum began as the private library of financier Pierpont Morgan, one of the preeminent collectors and cultural benefactors in the United States. Today, more than a century after its founding in 1906, the Morgan serves as a museum, independent research library, musical venue, architectural landmark, and historic site. In October 2010, the Morgan completed the first-ever restoration of its original McKim building, Pierpont Morgan's private library, and the core of the institution. In tandem with the 2006 expansion project by architect Renzo Piano, the Morgan now provides visitors unprecedented access to its world-renowned collections of drawings, literary and historical manuscripts, musical scores, medieval and Renaissance manuscripts, printed books, and ancient Near Eastern seals and tablets. 



General Information

The Morgan Library & Museum

225 Madison Avenue, at 36th Street, New York, NY 10016-3405
212.685.0008

www.themorgan.org


Hours
Tuesday-Thursday, 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; extended Friday hours, 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; closed Mondays, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year's Day. The Morgan closes at 4 p.m. on Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve.



Admission

$15 for adults; $10 for students, seniors (65 and over), and children (under 16); free to Members and children, 12 and under accompanied by an adult. Admission is free on Fridays from 7 to 9 p.m. Admission is not required to visit the Morgan Shop.

PRESS CONTACTS
The Morgan Library & Museum
Patrick Milliman
212.590.0310
pmilliman@themorgan.org

DALLAS, TX - The market in rare and vintage movie posters showed steady strength in Heritage Auctions’ $1.3+ million Signature® Movie Poster Auction on July 16 in Dallas, with an insert poster to Universal’s 1935 horror classic Werewolf of London leading the pack with a $47,800 final price realized. All prices quoted include 19.5% Buyer’s Premium.
 
“Results were solid across the board,” said Grey Smith, Director of Movie Posters at Heritage. “We offered quality and depth across all genres, which is what collectors want. That translated into good strong bids and spirited competition.”
 
More than 1,220 bidders competed in the auction for 1,296 lots, translating into a 91% sell-through rate by total value.
 
While early horror reigns supreme in movie poster collecting circles, the market in classic Film Noir posters has been enjoying continued popularity among collectors, as evidenced by the $20,315 price realized for a one sheet to Paramount’s 1942 Veronica Lake and Alan Ladd Noir classic This Gun For Hire, making it the number two lot in the entire auction.
 
One of the most anticipated lots of the auction was a 1939 three sheet poster to Columbia’s Only Angels Have Wings, which rose amongst competitive bidding to finish at $17,925, nearly triple its pre-auction estimate of $6,000+.
 
“The posters for this classic have always been scarce and much sought after,” said Smith. “We’ve only sold an insert and a few window cards to this title in 10 years, so it wasn’t surprising that collectors were all over this one when it opened.”
 
Lobby cards are always among the most popular offerings in any Heritage movie poster auction, and the July 16 auction boasted a trio of superb lobby cards that had collectors buzzing and bidding. A jumbo lobby card from Fritz Lang’s seminal Metropolis (UFA, 1927) led the way with a $17,925 price realized, while a lobby card from The Bride of Frankenstein (Universal, 1935) realized an impressive $13,145 final price and a very early and rare lobby card from The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (Goldwyn, 1920) well-exceeded pre-auction estimates to finish the day at $13,145.
 
Further highlights include, but are not limited to:
 
The Day the Earth Stood Still (20th Century Fox, 1951), one sheet: Realized: $16,730.
 
Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein (Universal International, 1948), three sheet: Realized: $15,535.
 
Baby Face (Warner Brothers, 1933), one sheet: Realized: $12,548.
 
That's My Wife (MGM, 1929), one sheet: Realized: $11,950.
 
Heritage Auctions, headed by Steve Ivy, Jim Halperin and Greg Rohan, is the world’s third largest auction house, with annual sales more than $700 million, and 600,000+ online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and gain access to a complete record of prices realized, along with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com.
                        
Want to get the up-to-the-minute updates and breaking news stories about Heritage Auctions? Get them as they happen at: www.Twitter.com/HeritageAuction; Facebook: www.HA.com/Facebook.To view a compete archive of Heritage press releases go to: HA.com/PR. To link to this press release on your blog or Website: HA.com/PR-2056.


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Media contact

Noah Fleisher, Public Relations Director
214-409-1143; NoahF@HA.com
 
DALLAS, TX - The original 1967 cover art for Amazing Spider-Man #49, by legendary comic book artist John Romita, Sr., featuring Spidey in a seemingly impossible bind between Kraven the Hunter and the Vulture, is expected to bring $100,000+ on Aug. 17-18 in Heritage AuctionsSignature® Vintage Comics & Comic Art Auction. This is the first time this indelible cover art has ever been offered for public sale.

“This cover was only John Romita Sr.’s eleventh for the title and it’s simply one of his very best,” said Ed Jaster, Senior Vice President at Heritage Auctions. “It's not just a cool cover; it's a priceless piece of Silver Age Marvel lore and only the second Romita Sr. Spider-Man cover from this era we have offered to date. We’re expecting some fireworks when this comes up.”

Iconic original comic art is not only represented in mainstream offerings like Spider-Man, but also in the form of classic Underground Comix illustration, with few pieces of original Underground art being more important than Victor Moscoso’s original treatment for Zap Comix #4 Wraparound Cover (Apex Novelties/Print Mint) from 1969, estimated at $50,000+.

“Underground comix opened up a real can of worms with the fourth issue of Zap,” said David Tosh, Consignment Director at Heritage. “This was the infamous comic book that was the subject of a lengthy obscenity trial in New York City in the early 1970s, one that eventually caused the rules on what exactly was considered ‘obscene’ to be left in the hands of local authorities, rather than any kind of federal ruling.”

Steve Ditko’s original 1964 art for Page 17 of The Amazing Spider-Man #12 (estimate: $40,000+), wherein Spidey and Doc Ock go at it in a classic, and bruising, exchange, has high end collectors across the comics spectrum abuzz at the prospect of acquiring this early Marvel masterwork.

A CGC grade 9.6 first printing of Zap Comix #1 is the latest high quality representation of this ever popular, and increasingly valuable, counterculture offering. Different copies of this same comic book, all sold under the Heritage auspices, have broken the record for most valuable Underground comic as they’ve come to auction in the past few years. This particular book, as the highest graded and estimated at $35,000+, should continue that upward trajectory.

Highlights of the auction continue with more incredible original early comic artwork offerings in the form of an exceedingly rare George Herriman hand colored Krazy Kat Sunday comic strip, dated June 25, 1922 (estimate: $30,000+), while The Man of Steel is expected to flex his muscle in the form of Joe Shuster, Paul Cassidy and Wayne Boring’s original Page 7 artwork from the unpublished landmark Superman "K-Metal from Krypton" story (estimate: $20,000+).

Rounding out the early top offerings of the auction comes an early 1960s run of The Amazing Spider-Man comic books from the Edward M. Sarley Collection, featuring one of the very best runs of the title that Heritage specialists have ever come across, including The Amazing Spider-Man #28 (estimate: $15,000+), The Amazing Spider-Man #39 (estimate: $15,000), The Amazing Spider-Man #40 (estimate: $15,000+) and The Amazing Spider-Man #50 (estimate: $15,000+).

Sarley was a brilliant young man, and a meticulous collector, who recognized early the value of investing, collecting and safe-keeping items that would become sought after in years to come. He kept his comics in a small closet in his tiny bedroom on the top floor of his house, safe from the prying eyes of his younger siblings. After graduating college Eddie had a promising career moving up the business ladder. Yet fate had other plans for this young man. Tragedy struck on Thanksgiving Day, 1974 when Eddie died instantly in an auto accident at the age of 25. It was more than 20 years before that Eddie’s mother and father were finally able to bring themselves to peruse their son’s beloved comic book collection. They put a number of Eddie’s comics up for auction at a different auction house in 1992.

“The family has finally decided to release the rest of Edward’s amazing collection,” said Jaster, “a boon to collectors and a great honor for Heritage. These are truly great comic books and should command according respect from collectors.”

New York, NY, July 19, 2011—Chinese artist Xu Bing's spectacular work, The Living Word 3, was unveiled to the public at The Morgan Library & Museum on Tuesday, July 19, culminating a week-long installation directed by the artist of more than four hundred calligraphic characters. The Living Word 3 soars from the floor of the Morgan's glass-enclosed Gilbert Court towards a position near its third floor balcony—as the characters rise in the air they gradually change from contemporary Chinese letters to ancient pictographic expressions of birds. It is the artist's third and largest version of "The Living Word" series and the first to be displayed in a New York City museum. The work will remain on view through October 2. 



Xu Bing has described The Living Word as a "floating, iridescent cloud of calligraphy" that traces the Chinese character niao, meaning "bird," through time. The characters are painted in rainbow-like colors to create a magical, fairy-tale quality as they rise and escape from the confines of literal definition. The installation at the Morgan also includes a selection of the artist's original sketches for the project.



"Xu Bing has long been attracted to the intersection of word and image," said William M. Griswold, director of The Morgan Library & Museum, "and The Living Word 3 is an extraordinary example of this. Moreover, it is particularly appropriate for the Morgan as it speaks to the focus of our collections on both text and fine art. We are delighted that Xu Bing has specifically designed this work to take full advantage of the beauty of Renzo Piano's architecture."


Though the Morgan is noted for its holdings of American and European art and literature, its founder, Pierpont Morgan, was also interested in Chinese art. He collected art and artifacts from the Middle East as well as Asia, and the Morgan will hold an exhibition this fall of some of its greatest Islamic manuscripts.



Most of the four hundred acrylic characters that make up The Living Word 3 are carefully tied to a specially-made wire grid attached to the Gilbert Court ceiling. The characters are suspended with monofilament, also known as fishing line. The court is the central public crossroads of the museum and includes the popular Morgan Café.
 

Xu Bing received a MacArthur Fellowship in 1999. In 2002 he was awarded the Fukuoka Asian Culture Prize and in 2004 received the first Wales International Visual Art Prize, Artes Mundi. Columbia University presented him with a Doctor of Humane Letters in 2010. In 2008, he was appointed vice president of the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing and he now divides his time between that city and New York.



The artist grew up in Beijing but during the final years of the Cultural Revolution was sent to the countryside to perform farm labor. He entered China's Central Academy of Fine Arts in 1977 to study printmaking, receiving both his bachelor's and master's degrees there.



Solo exhibitions of his work have been held at numerous museums, including the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in Washington, DC, the New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York, the Joan Miró Foundation, Barcelona, and the National Gallery of Prague. His work has also been featured in the 45th and 51st Venice Biennales as well as in the Sydney and Johannesburg biennales.



Since reopening in 2006, The Morgan Library & Museum has mounted a series of critically acclaimed exhibitions devoted to modern and contemporary art, including solo shows of work by Philip Guston, Roy Lichtenstein, and Jim Dine. In the summer of 2010 it held its first exhibition in Gilbert Court with three sculptures by Mark di Suvero.



The installation of The Living Word 3 is made possible by a donation from Susanna and Livio Borghese and further underwritten by Clement and Elizabeth Moore, Cynthia Hazen Polsky and Leon B. Polsky, and The Ricciardi Family Exhibition Fund, in honor of Parker Gilbert and in appreciation of his many contributions to The Morgan Library & Museum.



Generous support is also provided by the American Friends of the Shanghai Museum, with additional assistance from the DeBevoise Calello Family, Helen Little, and Xiling Group.



Public Program

A Conversation with Xu Bing

Wednesday, July 20, 2011 at 6:30 pm


In conjunction with the installation Xu Bing: The Living Word (July 19 through October 2, 2011), Xu Bing will discuss the genesis of his celebrated work with Isabelle Dervaux, curator of Modern and Contemporary Drawings at the Morgan. This program coincides with the publication of Xu Bing, a monograph published by Albion Editions which includes a full chronological account of the artist's life and work, featuring essays by David Elliott, Robert E. Harrist, Jr., Reiko Tomii, and an interview conducted by Andrew Solomon. 

This program is free. Advanced reservations are recommended as seating is limited. Please email: public_programs@themorgan.org 



Xu Bing Publication


This beautifully illustrated monograph on Xu Bing is published by Albion Editions and is the first major publication on one of the most prominent and influential Chinese artists working in the world today. Independent Japanese critic and scholar Reiko Tomii provides a full chronological account of the artist's life and work, from his student experiences in rural China and his involvement with the 1985 New Wave movement, which jump-started the rapid ascent of Chinese contemporary artists, to his move to the United States in the 1990s and subsequent success on the global stage. British curator and critic David Elliott and Robert E. Harrist Jr., Jane and Leopold Swergold Professor of Chinese Art History at Columbia University, explore key aspects of his practice and place it within the context of both recent Chinese history and international contemporary art, and an interview between Xu Bing and acclaimed author Andrew Solomon sheds light on recent events in the artist's life. 


The Morgan Library & Museum

The Morgan Library & Museum began as the private library of financier Pierpont Morgan, one of the preeminent collectors and cultural benefactors in the United States. Today, more than a century after its founding in 1906, the Morgan serves as a museum, independent research library, musical venue, architectural landmark, and historic site. In October 2010, the Morgan completed the first-ever restoration of its original McKim building, Pierpont Morgan's private library, and the core of the institution. In tandem with the 2006 expansion project by architect Renzo Piano, the Morgan now provides visitors unprecedented access to its world-renowned collections of drawings, literary and historical manuscripts, musical scores, medieval and Renaissance manuscripts, printed books, and ancient Near Eastern seals and tablets. 



General Information

The Morgan Library & Museum

225 Madison Avenue, at 36th Street, New York, NY 10016-34
05
212.685.0008

www.themorgan.org


Hours
Tuesday-Thursday, 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; extended Friday hours, 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; closed Mondays, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year's Day. The Morgan closes at 4 p.m. on Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve.


Admission

$15 for adults; $10 for students, seniors (65 and over), and children (under 16); free to Members and children, 12 and under accompanied by an adult. Admission is free on Fridays from 7 to 9 p.m. Admission is not required to visit the Morgan Shop.

PRESS CONTACTS
The Morgan Library & Museum
Patrick Milliman
212.590.0310
pmilliman@themorgan.org

David Zwirner is pleased to announce the gallery’s second annual summer pop-up bookstore.

July 25 - August 5, 2011
Hours: Monday - Friday, 10am - 6pm

Open late on Thursday, July 28 until 8pm for the second annual Chelsea Art Walk, an evening of extended hours and special events taking place at over 125 galleries and art institutions around Chelsea. Visit artwalkchelsea.com for details.

For two weeks only—Monday, July 25 through Friday, August 5—there will be special offers on a selection of rare and out-of-print books, signed artist catalogues and monographs, DVDs, posters, collectible show cards, and more. Highlights from this year’s pop-up include ceramic plates by Marcel Dzama, signed copies of the newly-released artist’s book Perlstein by Michael Riedel (limited edition), films by Raymond Pettibon, posters by Christopher Williams, and documentary films about Alice Neel and Robert Crumb.

The pop-up bookstore coincides with the gallery’s summer exhibition, The House Without the Door, on view until August 5.

For more information:
Pop-Up Bookstore contact:
Jessica Manchester
212-727-2070 or jmanchester@davidzwirner.com
Media contact:
Ben Thornborough, Press Officer
212-727-2070 x 141 or bthornborough@davidzwirner.com
twitter: @davidzwirner.com

Summer hours:
Monday - Friday, 10am - 6pm
In July and August, David Zwirner is closed on Saturdays. The gallery re-opens on Tuesday, September 6 with the Artists for Haiti exhibition. Visit artistsforhaiti.com for information. 
Long Island University’s Palmer School of Library and Information Science is pleased to announce the appointment of J. Fernando Peña as Director of its highly regarded program in Rare Books and Special Collections.  Mr. Peña succeeds Dr. Deirdre C. Stam who directed the program for nine years and recently announced her retirement effective August 31, 2011.

Mr. Peña comes to the Palmer School from The Grolier Club in New York, the country’s oldest and largest society for bibliophiles and graphic arts enthusiasts where he has served as Librarian since 2001.  While at the Grolier Club, Mr. Peña oversaw the library’s technical services operations, as well as assisting in collection development and exhibitions.  He also led the library’s conservation efforts and supervised the selection, design and installation of its first online public access catalog.

Prior to joining the Grolier Club, Mr. Peña worked in archives and special collections at Rutgers University and Harvard University.  He received his B.A. in Linguistics (with Distinction) from Stanford University; M.A. in Biblical Studies (with Honors) from the Graduate Theological Union, Berkeley, CA.;  M.A. in Hebrew Bible and Semitic Philology from Harvard University; and M.L.S. in Library and Information Science from Rutgers University.

Mr. Peña is currently Treasurer and a Board member of the Center for Book Arts, New York, N.Y.;   a Member‐at‐Large and Executive Committee member of the Rare Books and Manuscripts Section (RBMS), Association of College and Research Libraries, American Library Association;  and Secretary of the American Printing History Association (APHA). In recent years he served as chair of the RBMS Diversity Committee and the RBMS Pre‐Conference Scholarship Committee, and he has been active in the  RBMS Membership & Professional Development Committee, and Budget & Finance Committee.

The Palmer School is based on the C.W. Post campus of Long Island University in Brookville, N.Y. and also offers programs in Manhattan, Westchester and Brentwood, N.Y.  The School has a full-time faculty of eleven and offers a Master's in Library and Information Science, as well as a Ph.D. in Information Science.  The Rare Book and Special Collections concentration, the largest such program in the nation, is centered at the School’s Manhattan site.  The School has approximately 385 Master's students and 50 doctoral students.

Long Island University is in its ninth decade of providing access to the American dream through excellence in higher education.  It is one of the largest and most comprehensive private universities in the country, offering 590 undergraduate, graduate and doctoral degree programs.
The British Library has announced an ambitious fundraising campaign to acquire the St Cuthbert Gospel for the nation. Created in the 7th century and intimately associated with one of Britain’s foremost saints, the Gospel is the earliest surviving intact European book and one of the world’s most significant books.
 
A manuscript copy of the Gospel of St John, the St Cuthbert Gospel was produced in the North of England in the late 7th century and was buried alongside St Cuthbert on Lindisfarne, apparently in 698, and later found in the saint’s coffin at Durham Cathedral in 1104. It has a beautifully-worked original red leather binding in excellent condition, and is the only surviving high-status manuscript from this crucial period in British history to retain its original appearance, both inside and out.



The largest single grant for a heritage acquisition in the British Library’s history, the National Heritage Memorial Fund (NHMF) award of £4.5m is a huge boost to the campaign to acquire the Gospel. The Art Fund has also generously pledged £250,000 and a similar sum was donated by The Garfield Weston Foundation in recognition of the importance of the book to Britain. The Library is now in discussion with a range of other major donors with a view to securing the full amount by the deadline of 31 March 2012.



Announcing the campaign to acquire the St Cuthbert Gospel, the Chief Executive of the British Library, Dame Lynne Brindley, said: “The St Cuthbert Gospel is an almost miraculous survival from the Anglo-Saxon period, a beautifully preserved window into a rich, sophisticated culture that flourished some four centuries before the Norman Conquest. I am delighted to announce publicly this fundraising campaign - the largest the Library has ever embarked upon for a heritage item - and wish to express the Library’s profound gratitude to the funders who have already offered their generous support. In particular, the National Heritage Memorial Fund grant, amounting to half of the purchase price, helps us get our fundraising campaign off to the best possible start.”



Dame Jenny Abramsky, Chair of the NHMF, said: "The Cuthbert Gospel is an extraordinary piece of our heritage. The National Heritage Memorial Fund was set up to save our most precious heritage at risk and that's why we agreed it was vital that we should do our utmost to safeguard this absolutely unique survival. It’s a mark of the importance we placed on it that since our annual budget was spent at the time of this grant request, our Board decided, unusually, to dip into the NHMF’s endowment to make this grant possible. We're delighted that our grant will bring the British Library's aspiration to secure it for the nation a substantial step closer."



Stephen Deuchar, Director of the Art Fund, said: “This astonishing, beautifully preserved Gospel sheds bright light on the history and culture of the Church in the 7th century. We are pleased to offer £250,000 towards the purchase and we thank all our supporters for making this possible. We wish the British Library every success in raising the full sum, so this great treasure can be kept for the public to enjoy in the future.”



The St Cuthbert Gospel, formerly known as the Stonyhurst Gospel, has been on long-term loan to the British Library since 1979 and regularly on-view in the Library’s Sir John Ritblat Treasures Gallery. The Library was approached last year by Christie’s, acting on behalf of the Society of Jesus (British Province), and was given first option to acquire the Gospel for the UK public - a unique opportunity to make the Gospel a permanent part of the national collection.



Representing a major addition to the Library’s world-class collections relating to the early history and culture of Britain the Library plans to make a significant investment in the long-term preservation of the Gospel and will transform the possibilities for improved access to the item through digitisation and display.



Having sought opinions from a range of independent experts as well as the Library’s own curatorial specialists, a price of £9 million was agreed. The fundraising campaign announced today began in early 2011 with the aim of raising the whole amount from philanthropic sources.



In parallel with the fundraising campaign, the Library has also developed an innovative 50/50 display partnership with institutions in the North East of England, in recognition of the cultural, religious and historical resonance that St Cuthbert has for the region. A Memorandum of Understanding (MOU) signed by Durham Cathedral, Durham University and the British Library paves the way for future opportunities to display the Gospel 50% of the time on the Durham UNESCO World Heritage Site, once the acquisition has been completed. The MOU establishes a framework for the increasingly strong and constructive engagement between the Library, Durham University and Durham Cathedral, which among other projects, will also see the visit of the Lindisfarne Gospels to Durham in 2013.



The Very Reverend Michael Sadgrove, Dean of Durham, said: “This wonderful book links us directly to Saxon Christianity of the north of England, and to the north’s best-loved saint, Cuthbert himself. Durham Cathedral owes its very existence to him, and we prize not only his memory, but also the treasures associated with him here at the Cathedral such as his pectoral cross and portable altar. So I wholeheartedly support the campaign to save this book for the nation, for it is a vital part of our cultural and spiritual heritage. Like the Lindisfarne Gospel Book, the Cuthbert Gospel speaks powerfully about Northumbria’s golden age, whose spiritual vision, intellectual energy and artistic achievement continue to inspire us today. We are in the British Library’s debt for having taken this initiative. We must make sure it succeeds.”



Chris Higgins, Vice-Chancellor of Durham University, said: “Durham University is proud to partner with the British Library in the conservation, display and interpretation of the oldest and one of the most important of all western manuscripts. The University and Cathedral, together, house one of the most important collections of early books and manuscripts, visited by researchers and scholars from around the world, and closer working between the University and the British Library will enhance scholarship and the wider appreciation of the role of Durham and the North East in the development of England’s remarkable written heritage.”



A spokesman for the British Province of the Society of Jesus, said: “The St Cuthbert manuscript, which records the founding of Christianity as told in St John’s Gospel, speaks across thirteen centuries of British history. The Society of Jesus is delighted that this rare text is likely to be fittingly housed, and congratulates the Library on a successful start to the fundraising campaign. The Library not only has great expertise in conservation but also has the means to ensure access direct or virtual by people from around the world, who will be able to view the Gospel in its setting among the Library’s other treasures of the Christian faith and of Anglo-Saxon and Celtic art.”
 

St Cuthbert was a 7th-century, English Christian leader, renowned for his ascetic practices and the miracles attributed to him during his lifetime and posthumously. Born in Northumbria around 635, he entered the monastery of Melrose in 651, and later became guest-master at the newly founded monastery at Ripon. Cuthbert subsequently became prior of Melrose, then prior of Lindisfarne, and went on to live as a hermit on the island of Inner Farne, off the coast of Northumberland. He was consecrated as bishop of Lindisfarne in 685 but died at his Inner Farne hermitage on 20 March 687. He was elevated to sainthood in 698 when his body was reinterred in a new wooden coffin. This coffin was subsequently removed from Lindisfarne by the community of St Cuthbert and was carried with them as they travelled around the North East in the wake of Viking raids in the 9th and 10th centuries. At the end of the 10th century, the community took Cuthbert's coffin with them to Durham and settled there. In 1104, Cuthbert's coffin was opened and the gospel was discovered inside with the saint's body, which was reburied at the East end of the new Norman cathedral. He was one of England's most popular and widely venerated saints both in the Anglo-Saxon period and after the Norman Conquest, and his shrine was a major medieval pilgrimage centre.
 
For more information contact:
 
Ben Sanderson
The British Library
t:+44 (0) 1937 546 126
m:+44 (0) 7810 056848
e:ben.sanderson@bl.uk
 

The British Library is the national library of the United Kingdom and one of the world's greatest research libraries. It provides world class information services to the academic, business, research and scientific communities and offers unparalleled access to the world's largest and most comprehensive research collection. The Library's collection has developed over 250 years and exceeds 150 million separate items representing every age of written civilisation and includes books, journals, manuscripts, maps, stamps, music, patents, photographs, newspapers and sound recordings in all written and spoken languages. Up to 10 million people visit the British Library website - www.bl.uk - every year where they can view up to 4 million digitised collection items and over 40 million pages. 


The Art Fund
The Art Fund is the UK’s leading independent art charity. It offers grants to help UK museums and galleries enrich their collections; campaigns on behalf of museums and their visitors; and promotes the enjoyment of art. It is funded from public donations and has 80,000 members. Since 1903 the charity has helped museums and galleries all over the UK secure 870,000 works of art for their collections. The Art Fund led the successful £3.3 million campaign to save the Staffordshire Hoard - the unprecedented find of Anglo Saxon treasure - for the West Midlands. Visit www.artfund.org/hoard for more information. Other recent achievements include: helping secure Titian’s Diana and Actaeon for the nation in 2009 with a grant of £1million; helping secure Anthony d’Offay’s collection, ARTIST ROOMS, for Tate and National Galleries of Scotland in February 2008 with a grant of £1million and funding its nationwide tour with an additional £500,000 over two years; leading the successful £550,000 appeal to keep Turner’s Blue Rigi watercolour in the UK; and spearheading the campaign to ensure Dumfries House in Ayrshire and its contents were secured intact for the nation in July 2007. In February 2009, The Art Fund gave the British Library a grant of £18,000 towards the acquisition of a rare metal book, Parole in Libertà, created by Italian Futurist artists Filippo Tommaso Marinetti and Tullio D'Albisola. For more information contact the Press Office on 020 7225 4888 or visit www.artfund.org.

Durham Cathedral - The building of Durham Cathedral commenced in 1093 and took around 40 years to complete.  It replaced a Saxon cathedral built by the Community of St Cuthbert after it arrived in Durham in 995 following its flight from the ‘Holy Island’ of Lindisfarne 80 miles north of Durham.   The body of St Cuthbert is enshrined in the Feretory at Durham Cathedral and the Tomb of the Venerable Bede is in the Galilee Chapel.    The Cathedral existed as a Benedictine Monastery until 1539 when it became one of the Church of England’s major Cathedrals.   It continues to be a focus for pilgrimage and attracts over 600,000 visitors each year from all over the world.  The Cathedral has internationally important collections of artefacts, manuscripts and books that include St Cuthbert’s Saxon coffin and his pectoral cross, a superb example of Saxon craftsmanship. Durham Cathedral is often referred to as the best example of Romanesque architecture in Europe, or as American writer Bill Bryson put it, ‘the best Cathedral on planet earth.’
 
Since construction of the Cathedral, Durham has been alive with people and a centre for community activity.  The Cathedral is home to a vibrant worshipping community and continues to celebrate the English Choral Tradition with sung services by its highly acclaimed Choir.   As a new century unfolds Durham Cathedral aspires to enrich the many different ways in which it engages with people and organisations.  It is cherished equally by those who live, work and study in the region and by those who come to visit.  

Durham University is a world top 100 university with a global reputation and performance in research and education. The most recent UK league tables place Durham in the top handful of British universities; we are ranked 5th in the country in the influential Complete University Guide. Based in North East England, we are a collegiate university based at two locations: Durham City and Stockton-on-Tees. Durham is England’s third oldest university and has at its heart a UNESCO World Heritage Site, jointly owned with Durham Cathedral. www.durham.ac.uk.

Durham is a member of the 1994 Group of 19 leading UK research-intensive universities: www.1994group.ac.uk.

National Heritage Memorial Fund (NHMF) - The National Heritage Memorial Fund was set up to save the most outstanding parts of our national heritage, in memory of those who have given their lives for the UK. NHMF currently receives annual grant-in-aid from the Government of £10million. It is due to receive £20million between 2011-15 allowing for an annual budget of £4m-5m. www.nhmf.org.uk.

The Cuthbert Gospel joins a diverse range of over 1,200 iconic objects and places which have been safeguarded by the NHMF to the tune of over £300million. These include: The Coenwulf Coin, The Macclesfield Psalter, The Mappa Mundi,        The Staffordshire Hoard, The Milton Keynes Pot of Gold, The Mary Rose, The Flying Scotsman, The last surviving World War II destroyer, HMS Cavalier, Antonio Canova’s The Three Graces, The personal archive of Siegfried Sassoon, WWI soldier, author and poet and Skokholm Island, Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI) in Pembrokeshire.
 
AUSTIN, Texas—"Banned, Burned, Seized, and Censored," an exhibition at the Harry Ransom Center, reveals the rarely seen "machinery" of censorship in the United States between the two world wars.

The exhibition runs from Sept. 6 to Jan. 22, 2012, at the Ransom Center, a humanities research library and museum at The University of Texas at Austin.

Featuring more than 200 items drawn primarily from the Ransom Center's collections, the exhibition explores the question: How did hundreds of thousands of books, pictures, plays and magazines come to be banned, burned, seized and censored in less than 30 years?

"Traditionally, censorship exhibitions start with John Milton's 'Areopagitica' and then provide a list of banned books," said Ransom Center Assistant Director and Curator for Academic Programs Danielle Sigler. "This approach gives you perspective on which books have been banned over time, but it doesn't explain why or how censorship took place. This exhibition focuses on how censorship happens in one country, during a particular era. The New York Society for the Suppression of Vice had a leader who stormed into bookshops, pulled things off the shelves and hauled people to court. The New England Watch and Ward Society in Boston created an informal network of booksellers who quietly removed books from the shelves when they were deemed obscene. At the same time individuals operating as postmasters and customs agents decided for themselves what was obscene."

The exhibition draws heavily from the Ransom Center's collection of Morris Ernst, the leading civil liberties attorney who successfully defended James Joyce's "Ulysses" when it was put on trial for obscenity in 1933. In 2009, the Ransom Center received a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities to catalog the Morris Ernst papers. The Ernst papers will be open for research in late 2011. The exhibition features correspondence revealing the mechanics behind censorship, manuscripts edited for obscenity and pirated editions of James Joyce's "Ulysses" and D. H. Lawrence's "Lady Chatterley's Lover."

"Because the Center houses collections from writers, agents, publishers and attorneys, we can tell all aspects of this story," said Sigler.

The exhibition is organized by censoring institution, including sections on the New York Society for the Suppression of Vice, the New England Watch and Ward Society, the Book-of-the Month Club, the Post Office Department and the Treasury Department, as well as sections on the 1933 "Ulysses" trial and writers' responses to censorship.

Between the two world wars, censors waged war on "objectionable" literature using tactics from extra-legal intimidation to federal prosecution. Larger-than-life personalities battled publicly over obscenity, "clean books" and freedom of expression while writers, agents and publishers attempted to navigate the increasingly complex world of American censorship.
"The exhibition is limited to a particular time period, so the visitor can begin to get a sense of the materials that reformers deemed objectionable at that specific moment in American history," said Sigler. "During the interwar years, more often than not, the objection boiled down to sex.

"One of the goals of the exhibition is to show that censorship is far more complicated than one might think. In the United States in this particular period, it was not a matter of a monolithic body censoring books. The process is more nuanced. As you look at these materials, you begin to understand why reformers argued for censorship, why authors battled against it and even why some publishers found censorship a boon for sales."

High-resolution press images from the exhibition are available.

"Banned, Burned, Seized, and Censored" can be seen in the Ransom Center Galleries on Tuesdays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with extended Thursday hours to 7 p.m. On Saturdays and Sundays the galleries are open from noon to 5 p.m. The galleries are closed on Mondays.

AUSTIN, Texas—The Harry Ransom Center's exhibition "The Greenwich Village Bookshop Door: A Portal to Bohemia, 1920-1925" showcases how one artifact, in this case a door from a Greenwich Village bookshop in the 1920s, can serve as a starting point to reconstruct the history of a time and place.

The door, which is covered in signatures of visitors to the bookshop, serves as an entryway into the lives, careers and relationships of New York City bohemians of that era. Drawn entirely from the Ransom Center's collections, the exhibition highlights items related to the bookshop, the era and the signers themselves.

The exhibition runs from Sept. 6, 2011, through Jan. 22, 2012, at the Ransom Center, a humanities research library and museum at The University of Texas at Austin. The gallery exhibition is a physical complement to a web exhibition of the same name, which launches Sept. 1 at www.hrc.utexas.edu/bookshopdoor.

As early as 1921, noteworthy visitors to Frank Shay's bookshop, located at 4 Christopher Street in the heart of the Village, began signing the narrow door that opened into the store's back room. When the shop closed in 1925, manager Juliette Koenig preserved the door. The Ransom Center purchased the door in 1960 and added it to the collection of Christopher Morley, who was a patron of the shop and a friend of many of the door's signers. The Center published a brief article about the door in 1972 in "The Library Chronicle," but the door has never been investigated thoroughly.

Many of the signatures on the door represent significant figures in the literary Modernism canon: Theodore Dreiser, John Dos Passos, Upton Sinclair, Sherwood Anderson, Sinclair Lewis and Vachel Lindsay. Many more are remembered for their roles in the Greenwich Village and wider New York intellectual scenes. Other signers include founders of the Provincetown players, the theater troupe that launched Eugene O'Neill's career, as well as Hollywood screenwriters, "bohemian" characters, book designers, cartoonists and pilgrims to the Village.

The door is signed on both sides by more than 240 artists, writers, publishers and other notable habitués of the bohemian scene in New York at the time, and the exhibition uses the signatures to reconstruct the intersecting communities that made Greenwich Village famous as an epicenter of Modernism.

Like many Village businesses, the shop was as much an intellectual and social enterprise as a commercial one. Founder Frank Shay not only ran the shop, he also published a newspaper, books and a poetry magazine from the same address. The shop stocked publications that mirrored its range of customers: socialist magazines, commercial weeklies, avant-garde poetry, best-selling novels, children’s picture books and the latest censored shocker.

The exhibition is divided into four sections: "Reconstructing the Bookshop," which uses shop stationery, publications, maps, reconstructions of shop window displays and more to immerse visitors in New York bohemia from the era; "Deciphering the Door," which includes the door itself; "Christopher Morley," which looks at the man who was at the center of the community; and "Autograph Communities," which highlights some of the most interesting names and communities represented on the door.

The exhibition also includes a touch screen where visitors can delve more deeply into the connections between the door signers through the web exhibition.

"A Portal to Bohemia" introduces visitors to the relationship between artistic and commercial production during the modernist period and offers a window to a world in which the two were very much combined. A haven of experiment and unconventional living, the Village was also a place where the modern book and magazine businesses and professional modern theater flourished, laying the foundation for the creative culture of New York as we know it today.
"As we all know, bookselling and buying have changed dramatically in recent years," said Ransom Center Cline Curator of Literature Molly Schwartzburg. "Not long ago, bookshops were important to the social and intellectual community of any given city or town, and as that changes it is important to understand the history of bookshops, both as businesses and as gathering places."

High-resolution press images from the exhibition are available.

"A Portal to Bohemia" can be seen in the Ransom Center Galleries on Tuesdays through Fridays from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m., with extended Thursday hours to 7 p.m. On Saturdays and Sundays the galleries are open from noon to 5 p.m. The galleries are closed on Mondays.

The Henry Beston Society will present a program on the author Henry Beston and his classic book, The Outermost House on Tuesday, July 26, at 7:00 PM at the Salt Pond Visitor Center in Eastham. It is accessible, free, and sponsored by Friends of the Cape Cod National Seashore.

The pesentation will feature pre-production footage from the Beston Society's documentary film project, and will include two speakers, Don Wilding of the Henry Beston Society and Beston biographer Dr. Daniel Payne. Wilding is the producer for the Beston Society's documentary about Beston's influence on the national seashore and is working with director Christopher Seufert of Mooncusser Films in Chatham. The Dennis resident is the executive director and co-founder of the Beston Society and author of the book, Henry Beston's Cape Cod. Dr. Payne is a professor of English at the State University of New York in Oneonta, New York and is writing a critical literary biography, with a working title of Orion on the Dunes, about Beston.

This program is one in a series offered every Tuesday evening in July and August at Salt Pond. All of the programs are sponsored by Friends of the Cape Cod National Seashore, which raises awareness of national seashore resources and issues; provides funds for important park projects; sponsors interpretive and educational programs that advance the understanding of park stories and resources; and carries out significant volunteer work, especially in the area of trail maintenance.

IF YOU GO: Salt Pond Visitor Center is located at the intersection of Route 6 and Nauset Road in Eastham and is open daily from 9:00 AM to 5 PM.The center includes a lobby with expansive views of Salt Pond, Nauset Marsh, and the Atlantic; a museum featuring the park's natural and cultural stories; staff to assist with trip planning, and a store with books, maps, puzzles, games, t-shirts, and 50th-anniversary commemorative items. There are short films shown throughout the day. The Buttonbush and Nauset Marsh Trails, and the Nauset Bike Trail are located nearby. For more information on Cape Cod National Seashore programs call 508-255-3421, or check the park's website, www.nps.gov/caco.

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Upper Saddle River, NJ - On July 21, Leighton Galleries will offer 400 lots including Artworks, Silver, Jewelry, Furniture and Special Collections including Coins, Sports Memorabilia, Collectible Toys, Swarovski Crystal & Porcelain Figurines... all for sale to the highest bidder.
 
Artworks in the sale include a 40+ piece collection of Audubon prints from a Waldwick, New Jersey estate. Quadruped octavo as well as some Imperial lithographs will be offered including American Bison, The Cougar, Canada Lynx, Ocelot, American Beaver, Common American Skunk, Chipping Squirrel, and Hudson's Bay Lemming. Birds of America and Birds of Prey will also be offered including Common Cardinal Grosbeak, Pileated Woodpecker, Wood Duck Summer Duck, Ruby-crowned Kinglet, and Cape May Wood Warbler. The prints will be sold from single lots to multiple groups and carry estimates from $200-300 to $400-600.
 
Other Artworks include two Jerry Garcia signed offset lithographs "Dracula's Heart" and "Northern Lights" (est.500-700 each), an oil on masonite by New Jersey artist George Schwacha "Figures on a Tree-Lined Street" (est.300-500), an oil on canvas by another New Jersey artist Edgar Malin Craven "Autumn Landscape" (est.150-200), four sculptures by Israeli artist Frank Meisler (est.200-400 each), an oil on board by Gloucester artist David Pollock "Rabbi Holding a Torah" (est.200-300), a still life painting of large size by New York artist Natalie Levine (est.300-500), a watercolor by Mexican artist Manuel Lepe Macedo "Girl with Flower" (est.200-300), two Roger Hebbelinck mezzotints "Valerius de Saedeleer" (est.150-250 each), and a color lithograph after Rene Magritte "L'Idole" by Henri Deschamps (est.300-500).
 
Approximately 40 US coin lots will be offered including Morgan's, Eagles, Walking Liberty's, Franklins, Kennedy's, Washington's, ten cent coins, coin sets, some gold coins, lot of 70+ uncirculated mint sets from 1963-1989, and more. A small collection of sports memorabilia will include autographed balls and bats by Ted Williams, Roy Campenella, Wade Boggs, etc... and an Astros jersey signed by Nolan Ryan.
 
Also to be offered in the collectibles category is a large single-owner collection of 150+ Swarovski crystal figures (1987-2007) most of which are being offered as group lots estimated in the $200-300 range. Other collectibles include Boehm, Cybis, Royal Doulton, Royal Copenhagen, Lladro, and a small group of collectible toys including Ducal models "Marching Bands" boxed sets.
 
Estate jewelry in the sale includes a 14K fancy link bracelet at 38.6gms. (est.700-900), a 14K charm bracelet at 48.9gms. (est.800-1000), several gold groups, and signed costume jewelry lots including Miriam Haskell, Original by Robert, Joseff, St. John and Givenchy, as well as some couture including fur coats and vintage handbags.
 
Approximately 50 silver lots will cross the block including numerous hollowware and assorted flatware groups, as well as fine china sets including Minton Haddon Hall, Royal Worcester Imperial, Wedgwood California, Copeland Spode Indian Tree, Lenox Essex, and Wedgwood Marina. Other items of interest include a rosewood slide box signed Rohde, a Jacots cylinder music box by Mermod Freres, antique colored maps including two maps of the world by Robert de Vaugondy, chandeliers and other lighting, a 12x18 Chinese Kensington rug, and a small collection of clocks including two French wag on the walls.
 
Fine furniture to include an antique English mahogany tall case clock with dial signed John Hansford (est.1000-1500), a nineteenth-century German cherry tall case with dial marked Hindelang (est.600-800), a cherry extension dining table attributed to Jeffco (est.600-800), a pair of modern leather armchairs with ottomans by Ekornes (est.300-500), a Marcel Breuer Wassily leather chair (est.200-300), and a five-piece Heywood Wakefield bedroom suite (est.400-600).
 
The auction is scheduled for Thursday, July 21, at 5pm. It will be held at the Knights of Columbus Banquet Hall at 79 Pascack Road, Washington Township (Bergen County), New Jersey. Previews are scheduled for Wednesday, July 20 from 5-8pm, and on Thursday July 21 from 1-4pm. An illustrated web-based catalog is available at www.leightongalleries.com. For information call 201-327-8800 or info@Leightongalleries.com.
 
New York, NY— The more than 400 calligraphic characters that will comprise Chinese artist Xu Bing’s The Living Word 3 at The Morgan Library & Museum will begin being put in place Monday, July 12. The work will be completed on Tuesday, July 19, in the Morgan’s glass-enclosed Gilbert Court and will soar from the floor to a position just below the ceiling, some fifty feet above ground. It is the third in the artist’s “The Living Word” series and is the first ever to be displayed in a New York City museum. It will remain on view through October 2.
 

Xu Bing has described The Living Word as a “floating, iridescent cloud of calligraphy” that traces the Chinese character niao, meaning “bird,” from its present-day usage in simplified Chinese to its ancient pictographic expression. The artist will be at the Morgan during installation and a selection of his original sketches for the project will also be on view.



“Xu Bing has long been attracted to the intersection of word and image,” said William M. Griswold, director of The Morgan Library & Museum, “and The Living Word 3 is an extraordinary example of this. Moreover, it is particularly appropriate for the Morgan as it speaks to the focus of our collections on both text and fine art. We are delighted that Xu Bing has specifically designed this work to take full advantage of the beauty of Renzo Piano’s architecture.”



Though the Morgan is noted for its holdings of American and European art and literature, its founder, Pierpont Morgan, was also interested in Chinese art. He collected art and artifacts from the Middle East as well as Asia, and the Morgan will hold an exhibition this fall of some its greatest Islamic manuscripts.

Most of the 400 painted, acrylic characters that will make up The Living Word 3 will be tied to a specially made wire grid with monofilament, also known as fishing line. The grid, in turn, will be fastened to the Gilbert Court ceiling. The space is the central public crossroads of the museum and includes the popular Morgan café. 


Xu Bing received a MacArthur Fellowship in 1999. In 2002 he was awarded the Fukuoka Asian Culture Prize and in 2004 received the first Wales International Visual Art Prize, Artes Mundi. Columbia University presented him with a Doctor of Humane Letters in 2010.



The artist grew up in Beijing but during the final years of the Cultural Revolution he was sent to the countryside to perform farm labor. He entered China’s Central Academy of Fine Arts in 1977 to study printmaking, receiving both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees there.



Solo exhibitions of his work have been held at numerous museums, including the Arthur M. Sackler Gallery in Washington, DC, the New Museum of Contemporary Art, New York, the Joan Miró Foundation, Barcelona, and the National Gallery of Prague. His work has also been featured in the 45th and 51st Venice Biennales as well as in the Sydney and Johannesburg biennales.



Since reopening in 2006, The Morgan Library & Museum has mounted a series of critically acclaimed exhibitions devoted to modern and contemporary art, including solo shows of work by Philip Guston, Roy Lichtenstein, and Jim Dine. In the summer of 2010 it held its first exhibition in Gilbert Court with three sculptures by Mark di Suvero.



The installation of The Living Word is supported by a generous gift from Mr. and Mrs. Livio Borghese in honor of S. Parker Gilbert, with additional assistance from the American Friends of the Shanghai Museum. 



Public Program

A Conversation with Xu Bing

Wednesday, July 20, 2011 at 6:30 pm


In conjunction with the installation Xu Bing: The Living Word (July 19 through October 2, 2011), Xu Bing will discuss the genesis of his celebrated work with Isabelle Dervaux, curator of Modern and Contemporary Drawings at the Morgan. This program coincides with the publication of Xu Bing, a monograph published by Albion Editions which includes a full chronological account of the artist's life and work, featuring essays by David Elliott, Robert E. Harrist, Jr., Reiko Tomii, and an interview conducted by Andrew Solomon. 
This program is free. Advanced reservations are recommended as seating is limited. Please email: public_programs@themorgan.org. 



The Morgan Library & Museum

The Morgan Library & Museum began as the private library of financier Pierpont Morgan, one of the preeminent collectors and cultural benefactors in the United States. Today, more than a century after its founding in 1906, the Morgan serves as a museum, independent research library, musical venue, architectural landmark, and historic site. In October 2010, the Morgan completed the first-ever restoration of its original McKim building, Pierpont Morgan's private library, and the core of the institution. In tandem with the 2006 expansion project by architect Renzo Piano, the Morgan now provides visitors unprecedented access to its world-renowned collections of drawings, literary and historical manuscripts, musical scores, medieval and Renaissance manuscripts, printed books, and ancient Near Eastern seals and tablets. 



General Information

The Morgan Library & Museum

225 Madison Avenue, at 36th Street, New York, NY 10016-3405

212.685.0008

www.themorgan.org



Hours

Tuesday-Thursday, 10:30 a.m. to 5 p.m.; extended Friday hours, 10:30 a.m. to 9 p.m.; Saturday, 10 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday, 11 a.m. to 6 p.m.; closed Mondays, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Day, and New Year's Day. The Morgan closes at 4 p.m. on Christmas Eve and New Year's Eve.



Admission

$15 for adults; $10 for students, seniors (65 and over), and children (under 16); free to Members and children, 12 and under accompanied by an adult. Admission is free on Fridays from 7 to 9 p.m. Admission is not required to visit the Morgan Shop.
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July 8 -- DALLAS, TX - Effective July 8th the assets of Greg Martin Auctions of San Francisco, CA, one of the nation’s top auction houses of antique arms & related historic memorabilia were acquired by Heritage Auctions, the world’s largest collectibles auctioneer.

“The acquisition of our company by Heritage is a natural fit with advantages for all stakeholders,” said Greg Martin, a founder of Greg Martin Auctions. “We tap in to Heritage’s greater strength, reach and access to achieve more significant results in the future, while Heritage gains immediate expertise and exposure in the arms & armor segment through our past successes and the long legacy of our team. Moreover, thanks to our shared business values of high quality and customer service, both buyers and sellers will benefit as well.”

For Heritage, too, the acquisition fits perfectly with the company’s steady expansion over the last decade.

“Fine firearms is a market we’ve been looking to increase our reach for quite some time, just waiting for the right opportunity,” said Steve Ivy, Co-Founder of Heritage. “With that goal in mind, this situation is ideal. This association with Greg Martin allows us to expand our portfolio and product offerings in a key market segment with a leading company, further enhancing our presence in the marketplace and providing increased opportunities to collect and consign for our valued clients.”

Greg Martin Auctions was founded in 2002 by Greg Martin, John Gallo and Bernard Osher, the same management team that built at Butterfields & Butterfields (now Bonhams & Butterfields) into the world’s largest department of antique arms & armor, a position it held for decades. Greg Martin and staff will continue to office in San Francisco. Live firearms auctions will be conducted at the various Heritage offices in Dallas, New York and Beverly Hills.

Heritage Auctions, the third largest auction house in the world, is a $700+ million a year company, with more than 30 categories. By building a business based on transparency, technological advances and unparalleled customer service, the company has risen to the very top in the respective fields where it operates. Heritage currently enjoys unchallenged dominance in many of its 30 collecting categories, including rare coins, currency, comics, movie posters, sports memorabilia, illustration art and fine guitars and stringed instruments, Civil War memorabilia and Space Exploration.

Reflecting the priorities of both companies, clients can continue to expect superior consignment service, aggressive marketing for their collections, top-quality catalogs featuring detailed color photographs and descriptions and a continued emphasis on world class customer service, all with a focus on auctioning the top-quality offerings available.

Heritage Auctions' first official event under Greg Martin’s guidance will be a July 30, 2011, Internet-only Firearms auction, offering more than 700 estate arms and historic arms via an online catalog and online bidding. This will be followed by the “Firearms for Freedom” auction held in concert with the NRA (National Rifle Association), in Dallas, on Aug. 21, featuring approximately 1,000 antique and modern firearms.

On September 18, 2011, in a highly anticipated sale, the company will offer the superlative The Alfred (Al) Cali Collection of Important Colt Firearms. Amassed over 40 years, this heirloom collection showcases rare and exceptional Colt firearms of the ultimate condition and desirability. The event is expected to be one of the greatest Colt offerings ever to take place. The auction will have 29 lots valued at approximately $7 million. A second session on the same day features Fine & Collectible Sporting Guns.

Greg Martin Auctions has achieved the sale of some of the most important arms ever sold and numerous world records, including one of the highest prices ever paid at auction for a firearm - $862,500 - for the Serial No. 1 Colt Single Action Army “Peacemaker” revolver. For more information, contact Greg Martin Auctions at GregM@HA.com or online at GregMartinauctions.com.

Heritage Auctions, headed by Steve Ivy, Jim Halperin and Greg Rohan, is the world’s third largest auction house, with annual sales more than $700 million, and 600,000+ online bidder members. For more information about Heritage Auctions, and to join and gain access to a complete record of prices realized, along with full-color, enlargeable photos of each lot, please visit HA.com.

July 6, 2011--American regional writing gained increasing popularity in the years following the Great Depression and beyond. The period 1938 to 1980 was an especially fruitful one for this type of documentation of the nation’s people, history and culture, as well as America’s natural treasures - its mountains, plains, lakes, seaports, forts, trails, folkways and customs.

The Fitzgerald Collection, donated by Carol and Jean Fitzgerald, comprises books, original correspondence, documentation and copies of research materials related to the series devoted to Americana as highlighted in "Series Americana: Post Depression-Era Regional Literature, 1938-1980: A Descriptive Bibliography." This important contribution to 20th-century American publishing history is by Carol Fitzgerald and was published in 2010 by Oak Knoll Press and the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress.

In this illustrated and authoritative two-volume work, bibliographer and collector Fitzgerald presents full descriptions and publishing histories of 163 titles published during 1938-1980 in 13 popular book series, such as American Folkways, The American Lakes Series, The American Trails Series and Regions of America. She also includes historical sketches of the series’ publishers, as well as biographies of the 19 editors and the 237 writers who contributed to the various series.

Erskine Caldwell, A.B. Guthrie Jr., Henry G. Alsburg and Carl Carmer are among the 19 distinguished editors. The 237 authors of individual volumes include noted writers such as Cleveland Amory, Gertrude Atherton, Bruce Catton, Thomas D. Clark, Richard H. Dillon, Marjorie Stoneman, John Dos Passos, Erle Stanley Gardner, Josephine Herbst, Stetson Kennedy, David Lavender, Meridel Le Sueur, Oscar Lewis, Mari Sandoz, Irving Stone and Wallace Stegner.

"Carol Fitzgerald’s donation represents a remarkable contribution to the collections of the Rare Book and Special Collections Division," said Mark Dimunation, the division’s chief.

Fitzgerald is also the author of the 2001 work "The Rivers of America: A Descriptive Bibliography," published by the Center for the Book and Oak Knoll Press. To mark the Center for the Book’s 25th anniversary in 2003, Carol and Jean Fitzgerald donated their "Rivers of America" archives to the Library of Congress. The collection, comprising more than 400 first editions and related correspondence, audio and video archives, and original art, is also available to the public in the Rare Book and Special Collections Division.

Since its creation by Congress in 1977 to "stimulate public interest in books and reading," the Center for the Book in the Library of Congress (www.Read.gov/cfb/) has become a major national force for reading and literacy promotion. A public-private partnership, it sponsors educational programs that reach readers of all ages, nationally and internationally. The center provides leadership for 52 affiliated state centers for the book (including the District of Columbia and the U.S. Virgin Islands) and nonprofit reading promotion partners and plays a key role in the Library’s annual National Book Festival. It also oversees the Library’s Read.gov website and administers the Library’s Young Readers Center.

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Press contact: Guy Lamolinara (202) 707-9217
Public contact: Center for the Book (202) 707-5221
Elsevier announced today the launch of an online catalogue of the Elsevier Heritage Collection, comprising over 2,000 rare books with more than 1,000 distinct titles published by the original Elzevier publishing house from 1580 to 1712. Based in the Netherlands and closely tied to the University of Leiden, the original company published groundbreaking work from contemporary scholars including Descartes, Huygens and Galileo. Elsevier, the modern publisher was named after the original firm when it was founded in 1880 as a tribute to the publishing achievements of the Elzeviers.
 
The online short title scholarly catalogue was created with the expertise of curatorial consultant and digital librarian Donna Sy. Nearly 2,000 documentary photographs will accompany the online catalogue, illustrating the beauty and fine craftsmanship of many of the book bindings in the collection.

"It's been a privilege to work with the Elsevier Heritage Collection.  When we first created a catalog for local use in 2009, our hope was that we would eventually be able to bring it online, and that day has finally come. Since every book in the Collection is in many aspects unique, I hope that the online catalog will serve as a starting point for scholars to make exciting new discoveries in the Collection."
 
"As the stewards of the Elsevier Heritage Collection, it is our obligation-and pleasure - to ensure that the Collection can be fully appreciated and readily accessible for scholars to research. The Collection represents a tangible connection to a great publishing past and reminds us of the partnerships forged by publishers with the great minds of the Renaissance," said David Ruth, Senior Vice President of Global Communications.
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Tom Reast
Public Relations and Digital Communications
+44  (0) 20 3176 4721
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The National Sporting Library and Museum, Middleburg, Virginia, celebrates the opening of its Sporting Art Museum in October 2011.

The inaugural exhibition for the new Museum is Afield in America: 400 Years of Animal & Sporting Art 1585-1985, curated by F. Turner Reuter, Jr., and based on his book Animal and Sporting Artists in America which was published by the National Sporting Library in 2008. Mr. Reuter’s book is being reprinted this year. The inaugural exhibition in the new Museum is intended to raise awareness of the importance of animal and sporting art as a reflection of American history and cultural life.

Designed to attract the widest possible audience, Afield in America presents works by iconic American artists such as Albert Bierstadt, Alfred Jacob Miller, and Frederic Remington, as well as those by recognized masters of the animal and sporting art genre, including John James Audubon, Edward Troye, Arthur Fitzwilliam Tait, and William Tylee Ranney.

“The works of other fine American sporting artists, which have long been esteemed by enthusiasts of the genre but, until recently, were often overlooked by art historians, are an important focus of the exhibition,” says Mr. Reuter. This group includes: William Herbert Dunton, Herbert Haseltine, Thomas Hewes Hinckley, Anna Hyatt Huntington, Alexander Pope, Ogden Pleissner, Percival Rosseau, and John Martin Tracy.

The exhibition will also have an illustrated, color catalogue. In the catalogue, critical essays explore larger interpretations of the works with the objective of defining the remarkable role animal and sporting artists have played in the history of American art. Essayists include William H. Gerdts, Ph.D., art historian and author of Art Across America; Adam D. Harris, Ph.D., Curator of the National Museum of Wildlife Art and author of Wildlife in American Art; Daniel J. Herman, Ph.D., historian and author of Hunting and the American Imagination; and Robin R. Salmon, author and Vice President for Collections and Curator of Sculpture, Brookgreen Gardens; and F. Turner Reuter, Jr.
 
Afield in America: 400 Years of Animal & Sporting Art 1585-1985, will run from October 11, 2011 through January 14, 2012.

About the National Sporting Library and Museum
The National Sporting Library and Museum, Middleburg, Virginia, is dedicated to preserving, sharing and promoting the literature, art, and culture of horse and field sports. Founded as the National Sporting Library in 1954, by George L. Ohrstrom, Sr. and Alexander Mackay-Smith, the institution has expanded to become a library, research facility, and art museum with over 17,000 books and works of art in the collections. The John H. Daniels Fellowship program supports research and includes scholars from around the world. Information is shared through exhibits, lectures, seminars, publications, and special events. Many of the programs are free and open to the public.

The Library and Museum are located in the beautiful historic village of Middleburg, Virginia. The NSLM consists of two buildings on the same campus. The Library, built in 1999, was designed to provide facilities for book stewardship and research. It has the Forrest E. Mars, Sr., Exhibit Center and the Founders’ Room for public events. While primarily a research center, the Library is open to the public. The historic building, Vine Hill, also located on the campus, was once occupied by the Library. Vine Hill has been renovated and expanded to house the new art Museum.

About the Celebration Weekend October 7 - 9, 2011
To commemorate the opening of the Museum, the NSLM will host a historic Coaching Drive in the countryside and a Gala on the Museum grounds during a weekend celebration October 7 - 9, 2011. There will be over 25 historic coaches participating in a pageant on Saturday, October 8, 10:00 a.m., at the Upperville Colt & Horse Show grounds, site of the oldest horse show in the country. The presentation will be open to the public.

Visitor Information
The National Sporting Library and Museum
102 The Plains Road
P.O. Box 1335
Middleburg, Virginia 20118-1335
Tel. (540) 687-6542
Fax (540) 687-8540
www.nsl.org 
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