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Exhibit Calendar

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February 07, 2012 -
December 31, 2015
The Life of Art: Context, Collecting, and Display
From the time an object is made until the day it enters a museum's collection, it may be displayed, used, and perceived in different ways. The Life of Art takes selected objects from the Getty Museum's galleries and encourages visitors to sit down and spend time with them, offering the opportunity to examine them closely to understand how they were made and functioned, why they were collected, and how they have been displayed.

The J. Paul Getty Museum
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
March 01, 2014 -
January 04, 2015
Downton Abbey
Costumes of Downton Abbey is an original exhibition of exquisite designs from the award-winning television series. Approximately 40 historically inspired costumes from the television show will be displayed and supplemented by photographs and vignettes inspired by the fictional program and by real life at Winterthur.

Visitors will have a chance to step into and experience the world of Downton Abbey® and the contrasting world of Winterthur founder Henry Francis du Pont and his contemporaries in the first half of the 20th century.

In addition, Winterthur will host a wide range of lectures, workshops, and exciting events for adults and families focusing on entertaining and country house life in Britain and the United States.

A co-production of Carnival Films and Masterpiece, Downton Abbey depicts life in an aristocratic household of the fictional Earl and Countess of Grantham and is one of the most popular and critically acclaimed period dramas ever produced. It has won a Golden Globe Award for Best Miniseries and seven Emmys including a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Miniseries. It was the most watched television series in both the UK and the U.S. and became the most successful British costume drama series since the 1981 television serial Brideshead Revisited. By the third series, it had become one of the most widely watched television shows in the world. The Guinness World Records recognized Downton Abbey as the most critically acclaimed English-language television series of 2011.

The costumes will be lent by Cosprop, the world’s leading costumier to film, television, and theater. Winterthur’s most popular exhibition, Fashion in Film, which attracted more than 42,000 people over its three-month run, also featured costumes by Cosprop.

Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library
5105 Kennett Pike
Wilmington, DE
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 24, 2014 -
January 05, 2015
Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures
A signature can be as routine as a mark on a form or as extraordinary as a stroke of the pen that changes the course of history. For example, the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence simultaneously committed the brave act of treason against King George III and created a new nation.

Well-known signatures are found throughout the records of the National Archives. Equally important are the multitude of marks by people unknown to history. The documents signed by these individuals represent fascinating stories to be discovered.

“Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” features original signatures from our nationwide holdings. From developing a signature style to signing groundbreaking policy into law, they illustrate the many ways people have “made their mark” on history.

10:00am - 5:30pm

Free admission

National Archives Museum
Constitution Avenue NW (between 7th & 9th Street)
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 21, 2014 -
January 04, 2015
Focus on Nature XIII
Focus on Nature XIII features 91 natural and cultural history illustrations, representing the work of 71 illustrators from 15 different countries. The subjects represented are diverse, ranging from those only found in the artists’ home country to those that have a worldwide distribution. A special feature of FON XIII is a 3D illustration by Swiss artist Livia Maria Enderli of Neanderthal (Homo neanderthalensis). This reconstruction of a skull from an archaeological site in Uzbekistan in central Asia found in 1938 uses the latest technology available to artists and scientists.

Since its inception in 1990, the exhibit series Focus on Nature has reflected the standards, materials, and skills of contemporary natural history illustrators. It promotes awareness of a type of art that, although widely used in scientific publications, is not often seen by the general public.

Tue - Sun, 9:30am - 5pm
Closed Mondays
Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's Day

Free admission.
Donations are accepted at the door.

The Carousel is free. Donations are accepted.

Photography Gallery
New York State Museum
Cultural Education Center
222 Madison Avenue
Albany, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 28 -
December 05, 2014
Body of Knowledge: A History of Anatomy (in 3 Parts)
"Body of Knowledge" explores the act of anatomizing not as a process of mapping a finite arrangement of bodily structures, but as a complex social and cultural activity. By means of a diachronic perspective, the exhibit narrative cuts through the multiplicity of anatomical practices, presenting three important moments in the history of anatomy: sixteenth century dissections and anatomical drawings, nineteenth century anatomical practices, and contemporary use of both cadavers and digital technology for anatomic education. "Body of Knowledge" hopes to capture the complexity of the many people, places, and meanings involved in human dissection.

The Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments
Harvard Museum of Science & Culture
Science Center 371
1 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
June 20, 2014 -
January 11, 2015
A Certain Slant of Light: Spencer Finch at the Morgan
American artist Spencer Finch (b. 1962) will unveil a new, site-specific, large-scale installation at the Morgan inspired by its great collection of medieval Books of Hours—beautiful, hand-painted works that served as personal prayer books for different times of the day and different periods of the year. Taking advantage of the Morgan's four-story, glass-enclosed Gilbert Court, Finch will apply films of color to the windows and hang additional glass panes in the center of the Court to create a kind of calendar based on the movement of the sun.

Finch plans to cover or hang the panes of glass in groupings by month with each having a palette that corresponds to the time of the year. For example, November would be "harvesting" and the colors of the month will be based on the colors of the harvest. The installation also calls for what the artist is identifying as "red-letter days." Marking secular holidays the artist considers significant—such as Sir Isaac Newton's birthday on January 4—red-colored glass would align with the sun's arc across Gilbert Court at noon on these days. The precise measurements required to create the installation at the Morgan are a hallmark of Finch's work. At the same time, his installations emphasize movement and change, capturing fleeting moments of sublime beauty.

This exhibition is made possible in part by a gift from Susanna and Livio Borghese, in honor of Parker Gilbert and in appreciation of his many contributions to the Morgan Library & Museum, with additional generous support from Mickey Cartin; the Charles E. Pierce, Jr. Fund for Exhibitions; James Cohan Gallery; Christopher Scholz and Inés Elskop; Nancy Schwartz; and Rhona Hoffman Gallery, Chicago.

HOURS:
Tuesday through Thursday: 10:30am - 5pm
Friday: 10:30am - 9pm
Saturday: 10am - 6pm
Sunday: 11am - 6pm

ADMISSION:
$18 Adults
$12 Children (13–16)
$12 Seniors (65 and over)
$12 Students (with current ID)
Free to members and children 12 and under (must be accompanied by an adult)
Admission is free on Fridays from 7pm - 9pm
Admission to the McKim rooms only is without charge during the following times: Tuesday, 3pm - 5pm; Friday, 7pm - 9pm, Sunday, 4pm - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 23, 2014 -
March 15, 2015
Warhol On Vinyl: The Record Covers, 1949-1987+
Andy Warhol envisioned the record cover as a means to popularize his name as an artist and, once he reached iconic status in the 1960s, used it to directly impact popular culture. Designed to be collected by the masses, the records—numbering more than fifty— reinforce his maxim “repetition adds up to reputation.” While only a fortunate few own a Warhol painting, millions own his design for Rolling Stones’ Sticky Fingers.

The exhibition is drawn from the Cranbrook Art Museum’s preeminent collection of record covers by Andy Warhol, a recent gift by Frank M. Edwards and Ann M. Williams, and premieres three recently discovered covers that have never before been exhibited, including a cover recently discovered last year. Cranbrook has also been loaned a copy of the one-of-a-kind "Night Beat" album cover, making this the most comprehensive exhibition of authenticated record covers to date. The album covers range from the extremely rare to the widely recognizable; together they offer a unique lens to survey the artist’s career from a young graphic designer to a cultural phenomenon. At the same time, the exhibition documents the history of the mass-produced vinyl record and the zeitgeist of these eras through the inclusion of music, video and artworks from the Art Museum’s extensive Andy Warhol collection. Listening booths in the gallery will allow viewers to play select albums, thereby producing an experience between the cover art and the music—rock, classical, opera, jazz, soul, experimental—the way Warhol intended. The exhibition also includes album covers by other musicians that have controversially appropriated Warhol’s imagery and testify to his influence on subsequent generations.

Cranbrook Art Museum
39221 Woodward Avenue
Bloomfield Hills, MI
Exhibit Midwest
July 09, 2014 -
January 18, 2015
Bescribbled, Nibbled, and Dog-Eared: Early American Children’s Books
“It is quite normal for a bouncing bibliophile of twelve months to teethe on the hard board corners of, for instance, a copy of Cinderella,” wrote Dr. A. S. W. Rosenbach (1876—1952). As one of the first serious collectors of American children’s books, Rosenbach knew that pristine survivals of such books were rare and prized. But they were also fascinating windows into American history, education, and literature. Taking up a collection begun by his uncle, Moses Polock, Dr. Rosenbach bought and sold these tiny books dating from 1682 to 1836, making an historic donation of 816 children’s books to the Free Library of Philadelphia in 1947 and assisting other collectors in refining their own holdings. This exhibition explores the history of these early children’s books from the religious tracts of Puritan printers to the adventure novels of the 19th century, while introducing visitors to Dr. Rosenbach’s passion for these dog-eared gems.

Rosenbach Museum & Library
2008-2010 Delancey Place
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 11, 2014 -
February 01, 2015
Chester Beatty’s A to Z: from Amulet to Zodiac
A is for Amulet, B is for Beatty, C is for Calligraphy . . ., Chester Beatty’s A to Z will take you on a journey through a selection of highlights, showcasing the breadth and quality of this wonderful collection.

This curators’ choice show is a visual treat with universal appeal. Featuring works that are seldom on display, the exhibition presents an opportunity to explore the threads that link cultures across the Western, Islamic and East Asian worlds.

A is for Amulet and the exhibition displays exquisite examples of these seventeenth- to nineteenth- century protective charms from the Christian, Hebrew, Islamic and Hindu faiths.

E is for Embroidery and the objects on view include European sixteenth- to eighteenth-century covers for almanacs and devotional works, as well as eighteenth- and nineteenth-century embroidered badges worn to indicate status in the Chinese imperial court.

T is for Travel and among the early printed travel books is a rare 1576 guide to the ‘most famous islands of the world’ with a chapter devoted to Ireland.

B is for Beatty and M is for Mining, and rarely seen material from the Library’s Archives offer a glimpse into Chester Beatty’s family and professional life.

Chester Beatty Library
Dublin Castle
Dublin, IRELAND
Exhibit International
July 23 -
December 14, 2014
Caricature, Fashion and Fantasy
This group of prints and drawings, chiefly from the 16th to 18th centuries, encompasses a broad span of social comment from caricatures to documentary realism. Various levels of society are represented: carousing peasants, ladies of fashion, celebrities or anonymous adolescents. Some examples are complex, offering thinly veiled criticism of religious or secular institutions, while others represent the animal world, both real and imaginary. Some works are by little known artists, others by more famous names, like Tiepolo for example, who did caricatures in "off duty" moments. Many combine keen observation with fantasy and humor in a way that transforms the everyday into the exotic.

Wed, 10 am—5 pm
Thurs/Fri, 10 am—9 pm
Sat/Sun, 10 am—5 pm

Free admission

Nelson-Atkins Building, P13
The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
4525 Oak Street
Kansas City, MO
Exhibit Midwest
July 25, 2014 -
January 11, 2015
Across the Indian Country: Photographs by Alexander Gardner, 1867-68
By the 1860s, the Plains Indians found themselves sandwiched in the middle of the country with white advancement on both sides. Rail lines cut directly through their hunting grounds–scattering the game necessary for survival. This exhibition highlights two rare bodies of work created by Alexander Gardner at this pivotal time: Across the Continent on the Kansas Pacific Railroad in 1867-68 and Scenes in the Indian Country in 1868.

The Across the Continent series was photographed first on the existing railroad line across Kansas (resulting in some of the earliest images of that state) and then along the proposed route to the Pacific Ocean. Gardner's photographs stress the benefits of railroad construction–once railroads were built, towns would follow–and suggest the possibility of successful Indian and settler coexistence.

In 1868, in an attempt to end conflict, an unprecedented gathering of tribal leaders from the Northern Plains assembled at Fort Laramie, Wyoming. For his Scenes in the Indian Country series, Gardner photographed the treaty negotiations between the government-led Indian Peace Commission and the tribes who agreed to give up land and move to reservations.

Wed, 10 am—5 pm
Thurs/Fri, 10 am—9 pm
Sat/Sun, 10 am—5 pm

Free admission

Bloch Building, Gallery L11
The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
4525 Oak Street
Kansas City, MO
Exhibit Midwest
July 26, 2014 -
March 01, 2015
The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters
A preeminent artist of belle époque Paris, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901) brought the language of the late-19th-century avant-garde to a broad public through his famous posters, prints, and illustrations for journals and magazines. A cultural nexus, he connected artists, performers, authors, intellectuals, and society figures of his day, creating a bridge between the brothels and society salons of the moment. His work allows entry into many facets of Parisian life, from politics to visual culture and the rise of popular entertainment in the form of cabarets and café-concerts. This exhibition, drawn almost exclusively from The Museum of Modern Art’s stellar collection of posters, lithographs, printed ephemera, and illustrated books, is the first MoMA exhibition in 30 years dedicated solely to Lautrec, and features over 100 examples of the best-known works created during the apex of his career.

Organized thematically, the exhibition explores five subjects that together create a portrait of Lautrec’s Paris. A section devoted to café-concerts and dance halls examines the rise of nightlife culture in France through the depiction of famous venues, including the celebrated Moulin Rouge. Another focuses on the actresses, singers, dancers, and performers who sparked the artist’s imagination and served as his muses, including Yvette Guilbert, acclaimed dancer Loie Fuller, and close friend Jane Avril. Lautrec’s sympathetic images of women are evident in a group of works that includes his landmark Elles portfolio, depicting prostitutes during nonworking hours, in quiet moments of introspection. Lautrec’s role in Paris’s artistic community is explored in a section devoted to his creative circle, highlighting designs for song sheets for the popular music that flooded Paris’s café-concerts, programs for the avant-garde theatrical productions that he attended, and his contributions to magazines and intellectual reviews. A final section looks at the pleasures of the capital, from horse racing at Longchamp and promenading on the Bois de Boulogne, to the new fad for ice skating and the enduring appeal of Paris’s culture of gastronomy.

The accompanying publication highlights the Museum’s collection of prints and posters by Lautrec, with an introductory essay on the artist and five illustrated thematic sections that explore belle époque Paris as seen through Lautrec’s eyes, by Sarah Suzuki.

The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 29, 2014 -
February 15, 2015
Over Here: WWI and the Fight for the American Mind
World War I. The Great War. The War to End All Wars. The conflict that enveloped the globe from July 28, 1914, to November 11, 1918, backlit an intense home-front struggle as Americans debated their individual and collective relationship to the conflict. Should the United States be involved in the war? If so, then to what extent and in what capacity?

The vigorous—and, at times, vicious—public debate over these questions was facilitated by an unprecedented array of media and performance outlets, including such recent inventions as recorded sound and motion pictures. Throughout the period, government at all levels, in addition to private organizations and individual citizens, used these communication tools in an increasingly sophisticated manner, all in an effort to win the hearts and minds of the nation. Truly, never before in the country’s history had Americans been so widely, and energetically, courted. And never in its history had the concept of Americanism—of what it means to be an American—been so hotly contested.

Drawing from collections across The New York Public Library, Over Here: WWI and the Fight for the American Mind explores the manner in which public relations, propaganda, and mass media in its many forms were used to shape and control public opinion about the war while also noting social and political issues that continue to resonate, such as freedom of speech and the press, xenophobia, and domestic espionage.

Mon, Thu, Fri, & Sat 10am - 6pm
Tue & Wed 10am - 8pm
Sun CLOSED

Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
New York Public Library
Fifth Avenue at 42nd Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
August 05, 2014 -
January 05, 2015
Highlights of American Drawings and Watercolors from The Huntington’s Art Collections
Thirty rarely seen masterworks from The Huntington’s significant collection of American drawings and watercolors are on view during this six-month-long exhibition. The installation highlights drawings by John Singer Sargent and Grant Wood, pastels by Mary Cassatt and Edwin Austin Abbey, and watercolors by Winslow Homer and Charles Burchfield. Some works will be rotated with others by the same artists in October 2014 for conservation reasons.

Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art, Susan and Stephen Chandler Wing
The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
August 12 -
December 31, 2014
Theodore Roosevelt – "How I Love Sagamore Hill" by Xiomáro
Harvard University's Houghton Library opens the New Year with selections from this photographic series. The New York artist was commissioned by the National Park service to photograph the interiors of the president's "Summer Whitehouse" at what is now Sagamore Hill National Historic Site.

Xiomáro's photographs show the house in a historically rare condition: the 23 room mansion, usually chock full of furnishings and mementos, was nearly vacant as part of a three-year, $7.2 million structural rehabilitation. The last significant body of interior photographs, albeit fully-furnished, is at the Library of Congress and was created in 1966 by Samuel Gottscho.

Xiomáro's exhibit is timely in that filmmaker Ken Burns, a Harvard graduate, is releasing The Roosevelts, a new PBS documentary that explores the political dynasty of TR, FDR and Eleanor Roosevelt. The exhibit is also unique in that Xiomáro's photographs do not solely focus on TR, but also draw attention to his wife, children and servants to give a sense of what life was like in the household. "Even though the rooms are nearly vacant, the photographs reveal the imposing character of America's 26th president and the more intimate domestic nature of his family," explained the artist. "Some of these nuances are overwhelmed by a room's furnishings or inaccessible to visitors behind velvet rope barriers."

Mon, Fri, & Sat 9:00am - 5:00pm
Tue, Wed, & Thu 9:00am - 7:00pm
Sun CLOSED

Theodore Roosevelt Gallery
Pusey Library
Harvard Yard
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
August 12 -
December 14, 2014
Harvard College Annual International Photo Contest
Photos taken by Harvard students who have studied, worked, interned, or done research abroad during the past year are on exhibit. For more information on the contest, see the photo contest page.

Mon, Fri, & Sat 9:00am - 5:00pm
Tue, Wed, & Thu 9:00am - 7:00pm
Sun CLOSED

Level B, 1st & 3rd floor display cases
Lamont Library
Harvard Yard
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
August 12, 2014 -
May 09, 2015
2014 Philip Hofer Prize for Collecting Books or Art
The Philip Hofer prize is awarded each year to a student at Harvard whose collection of books or works of art best exemplifies the traditions of breadth, coherence, and imagination represented by Philip Hofer, A.B. '21, L.H.D. '67, founder and first Curator of the Department of Printing and Graphic Arts in the Houghton Library and Secretary of the Fogg Art Museum. The prize, which is to encourage student interest in collecting, was established in 1987 by Melvin R. Seiden, A.B. '52, L.L.B. '55. Students competing for the prize submit an annotated list or bibliography and an essay describing the scope, contents, and goal of the collection. On exhibition are samples of this year's first prize winning collection, , A History of the 1933 Goudey Baseball Card Set: From Artwork to Copyright Registration, submitted by Benjamin Lee, Class of 2017.

Mon, Fri, & Sat 9:00am - 5:00pm
Tue, Wed, & Thu 9:00am - 7:00pm
Sun CLOSED

3rd floor display cases
Lamont Library
Harvard Yard
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
August 12, 2014 -
May 09, 2015
2014 Undergraduate Book Collecting Prize
Established in 1977, the Visiting Committee Prize for Undergraduate Book Collecting recognizes and encourages book collecting by undergraduates at Harvard. Students competing for the annual prize submit an annotated bibliography and an essay on their collecting efforts, the influence of mentors, the experience of searching for, organizing and caring for items, and the future direction of the collection. On display are samplings of the collections of this year's prize-winning entries, along with personal commentary.

Mon, Fri, & Sat 9:00am - 5:00pm
Tue, Wed, & Thu 9:00am - 7:00pm
Sun CLOSED

2nd & 3rd floor display cases
Lamont Library
Harvard Yard
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
August 20, 2014 -
July 06, 2015
The Temple of Flora: Prints by Robert John Thornton and Jim Dine
Dr. Robert John Thornton published The Temple of Flora (1799-1807), a botanical book of prints depicting
flora, information, commentary, and poetry. In 1984, American pop artist Jim Dine (born 1935) used the color mezzotints as models for his folio book “The Temple of Flora” also featuring etchings and poetry. The exhibition includes prints by Dine coupled with original Temple of Flora.
Free and open to the public.

Harnett Museum of Art
University of Richmond Museums
28 Westhampton Way
Richmond, VA
Exhibit South
August 20, 2014 -
January 24, 2015
American Ballet Theatre: Touring the Globe for 75 Years
In 1939, a group of dancers, choreographers, and producers associated with Russian-born Mikhail Mordkin's ballet company joined together to establish a new, innovative dance company they called Ballet Theatre. The company premiered in New York City on January 11, 1940, to great critical acclaim. Early in its organization, Ballet Theatre—renamed American Ballet Theatre (ABT) in 1957—began to tour, representing the United States both domestically and internationally. The exhibition highlights ABT's vibrant seventy-five year history with objects drawn primarily from the American Ballet Theatre Collection at the Library of Congress, as well as from the Library's extensive dance and music collections.

Performing Arts Reading Room, 1st Floor, James Madison Building
Library of Congress
101 Independence Avenue SE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
August 20, 2014 -
January 16, 2015
Context: Reading the Photography of Margaret Bourke-White
Margaret Bourke-White (1904-1971) was a celebrity behind, and in front of, the camera. As a photographer for Life magazine from the 1930s through the 1950s she documented unforgettable moments—African-American flood victims in Louisville, Kentucky, standing in a bread line beneath a banner that reads almost mockingly “There’s No Way Like the American Way”; just-liberated survivors of the Buchenwald Concentration Camp returning the camera’s gaze under an eerily cinematic light; Mahatma Gandhi sitting cross-legged on the floor reading, spinning wheel in the foreground. Bourke-White’s photographs helped shape the way millions of Americans experienced the Great Depression, the Second World War, and the world that followed.

In front of the camera she cultivated an image of herself as fearless, undaunted in pursuit of her “shot,” and fashionable, donning fine clothes and a coquettish smile. Oscar Graubner’s famous 1934 photograph of New York City’s Chrysler building shows her perched atop an Art Deco gargoyle staring down through the lens of her view camera at the street 61 stories below. A 1937 magazine profile called her the “camera queen” and positioned a well-coiffed Bourke-White with her camera in front of an industrial train yard. In 1959, when she was battling Parkinson’s Disease (it would eventually claim her life in 1971), Life ran a photo-essay on her pursuit of a cure.

After three decades in the public eye Bourke-White began to write her memoirs in the early 1950s. When Portrait of Myself finally appeared in 1963, she had already published ten books, countless essays, and been the subject of many interviews. In fact, but for the occasional gallery exhibition, text had always surrounded Bourke-White’s photographs, from her early days as a commercial photographer capturing the streamlined grace of the Pierce Arrow automobile in a sales brochure, to her profile of Otis Steele for Fortune magazine, to her pioneering 1937 collaboration with writer (and future husband) Erskine Caldwell, You Have Seen Their Faces. This exhibition explores how text “framed” the photography of Margaret Bourke-White and, ultimately, how she sought to transcend the limits of the medium that made her famous.

Special Collections Research Center Gallery
Syracuse University Libraries
222 Waverly Avenue
Syracuse, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
August 22 -
December 19, 2014
As the Ink Flows: Works from the Pen of William Steig
The exhibition explores the life and career of the artist, cartoonist, and children's book author/illustrator William Steig. The exhibition highlights materials from the recent gift of over 3,000 original drawings, notebooks and scrapbooks, correspondence, books, posters, and other materials made by Jeanne Steig, his widow, to the University of Pennsylvania Libraries, supplemented with loans from his family.

Pen and ink played a central role in William Steig's life, from childhood on. Interestingly, for someone who would become an important artist and gifted cartoonist for The New Yorker magazine, it was writing, not drawing that was his first creative outlet. The exhibition explores this world of pen and ink, of writing and drawing, to show how intertwined these activities were for William Steig, who became an author as well as an artist. Unlike many artists, who are not great readers, Steig consumed books, and the ideas they contained. The more one considers the range of his work, the more one can see that his artistry is ultimately informed by language, that is, by ideas that can be thought and written, and then translated into images.

The exhibition will examine the trajectory of Steig's career, from his family background and youth through his cartoons and covers for The New Yorker and other publications, to his books of symbolic drawings and his later work, culminating in his children's books.

Mon - Fri 10am - 5pm
Wedn 10am - 8pm

Goldstein Family Gallery
Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books & Manuscripts
Van Pelt Dietrich Library Center, 6th Floor
3420 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 05 -
December 06, 2014
Water Paper Stone :: A Walk-Through Book
authored by Judy O'Shea

THE EXHIBITION:
Water Paper Stone: A Walk-Through Book by Judy O'Shea opens at San Francisco Center for the Book on September 5. The installation celebrates the experiences Judy writes about in her memoir Water Paper Stone. Art from 18 of the French and American artists who participated in the artist-in-residence Judy and her husband hosted in Plaisance, France are featured:

Judy O'Shea :: Chantal Armagnac :: Carole Beadle :: Richard Berger :: Kay Bradner :: Bernard Cauhape :: Catherine Choron-Baix :: Michel Cubilie :: Sylvie Gravellard :: Mariana Goodheart :: Francois Grand-Clement :: Charles Hobson :: Michel Hulliard :: Carolyn Miller :: Mike O'Shea :: Dan Pillers :: Jean-Michel Pret :: Inge Roberts :: Alice Wingwall

OPENING RECEPTION
Friday, September 5, 2014
6:00pm to 9:00pm

THE BOOK:
Judy O'Shea recently published a memoir of her experience running an artist-in-residence program in France for 17 years. The heart of Judy and her husband Mike’s residence program was the group of artists, American and French, who came together to work at La Pilande Basse, an 18th-century watermill in the Aveyron region of southern France that Judy and Mike restored as a base for art.

THE INSTALLATION:
Judy came up with the idea to create an artists’ book version of her memoir as a full-scale exhibition at the San Francisco Center for the Book. The scale of the exhibition would allow the viewer to wander through an enormous book: 15-foot covers, a 20-foot spine, and pages hanging from the rafters. The primary structure of the book would be constructed with paper that Judy makes by hand at her Inverness, California studio. Judy invited 17 artists (10 American and 7 French) to contribute the “pages” for this special artists’ book. The pages are as varied as the artists, but are all originally conceived for the site, and have a special dialogue that comes from collective experiences.

FREE PUBLIC LECTURE:
by Judy O'Shea
October 19, 2014
2:00pm
Koret Auditorium
San Francisco Public Library, Main Library

San Francisco Center for the Book
375 Rhode Island Street
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
September 09 -
December 15, 2014
Reading English: An Exhibition Celebrating the James Marshall & Marie-Louise Osborn Collection
This exhibition marks the 80th anniversary of the James Marshall and Marie-Louise Osborn Collection of English Literary and Historical Manuscripts, held at the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library. Renowned for its holdings in in English manuscripts, archives, and annotated books, the Osborn Collection has had a formative influence on early mordern British scholarship. This was the intention of the collection's founder, James Marshall Osborn, who studied English Literature at the University of Oxford before settling at Yale. The exhibition introduces the collector alongside the collection: scholar and collector of early modern British manuscripts; colleague and friend of literary critics Cleanth Brooks, William Wimsatt, Robert Penn Warren, Maynard Mack, and Wilmarth Lewis; and active particpant in Yale University's emergence as the leading center for literary criticism in 20th-century America.

Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library
121 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
September 09 -
December 31, 2014
RARE LETTERPRESS SHAKESPEARE BY THE FOLIO SOCIETY
The Folio Society announced today that the only complete collection of its Letterpress Shakespeare editions outside of the United Kingdom, will be on display to the public at the Center for Fiction through the end of the year.

Since the First Folio in 1623 there have been countless editions of Shakespeare's works. The Folio Society wanted to do something unprecedented: to design an edition so pure, so simple, that the beauty of the text could be fully appreciated – an edition that would be as timeless as the text itself. The project was to occupy some of the Europe's finest book designers, typesetters, paper-makers, printers and binders for eight years.

The starting point was the text. Rather than keep text and commentary together, The Folio Society decided to put them in separate volumes. Out went the elements that clutter the page: footnotes and textual variants. All that remained was Shakespeare's words. Alongside the leather-bound primary volume is an annotated Oxford University Press edition, edited by eminent Shakespeare scholar, Stanley Wells.

“There was never any doubt about what printing process to use,” said Joe Whitlock Blundell, Production Director at The Folio Society. “For all the benefits of modern technology, letterpress is still unmatched in the visual and tactile pleasure it affords the reader. It would be slow, it would be expensive, it would be laborious, but it would give a beauty to each page, the beauty of fresh type crisply pressed into mould-made paper, which no other printing process could match.”

The Folio Society found four printing firms who had the necessary enthusiasm and expertise to produce the Letterpress Shakespeare: Hand & Eye Letterpress in London, Logan Press in Northamptonshire, Stan Lane's Stonehouse Fine Press in Gloucestershire and Offizin Haag-Drugulin in Germany – a firm that gained its reputation printing the first editions of Franz Kafka and Thomas Mann. When the printing was complete the type was melted down, never to be used again. The intricate and skilled task of casting and setting the hot metal type by hand fell to Stan Lane, a master compositor and type caster who has worked with letterpress for over 50 years.

Monday - Thursday 10:30am - 7:30pm
Friday 9:00am - 5:00pm
Saturday 11:00am - 3:00pm

The Center for Fiction
17 E. 47th Street (between Fifth & Madison)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 09, 2014 -
January 05, 2015
Highlights of American Drawings and Watercolors from The Huntington’s Art Collections
Thirty rarely seen masterworks from The Huntington’s significant collection of American drawings and watercolors are on view during this six-month-long exhibition. The installation highlights drawings by John Singer Sargent and Grant Wood, pastels by Mary Cassatt and Edwin Austin Abbey, and watercolors by Winslow Homer and Charles Burchfield. Some works will be rotated with others by the same artists in October 2014 for conservation reasons.

Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art, Susan and Stephen Chandler Wing
The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
September 10, 2014 -
January 31, 2015
OVER HERE: WORLD WAR I POSTERS FROM AROUND THE WORLD
The Boston Athenæum holds an extraordinary, but little known, collection of World War I posters. Consisting of nearly 1,800 posters from fourteen countries, this collection provides a unique graphic record of the War of Nations. The exhibition, Over Here: World War I Posters from around the World, timed to coincide with centennial observances of World War I, will feature highlights from the collection, including forty-four framed posters and cases filled with leaflets, postcards, and book and magazine illustrations.

Boston Athenæum
10½ Beacon Street
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
September 10, 2014 -
January 04, 2015
The Making of Gone With The Wind
Go behind the scenes of one of the classic films of Hollywood's Golden Age. Featuring more than 300 rarely seen and some never-before-exhibited materials, the exhibition is drawn entirely from the Ransom Center's collections and includes on-set photographs, storyboards, correspondence and fan mail, production records, makeup stills, concept art, costume sketches, audition footage, and producer David O. Selznick's memos. The green curtain dress and other gowns worn by Vivien Leigh are displayed together for the first time in more than 25 years.

Before a single frame of film was shot, Gone With The Wind was embroiled in controversy. Selznick struggled to balance his desire for authenticity with audience expectations of spectacle. Americans debated who should be cast as Rhett and Scarlett. There were serious concerns about how the 1939 film, based on the 1936 novel by Margaret Mitchell, would depict race, sex, and violence in the South during the U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction.

This insider view reveals why Gone With The Wind remains influential and controversial 75 years after it was released.

Extended Hours for Gone With The Wind (starting Sept. 9):
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, & Friday 10am – 5:00pm
Thursday 10am – 7pm
Saturday & Sunday Noon – 5:00pm

Member-only hours 10am - noon Saturday & Sunday

Free admission, donations welcome

TOURS:
Noon Daily
6pm Thursday
2pm Saturday
2pm Sunday

Gone With The Wind screentests will be shown in the Ransom Center's first-floor theater at 1:30pm and 3:30pm on weekends, immediately following the public tour.

The Ransom Center Galleries
Henry Ransom Center
The University of Texas at Austin
300 West 21st Street (21st & Guadalupe Streets)
Austin, TX
Exhibit Southwest
September 10 -
December 12, 2014
Welcome Additions
This exhibition highlights fifty rare books, manuscripts, broadsides, prints, and letters that were acquired by Bridwell Library Special Collections between 2008 and 2014. Produced in Europe and the Americas from the fifteenth to the nineteenth century, these works include late-medieval manuscripts, early printing, devotional manuals, books for worship, biblical translations, illustrated religious texts, Methodist writings, and printed ephemera. Each selected item is an authentic witness both to the history of written or printed communication and to important aspects of religious life in the past. Exhibited here for the first time, these recent acquisitions enhance the research potential of Bridwell Library’s holdings in a variety of important collecting areas.

The Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Galleries
Bridwell Library
Perkins School of Theology
Southern Methodist University
6005 Bishop Blvd.
Dallas, TX
Exhibit Southwest
September 10 -
December 05, 2014
Missionary Presses
This exhibition highlights Bibles and other religious texts in indigenous languages published by missionary presses in the nineteenth century. Printed throughout the world in a variety of languages and letterforms, these translations were disseminated for local use as an integral element of conversion efforts by various denominations. Reminders of the numerous difficulties of communicating across cultural, theological, and linguistic boundaries, these works testify to the series of collaborations between translators, native speakers, and printers whose combined efforts created the sacred and instructional works here on display.

Bridwell Library Entry Hall
Perkins School of Theology
Southern Methodist University
6005 Bishop Blvd.
Dallas, TX
Exhibit Southwest
September 11 -
December 13, 2014
InsideOUT Contemporary Bindings of Private Press Books
Fifty-nine binders and nine private presses from North America, Canada and Britain have collaborated to form an exhibition which demonstrates the relationship of the binding design to the printed book. Because many of the binders have chosen the same title to work on, it also highlights the differing approaches to the same text. Samples of the texts and illustrations are shown alongside the bindings. The relationship between private presses and bookbinders is longstanding and it is hoped that this extra element to the show will provide the viewer with a more rounded appreciation of the work on display. Curator of the exhibition is Lester Capon, Fellow of Designer Bookbinders, the organization that sponsored the competition for which these bindings were created.

Mon, Fri, & Sat 9:00am - 5:00pm
Tue, Wed, & Thu 9:00am - 7:00pm
Sun CLOSED

Edison Newman Room
Houghton Library
Harvard Yard
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
September 16, 2014 -
January 04, 2015
Call to Duty: World War Posters
This exhibition, highlighting more than 70 original World War I and World War II posters, many of which were donated by Captain Roswell C. Williams, Jr., and Raymond Schock, are drawn from The Museum's own permanent collection. These posters help to tell the story of the massive human efforts put forth during these two world wars. Originally displayed in public locations such as post offices, train stations, city halls, schools, and businesses, these war posters and the messages they communicated, were found throughout the United States.

This impressive selection explores themes of military recruitment; raising funds for war through government bonds and other methods; efforts on the home front like conservation and work ethic; campaigns by service organizations such as the Salvation Army, YMCA and Boy Scouts; and the role of women in the war effort. Many of the posters are American, but examples from Canada, France, Great Britain and other ally nations are also featured.

Artists such as J. C. Leyendecker, James Montgomery Flagg, Howard Chandler Christy, Edward Penfield, Francis Luis Mora, Jessie Wilcox Smith, and Norman Rockwell, among others, are included in this exhibition.

Second Floor Galleries
Reading Public Museum
500 Museum Road
Reading, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 17, 2014 -
January 03, 2015
Chicago, Europe, and the Great War
In the fall of 2014, the Newberry will mark the centennial of the start of World War I with two linked exhibitions and a series of related public programs.

Chicago, Europe, and the Great War draws on the Newberry’s collection to tell the story of Chicago’s many and varied connections to the conflict. Chicagoans reported and commented on the war, fought in it, supported it, and protested against it. Letters and photographs by servicemen; dispatches and drawings by reporters who covered the war for Chicago newspapers; writings from opponents of the war; photographs and letters documenting medical relief at the front; and posters and sheet music that encouraged food conservation, fundraising, and wartime patriotism—these are just some of the items attesting to both the sheer scale of the “Great War” and Chicago’s place within it.

Chicago’s Jane Addams and the settlement movement she led inspired Anne Morgan’s relief work in northern France and provided a model for what her volunteers accomplished there. Morgan’s efforts are chronicled in the companion exhibition, American Women Rebuilding France, 1917-1924. Chicago, Europe, and the Great War contextualizes Addams’s influence on Morgan’s work by showing how other Chicago club women, settlement workers, and Progressive reformers responded to the war crisis.

Free and open to the public.

Hermon Dunlap Smith Gallery
The Newberry
60 West Walton Street
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
September 19, 2014 -
January 18, 2015
Sacred Places, Sacred Books
Starting on 19 September, the MAS | Museum aan de Stroom and the Hendrik Conscience Heritage Library will present Sacred Places, Sacred Books, a fascinating exhibition on the three major religions: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. They differ from each other, but there are also some surprising similarities. Visitors embark on a journey of discovery to find out what the sacred books and sacred places mean today.

The exhibition in the autumn of 2014

The MAS and the Hendrik Conscience Heritage Library are looking forward to the dual exhibition, Sacred Places, Sacred Books. The MAS sheds light on pilgrimage to sacred places and shows how these sacred places have held a magnetic attraction for centuries. Visitors tread in pilgrims’ footsteps and follow their experiences through rare documents and valuable works of art from all over the world. The Nottebohm Hall in the Hendrik Conscience Heritage Library offers a unique insight into the form, content, use and study of the Tanakh, the Bible and the Qur'an. It is an exceptional dual exhibition with more than 200 art historical and valuable religious objects and books. There are several masterpieces from each religion.

Judaism, Christianity and Islam are well represented in Antwerp. The exhibition Sacred Places, Sacred Books is an ambitious project to which various heritage organisations and the three religious communities have contributed.

Sacred Places – MAS | Museum aan de Stroom

The MAS provides an insight into the living traditions of pilgrimage. Jewish, Christians and Muslims alike feel a strong attraction to places that are related to special objects or individuals or to historic events. Pilgrims make long journeys to experience the divine forces at work there. The exhibitions follows their journey from their departure and the visit of the sanctuary to their return home. It is a physical and spiritual journey which inspires a similar sentiment in pilgrims all over the world. Why do certain places exert such a pull on people? What makes places like Jerusalem, Rome or Mecca so special? Why do people visit the graves of saints? The visitor follows the pilgrims in the exhibition, and experiences their feelings of hope, ecstasy and purification.

Fringe activities

In the framework of the dual exhibition, Antwerpen Open has set up a cultural fringe programme together with several cultural partners in the city, including exhibitions in Museum Plantin-Moretus, the Monumental Churches of Antwerp and the Ruusbroec Society. There will be concerts and lectures in Amuz, Graindelavoix will give a performance, and the Berlin theatre company will perform “Jerusalem”. As well as this, several walks are being organised and fascinating encounters will take place in Antwerp's most beautiful churches, synagogues and mosques.

MAS | Museum aan de Stroom and the Hendrik Conscience Heritage Library
Hanzestedenplaats 1
Antwerpen, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
September 19, 2014 -
January 03, 2015
i found god in myself: The 40th Anniversary of Ntozake Shange's for colored girls
Since its debut performance in California in 1974, Shange’s work has captivated, provoked, inspired and transformed audiences all over the world. Turning to the choreopoem not simply as an engaging work of text or drama but as a well of social, political and deeply personal issues affecting the lives of women of color, the exhibition will feature 20 specially commissioned pieces in honor of each individual poem, additional non-commissioned artworks on display at satellite locations that address the work’s themes and archival material donated by Shange.

The exhibition’s title is drawn from one of the last lines recited in the finale poem a laying on of hands. The title suggests that navigating through the complexities of what it means to be of color and female is only enlightened by an understanding, acceptance and appreciation of self. With self-empowerment comes the process of “…moving to the ends of their own rainbows.” By presenting visual works from both women and men, all races and various generations, i found god in myself explores the universality inherent in Shange’s powerful message to the world.

A series of spoken word performances, screenings, panels, a community art project and a guided art crawl will accompany the exhibition.

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
Latimer/Edison Gallery
515 Malcolm X Blvd.
Manhattan, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 20, 2014 -
January 11, 2015
ART=TEXT=ART: PRIVATE LANGUAGES / PUBLIC SYSTEMS
The exhibition explores the advent of language in the visual arts in post-war America and the simultaneous emergence of concrete poetry. These practices embraced language’s ability to carry multiple, even contradictory meanings, thus creating a space for individual acts of anti-conformist thought. Through words in art, flirtations with ideas unauthorized by then-dominant socio-political realities were allowed expression, especially among an early generation of LGBTQ artists.

Wed - Sat 11am - 5pm
Sun 1pm - 5pm

Free admission

UB Anderson Gallery
One Martha Jackson Place
Buffalo, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 26, 2014 -
January 18, 2015
The Untamed Landscape: Théodore Rousseau and the Path to Barbizon
With Camille Corot and Jean-François Millet, Théodore Rousseau (1812–67) ranks as one of the preeminent masters of the Barbizon School, a group of nineteenth-century French artists whose preferred subject was the primeval wooded landscape of the forest of Fontainebleau. The Barbizon School painters were greatly influenced by the Romantic movement, producing works inspired by the powerful forces of nature. Surprisingly, despite his pivotal role in French art and his profound impact on the development of landscape painting, Rousseau has never before been the subject of a monographic exhibition.

Comprising seventy works from private and public collections, including the Morgan Library & Museum, this exhibition will consider the artist's wide-ranging achievements as a draftsman and his particular approach to the open-air oil sketch. It will trace Rousseau's path to Barbizon—from his early oil sketches in the Ile-de-France to his mature works in the Auvergne, Normandy, and Fontainebleau forest—assessing the impact of the Dutch masters on the artist's landscape imagery. Rousseau's essays—some bucolic and evocative of a simpler, pre-industrial age, others brooding, moody, and redolent with lingering vestiges of Romanticism or testaments to the haunting majesty of the natural world—are both appealing and instructive. Collectively, this selection chronicles Rousseau's artistic practice and highlights his contribution to the shifting conception of landscape in the wake of the Industrial Revolution. The show will explore the range of techniques and handling of media, and the sense of poetic melancholy that permeates Rousseau's art. A fully illustrated scholarly catalogue accompanies the exhibition.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5:00pm
Fri 10:30am - 9:00pm
Sat 10:00am - 6:00pm
Sun 11:00am - 6:00pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 26, 2014 -
January 25, 2015
Cy Twombly: Treatise on the Veil
This exhibition showcases Cy Twombly's monumental painting Treatise on the Veil (Second Version), executed in Rome in 1970, and its related drawings, all from the Menil Collection in Houston. Not shown in New York City for nearly thirty years, and rarely on display at the Menil due to its size (nearly 33 feet in length), the painting marks a pivotal moment in the career of one of the most important artists to emerge in the wake of Abstract Expressionism. Inspired by a musical piece, Treatise on the Veil is a meditation on time and space. The preparatory drawings, which combine pencil, crayon, collage, tape, measurements and other inscriptions, offer a fascinating window into the artist's creative process.

Twombly (1928-2011) was born in Lexington, Virginia. He studied at the Boston Museum School of Fine Arts, New York's Art Students League, and at Black Mountain College, North Carolina, under Abstract Expressionists Robert Motherwell and Franz Kline. Early travels to Europe and North Africa nourished his interest in ancient art and mythology. In 1957, Twombly moved to Rome, where he lived most of his life. References to Antiquity and the Renaissance abound in his art, which is characterized by a rich repertoire of marks, scrawls, scribbles, doodles, and scratches – at once expressive of a gestural approach and of cultural symbols. The two paintings entitled Treatise on the Veil (the first version, of 1968, is in the Ludwig Museum in Cologne) are highlights of Twombly's "grey-ground" period which spanned from 1966 to the early 1970s, in which thin white lines running across a grey background convey an increasingly lyrical feel.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5:00pm
Fri 10:30am - 9:00pm
Sat 10:00am - 6:00pm
Sun 11:00am - 6:00pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 27, 2014 -
March 01, 2015
Three exhibitions exploring mythology
The Bowdoin College Museum of Art Presents
Three Exhibitions Exploring Mythological Themes, Spanning the 16th Century to Today

Exhibitions feature works by Hendrick Goltzius, Rare Baroque Tapestries, and an Alison de Vere film.

This fall, the Bowdoin College Museum of Art presents three focus exhibitions, spotlighting historical and 20th-century artist’s approaches to and interpretations of classical Greek mythology. Together the exhibitions—including Hendrick Goltzius: Mythology and Truth; Weaving the Myth of Psyche: Baroque Tapestries from the Wadsworth Atheneum, and Alison de Vere’s short film, Psyche and Eros (1994)—explore key themes that mythological narratives have evoked over time and that continue to resonate in contemporary culture.

Hendrick Goltzius: Mythology and Truth features a group of prints and one painting that showcase the Dutch artist’s evolution as one of the most skilled printmakers of the late 16th and early 17th centuries. Born in 1558, Goltzius was both a renowned painter and printmaker during his lifetime, and first gained critical acclaim as one of Northern Europe’s leading mannerists. Today, Goltzius is best known for his sumptuously detailed engravings that bring diverse subjects to life—from renderings of the King of France to the feats of Hercules to the life of the Virgin Mary. Hendrick Goltzius: Mythology and Truth examines the artist’s illustrious and versatile career, illuminating new aspects of Goltzius’s artistic legacy by presenting his ongoing thematic and technical experimentation in the medium of printmaking at the end of the 16th century.

Mythology and Truth includes Goltzius’s engraving The Wedding of Cupid and Psyche, the classical myth further explored in the exhibition on view in the adjoining gallery, Weaving the Myth of Psyche: Baroque Tapestries from the Wadsworth Atheneum. On view through March 8, 2015, Weaving the Myth of Psyche features five rare 17th-century tapestries depicting the tumultuous love affair of Psyche and Eros. These tapestries derive from a 1660 cycle designed for a noble family in Paris during the reign of King Louis XIV. Though the designs were initially attributed to Raphael, they have since been reattributed to the Flemish artist Pieter Coecke van Aelst (1502–1550), who conceived some of the most ambitious tapestry series of the 16th century, and whose achievements are currently highlighted in the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s exhibition Grand Design: Pieter Coecke van Aelest and Renaissance Tapestry.

The myth of Cupid and Psyche dates to the 4th century BCE, and regained popularity in early modern Europe after the rediscovery of The Golden Ass, a novel by 2nd-century Roman author Apuleius. Apuleius tells the story of the romance between the mortal Psyche and the god Cupid, which is thwarted by the jealousy of the goddess Venus. Immortalized in these Baroque tapestries, this ancient tale addresses the universal themes of love, loss, and self-discovery.

On view the Museum’s rotunda, British filmmaker Alison de Vere’s short animated film, Psyche and Eros (1994), offers a contemporary interpretation of this rich mythological narrative. Collaboratively created by de Vere and her husband, artist Karl Weschke, this retelling of the myth provides a particularly personal and poignant dimension to the character of Psyche, and illustrates the story’s enduring significance in contemporary culture.

Free and open to the public

Shaw Ruddock Gallery
Bowdoin College Museum of Art
9400 College Station
Brunswick, ME
Exhibit New England
September 27, 2014 -
January 05, 2015
John James Audubon and the Artist as Naturalist
In his famous publication The Birds of America (1827–1838), American naturalist and artist John James Audubon depicts over 400 species of North American birds with his life-size prints. The exhibition will feature Crystal Bridges’ double elephant folio copy of The Birds of America, re-issued by Audubon’s son in 1861, and will highlight several artworks related to the renowned publication, including:

Wild Turkey Cock, Hen and Young, which was painted during Audubon’s promotional tour in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1826 at a key moment in the artist’s career. This painting, part of the Crystal Bridges collection, is one of the few oil paintings by Audubon that are known to have survived. He used such paintings to raise funds and recruit subscribers for The Birds of America. Audubon created his bird studies using watercolor, pastel, pencil, and gouache. Wild Turkey Cock, Hen and Young is based on two watercolors that were among the first to be engraved for his famous collection of prints.

Wild Turkey (ca. 1845), on loan from the Gilcrease Museum for this exhibition, is an almost identical oil copy of the first plate of his The Birds of America. The American wild turkey was Audubon’s favorite subject and is the largest species in his publication.

Audubon’s oil painting Osprey and Weakfish, on loan from the National Gallery of Art, documents the artist’s skill in adding dramatic effects to his compositions, and will join the exhibition in November after a current loan concludes.

In addition, the exhibition features the New York Historical Society’s portrait of Audubon by his son John Woodhouse Audubon, works by Martin Johnson Heade, and Karl Bodmer, plus rare color plates by Mark Catesby and Alexander Wilson, artists who had in common a willingness to face challenges and take risks during their field studies and drawing expeditions to unexplored areas. Fidelia Bridges and Lucia Smith Carpenter Bliss, whose watercolors are included in the exhibition, were among the few successful 19th-century female artists who focused on smaller aspects of nature such as flower studies and birds and sought to express the truth and beauty of nature.

Colonial to Early 19th-century Art Gallery
Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art
600 Museum Way (off NE J Street)
Bentonville, AR
Exhibit South
September 29, 2014 -
March 01, 2015
GOYA A Lifetime of Graphic Invention
Francisco José de Goya y Lucientes (1746-1828) is regarded as the most important Spanish artist of the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. A witness to decades of political upheaval and social unrest, he represents both the culmination of the tradition of the Old Masters and the beginning of modernity.

In addition to his commissioned work as a court painter, Goya was an innovative and subtle graphic artist. Over the course of his long career, he produced almost three hundred etchings and lithographs that reveal his personal vision, tireless invention, and enthusiasm for technical experimentation. Goya: A Lifetime of Graphic Invention will present Goya’s printed oeuvre as an integral—indeed defining—component of his life and career. The exhibition will also invite a reconsideration of the Museum’s paintings by Goya through the context of his lifelong engagement with printmaking.

Among the more than 200 works to be featured are complete first edition sets of Goya’s four major print series, Los Caprichos (The Caprices, 1799), Los Desastres de la Guerra (The Disasters of War, 1810-19), La Tauromaquia (Bullfighting, 1816), and Los Disparates (The Follies, 1816-23).

Tuesday-Friday 10am - 5pm
Saturday 10am - 5pm
Sunday 1 - 5pm
Thursdays until 9pm
Monday CLOSED

$10 for adults, $8 for seniors 65 and over, $4 for students.
Complimentary admission on Thursdays after 5pm.
Meadows Museum members and children under the age of 12 are admitted free.
SMU faculty, staff, and students receive free admission upon presentation of their University photo ID.

Meadows Museum
5900 Bishop Blvd.
Dallas, TX
Exhibit Southwest
September 29, 2014 -
February 28, 2015
A Day in the Life: Artists' Diaries from the Archives of American Art
Reading an artist’s diary is the next best thing to being there. Direct and private, diaries provide firsthand accounts of appointments made and met, places seen, and work in progress—all laced with personal ruminations, name-dropping, and the occasional sketch or doodle. Whether recording historic events or simple day-to-day moments, these diary entries evoke the humanity of these artists and their moment in time.

Open daily 11:30am – 7:00pm

Admission: Free

Lawrence A. Fleischman Gallery
Donald W. Reynolds Center for American Art and Portraiture
8th & F Streets NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 29, 2014 -
January 11, 2015
Witches and wicked bodies
This exhibition will examine the portrayal of witches and witchcraft in art from the Renaissance to the end of the 19th century. It will feature prints and drawings by artists including Dürer, Goya, Delacroix, Burne-Jones and Dante Gabriel Rossetti, alongside classical Greek vessels and Renaissance maiolica.

Efforts to understand and interpret seemingly malevolent deeds – as well apportion blame for them and elicit confessions through hideous acts of torture – have had a place in society since classical antiquity and Biblical times. Men, women and children have all been accused of sorcery. The magus, or wise practitioner of ‘natural magic’ or occult ‘sciences’, has traditionally been male, but the majority of those accused and punished for witchcraft, especially since the Reformation, have been women. They are shown as monstrous hags with devil-worshipping followers. They represent an inversion of a well-ordered society and the natural world.

The focus of the exhibition is on prints and drawings from the British Museum’s collection, alongside a few loans from the V&A, the Ashmolean, Tate Britain and the British Library. Witches fly on broomsticks or backwards on dragons or beasts, as in Albrecht Dürer’s Witch Riding backwards on a Goat of 1501, or Hans Baldung’s Witches’ Sabbath from 1510. They are often depicted within cave-like kitchens surrounded by demons, performing evil spells, or raising the dead within magic circles, as in the powerful work of Salvator Rosa, Jacques de Gheyn and Jan van der Velde.

Francisco de Goya turned the subject of witches into an art form all of its own, whereby grotesque women conducting hideous activities on animals and children were represented in strikingly beautiful aquatint etchings. Goya used them as a way of satirising divisive social, political and religious issues of his day. Witches were also shown as bewitching seductresses intent on ensnaring their male victims, seen in the wonderful etching by Giovanni Battista Castiglione of Circe, who turned Odysseus’ companions into beasts.

During the Romantic period, Henry Fuseli’s Weird Sisters from Macbeth influenced generations of theatre-goers, and illustrations of Goethe’s Faust were popularised by Eugène Delacroix. By the end of the 19th century, hideous old hags with distended breasts and snakes for hair were mostly replaced by sexualised and mysteriously exotic sirens of feminine evil, seen in the exhibition in the work of Edward Burne-Jones, Dante Gabriel Rossetti and Odilon Redon.

The exhibition will also include several classical Greek vessels and examples of Renaissance maiolica to emphasise the importance of the subject in the decorative arts.

Open daily 10.00–17.30

Free admission

Room 90
British Museum
Great Russell Street
London, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
October 03, 2014 -
January 04, 2015
Gridiron Glory: The Best of the Pro Football Hall of Fame
It’s an all-American exhibition from the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

Exhibit Highlights:
See the Dazzling Vince Lombardi Trophy
Check out Jerry Rice’s Record-Breaking Football
See Jim Brown’s Jersey
Step into an Authentic Instant-Replay Booth
See Knute Rockne’s 1919 Massillon Tigers Helmet
Watch Spectacular NFL Film Footage of the Game’s Most Spectacular Runners, Including Tony Dorsett, Walter Payton and Bo Jackson

See the 1892 Allegheny Athletic Association Accounting Ledger Featuring “Pro Football’s Birth Certificate”

See Hundreds of Personal Artifacts from Dozens of All-Pro Icons: Tom Brady, Peyton Manning, John Elway, Joe Montana and the Detroit Lions’ One-and-Only Barry Sanders

Please Note: Photography, recording of any kind, food and drink are strictly prohibited in the exhibit area.

For a limited time, hundreds of hard-hitting artifacts from the Pro Football Hall of Fame. The dynasties, the pioneers, the superstars and the legends.

Henry Ford Museum celebrates the Pro Football Hall of Fame’s 50th anniversary with a 6,000-square-foot exhibition jam-packed with hundreds of artifacts chronicling pro football’s story, from its humble beginnings to the cultural phenomenon it is today.

Slip on a helmet rigged up with coach-to-player communication. Test your vertical leaping ability. Or step inside the Champions Theater and see hard-hitting new material from NFL Films, including the eye-popping feature Fantastic Finishes.

Have your own personal encounter with football history.

Open daily 9:30am - 5:00pm

Admission free with Henry Ford Museum ticket (Non-member):
Seniors (age 62 & up) $16
Adults (age 13-61) $18
Youth (age 5-12) $13.50
Children 4 & under are free.

Save $2 off Museum admission when you wear your favorite football jersey at the point of purchase. Offer expires November 30, 2014. Limit one discount per jersey.

Members free

The Henry Ford
20900 Oakwood Blvd.
Dearborn, MI
Exhibit Midwest
October 07, 2014 -
January 25, 2015
Fred Tomaselli: The Times
Even in our digital age of constant information, the rhythmic cycle of the daily newspaper is still a central form of organizing the world around us. The paper’s front page records in the present tense what will eventually become history. It orients our attention to pressing actions, be they individual, political, or natural, that over time repeat and rearrange into patterns around common human motivations. Fred Tomaselli‘s The Times traffics in these patterns, reflecting and reinventing them through complexly layered collages superimposed on recent cover stories in The New York Times. The collages surface unseen connections, rearrange realities, and reveal relationships of images and ideas across time and space.

Tomaselli uses images within the familiar grid of the front page as portals, overwriting and manipulating the supposed objective reality of the newspaper with his completely subjective surreality. His interventions play against the detachment of journalistic forms, inserting emotion, fantasy, and absurdity to counterpoint or underscore the original narrative. Tomaselli says these works “freeze time,” trapping inherently ephemeral events and images like flies in amber. But in aggregate this act also reimagines time, linking images and actions of a chosen day to their counterparts in the past and in some projected future.

The Times grew from Tomaselli’s own doodlings of personal commentary while reading, eventually spurring him to marry his “news junkie” habit with his studio practice. The series runs the gamut from hard-edged abstraction to hallucinatory pattern play, and engages in a dialogue with art historical imagery and themes, refracted through present-day news images.

Tue - Sat 11am – 5pm
Mon CLOSED
Sunday 12pm – 5pm

The Forum, Commons, and selected public spaces in the Maxine and Stuart Frankel and the Frankel Family Wing are open daily 8am – 8pm.

Free admission, $5 suggested donation is appreciated.

University of Michigan Museum of Art (UMMA)
525 South State Street
Ann Arbor, MI
Exhibit Midwest
October 11, 2014 -
January 04, 2015
Ghosts And Demons in Japanese Prints
Complementing the special exhibition Temptation: The Demons of James Ensor, this exhibition of Japanese prints of ghosts and demons draws upon the celebrated Clarence Buckingham Collection of Japanese Prints. It showcases some of the most special works in the collection, including Hokusai’s series One Hundred Stories (Hyaku monogatari), featuring chilling images of ghouls against bright blue backgrounds drawn from legends. This exhibition also features depictions of Shoki, the Demon Queller, who could subdue even the most frightening goblins with his sword. His image was often posted on doors to ward off disease and bad luck during the Edo period (1615-1868).

Open daily 10:30–5:00
Thursday until 8:00
General admission to the Art Institute of Chicago is free to Illinois residents every Thursday from 5 - 8pm.
An additional fee for special exhibitions may be applied.

The Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
October 11 -
December 20, 2014
Behind the Personal Art Library: Collectors Creating the Canon
Behind the Personal Art Library: Collectors Creating the Canon considers the influence of private collectors on the critical dialogue in the field of book arts. Rather than curating the works around a central theme, the goal of this exhibition is to examine works in these collections that have become seminal artworks in the field at large, thus becoming influential to establishing a canon. The exhibition also analyzes the collectors themselves: how they came to collect books, what drove them to continue collecting, whether they consciously built and curated their collections, and how these factors influenced and informed artist bookmaking practices. On top of continuing the conversation of the book arts canon, Behind the Personal Art Library is a walk down memory lane with the Center for Book Arts. Many of the works and artists in this show are coming full circle, having exhibited at the Center previously.

Mon - Fri 11am-6pm
Sat 10am-5pm

Fall Exhibitions Opening & Birthday Bash
October 11th 6:00 - 9:00pm

The Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 11 -
December 20, 2014
Featured Artist Project: Richard Minsky: Notes
Mon-Fri 11am - 6pm
Sat 10am - 5pm

The Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th St, 3rd Floor
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 11 -
December 20, 2014
Behind the Personal Library: Collectors Creating the Canon
Fall Main Gallery Exhibition
Featuring artworks from 13 private collections from around the world.

Behind the Personal Art Library: Collectors Creating the Canon considers the influence of private collectors on the critical dialogue in the field of book arts. Rather than curating the works around a central theme, the goal of this exhibition is to examine works in these collections that have become seminal artworks in the field at large, thus becoming influential to establishing a canon. The exhibition also analyzes the collectors themselves: how they came to collect books, what drove them to continue collecting, whether they consciously built and curated their collections, and how these factors influenced and informed artist bookmaking practices. On top of continuing the conversation of the book arts canon, Behind the Personal Art Library is a walk down memory lane with the Center for Book Arts. Many of the works and artists in this show are coming full circle, having exhibited at the Center previously.
Collections featured include: Philip E. Aarons & Shelley Fox Aarons (NY), Mary Austin (CA), Duke Collier (MA), Jack Ginsberg (South Africa), Arthur Jaffe (FL), Monica Oppen (Australia), Barbara Pascal (CA), Marvin & Ruth Sackner (FL), Julia Vermes (Switzerland), Frank Williams (MA/NY), Martha Wilson (NY), and Tony Zwicker (CT).

The Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th St, 3rd Floor
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 17, 2014 -
February 01, 2015
ida y Drama de México: Prints from the Monroe E. Price and Aimée Brown Price Collection
Vida y Drama de México: Prints from the Monroe E. Price and Aimée Brown Price Collection presents a selection of approximately 50 Mexican prints and posters from a group of over 125 given or lent to the Gallery. Most of the works in the exhibition were made at the Taller de Gráfica Popular (People’s Graphic Workshop), a collective printmaking workshop in Mexico City founded in 1937 by Leopoldo Méndez, Luis Arenal, and Pablo O’Higgins. The collective’s aim was to create art to improve the lives of peasants and laborers and to support social justice—goals not fully realized by the Mexican Revolution (1910–20). To reach the broadest possible audience, the Taller artists created works that could be widely distributed and that employed a clear, representational style and inexpensive techniques, like lithography and linocut. The subjects of these powerful prints and posters include anti-war messages; support for workers and their unions; protests of government-sanctioned violence against demonstrators; political heroes and villains; U.S.-Mexican relations; and indigenous Indians.

Tue – Fri 10am – 5pm
Thu (Sept.–June) 10am – 8pm
Sat – Sun 11am – 5pm
Closed Mondays

Yale University Art Gallery
1111 Chapel Street (at York Street)
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
October 17, 2014 -
January 05, 2015
The Crusader Bible: A Gothic Masterpiece
The spectacular Crusader Bible is one of the greatest illuminated manuscripts in the world, renowned as much for its unrivalled and boldly colored illustrations as it is for its fascinating history. The work brings Old Testament stories alive in bright images replete with medieval castles, towns, and battling knights in armor, all set in thirteenth-century France. Before the manuscript is rebound visitors will have the opportunity to view over forty of its miniatures, the work of six anonymous artists who were the artistic geniuses of their day. They will also learn about the manuscript's incredible journey from France to Italy, Poland, Persia, Egypt, England, and finally, New York.

The picture book, which was likely made in Paris about 1250, has long been associated with the court of Louis IX, the pious crusader king of France and builder of the Sainte-Chapelle. The book originally had no text, but along the way inscriptions were added in Latin, Persian, and Judeo-Persian, indicative of changing owners. The illuminations represent one of the greatest visualizations of Old Testament events ever made. Some of the stories are familiar, but others, more rarely depicted, are surprising.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5:00pm
Fri 10:30am - 9:00pm
Sat 10:00am - 6:00pm
Sun 11:00am - 6:00pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 17, 2014 -
February 01, 2015
Vida y Drama de México: Prints from the Monroe E. Price and Aimée Brown Price Collection
Vida y Drama de México: Prints from the Monroe E. Price and Aimée Brown Price Collection presents a selection of approximately 50 Mexican prints and posters from a group of over 125 given or lent to the Gallery. Most of the works in the exhibition were made at the Taller de Gráfica Popular (People’s Graphic Workshop), a collective printmaking workshop in Mexico City founded in 1937 by Leopoldo Méndez, Luis Arenal, and Pablo O’Higgins. The collective’s aim was to create art to improve the lives of peasants and laborers and to support social justice—goals not fully realized by the Mexican Revolution (1910–20). To reach the broadest possible audience, the Taller artists created works that could be widely distributed and that employed a clear, representational style and inexpensive techniques, like lithography and linocut. The subjects of these powerful prints and posters include anti-war messages; support for workers and their unions; protests of government-sanctioned violence against demonstrators; political heroes and villains; U.S.-Mexican relations; and indigenous Indians.

Tue – Fri 10am – 5pm
Thu (Sept.–June) 10am – 8pm
Sat – Sun 11am – 5pm
Closed Mondays

Yale University Art Gallery
1111 Chapel Street (at York Street)
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
October 18, 2014 -
January 04, 2015
African American Art: Harlem Renaissance, Civil Rights Era, and Beyond
The exhibition presents 100 paintings, sculpture, and photographs by 43 African American artists from the premier collection of the Smithsonian American Art Museum, more than half of which are being shown for the first time. The exhibition features artists who came to prominence during the period bracketed by the Harlem Renaissance and the Civil Rights movement. Some trained in this country's most prestigious art schools, others in the ateliers of Paris. Many were teachers; others worked at whatever jobs allowed them time to create. All participated in multivalent dialogues about art, black identity, and the rights of the individual that engaged American society throughout the 20th century. The exhibition includes works by James Van der Zee, Robert McNeill, Richmond Barthe, Benny Andrews, Jacob Lawrence, Norman Lewis, Thornton Dial, Sargent Johnson, Lois Mailou Jones, Charles Searles, Romare Bearden, James Porter and Alma Thomas.

Sun Noon – 5 pm
Tue Noon – 5 pm
Wed Noon – 5 pm
Thu Noon – 5 pm
Fri Noon – 5 pm
Sat 10 am – 5 pm
On the third Thursday of every month 5:00-8:00 pm

General admission is $5 per person, suggested donation.

Everson Museum of Art
401 Harrison Street
Syracuse, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 21, 2014 -
January 04, 2015
Paul Strand: Master of Modern Photography
This major retrospective presents the work of a critical figure in the history of modern art, American photographer and filmmaker Paul Strand (1890–1976), whose archive of nearly 4,000 prints stands as a cornerstone of the Museum’s collection. Emphasizing the influential artist’s most important projects from the 1910s through the 1960s, the exhibition surveys Strand’s entire life’s work, including his breakthrough trials in abstraction and candid street portraits, close-ups of natural and machine forms, and extended explorations of the American Southwest, Mexico, New England, France, Italy, Scotland, Egypt, Morocco, Ghana, and Romania.

This exhibition includes approximately 250 of Strand’s finest prints, selected primarily from the Museum’s holdings, with important early prints from public and private collections. The wide range of imagery highlights how Strand radically changed his work at several key moments in an effort to identify photography's pivotal role as a means of understanding and describing the modern world. The exhibition also features works by fellow artists from the Alfred Stieglitz circle (Georgia O’Keeffe, John Marin, and Arthur Dove), screenings of Strand’s films, and a selection of archival materials.

ADMISSION*:
Access for two consecutive days to main Museum building, Perelman Building, Rodin Museum, and Historic Houses Mount Pleasant and Cedar Grove.

Adults: $20
Seniors (65 & over): $18
Students (with valid ID): $14
Youth (13–18): $14
Children (12 & under): Free
Members: Free

*First Sunday of the month and every Wednesday after 5:00 p.m.: pay what you wish.

Philadelphia Museum of Art
2600 Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 21, 2014 -
February 15, 2015
Sublime: The Prints of J. M. W. Turner and Thomas Moran
Celebrated for his innovative landscapes that included arresting topographies, luminous light effects, and fearsome storms, British Romantic painter Joseph Mallord William Turner (1775–1851) published his Liber Studiorum (Book of Studies) between 1807 and 1819. The set signals the artist’s commitment to elevating landscape to a level then enjoyed by history painting, a genre that comprised representations of religious, mythological, and historical events. Evoking a sense of the sublime—a term the 18th-century philosopher Edmund Burke defined as “whatever is fitted . . . to excite ideas of pain or danger”—Turner’s Liber Studiorum conveys the full range of nature’s expression. Widely circulated, the series shaped the ways in which contemporaries came to regard the natural world’s more awe-inspiring qualities.

Among those drawn to Turner’s art was American painter and printmaker Thomas Moran (1837–1926), who traded his own watercolors for Turner’s Liber Studiorum and traveled to England in 1862 to experience the English master’s works first-hand. Unlike other artists of the Hudson River School, Moran did not rely solely on other printmakers to reproduce his works, but rather viewed prints as an important extension of his own creative process. Drawing subjects from his travels in Europe and America, he is best known for images of Niagara and the American West, all of which manifest a distinctly Turneresque sensibility. Examples of prints by Eugène Isabey, Charles-François Daubigny, and James Abbott McNeill Whistler further highlight Moran’s responses to contemporary artists and art movements.

Shown in adjoining galleries, the exhibition offers an unprecedented opportunity to experience side by side the British and American artists’ often complementary and sometimes divergent views of nature.

Mon, Thu, Fri, Sat 10am - 6pm
Tue & Wed, 10am - 7:30pm
Sun 1pm - 5pm

Print Gallery
Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
NY Public Library
Fifth Avenue at 42nd Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 21, 2014 -
January 11, 2015
A Bible For Our Nation: American Bible Society, 1816-1831
This exhibition will focus on the founding of American Bible Society (ABS) and its early years as a national organization. Approximately 20 items will be on display, including copies of the first Scriptures published by ABS and copies of the earliest books to enter the ABS Library. The first section will include The Constitution of ABS and some early ABS publications: the first Bible dating from November 1816, the first Scripture in a native American language (1-3 John in Delaware, 1818), the first Scripture in an indigenous language of Latin America (Luke in Aymara, 1829), the first Bibles in Spanish, French, and German.

The early history of the ABS Library will also present the ABS Founding Fathers, who donated their own Bibles to the organization. The bibles on view will include the London Polyglot of 1655-57, an eight-volume set that was presented in 1818 by nineteen ABS Managers on the initiative of John Pintaed; a 1595 Geneva Bible presented by Boudinot in 1817; a Latin Bible published in 1476 presented by D. Bethune in 1821, the first incunabulum acquired by the Library; the Polyglot New Testament published in Nuremberg in 1599 and donated by Richard Varick in 1819; and the first Scripture published by the The British and Foreign Bible Society (John in Mohawk, 1804).

Tue - Sun 10am - 6pm

Free admission

Museum of Biblical Art
1865 Broadway at 61st Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 21, 2014 -
January 11, 2015
Dürer, Rembrandt, Tiepolo
The Jansma Master Prints Collection from the Grand Rapids Art Museum

Spanning five centuries of printmaking, Dürer, Rembrandt, Tiepolo: The Jansma Master Prints Collection from the Grand Rapids Art Museum will feature the complete Jansma Collection, including works by Albrecht Dürer, Rembrandt van Rijn, Giovanni Domenico Tiepolo, Édouard Manet, and Max Pechstein, as well as a series of 21 engravings by William Blake, to underscore the Bible’s enduring influence on Western artists.

The exhibition will also feature Dürer’s woodcut print and accompanying block for The Martyrdom of St. Catherine of Alexandria (c. 1498) from The Metropolitan Museum of Art, as well as other loans, to showcase the process and complexity of printmaking. A selection of rare bibles from the American Bible Society’s Collection will be paired with each print series to further illustrate the breadth and range of the Collection—from a 15th-century German Bible displayed alongside the Dürer works to a 19th-century English Bible accompanying the Blake series.

Established in 2005, The Jansma Print Collection comprises 57 etchings, engravings, and woodcuts, including the recently acquired Illustrations of the Book of Job (1825) by William Blake. The exhibition will reflect the Jansma family’s desire to bring together works representing the diverse styles and techniques, as well as outstanding level of ingenuity and skill exemplified in prints from the 16th- to the 20th-centuries.

Tue - Sun 10am - 6pm

Free admission

Museum of Biblical Art
1865 Broadway at 61st Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 21, 2014 -
January 11, 2015
FROM HOUDINI TO HUGO: THE ART OF BRIAN SELZNICK
From Houdini to Hugo: The Art of Brian Selznick presents over 100 paintings and drawings by this award-winning children’s author and illustrator. Selznick’s world includes images of characters as diverse as magician Harry Houdini, poet Walt Whitman, singer Marian Anderson, and the fictional Hugo Cabret—an orphan who lives in the walls of a busy Paris train station, portrayed inThe Invention of Hugo Cabret, written and illustrated by Selznick. The exhibition encompasses works from Hugo and 18 of Selznick’s other books, among them The Houdini Box, Walt Whitman: Words for America, Amelia and Eleanor Go for a Ride, The Dinosaurs of Waterhouse Hawkins, and Frindle. The illustrations are accompanied by the books, allowing visitors to put each image into the context of the story. Selznick received a 2002 Caldecott Honor for The Dinosaurs of Waterhouse Hawkins and was awarded the 2008 Caldecott Medal for The Invention of Hugo Cabret, which was made into the Oscar award-winning film Hugo, directed by Martin Scorsese.

Wed – Sat 10am – 4pm
Sun Noon – 4pm
Mon – Tue Closed
Select Fridays each month: 6pm – 10pm

Museum admission includes entry into all galleries, including the permanent collection and temporary exhibitions. There is no additional fee for any exhibitions.
Adults: $12.00
Seniors (60+): $10.00
Students (w/valid ID): $6.00
Youth (ages 7-18): $6.00
Children (6 and under): Free
Families (up to 2 adults and 4 youth): $25.00
*See website for addition Specials & Discounts

Delaware Art Museum
2301 Kentmere Parkway
Wilmington, DE
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 25, 2014 -
February 08, 2015
Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs
In the late 1940s, Henri Matisse turned almost exclusively to cut paper as his primary medium, and scissors as his chief implement, introducing a radically new operation that came to be called a cut-out. Matisse would cut painted sheets into forms of varying shapes and sizes—from the vegetal to the abstract—which he then arranged into lively compositions, striking for their play with color and contrast, their exploitation of decorative strategies, and their economy of means. Initially, these compositions were of modest size but, over time, their scale grew along with Matisse’s ambitions for them, expanding into mural or room-size works. A brilliant final chapter in Matisse’s long career, the cut-outs reflect both a renewed commitment to form and color and an inventiveness directed to the status of the work of art, whether as a unique object, environment, ornament, or a hybrid of all of these.

Henri Matisse: The Cut-Outs is a groundbreaking reassessment of this important body of work. The largest and most extensive presentation of the cut-outs ever mounted, the exhibition includes approximately 100 cut-outs—borrowed from public and private collections around the globe—along with a selection of related drawings, prints, illustrated books, stained glass, and textiles. The last time New York audiences were treated to an in-depth look at the cut-outs was in 1961.

This exhibition was sparked by an initiative to conserve The Museum of Modern Art’s monumental cut-out The Swimming Pool (1952), a favorite of visitors since its acquisition by MoMA in 1975. The Swimming Pool is the only cut-out composed for a specific room—the artist’s dining room in his apartment in Nice, France. The goals of the multiyear conservation effort have been to bring this magical environment back to its original color balance, height, and spatial configuration. Newly conserved, The Swimming Pool—off view for more than 20 years—returns to MoMA’s galleries as a centerpiece of the exhibition.

The Joan and Preston Robert Tisch Exhibition Gallery, 6th floor
The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 27 -
December 26, 2014
“Put To Good Use”
Visit Special Collections to view books owned by women, books owned by royalty and books with evidence that their owners used them to get a job done.

Providence Public Library
150 Empire Street
Province, RI
Exhibit New England
October 27, 2014 -
March 01, 2015
“His Booke: Ownership Marks and Book Plates”

Redwood Library and Athenaeum
50 Bellevue Ave
Newport, RI
Exhibit New England
October 28 -
December 12, 2014
The 2014 Harnett Biennial of American Prints
The eleventh competitive national exhibition organized by the University of Richmond Museums is a celebration of contemporary printmaking by artists throughout the United States. This year’s juror is artist Mary Fisher, Founder of Mary Fisher Clinical AIDS Research and Education (CARE) Fund at the University of Alabama at Birmingham.

Sunday - Friday, 1 - 5pm
Saturdays, Closed

Joel & Lila Harnett Museum of Art
28 Westhampton Way
University of Richmond
Richmond, VA
Exhibit South
October 28 -
December 12, 2014
Mary Fisher: Messages from My Sketchbook
Over the past two decades, American political activist, artist, author, and advocate Mary Fisher has balanced her passion for art and her commitment to helping others. The exhibition features a collection of hand-dyed, hand-printed silk and cotton pieces with additions by the artist and based on her journal and accompanying sketchbook. The artist’s statement for each piece is uniquely related to her life.

Sunday - Friday, 1 - 5pm
Saturdays, Closed

Joel & Lila Harnett Museum of Art
28 Westhampton Way
University of Richmond
Richmond, VA
Exhibit South
November 01, 2014 -
February 01, 2015
Strokes of Genius: Italian Drawings from the Goldman Collection
Focusing on the periods of Mannerism and the early Baroque, Strokes of Genius features over 80 masterpieces of Italian draftsmanship selected from the collection of Chicagoans Jean and Steven Goldman, including nearly 60 drawings never before exhibited in public. Joining the Goldman drawings are over 20 works from the Art Institute’s Prints and Drawings collection, providing greater historical context for this prodigious era of Italian art.

The exhibition reveals the different ways and reasons artists utilized drawings from the late 15th to mid 17th centuries. Some drawings served as models for workshop reference, but most were intended as working drawings made in preparation for paintings, sculpture, and other art forms. In addition to studies from nature—including a rare human figure drawing of the late 1400s—there are “first thoughts” of major compositions and complex works reflecting biblical, mythological, literary, and historical subjects.

Different stages of the artistic process are illuminated and juxtaposed, even by the same artist for the same commission, as in two sheets by Francesco Vanni (1563–1610) for The Coronation of the Virgin created for the Chiesa del Santuccio in Siena between 1610 and 1614. In addition to these working drawings, there are finished presentation renderings and sheets that seem to have been executed as works of art in their own right, including head studies by Guercino (1591?–1666) and Pietro da Cortona (1596–1669). The era witnessed an increased interest in collecting works on paper, which were valued as reflections of artistic genius. In addition to well-known artists of the day, the exhibition includes a number of major works by minor masters.

An exhibition catalogue, prepared by independent scholars Jean Goldman and Nicolas Schwed, includes essays situating the collection within the context of Mannerism and examining the role of drawing in the business of art. In conjunction with the exhibition, the Art Institute will host an international symposium (supported by the Ratjen Foundation and Christie’s) on Friday, October 31: The Role of the Itinerant Artist in the Dissemination of Romanism in the 16th Century.

Open daily 10:30–5:00
Thursday until 8:00
General admission to the Art Institute of Chicago is free to Illinois residents every Thursday from 5 - 8pm.
An additional fee for special exhibitions may be applied.

Galleries 124–127
The Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
November 01 -
December 31, 2014
“Thro’ various hands has passed till it found refuge in mine”
Ownership Marks and the Personal Histories of Books

John Carter Brown Library
94 George Street
Province, RI
Exhibit New England
November 01 -
December 31, 2014
“Hai Excomunion: Book Threats & Bookplates in the Collection of the R.I. Historical Society”
RIHS Library
Rhode Island Historical Society
121 Hope Street
Province, RI
Exhibit New England
November 03 -
December 17, 2014
Raymond Meeks: Where Objects Fall Away
Light Work is pleased to announce Where Objects Fall Away, an exhibition spanning the career of photographer and book artist Raymond Meeks, exploring his relationship to the photobook and its form.

In the words of artist and publisher Raymond Meeks, “I continue to be inspired by collaboration with writers of poetry and short fiction and the merging of visual and word narratives. Recently, I’ve focused my efforts towards making artist books and a collaborative journal, orchard, which presents a visual conversation with fellow artists.” Meeks has collaborated with artists Deborah Luster, Wes Mills, and Mark Steinmetz. His books and pictures are housed in numerous public and private collections, including the Bibliotheque Nationale, Paris, George Eastman House, Corcoran Gallery of Art, and the Howard Stein Collection.

Gallery Talk: Thur, November 13, 5pm
Reception: Thur, November 13, 5 - 7pm

Kathleen O. Ellis Gallery
Light Work
316 Waverly Avenue
Syracuse, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 03, 2014 -
January 11, 2015
“MINE!: Rhode Island Collectors at the ATH”

Philbrick Rare Book Room
Providence Athenaeum
251 Benefit Street
Province, RI
Exhibit New England
November 06, 2014 -
February 15, 2015
Master Prints: Dürer to Matisse
This exhibition showcases 40 astonishing, museum-quality works on paper. Including woodcuts, etchings, engravings, and lithographs, the exhibition spans a period of 500 years. Works by old masters Dürer, Rembrandt, Goya, and Canaletto will be displayed alongside those by modern masters such as Degas, Matisse, Picasso, and Cezanne. The installation will be accompanied by a video demonstrating the engraving process, and explanatory texts describing the role prints held in society before the advent of photography.

MEMBERS' MORNING / 10am - 1pm
Jerry Dobrick, Curatorial Associate of European Art, leads a tour of the Master Prints exhibition.

Norton Museum of Art
1451 S. Olive Avenue
West Palm Beach, FL
Exhibit South
November 07, 2014 -
February 01, 2015
Odd Volumes: Book Art from the Allan Chasanoff Collection
Drawn from a major collection given to the Gallery by Allan Chasanoff, B.A. 1961, Odd Volumes showcases a selection of experimental and innovative works of book art from the 1960s to the present. This student-curated exhibition considers the transformation of books into sculptural objects from multiple perspectives: the history of book art, the relationship between form and content, and the interaction between the viewer and the work. Featuring approximately 100 works by more than 80 artists, including acclaimed figures such as Olafur Eliasson, Yoko Ono, and Dieter Roth, this exhibition offers a rare opportunity to discover the world of book art. The exhibition is produced in collaboration with Artspace, a nonprofit arts organization in New Haven’s 9th Square. From November 7, 2014, through January 31, 2015, Artspace presents a companion exhibition, Connecticut (un) Bound, featuring additional works from Chasanoff’s collection as well as responses by local artists.

Tue – Fri 10am – 5pm
Thu (Sept.–June) 10am – 8pm
Sat – Sun 11am – 5pm
Closed Mondays

Yale University Art Gallery
1111 Chapel Street (at York Street)
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
November 07, 2014 -
February 01, 2015
Odd Volumes: Book Art from the Allan Chasanoff Collection
Drawn from a major collection given to the Gallery by Allan Chasanoff, B.A. 1961, Odd Volumes showcases a selection of experimental and innovative works of book art from the 1960s to the present. This student-curated exhibition considers the transformation of books into sculptural objects from multiple perspectives: the history of book art, the relationship between form and content, and the interaction between the viewer and the work. Featuring approximately 100 works by more than 80 artists, including acclaimed figures such as Olafur Eliasson, Yoko Ono, and Dieter Roth, this exhibition offers a rare opportunity to discover the world of book art. From November 7, 2014, through January 31, 2015, Artspace, a nonprofit arts organization in New Haven’s 9th Square, presents a companion exhibition, Connecticut (un) Bound, featuring additional works from Chasanoff’s collection as well as responses by local artists.

Mon CLOSED
Tue – Fri, 10am – 5pm
Thu (Sept.–June) 10am – 8pm
Sat – Sun, 11am – 5pm

Free and open to the public

The Yale University Art Gallery
1111 Chapel Street (at York Street)
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
November 08, 2014 -
March 09, 2015
Bruce Davidson/Paul Caponigro: Two American Photographers in Britain and Ireland
This traveling exhibition pairs for the first time approximately 150 works by American photographers Paul Caponigro (b. 1932) and Bruce Davidson (b. 1933), enlightened observers of Britain and Ireland in the 1960s and ’70s. For Caponigro, Ireland and Britain became sites of creative energy to which he returned repeatedly. Davidson brought the same gritty street sensibility that had made his Brooklyn Gang series a sensation among photograph collectors. The exhibition examines the artistic, social, and historical forces informing two master photographers as they bring American eyes to enduring landscapes and changing cultural scenes. Co-organized by the Yale Center for British Art (where it is on view June 26–Sept. 14, 2014) and The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens, “Bruce Davidson/Paul Caponigro: Two American Photographers in Britain and Ireland” is accompanied by a catalog of the same title published by Yale University Press.

MaryLou and George Boone Gallery
The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
November 11, 2014 -
March 01, 2015
Decoding the Renaissance
The Renaissance was the first great age of mass communication, but it was also the period when the art of secret writing came into its own. The new science of codes and ciphers produced some of the period’s most brilliant inventions, most beautiful books, and most enduring legacies. It left its mark on virtually every aspect of Renaissance culture, including the development of diplomacy and the waging of war, the creation of the postal system, the invention of sign language, and the search for hidden meanings in literature and the visual arts. And it provided the inspiration for the pioneering modern code-breaker William F. Friedman—chief cryptanalyst for the US government from the 1920s to the 1950s. Friedman’s introduction to ciphers (as well as to his wife Elizebeth, a distinguished code-breaker in her own right) came through his early work on Sir Francis Bacon; and he drew directly on Renaissance texts and technologies throughout his cryptographic career.

Decoding the Renaissance explores some six hundred years of secret communication, introducing the tricks of the trade and revealing the surprising connections between Renaissance texts and technologies and modern methods of cryptanalysis. The exhibition brings together the first comprehensive collection of early books on cryptography, many of Friedman’s most influential works, and the most mysterious of all unbroken codes, the so-called Voynich Manuscript, on loan for the first time from the Beinecke Library at Yale.

Mon - Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun Noon - 5pm

Free admission

Folger Great Hall
Folger Shakespeare Library
201 East Capitol Street, SE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 13 -
December 31, 2014
The Everyman’s Library Volumes from the Collections of the John J. Burns Library
The Everyman’s Library (EML) was first conceived in 1905 by the publisher Joseph Malaby Dent and editor Ernest Rhys. The goal of EML was to create a collection of 1,000 volumes of classic literature that would appeal to every type of person, from students, scholars and professionals to the everyday working man. They would be divided into different categories, originally thirteen in total and have corresponding design attributes. The key to this endeavor was to make the books affordable, and they were originally available for the very low price of one schilling. The name “Everyman” comes from the medieval play of the same name in which the character Knowledge says the following to the character Everyman:

Everyman, I will go with thee
and be thy guide,

In thy most need to go
by thy side.

The library began publication in February 1906 and four years later 500 volumes had already been published. Through two world wars and a depression, the series finally published volume 1,000 in 1956. In 1988 the publishing company J.M. Dent was sold and eventually the Everyman series was re-launched in the early 1990s. Though very different from the early editions of 1906, you can still buy Everyman’s Library books through Alfred A. Knopf in the United States and Random House abroad.

This exhibit has two purposes firstly, to show the changing styles of EML throughout the many decades it was in print, and secondly to show the variety of collections at the Burns Library that contain volumes of the series. From the Irish collection to the Liturgy and Life Collection, the personal libraries of authors Rex Stout and Flann O’Brien, copies of the EML can be found in all of the major collections in the Burns Library.

Ford Tower
John J. Burns Library
Boston College
140 Commonwealth Avenue
Chestnut, MA
Exhibit New England
November 15, 2014 -
February 22, 2015
Madeline at 75: The Art of Ludwig Bemelmans
To mark the anniversary of everyone's favorite schoolgirl, Madeline, this exhibition celebrates Ludwig Bemelmans's legacy. Drawings from each of the six Madeline books will be on view, plus a generous cross-section of his other artwork for children and adults. A Bemelmans bar brought back from Paris, delightful fabric designs, and memorabilia like the Bad Hat's original hat are just a few of the treasures that will be on view.

Support for Madeline at 75: The Art of Ludwig Bemelmans has been generously provided by Mr. and Mrs. Charles M. Royce and The Walton Family Foundation

East Gallery
The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
November 15, 2014 -
March 29, 2015
Water and Shadow: Kawase Hasui and Japanese Landscape Prints
This exhibition presents a visually compelling selection of Japanese woodblock prints — as well as paintings and didactic material — that explores the dynamic early work of Japanese landscape artist Kawase Hasui (1883-1957). Through the work of Hasui, the exhibition explores the themes of nostalgia and longing — the search for individual and national identity in Japan during the early Taisho period, an era of dizzying social and cultural change. It presents the best work of one of Japan’s modern masters, featuring high quality objects that are compelling visually, often rare, and broadly resonant. The core themes of this art — the exploration of the native landscape and the discovery of a new urban beauty in response to the anonymity of modern life — are as relevant to American audiences now as they were to Japan in the 1920s.

The works selected for this exhibition focus on Hasui’s most creative period of woodblock print design: the years from 1918 to the Great Earthquake of 1923. The exhibition utilizes the unparalleled collection donated to the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts by preeminent Hasui collectors, René and Carolyn Balcer.

Open 365 days a year
Sat – Wed 10am – 5pm
Thu & Fri 10am – 9pm

Free admission

Virginia Museum of Fine Arts
200 N. Blvd.
Richmond, VA
Exhibit South
November 17, 2014 -
May 08, 2015
Doris Lee: American Painter and Illustrator
Doris Emrick Lee (1905–1983) was an American painter and illustrator best known for her painting Thanksgiving, which won the prestigious Logan Prize at the Art Institute of Chicago in 1935. In her wide-ranging career, she painted murals for the United States Post Office buildings, participated in annual exhibitions at the Carnegie Institute in Washington, D.C., created commissioned work for Life magazine, and illustrated children’s books. Lee’s art was also featured on greeting cards, calendars, menus, pottery, and fabric. This exhibition showcases photographs, sketches, and objects from the Doris Lee Papers housed in the Betty Boyd Dettre Library and Research Center.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

National Museum of Women in the Arts
1250 New York Ave NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 17, 2014 -
March 29, 2015
Lines in the Ice: Seeking the Northwest Passage
See why Europeans are drawn to explore the Arctic and, in particular, the Northwest Passage.

Lines in the Ice examines why Europeans are drawn to explore the Arctic and, in particular, the fabled Northwest Passage. Arctic exploration has influenced our culture, changed the societies of indigenous peoples, and had a powerful effect on the making of the modern world.

The exhibition displays early European maps of the Arctic, Inuit accounts of the coming of the explorers, writings from the search for Franklin, early Arctic photography and much more. It also unearths the history of the North Pole’s most famous resident – Santa.

We uncover the beauty, drama and importance of the Arctic, from the distant past up to the present day.

Free admission

Entrance Hall
The British Library
96 Euston Road
London, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
November 18, 2014 -
January 30, 2015
"Purloined Letters: Literary Correspondence and Its Unintended Recipients"
What happens when a letter reaches an unintended recipient? For writer Edgar Allan Poe, the letter has been purloined: diverted from its original destination and “stolen” by an unexpected reader. This exhibition features an array of rare and important purloined letters from the Boston Public Library’s collection, including handwritten missives from such notable figures as the incarcerated Oscar Wilde, Nathaniel Hawthorne’s sister Elizabeth, and mural artist Edwin Austin Abbey. It also showcases writers who composed experimental works in epistolary modes—including Bram Stoker, the author of Dracula—and explores prefaces and letters to the reader in early printed books such as Edmund Spenser’s The Faerie Queene.

This exhibition is a collaboration between graduate students and faculty of the Department of English, University of Massachusetts, Boston, and the BPL’s Rare Books and Manuscripts Department.

Mon – Fri 9am – 5pm

Central Library
Copley Square (Special Collections Lobby)
Special Collections Exhibition Room, 3rd floor
McKim Building
Boston Public Library
700 Boylston Street
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
November 21, 2014 -
January 05, 2015
Handmade: Artists' Holiday Cards from the Archives of American Art
The Morgan will present an exhibition of highly original, graphically intriguing, and rarely seen handmade holiday cards created by major twentieth-century artists. Drawn from the Smithsonian’s Archives of American Art, the world’s pre-eminent repository dedicated to collecting and preserving the papers and primary records of the visual arts in America, the extraordinary array of works on view will include seasonal cards created for friends and family by such important American artists as Helen Frankenthaler, Milton Avery, Alexander Calder, Ad Reinhardt, and Saul Steinberg.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5:00pm
Fri 10:30am - 9:00pm
Sat 10:00am - 6:00pm
Sun 11:00am - 6:00pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 21, 2014 -
February 22, 2015
Annie Leibovitz: Pilgrimage
Exhibition charts a new direction for one of America’s best-known living photographers. Unlike her staged and carefully lit portraits made on assignment for magazines and advertising clients, the photographs in this exhibition were taken simply because Leibovitz was moved by the subject. The images speak in a commonplace language to the photographer’s curiosity about the world she inherited, spanning landscapes both dramatic and quiet, interiors of living rooms and bedrooms, and objects that are talismans of past lives.

The exhibition, which includes 64 photographs taken between April 2009 and May 2011, is organized for the Smithsonian American Art Museum by guest curator Andy Grundberg, former New York Times photography critic and associate provost and dean of undergraduate studies at the Corcoran College of Art + Design. Joann Moser, deputy chief curator, is the coordinating curator at the museum. The prints were made by David Adamson of Adamson Editions in Washington, D.C. The Bernie Stadiem Endowment Fund provided support for the exhibition. The C.F. Foundation in Atlanta supports the museum's traveling exhibition program, Treasures to Go.

Tue - Thu, Sat - 10am - 6pm
Fri - 10am - 8pm
Sun - 11am - 5pm
Mon - CLOSED

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West
at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 22, 2014 -
January 18, 2015
CONFLICT UNKNOWN: Lale Westvind
The Booklyn Art Gallery is pleased to present Conflict Unknown, an otherworldly drawing installation and solo-exhibition from alternative comics and animation artist Lale Westvind.

Coinciding with the release of Now & Here #3: Trial One, the final book in a series of experimental comic based works, Conflict Unknown combines original graphite drawings, paintings on wood panel, screenprints and a site-specific wall painting. Westvind's drawings and paintings depict characters, symbols and events of an allegorical belief system spawned from the experimental comic series. Artworks act as artifacts, schematics, advertisements, religious relics and sacred objects of an imagined mythos from an alternate reality. The protagonists are confronted by physical and telepathic violence in murky jungles, abstract interiors, echoing black oceans, energetic mountain ranges and vast aggressive plains. Conflicted by cryptic forces, our heroines question their self-awareness, consciousness, and physicality.

While the juxtaposition of confidential sketches with finished works gives the viewer the illusion of omniscience, the works' chaotic philosophy and apocryphal truths create a state of total unknown and questioning. Exploring the conflict between physicality and mind, the narrator, often shifting perspectives, dimensions and subsequent consciousnesses, chronicles the world both in first person and alternately as omnipresent guide. Westvind's unparalleled poetic style is mirrored by her unusual work process, creating the drawings first and later allowing the text to evolve from that spontaneous visual narrative. The chaotic conflict and spiritual philosophy of the narrative are rendered energetically with diagonals and broken planes. The brash brushstrokes of Westvind's paintings and layered graphite lines of her drawings capture overlapping moments in time and space reminiscent of Italian Futurism.

Conflict Unknown is Lale Westvind's first solo-exhibition, the fifth and final in a series of one person shows dedicated to New York based artists exhibiting audacity and prolific output in the self-publishing community. Westvind attended the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and now lives in Harlem, New York. As an alternative comics and animation artist her work has been published and exhibited nationally, in 2012 she won the Ignatz Award for Promising New Talent.

Thu - Tue 12 - 5pm

Opening Reception & Book Launch:
Sat, November 22, 7 - 10pm

Booklyn Artists Alliance
37 Greenpoint Ave
4th fl, Ste. E4G (Box #23)
Brooklyn, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
November 26, 2014 -
February 21, 2015
MURDER AND WOMEN IN 19th-CENTURY AMERICA: TRIAL ACCOUNTS IN THE YALE LAW LIBRARY
Murder trials have long been a subject of sensational treatment in popular culture, and murder trials involving women, as the accused or the victims, especially so. The latest exhibit from the Yale Law Library's Rare Book Collection features 19th-century illustrated pamphlets that document the public's fascination with these trials.

Rare Book Exhibition Gallery, Level L2
Lillian Goldman Law Library
Yale Law School
127 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
December 05, 2014 -
March 01, 2015
William Blake: Apprentice and Master
This major exhibition will focus on the extraordinary life and work of William Blake (1757–1827), printmaker, painter and revolutionary poet of the prophetic books. It will examine his formation as an artist, including his apprenticeship as an engraver, and his maturity during the 1790s when he was at the height of his powers as both an artist and revolutionary poet. The exhibition will also explore his influence on the young artist-printmakers who gathered around him in the last years of his life, including Samuel Palmer, George Richmond and Edward Calvert.

£10 Full Price with Donation for Gift Aid Purposes*
£8 Concession Price with Donation for Gift Aid Purposes*

*Gift Aid Tickets include an additional £1 voluntary donation allowing the Museum to reclaim tax on both the donation and the ticket price. More information is given on our booking pages. Standard ticket prices are shown below.

10am to 5pm Tuesday - Sunday, & Bank Holidays
Closed Monday

£9 Standard Full Price
£7 Standard Concession Price

£4.50 12-17 years
£4.50 Art Fund Members

Entry is free for Members and for Under-12s

Ashmolean Museum of Art & Archaeology
Oxford University
Beaumont Street
Oxford, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
December 08, 2014 -
January 04, 2015
Soboroff Typewriter Collection: Hemingway, Lennon, Capote & others
Steve Soboroff has compiled the world’s most important collection of twenty-eight original typewriters from famous (and infamous) authors and personalities, including:

• The 1932 Royal Model P that Ernest Hemingway used to write letters during his time in Cuba.
• A tiny Imperial Good Companion Model T on which John Lennon banged out song lyrics years before the Beatles invaded America.
• The snappy red Underwood 4-Bank portable on which Orson Welles created the cinematic masterpiece Citizen Kane.
• Jerry Siegel’s Royal Portable Quiet Deluxe. Jerry said that "one of the little known stories of Superman is that he owes a lot of his existence to this typewriter…it was the only portable I ever had or used."

To Soboroff, a typewriter carries more meaning than the story of the hands that have touched the keys of the machine. "What the typewriter symbolizes now is timelessness, and also a slower, more thoughtful way of life," he said. "What is made these days that will be used 60, 70, 80, 100 years from now? I don't think there's anything, and these typewriters have hundreds of years to go."

"I love people who are the best at what they do," Soboroff said. "The idea that geniuses sat there and accomplished what they accomplished on these typewriters … it gives me chills."

Wednesdays to Sundays 12:00 to 5:00pm,
Closed Mondays and Tuesdays

Free and open to the public

The Paley Center
465 North Beverly Drive
Beverly Hills, CA
Exhibit West
December 08, 2014 -
May 08, 2015
Doris Lee: American Painter and Illustrator
Doris Emrick Lee (1905–1983) was an American painter and illustrator best known for her painting Thanksgiving, which won the prestigious Logan Prize at the Art Institute of Chicago in 1935. In her wide-ranging career, she painted murals for the United States Post Office buildings, participated in annual exhibitions at the Carnegie Institute in Washington, D.C., created commissioned work for Life magazine, and illustrated children’s books. Lee’s art was also featured on greeting cards, calendars, menus, pottery, and fabric. This exhibition showcases photographs, sketches, and objects from the Doris Lee Papers housed in the Betty Boyd Dettre Library and Research Center.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

National Museum of Woman in the Arts
1250 New York Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
December 09, 2014 -
March 08, 2015
The Winchester Bible A Masterpiece of Medieval Art
This exhibition will feature masterfully illuminated pages from two volumes of the magnificent, lavishly ornamented Winchester Bible. Probably commissioned around 1155–60 by the wealthy and powerful Henry of Blois (1129–1171), who was the Bishop of Winchester (and grandson of William the Conqueror and King Stephen's brother), the manuscript is the Winchester Cathedral's single greatest surviving treasure. Renovations at the Cathedral provide the opportunity for these pages, which feature the Old Testament, to travel to New York. This presentation marks the first time the work will be shown in the United States. At the Metropolitan Museum, the pages of one bound volume will be turned once each month; three unbound bi-folios with lavish initials from the other volume—which is currently undergoing conservation—will be on view simultaneously for the duration of the exhibition.

A highlight of the presentation will be the display of an elaborately illustrated double-sided frontispiece—long separated from the Bible and now in the collection of the Morgan Library & Museum in New York—that features scenes from the life of David and Samuel. Works of art from the Metropolitan Museum's own collection—medieval sculpture, goldsmith work, ivories, stained glass, and other examples of manuscript illumination—will provide a larger context for the two volumes.

The Winchester Bible consists of four bound volumes whose pages measure approximately 23 inches high by 15 inches wide (58 by 39 centimeters). The text of 468 folios was written over a period of thirty years by a single scribe with at least five different gifted painters applying expensive pigments, including lapis lazuli and gold, to calf-skin parchment. Their ambitious work was never completed.

Accompanied by a publication

Exhibitions are free with Museum admission

RELATED EVENTS:
Studio Workshop:
From Pigment to Page: Modern Manuscripts with Medieval Techniques
Sun, December 14, 10:30am – 4:30pm
Fee: $95 for the one-day workshop (includes Museum admission and materials). Limited student discounts available.

Gallery Talk:
Exhibition Tour—The Winchester Bible: A Masterpiece of Medieval Art
Mon, January 5, 2015, 10:30am – 11:30am
Free with Museum admission

Gallery Talk:
Exhibition Tour—The Winchester Bible: A Masterpiece of Medieval Art
Mon, January 19, 2015, 10:30am – 11:30am
Free with Museum admission

Gallery 304
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue (at 82nd Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
December 10, 2014 -
February 07, 2015
One Hundred Books Famous in Children’s Literature
Curated by Chris Loker

Mon – Sat 10am - 5pm

Admission: Exhibitions are open to the public free of charge

RELATED TALK:
One Hundred Books Famous in Children’s Literature: An Illustrated Talk by Chris Loker
Monday, December 15, 2014, 5-7 pm
The Book Club of California
312 Sutter Street, Suite 500
San Francisco, CA

Chris will compliment her talk with numerous photographs of the “famous” books in the exhibition, and will share the 300-page exhibition catalogue, expected to be a watershed publication in the world of children’s literature, in its West Coast debut.

Ground Floor Gallery
Grolier Club
47 East 60th Street (between Park & Madison Avenues)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
December 12, 2014 -
September 04, 2015
Public Eye: 175 Years of Sharing Photography
Thanks to the development of new technology and social media, more photographs are created, viewed, and shared today than ever before. Public Eye, the first-ever retrospective survey of photography organized by NYPL, takes advantage of this moment to reframe the way we look at photographs from the past. What are some of the platforms and networks through which photographs have been shared? In what ways have we, as photography’s public and one of its subjects, been engaged over time? To what ends has the street served as a venue for photographic practice since its beginnings? And, of more recent concern, are we risking our privacy in pursuit of a more public photography? Ranging from photography’s official announcement in 1839 to manifestations of its current pervasiveness, this landmark exhibition, drawn entirely from the Library’s collections, explores the various ways in which photography has been shared and made public. Photography has always been social.

Free public tours of the exhibition are available at 12:30 and 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and at 3:30 p.m. on Sunday.

Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
New York Public Library
Fifth Avenue at 42nd Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic