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February 07, 2012 -
December 31, 2015
The Life of Art: Context, Collecting, and Display
From the time an object is made until the day it enters a museum's collection, it may be displayed, used, and perceived in different ways. The Life of Art takes selected objects from the Getty Museum's galleries and encourages visitors to sit down and spend time with them, offering the opportunity to examine them closely to understand how they were made and functioned, why they were collected, and how they have been displayed.

The J. Paul Getty Museum
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
January 30 -
November 15, 2014
From the Western Front and Beyond: The Writings of World War One
The New York Society Library is proud to present From the Western Front and Beyond: The Writings of World War One. It marks the one hundredth anniversary of the first major war of the twentieth century, a war that left millions dead and ravaged the landscape of the Western and Eastern Fronts. Here at the Library, our collection evokes this unforgettable legacy in the writings and literature that came from the trenches and bloodstained battlefields.

In 1914 when the guns of August shattered an uneasy peace, the war seemed at a comfortable distance from American shores, but Head Librarian Frank Bigelow saw the importance of books on the war meant to end all wars. The diverse volumes that Bigelow purchased in the years before, during and immediately following the Great War have laid the groundwork for our deep and varied collection, which has been enhanced since with later generations' perspectives.

This new and unique exhibition will include books from our special collections and open stacks, such as early editions of the legendary poets Rupert Brooke, Wilfred Owen, Robert Graves, and Siegfried Sassoon, and lesser-known accounts by Allied and German soldiers, ambulance drivers, stretcher bearers, nurses, priests, reporters, and artists. Also on display will be drawings by Muirhead Bone, an English artist who captured scenes of the towns and battlefields of France.

A softcover catalog accompanies the exhibition. It features contributions from authors Caroline Alexander (The War That Killed Achilles) and Adam Kirsch (Why Trilling Matters) about the war itself and its major writers.

A hundred years on, time has not dulled the urgency of these voices. We hope that From the Western Front and Beyond will remind us all of the literature that endured once the guns went silent.

Both members and nonmembers are welcome to visit the exhibition any time the Library is open.

Mon, Wed, Fri, Sat 9am - 5pm
Tue & Thu 9am - 7pm
Sun 1pm - 5pm

The New York Society Library
53 East 79th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 10 -
October 17, 2014
That’s So Gay: Outing Early America
Gay History in the Collections of the Library Company of Philadelphia

The exhibition That’s So Gay: Outing Early America will show that – like African Americana and women’s history – the abundance of resources documenting homosexuality at the Library Company merely needs to be revealed. To paraphrase the late gay activist Harry Hay (1912-2002), history knows more about gay people than it knows it knows.

How can we know whether someone was gay? There are many answers to that question, but ultimately we cannot know whether a person who lived in the past would be called lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender today.

That does not mean, however, that we cannot study gay history. Individuals participated in same-sex relationships, wrote poems and novels celebrating such relationships, deviated from gender norms, and suffered for such deviance in ways that are well-documented in the historical record. Gayness can also be considered a shared cultural experience based on an intrinsically gay outlook on the world.

Library Company of Philadelphia
1314 Locust Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 01, 2014 -
January 04, 2015
Downton Abbey
Costumes of Downton Abbey is an original exhibition of exquisite designs from the award-winning television series. Approximately 40 historically inspired costumes from the television show will be displayed and supplemented by photographs and vignettes inspired by the fictional program and by real life at Winterthur.

Visitors will have a chance to step into and experience the world of Downton Abbey® and the contrasting world of Winterthur founder Henry Francis du Pont and his contemporaries in the first half of the 20th century.

In addition, Winterthur will host a wide range of lectures, workshops, and exciting events for adults and families focusing on entertaining and country house life in Britain and the United States.

A co-production of Carnival Films and Masterpiece, Downton Abbey depicts life in an aristocratic household of the fictional Earl and Countess of Grantham and is one of the most popular and critically acclaimed period dramas ever produced. It has won a Golden Globe Award for Best Miniseries and seven Emmys including a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Miniseries. It was the most watched television series in both the UK and the U.S. and became the most successful British costume drama series since the 1981 television serial Brideshead Revisited. By the third series, it had become one of the most widely watched television shows in the world. The Guinness World Records recognized Downton Abbey as the most critically acclaimed English-language television series of 2011.

The costumes will be lent by Cosprop, the world’s leading costumier to film, television, and theater. Winterthur’s most popular exhibition, Fashion in Film, which attracted more than 42,000 people over its three-month run, also featured costumes by Cosprop.

Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library
5105 Kennett Pike
Wilmington, DE
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 22 -
November 02, 2014
New World, Old Maps
New World, Old Maps is a rotating display of the acclaimed historic map collection formed by Dallas Pratt, co-founder of the American Museum in Britain, Bath, and celebrates the new publication Mapping the New World – Renaissance Maps from the American Museum in Britain. Illustrating the changing shape of the Americas as Renaissance cartographers (working from ancient and medieval sources) learned more of the New World, this is the third in a series of extensively illustrated catalogues produced by Scala Arts and Heritage Publishers to showcase the core collections of the American Museum in Britain.

The ‘New World’ was constantly changing shape on maps made from the 15th to 17th centuries as European cartographers learned more from the navigators, who had ventured forth across the Atlantic in search of treasure – notably pearls, gold, and spices.

Tue - Sun 12 noon - 5pm
Closed Mondays except during August and Bank Holidays

American Museum in Britain
Claverton Manor
Bath, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
March 24, 2014 -
January 05, 2015
Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures
A signature can be as routine as a mark on a form or as extraordinary as a stroke of the pen that changes the course of history. For example, the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence simultaneously committed the brave act of treason against King George III and created a new nation.

Well-known signatures are found throughout the records of the National Archives. Equally important are the multitude of marks by people unknown to history. The documents signed by these individuals represent fascinating stories to be discovered.

“Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” features original signatures from our nationwide holdings. From developing a signature style to signing groundbreaking policy into law, they illustrate the many ways people have “made their mark” on history.

10:00am - 5:30pm

Free admission

National Archives Museum
Constitution Avenue NW (between 7th & 9th Street)
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 26 -
November 02, 2014
Sendak in the '60s
midst the turbulence of 1960s America a quiet revolution took place where few expected it: the world of children’s books. Maurice Sendak was part of a vanguard of writers and illustrators transforming the American picture book and revolutionizing children’s culture in the ‘60s. He illustrated more than 30 books throughout the decade, including the character-driven The Sign on Rosie’s Door(1960), the painterly Mr. Rabbit and the Lovely Present (1962), and the controversial In the Night Kitchen (1970), as well as the beloved Nutshell Library (1962) and his most celebrated bestseller, Where the Wild Things Are (1963).

We may take these books for granted now but each was experimental in its day, breaking picture book conventions and defying expectations. In between the boldly colorful Wild Things and Night Kitchen, Sendak went through a “black-and-white” period, ignoring color altogether and producing some of his most haunting and nuanced drawings. This period coincided with immense personal losses, including the death of his mother and his beloved dog, as well as his father’s cancer and his own recuperation from a heart attack that nearly killed him. This exhibition is the first to explore how Sendak’s art reflected both social and personal turmoil throughout the decade.

MUSEUM HOURS
Tuesday — Noon - 5pm
Wednesday — Noon - 8pm
Thursday — Noon - 8pm
Friday — Noon - 5pm
Saturday — Noon - 6pm
Sunday — Noon - 6pm

Closed Mondays and National Holidays.

Rosenbach Museum & Library
2008-2010 Delancey Place
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 03 -
September 01, 2014
Now You See It: Photography and Concealment
Photography is a medium prized for its capacity to expose, lay bare, make visible. For many artists, the camera is, above all, a tool for revealing what would otherwise remain unnoticed. As Diane Arbus once said: "I really believe there are things which nobody would see unless I photographed them." At the root of this artistic impulse is a keen fascination with that which is hidden, obscure, or hitherto unseen. This exhibition presents a selection of contemporary photographs and video from the permanent collection that variously explores the medium's dynamic interplay between concealment and revelation.

Some of the artists featured here use the camera to reveal subjects or places ordinarily hidden, as in Vera Lutter's majestic view of the interior of a Pepsi-Cola bottling plant or Miguel Rio Branco's lush image of a tapestry's seamy underside. Others address instances of geopolitical obfuscation: Fazal Sheikh's aerial photographs of the Negev desert in southern Israel record the traces of Bedouin villages that have been transformed into forests or farmland, while Mishka Henner collects images of stylishly censored high-security sites on Google Earth. In Vault (2011), Thomas Demand takes his inspiration from current events, meticulously re-creating a storeroom in which thirty missing works of art were discovered during a recent police raid.

The tension between publicity and privacy—the simultaneous desire to be looked at and to evade the merciless gaze of the camera—animates the work of artists as diverse as Arbus, Lutz Bacher, Jack Pierson, and Taryn Simon. In her video, The Nightingale (2003), Grace Ndiritu explores the tradition of the veil and its complex poetics of exposure and effacement. Complementing the contemporary works on view is a selection of earlier photographs in which the primary subject is hidden or obscured—a brief anthology of playfulness, shame, and seduction.

HOURS:
Open 7 Days a Week
Sun – Thu 10am – 5:30pm*
Fri & Sat 10am – 9pm*
Closed Thanksgiving Day, December 25, January 1, and the first Monday in May

*Galleries are cleared fifteen minutes before closing.

Fee includes same-week admission to the Main Building and The Cloisters museum and gardens. There is no extra charge for entrance to exhibitions.

ADMISSION:
Adults $25
Seniors (65 & older) $17
Students $12*
Members (Join Now) Free
Children under 12 (accompanied by an adult) Free

*The Museum participates in several programs that include free admission for students. All New York City public school students, along with students from Bard Graduate Center, Barnard College, Columbia University, and the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, may visit the Museum for free. Please check with your school administrator to see if your student ID allows free admission to the Museum.

Gallery 851
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue (at 82nd Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 16 -
October 03, 2014
A Collection's Progress: The Lewis Walpole Library, 2000-2014
This new exhibition presents materials selected from the Library's collecting successes of the last fourteen years.

When Wilmarth Sheldon Lewis left his library to Yale in 1979 Lewis thought of his gift not as a finished monument but as a living thing that required growth and change lest it become, in his words, “static and moldy.” The exhibition presents materials selected from the LWL’s collecting successes of the last fourteen years. Together the objects on display argue forcefully for the Library’s conquest of stasis and mold, and each speaks eloquently of another time, its politics and conflicts, its arts, fashions, and pastimes.

Lewis Walpole Library
Yale University
154 Main Street
Farmington, CT
Exhibit New England
April 17 -
November 02, 2014
Sendak in the '60s
Amidst the turbulence of 1960s America a quiet revolution took place where few expected it: the world of children’s books. Maurice Sendak was part of a vanguard of writers and illustrators transforming the American picture book and revolutionizing children’s culture in the ‘60s. He illustrated more than 30 books throughout the decade, including the character-driven The Sign on Rosie’s Door(1960), the painterly Mr. Rabbit and the Lovely Present (1962), and the controversial In the Night Kitchen (1970), as well as the beloved Nutshell Library (1962) and his most celebrated bestseller, Where the Wild Things Are (1963).

We may take these books for granted now but each was experimental in its day, breaking picture book conventions and defying expectations. In between the boldly colorful Wild Things and Night Kitchen, Sendak went through a “black-and-white” period, ignoring color altogether and producing some of his most haunting and nuanced drawings. This period coincided with immense personal losses, including the death of his mother and his beloved dog, as well as his father’s cancer and his own recuperation from a heart attack that nearly killed him. This exhibition is the first to explore how Sendak’s art reflected both social and personal turmoil throughout the decade.

Rosenbach Museum & Library
2008-2010 Delancey Place
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 21 -
September 21, 2014
The Shot Heard Round the World: April 19, 1775
The Shot Heard Round the World: April 19, 1775 will follow an hour-by-hour account of the actions of British Regulars and Patriots on April 19th, 1775, presenting a chronological and geographical timeline of the day and representing many of the communities surrounding Boston – Lexington, Concord, Lincoln, Arlington (Menotomy), and Cambridge – whose militias played a prominent role in the day-long engagement.

Organized by Concord Museum curator David Wood and militaria expert Joel Bohy, the exhibition will draw from the Museum’s important collection, as well as a number of private and institutional collections.

Concord Museum
53 Cambridge Turnpike
Concord, MA
Exhibit New England
April 21, 2014 -
January 04, 2015
Focus on Nature XIII
Focus on Nature XIII features 91 natural and cultural history illustrations, representing the work of 71 illustrators from 15 different countries. The subjects represented are diverse, ranging from those only found in the artists’ home country to those that have a worldwide distribution. A special feature of FON XIII is a 3D illustration by Swiss artist Livia Maria Enderli of Neanderthal (Homo neanderthalensis). This reconstruction of a skull from an archaeological site in Uzbekistan in central Asia found in 1938 uses the latest technology available to artists and scientists.

Since its inception in 1990, the exhibit series Focus on Nature has reflected the standards, materials, and skills of contemporary natural history illustrators. It promotes awareness of a type of art that, although widely used in scientific publications, is not often seen by the general public.

Tue - Sun, 9:30am - 5pm
Closed Mondays
Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's Day

Free admission.
Donations are accepted at the door.

The Carousel is free. Donations are accepted.

Photography Gallery
New York State Museum
Cultural Education Center
222 Madison Avenue
Albany, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 28 -
December 05, 2014
Body of Knowledge: A History of Anatomy (in 3 Parts)
"Body of Knowledge" explores the act of anatomizing not as a process of mapping a finite arrangement of bodily structures, but as a complex social and cultural activity. By means of a diachronic perspective, the exhibit narrative cuts through the multiplicity of anatomical practices, presenting three important moments in the history of anatomy: sixteenth century dissections and anatomical drawings, nineteenth century anatomical practices, and contemporary use of both cadavers and digital technology for anatomic education. "Body of Knowledge" hopes to capture the complexity of the many people, places, and meanings involved in human dissection.

The Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments
Harvard Museum of Science & Culture
Science Center 371
1 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
May 12 -
September 01, 2014
Peter Sis: Cartography of the Mind
Solo exhibition by Peter Sis, an internationally acclaimed artist, illustrator, writer and filmmaker, focuses on the artist’s poetic renditions of men’s unending quest for discovery. On view is a wide selection of his original drawings, watercolors and gouaches re-telling and re-imagining the stories of people, which changed with their adventures spirit the course of the history.

Czech Center New York
at the Bohemian National Hall (between 1st and 2nd Avenue)
321 East 73rd Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 20 -
November 30, 2014
Amherst
Harriet the Spy Turns Fifty

Louise Fitzhugh's Harriet the Spy turns fifty in 2014. To celebrate this golden anniversary, The Carle is organizing an exhibition of original drawings from the book. Initially, Harriet & Co. will return to New York City, premiering at The Forbes Galleries from March 7 to May 3, 2014. Subsequently, these drawings will be joined by those from the sequel, The Long Secret, and be on view from May 20 until November 30, 2014. Random House is publishing a 50th-anniversary commemorative edition with appreciations from, among others, Judy Blume and Lois Lowry.

Support for Harriet The Spy Turns Fifty has been generously provided by Random House Children’s Books

Central Gallery
The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
May 20 -
September 07, 2014
Gatsby to Garp: Modern Masterpieces from the Carter Burden Collection
Between 1973 and 1996 Carter Burden, a cultural benefactor and former New York City councilman, assembled the greatest collection of modern American literature in private hands. This exhibition brings together nearly one hundred outstanding works from the collection, including first editions, manuscripts, letters, and revised galley proofs. Authors featured in this unparalleled exhibition are some of the twentieth century's most celebrated—William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Allen Ginsberg, Ernest Hemingway, Langston Hughes, John Irving, Henry James, Jack Kerouac, Norman Mailer, Toni Morrison, J. D. Salinger, Gertrude Stein, John Steinbeck, John Updike, Tennessee Williams, and Richard Wright, among others.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

$18 Adults
$12 Children (13–16)
$12 Seniors (65 and over)
$12 Students (with current ID)
Free to members & children 12 & under (must be accompanied by an adult)
Admission is free on Fridays from 7pm - 9pm
Admission to the McKim rooms only is without charge during the following times: Tue 3pm - 5pm; Fri 7pm - 9pm; Sun 4pm - 6pm
Admission is not required to visit the Morgan Shop, Morgan Dining Room, and Morgan Café.

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 30 -
September 14, 2014
Miracles in Miniature: The Art of the Master of Claude de France
The Master of Claude de France was one of the last great French illuminators. His was a fine and delicate style, characterized by the use of subtle lilacs, mauves and roses, juxtaposed with chartreuse and royal blue—all applied in tiny, almost invisible brushstrokes. The Claude Master flourished in Tours (in the Loire valley) for only about twelve years (ca. 1508-1520), leaving behind a small but exceptional oeuvre.

Over the last several years, the Morgan has acquired a critical mass of the Claude Master's work, of which nearly two dozen items will be featured in this exhibition. The centerpiece is the Prayer Book of Claude de France, one of two tiny, jewel-like manuscripts that he painted for the queen of France and after which the artist was named. The Prayer Book was a personal commission by Queen Claude (first wife of King François I) around the time of her coronation in 1517. The manuscript measures a mere 2 ¾ by 2 inches, but it includes an amazing 132 miniatures. Encoded within the tiny book are images that reflect the queen's private anxieties, including her fear that she might have inherited from her mother, Anne de Bretagne (twice queen of France), the inability to bear healthy sons. Visitors will have the opportunity to access all of the Prayer Book's miniatures via an iPad in the gallery.

Also on view will be twelve newly discovered calendar miniatures by the Claude Master, which the Morgan recently acquired. These works will be complimented by loans from private collectors and from the Free Library of Philadelphia. Manuscripts by Jean Bourdichon, the Claude Master's teacher, and by Jean Poyer and Jacques Ravaud, two artists active in Tours who influenced him, will also be displayed.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

$18 Adults
$12 Children (13–16)
$12 Seniors (65 & over)
$12 Students (with current ID)
Free to members & children 12 & under (must be accompanied by an adult)

Admission is free on Fridays from 7 pm - 9pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 31 -
September 15, 2014
Small Prints, Big Artists: Masterpieces from the Renaissance to Baroque
Small Prints, Big Artists presents more than 200 masterworks from Carnegie Museum of Art’s exceptional collection of over 8,000 prints, many of which have not been on view in decades.

The intimately scaled woodcuts, engravings, and etchings reveal the development of printmaking as a true art form, from 15th-century Northern Europe, through the masterful innovations of Albrecht Dürer and Rembrandt, to the fantastical prints of Canaletto, Tiepolo, and Piranesi in the 18th century.

Artists began to make prints in the middle of the 15th century, mainly as devotional images included in religious volumes or as small individual sheets handed out to pilgrims at monasteries and shrines. By the year 1500, a new art form and a new means of communicating ideas was born—one that had as great an impact in its time as the Internet has had in our own. Small Prints, Big Artists traces the development of prints over the centuries, exploring the evolution of printmaking techniques and unlocking the images’ hidden meanings. It offers a unique opportunity to discover works by some of the best-known artists of the Renaissance and beyond.

This exhibition is organized by Linda Batis, independent curator.

HOURS:
Mon, 10am – 5pm
Tue, Closed
Wed, 10am – 5pm
Thu, 10am – 8pm
Fri, 10am – 5pm
Sat, 10am – 5pm
Sun, noon – 5pm

ADMISSION (includes Carnegie Museum of Natural History):
Adults: $17.95
Seniors (65+): $14.95
Students with ID/Children age 3–18: $11.95
Members and children under 3: Free

Heinz Galleries A&B
Carnegie Museum of Art
4400 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 06 -
September 14, 2014
Marks of Genius: Treasures of the Bodleian Library
Marks of Genius presents some of the greatest achievements of human creativity, from the beginning of recorded information up to the industrial era, as preserved in the incomparable collections of Oxford University's Bodleian Library. The exhibition features approximately sixty rare and exceptional objects from diverse disciplines that serve as points of departure for exploring some of the fundamental meanings of genius.

The ways in which genius has been cultivated, recognized, and venerated will be explored through such works as early manuscripts of Euclid's Elementa and Gregory I's Regular Pastoralis, the oldest book written in English; an Arabic manuscript book of constellations; a unique papyri of Sappho's poems; the copyright deposit copy of Shakespeare's First Folio; a thirteenth-century manuscript of the Magna Carta; the definitive account of Aztec civilization; the manuscript of Handel's Messiah; J.R.R. Tolkien's drawings for The Hobbit; and Mary Shelley's manuscript draft of Frankenstein.

Marks of Genius travels exclusively to the Morgan before returning to the Bodleian Library to mark the opening of a new building devoted to its special collections.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

$18 Adults
$12 Children (13–16)
$12 Seniors (65 & over)
$12 Students (with current ID)
Free to members & children 12 & under (must be accompanied by an adult)

Admission is free on Fridays from 7 pm - 9pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 16 -
September 14, 2014
Gustave Doré (1832–1883): Master of Imagination
Draftsman, painter and sculptor, Gustave Doré is arguably the most renowned illustrator of all time. Organized in collaboration with the Musée d’Orsay in Paris, this exhibition will be the first comprehensive retrospective devoted to this major artist and will include prints, drawings, paintings and sculpture. A hundred works, ranging from spectacular panoramas to intimate studies, will be brought together to illustrate Doré’s great artistic diversity. Unswayed by new trends, Doré was guided principally by his own extraordinary imagination and, intriguingly, has become a fertile source of inspiration to many 20th and 21st-century artists and filmmakers. Gustave Doré: Master of Imagination promises to be an enjoyable visual tour de force for all ages.

Hours
Sun 10am - 5pm
Mon 10am - 5pm
Tue 10am - 5pm
Wed 10am - 5pm
Thu 10am - 8pm
Fri 10am - 5pm
Sat 10am - 5pm

National Gallery of Canada
380 Sussex Drive
Ottawa, Ontario, CANADA
Exhibit International
June 20, 2014 -
January 11, 2015
A Certain Slant of Light: Spencer Finch at the Morgan
American artist Spencer Finch (b. 1962) will unveil a new, site-specific, large-scale installation at the Morgan inspired by its great collection of medieval Books of Hours—beautiful, hand-painted works that served as personal prayer books for different times of the day and different periods of the year. Taking advantage of the Morgan's four-story, glass-enclosed Gilbert Court, Finch will apply films of color to the windows and hang additional glass panes in the center of the Court to create a kind of calendar based on the movement of the sun.

Finch plans to cover or hang the panes of glass in groupings by month with each having a palette that corresponds to the time of the year. For example, November would be "harvesting" and the colors of the month will be based on the colors of the harvest. The installation also calls for what the artist is identifying as "red-letter days." Marking secular holidays the artist considers significant—such as Sir Isaac Newton's birthday on January 4—red-colored glass would align with the sun's arc across Gilbert Court at noon on these days. The precise measurements required to create the installation at the Morgan are a hallmark of Finch's work. At the same time, his installations emphasize movement and change, capturing fleeting moments of sublime beauty.

This exhibition is made possible in part by a gift from Susanna and Livio Borghese, in honor of Parker Gilbert and in appreciation of his many contributions to the Morgan Library & Museum, with additional generous support from Mickey Cartin; the Charles E. Pierce, Jr. Fund for Exhibitions; James Cohan Gallery; Christopher Scholz and Inés Elskop; Nancy Schwartz; and Rhona Hoffman Gallery, Chicago.

HOURS:
Tuesday through Thursday: 10:30am - 5pm
Friday: 10:30am - 9pm
Saturday: 10am - 6pm
Sunday: 11am - 6pm

ADMISSION:
$18 Adults
$12 Children (13–16)
$12 Seniors (65 and over)
$12 Students (with current ID)
Free to members and children 12 and under (must be accompanied by an adult)
Admission is free on Fridays from 7pm - 9pm
Admission to the McKim rooms only is without charge during the following times: Tuesday, 3pm - 5pm; Friday, 7pm - 9pm, Sunday, 4pm - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 23 -
October 31, 2014
Enduring War: Grief, Grit and Humour
A major part of the Library's contribution to the First World War Centenary, Enduring War examines how people coped with life during the war: from moments of patriotic fervour to periods of anxious inactivity, shock and despair.

Through posters, poetry, books and pamphlets from the period, the exhibition considers attempts to boost morale at home and in the field, as well as presenting individual responses to the conflict, such as letters from Indian soldiers on the Western Front, schoolboys' descriptions of Zeppelin raids over London and examples of the black humour expressed in trench journals.

The exhibition also showcases the Library's work for Europeana 1914-1918, a major pan-European project to digitise more than 400,000 items from World War One through an audiovisual art installation.

A series of public events, artistic performances and discussions accompany the exhibition, as well as a programme for schools and teachers.

Admission free

Folio Society Gallery
The British Library
96 Euston Road
London, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
June 23, 2014 -
March 15, 2015
Warhol On Vinyl: The Record Covers, 1949-1987+
Andy Warhol envisioned the record cover as a means to popularize his name as an artist and, once he reached iconic status in the 1960s, used it to directly impact popular culture. Designed to be collected by the masses, the records—numbering more than fifty— reinforce his maxim “repetition adds up to reputation.” While only a fortunate few own a Warhol painting, millions own his design for Rolling Stones’ Sticky Fingers.

The exhibition is drawn from the Cranbrook Art Museum’s preeminent collection of record covers by Andy Warhol, a recent gift by Frank M. Edwards and Ann M. Williams, and premieres three recently discovered covers that have never before been exhibited, including a cover recently discovered last year. Cranbrook has also been loaned a copy of the one-of-a-kind "Night Beat" album cover, making this the most comprehensive exhibition of authenticated record covers to date. The album covers range from the extremely rare to the widely recognizable; together they offer a unique lens to survey the artist’s career from a young graphic designer to a cultural phenomenon. At the same time, the exhibition documents the history of the mass-produced vinyl record and the zeitgeist of these eras through the inclusion of music, video and artworks from the Art Museum’s extensive Andy Warhol collection. Listening booths in the gallery will allow viewers to play select albums, thereby producing an experience between the cover art and the music—rock, classical, opera, jazz, soul, experimental—the way Warhol intended. The exhibition also includes album covers by other musicians that have controversially appropriated Warhol’s imagery and testify to his influence on subsequent generations.

Cranbrook Art Museum
39221 Woodward Avenue
Bloomfield Hills, MI
Exhibit Midwest
June 24 -
October 31, 2014
Once There Were Billions: Vanished Birds of North America
Once an amazing diversity of birds—some in breathtaking abundance—inhabited the vast forests and plains of North America. But starting around 1600, species began to disappear, as humans altered habitats, over-hunted, and introduced predators.

A notable extinction occurred 100 years ago, with the death of Martha the Passenger Pigeon, the last member of a species that once filled America’s skies.

The story of the last Passenger Pigeon and the disappearance of the Great Auk, Carolina Parakeet, and Heath Hen reveal the fragile connections between species and their environment. Illustrations come from the Biodiversity Heritage Library, a global project that is changing the way research is done by digitizing and freely sharing biodiversity publications with scientists and other users around the world.

"The Lost Bird Project" at the Smithsonian
Smithsonian Indoor and Outdoor Exhibits Showcase Extinct Birds

The Smithsonian Libraries and Smithsonian Gardens present “The Lost Bird Project,” an exhibit by artist Todd McGrain, March 27 through March 15, 2015. This project recognizes the tragedy of modern extinction by immortalizing North American birds that have been driven to extinction. It will feature large-scale bronze sculptures of the Carolina Parakeet, the Labrador Duck, the Great Auk, the Heath Hen and the Passenger Pigeon.

Ground Floor
National Museum of Natural History
1000 Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 28 -
November 02, 2014
Simms Taback: Art by Design
To celebrate the gift of a significant part of Simms Taback’s archive, the museum is mounting an exhibition, Simms Taback: Art by Design. It will be on view from June 27 until October 19, 2014. The exhibition will survey Simms’s eight major books, including his Caldecott Medal Book, Joseph Had a Little Overcoat, and his Honor Book, I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly. Taback's irrepressible humor shines through in his colorful, beautifully crafted compositions, and important messages abound. This show is the second in an ongoing series highlighting the permanent collection and it will be accompanied by a sixteen-page illustrated brochure with an essay by Chief Curator, Nick Clark.

Support for Simms Taback: Art by Design has been generously provided by Penguin Young Readers Group

East Gallery
The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
July 01 -
October 26, 2014
Heralds and Heraldry in Shakespeare's England
Discover the colorful world of heralds and their rivals, all competing to profit from the craze for coats of arms that seized England under Elizabeth I. Books explaining heraldry's complex rules, manuscripts illustrating actual coats of arms, and documents from professional heralds attempting to regulate heraldic practice show an ambitious world eager to display success and status.

Folger Great Hall
Folger Shakespeare Library
201 East Capitol Street, SE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 03 -
September 01, 2014
Magna Carta: Cornerstone of Liberty
See a rare copy of England's Magna Carta along with the Sons of Liberty Bowl, drafts of Declaration of Independence, and more symbols of liberty and justice.

One of only four surviving copies of the original Magna Carta—a document written in 1215 that is the foundation for many liberties that Americans enjoy—travels to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, this summer for a special exhibition in the Art of the Americas Wing. An inspiration for the US Constitution and Bill of Rights, the exemplar typically housed in the Lincoln Cathedral in Lincolnshire, England, is on view at the MFA this summer in partnership with the Massachusetts Historical Society and the Massachusetts House of Representatives. Magna Carta—Latin for “Great Charter”— joins other historical loans as well as portraits and works of art from the Museum’s collection—including the MFA’s Sons of Liberty Bowl (1768) by Paul Revere, which is engraved with the words "Magna/Charta" and "Bill of/Rights"—to tell the story of patriots and revolutionaries who fought for freedom in the face of tyranny. The exhibition also includes portraits, marble busts, and historical documents related to several of the Founding Fathers, presidents, and abolitionists, particularly from Massachusetts, who were inspired by the liberties enshrined in Magna Carta.

Mon–Tue: 10am – 4:45pm
Wed–Fri: 10am – 9:45pm
Sat–Sun: 10am – 4:45pm

Members FREE
Adults $25
Seniors (65+) $23
Students (18+) $23
Youths 7–17* FREE*
Children 6 and under FREE
*Weekdays after 3 pm, weekends, and Boston public school holidays; otherwise $10.

Edward and Nancy Roberts Family Gallery (Gallery LG26)
Museum of Fine Arts - Boston
Avenue of the Arts
465 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
July 04 -
October 13, 2014
Madeline in New York: The Art of Ludwig Bemelmans
To celebrate the 75th anniversary of Madeline’s publication, the New-York Historical Society will honor the beloved schoolgirl and her creator Ludwig Bemelmans with an exhibition of more than 90 original artworks.

In addition to drawings from all six Madeline books, the exhibition will also feature Bemelmans' drawings of the old Ritz Hotel in New York, murals from a rediscovered Paris bistro, panels from the Onassis yacht, and a cache of fabrics based on an early picture book.

Tue - Thu, & Sat 10am - 6pm
Fri - 10am - 8pm
Sun - 11am - 5pm
Mon - CLOSED

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West
at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 04 -
October 13, 2014
Madeline in New York: The Art of Ludwig Bemelmans
To celebrate the 75th anniversary of Madeline’s publication, the New-York Historical Society will honor the beloved schoolgirl and her creator Ludwig Bemelmans with an exhibition of more than 90 original artworks.

In addition to drawings from all six Madeline books, the exhibition will also feature Bemelmans' drawings of the old Ritz Hotel in New York, murals from a rediscovered Paris bistro, panels from the Onassis yacht, and a cache of fabrics based on an early picture book.

Related Programs:
Madeline's Tea Party: Wednesdays 3pm – 5pm
July 16
August 13
September 10
October 8

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West
at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 07 -
September 28, 2014
FABELO'S ANATOMY
Roberto Fabelo’s images appear to us from a different dimension. Strangely beautiful nude female torsos, sometimes winged, at other times sporting beaks, peer out of pages from ancient texts that seem to describe these haunting and unusual creatures. The metamorphosis of these human figures into Fabelo’s unique creatures parallels the transformation that takes place in the viewer who is forced to question their own perceptions of fantasy and reality.

Fabelo’s Anatomy offers a glimpse into the complex world of imagery emerging from the mind of one of Cuba’s most compelling artists. This cameo exhibition at MOLAA is the first solo museum exhibition of the artist’s work in the U.S.

HOURS
Wed, Thu, Sat & Sun 11am - 5pm
Fri (extended hours) 11am - 9pm
Mon & Tue Closed

ADMISSION
General Admission $9.00
Seniors $6.00
Students $6.00
MOLAA Members FREE
Children under 12 years FREE
Free Admission Every Sunday
Free Admission the fourth Friday of every month between 5 - 9pm

Temporary Gallery
Museum of Latin American Art
628 Alamitos Avenue
Long Beach, CA
Exhibit West
July 07 -
November 13, 2014
What Did Renaissance Printmakers Make of Antiquity?
Around 1500 Italian artists became so competitive that they even tried to surpass famous artists from ancient times. The Renaissance, a modern name for this period encompassing the 15th to late 16th centuries throughout Europe, refers to the rebirth of Classical forms of learning and artistic expression. Artists active during this time, especially in Rome, witnessed first-hand the rediscovery of ancient sculptures such as the colossal Hellenistic (c. 323–31 B.C.) marble Laöcoon group, which Michelangelo himself inspected soon after it was unearthed in 1506. Printed reproductions circulated soon thereafter, including two in this gallery rotation, one of which is a lively woodcut lampooning the study of antiquity by recasting the writhing, heroic figures as hairy apes.

The Renaissance artist was frequently praised as the "new Apelles," who had once been painter to Alexander the Great. An extended historical description survives of one of Apelles's paintings about a false judgment made on an innocent man. The cast from that lost composition populates several different prints in this rotation and inspired many paintings as well.

In the case of ancient paintings and sculptures, pictures for the Renaissance artist were indeed worth more than a thousand words, for they were worth recreating. These attempts to understand ancient sculpture and recreate lost paintings underscore the Renaissance artist's deep investment in the past.

Open daily 10:30–5:00
Thursday until 8:00
General admission to the Art Institute of Chicago is free to Illinois residents every Thursday from 5 - 8pm.
An additional fee for special exhibitions may be applied.

Gallery 205A
The Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
July 07 -
October 12, 2014
What May Come: The Taller de Gráfica Popular and the Mexican Political Print
The most influential and enduring progressive printmaking collective of its time, the Taller de Gráfica Popular (the Popular Graphic Art Workshop) or TGP, created some of the most memorable images in mid-century printmaking. This Mexico City–based workshop took up the legacy of the famous Mexican broadside illustrator José Guadalupe Posada, creating prints, posters, and illustrated publications that were popular, affordable, legible, politically topical, and, above all, formally compelling. This exhibition includes over 100 works from the Art Institute’s rich holdings—one of the most significant TGP collections in the United States—demonstrating why this collective boasted such international influence and inspired the establishment of print collectives around the world.

Founded in 1937 by Leopoldo Méndez, Luis Arenal, and American-born Pablo O’Higgins, the TGP emerged and evolved in the crucible of antifascist and leftist politics in Mexico in the period surrounding World War II. This milieu shaped not only the workshop’s dedication to a collective printmaking model but also its production aimed at both “the people” and discerning collectors, a strategy necessitated by the era’s quickly changing political tides. The collective created works for groups spanning the leftist and progressive political spectrum, including the government of Lázaro Cárdenas and his successors, the Mexican Communist Party, major trade unions, and antifascist organizations.

During the TGP’s heyday, from its founding until the 1950s, the workshop produced thousands of prints, primarily linocuts and lithographs, for everything from ephemeral handbills and newspapers to political and advertising posters to luxe portfolios and printed books. Favoring an expressive, realist visual language, its work addressed a wide range of socially engaged themes, including Mexican history and culture, political satires both local and international (including calavera broadsides), rural and urban scenes of daily life, and agitprop prints. The members of the workshop, a core of about 40 during its height, produced both individual and collective works and welcomed numbers of foreign members and guest artists—from Elizabeth Catlett to Josef Albers—to use the workshop in order to collaborate on prints and create individual pieces.

Showcasing the TGP’s prolific and varied output, What May Come is organized into thematic sections such as Chicago connections to the TGP, antifascism, national history, daily life, caricature, and popular visual traditions. A Spanish-English catalogue accompanies the exhibition, which also features bilingual labeling.

Open daily 10:30–5:00
Thursday until 8:00
General admission to the Art Institute of Chicago is free to Illinois residents every Thursday from 5 - 8pm.
An additional fee for special exhibitions may be applied.

Galleries 124–127
The Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
July 07 -
October 12, 2014
Saul Steinberg: Commemorating the 100th Anniversary of His Birth
Saul Steinberg (1914–1999) had one of the most remarkable and varied careers in postwar American art. He is as equally renowned for the covers and drawings that appeared in The New Yorker for nearly six decades as for the drawings, paintings, prints, collages, and sculptures that earned him over 80 solo exhibitions across the world throughout his lifetime. While he was committed to the act of drawing in an era dominated by large-scale painting and sculpture, he explored any visual idiom that met his immediate needs, constantly crossing boundaries into uncharted artistic territory and freely conflating high and low art. As a result Steinberg’s art resists classification, as he himself knew: “I don’t quite belong to the art, cartoon, or magazine world, so the art world doesn’t quite know where to place me.” He nevertheless crafted a rich and ever-evolving oeuvre that found full expression through his various parallel careers and is famed internationally for giving graphic definition to the postwar age.

The Art Institute is thrilled to announce a remarkable gift from the Saul Steinberg Foundation of 54 works on paper, including five masks, by this amazingly versatile artist. In celebration of this significant addition to the collection and in honor of Steinberg’s 100th birthday, this focused installation presents five works from the recent gift—each capturing a distinct style and working method from Steinberg’s long and varied career—alongside three works already in the museum’s collection. The earliest work in the installation is the 1952 collage Downtown Building, which transforms two 19th-century engravings—of an organ and a display cabinet—into a building through the addition of inked doorways and an urban streetscape, while the latest work is the 1989 drawing Las Vegas (which became a 1992 New Yorker cover), a satirical take on the United States’ national icons with a skeleton-faced cowboy, a soldier in camouflage, Abraham Lincoln, Lady Liberty, a Klansman, and Mickey Mouse—all posing as sphinxes along the Las Vegas highway. As wide-ranging stylistically as they are chronologically, the works in this selection demonstrate the rich visual imagination, boundless wit, and keen cultural critique of Steinberg’s art, offering a brief but rich overview of this uncategorizable artist.

Open daily 10:30–5:00
Thursday until 8:00
General admission to the Art Institute of Chicago is free to Illinois residents every Thursday from 5 - 8pm.
An additional fee for special exhibitions may be applied.

Gallery 124A
The Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
July 07 -
September 28, 2014
Sharp, Clear Pictures: Edward Steichen’s World War I and Condé Nast Years
At the start of World War I in 1914, Edward Steichen was a pioneering champion of art photography—catapulting to fame as a leading member of the Photo Secessionists and as cofounder of the trailblazing magazine Camera Work. Yet by the early 1920s, Steichen had rejected the soft focus, dreamy landscapes and portraits of his early years in favor of realist photographs made for informational purposes or popular consumption. This turning point was first marked by his role in World War I as chief of the Photographic Section of the American Expeditionary Forces from 1917 to 1919; it was fully realized in his subsequent work as lead photographer at Condé Nast publications from 1923 to 1937.

While on military duty, Steichen helped adapt aerial photography for intelligence purposes, implementing surveillance programs that had a lasting impact on modern warfare. He later reflected: “The wartime problem of making sharp, clear pictures from a vibrating, speeding airplane ten to twenty thousand feet in the air had brought me a new kind of technical interest in photography. . . . Now I wanted to know all that could be expected from photography.” Steichen began to value photography’s capacity to transmit and encode information, and he soon proved his savvy as a collaborator and producer rather than a solitary auteur—new skills that enabled his subsequent groundbreaking career in magazines. Upon his return to New York in 1923, Steichen joined Condé Nast publications, creating iconic fashion photographs and celebrity portraits for Vogue and Vanity Fair. Over a period of nearly 15 years he created images that redefined the field through their clever use of modernist aesthetics and advertising tactics, becoming an influential impresario who promoted photography as a mass-media tool.

Focusing on rarely seen Steichen photographs drawn from the Art Institute’s collection, this exhibition includes a unique album of over 80 World War I aerial photographs assembled and annotated by Steichen himself as well as a group of iconic glamour portraits and fashion photographs done for Condé Nast, featuring notable figures such as Greta Garbo, Fred Astaire, and Gloria Swanson.

Open daily 10:30–5:00
Thursday until 8:00
General admission to the Art Institute of Chicago is free to Illinois residents every Thursday from 5 - 8pm.
An additional fee for special exhibitions may be applied.

Galleries 1–4
The Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
July 07 -
October 26, 2014
Mind’s Eye: Masterworks on Paper from David to Cézanne
From quick sketches to watercolors, works by artists such as Edgar Degas, Paul Cézanne, Vincent van Gogh, Edouard Manet, Jacques-Louis David, Théodore Géricault, and Eugène Delacroix are brought together in the DMA-organized exhibition Mind’s Eye: Masterworks on Paper from David to Cézanne. Drawn from the Dallas Museum of Art’s collection, as well as from several private collections, the exhibition features more than 100 works on paper, many of which are rarely on view, in various media by 70 artists. Mind’s Eye offers new insights into the working methods and practices of these artists, providing an intimate view of their approach to art making while also presenting the drawings and watercolors as finished works of art in their own right.

Monday: Closed
Tue 11am – 5pm
Wed 11am – 5pm
Thu 11am – 9pm
Fri* 11am – 5pm
Sat 11am – 5pm
Sun 11am – 5pm

*Late Night Fridays (third Friday of the month, excluding December), the Museum is open until midnight

Special exhibition admission is $8
DMA Partners: FREE
Children 11 and under: FREE

Dallas Museum of Art
1717 North Harwood
Dallas, TX
Exhibit Southwest
July 09, 2014 -
January 18, 2015
Bescribbled, Nibbled, and Dog-Eared: Early American Children’s Books
“It is quite normal for a bouncing bibliophile of twelve months to teethe on the hard board corners of, for instance, a copy of Cinderella,” wrote Dr. A. S. W. Rosenbach (1876—1952). As one of the first serious collectors of American children’s books, Rosenbach knew that pristine survivals of such books were rare and prized. But they were also fascinating windows into American history, education, and literature. Taking up a collection begun by his uncle, Moses Polock, Dr. Rosenbach bought and sold these tiny books dating from 1682 to 1836, making an historic donation of 816 children’s books to the Free Library of Philadelphia in 1947 and assisting other collectors in refining their own holdings. This exhibition explores the history of these early children’s books from the religious tracts of Puritan printers to the adventure novels of the 19th century, while introducing visitors to Dr. Rosenbach’s passion for these dog-eared gems.

Rosenbach Museum & Library
2008-2010 Delancey Place
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 10 -
October 26, 2014
Virginia Woolf: Art, Life and Vision
Virginia Woolf was one of the most important and celebrated writers of the twentieth century. This extensive exhibition of portraits and rare archival material will explore her life and achievements as a novelist, intellectual, campaigner and public figure.

Curated by biographer and art historian Frances Spalding, the exhibition includes distinctive portraits of Woolf by her Bloomsbury Group contemporaries Vanessa Bell and Roger Fry and photographs by Beresford and Man Ray, as well as intimate images recording her time spent with friends and family. Woolf’s early life and literary achievements, alongside lesser known aspects of her time in London and political views, are brought into focus through in-depth research and a remarkable array of personal objects including letters, diaries and books.

Daily 10.00 – 18.00
Closure commences at 17.50

Thursdays and Fridays until 21.00
Closure commences at 20.50

Last admission to the exhibition is 1 hour before the Gallery closes.

National Portrait Gallery
St Martin's Place
London, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
July 10 -
September 14, 2014
On 52nd Street: The Jazz Photography of William P. Gottlieb
On 52nd Street: The Jazz Photography of William P. Gottlieb features forty vintage photographs of jazz musicians in performance from the collection of the photographer’s family. William P. Gottlieb (1917–2006) began photographing jazz musicians in 1938 to illustrate a weekly feature he wrote for The Washington Post. Over the next decade he created almost 2,000 portraits of more than 250 musicians. This exhibition brings together Gottlieb’s photographic portraits of jazz musicians whose rebellious self-expression, charisma, edge, and mystery made them American icons.

RELATED PROGRAMMING
Thu, July 10, 2014 6pm - 8pm
Members' Reception and Tour

Museum members are invited to a reception and presentation celebrating the exhibition. Join us for refreshments and hors d'ouevres at 6:00 p.m., followed by a tour of the exhibition led by Frank Goodyear, co-director of the Bowdoin College Museum of Art at 7:00 pm.

Not a member? Free membership is available.

Thu, August 14 7pm
Jazz Duo
Hannah Judd and Tate Gale will play within the exhibition.

Thu, September 11, 2014 7pm
Thursday Night Salon

Frank Goodyear, co-director of the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, will lead a tour of the exhibition.

Shaw Ruddock Gallery
Bowdoin College Museum of Art
9400 College Station
Brunswick, ME
Exhibit New England
July 11, 2014 -
February 01, 2015
Chester Beatty’s A to Z: from Amulet to Zodiac
A is for Amulet, B is for Beatty, C is for Calligraphy . . ., Chester Beatty’s A to Z will take you on a journey through a selection of highlights, showcasing the breadth and quality of this wonderful collection.

This curators’ choice show is a visual treat with universal appeal. Featuring works that are seldom on display, the exhibition presents an opportunity to explore the threads that link cultures across the Western, Islamic and East Asian worlds.

A is for Amulet and the exhibition displays exquisite examples of these seventeenth- to nineteenth- century protective charms from the Christian, Hebrew, Islamic and Hindu faiths.

E is for Embroidery and the objects on view include European sixteenth- to eighteenth-century covers for almanacs and devotional works, as well as eighteenth- and nineteenth-century embroidered badges worn to indicate status in the Chinese imperial court.

T is for Travel and among the early printed travel books is a rare 1576 guide to the ‘most famous islands of the world’ with a chapter devoted to Ireland.

B is for Beatty and M is for Mining, and rarely seen material from the Library’s Archives offer a glimpse into Chester Beatty’s family and professional life.

Chester Beatty Library
Dublin Castle
Dublin, IRELAND
Exhibit International
July 23 -
September 27, 2014
Zines+ and the World of ABC No Rio
Zine is an abbreviation of the term fanzine, and in describing its history and uses Thomas Paine and Benjamin Franklin are commonly cited, often alongside 1970's punk music. By straddling the line between functional brochure and works of art realized in book form, the zine has retained its popularity even as the internet has largely become the preferred method of self-publishing. Zines+ and The World of ABC No Rio, organized by Jason Lujan, is an exhibition that goes beyond the mere form of the zine, which is usually a cheaply-made and priced publication, often in black and white, mass-produced via a photocopier, and bound with staples. The exhibit presents and explains a range of these self-same printed materials, mixing both artists' original creations with items from the ABC No Rio zine library archives, covering subject matter from arts-community history to political commentary.
The zines will be shown in the context of art in book form. The overall aesthetic reflects a Do-It-Yourself approach, firmly rooted in a downtown New York scene that celebrates volunteerism, art, and activism. The zine form lends itself as a tool for community activism and empower-ment. And, through this exhibition that community's voice, the lower eastside downtown scene, is clearly articulated.
The Center is pleased to present this engaging exhibition which builds upon The Center's recent exhibitions of similar vein, such as No More Drama: The Saga Continues, organized by Edwin Ramoran; From Bande Dessinée to Artist's Book: Testing the Limits of Franco-Belgian Comics, organized by Catherine Labio; and Garo Manga: The First Decade, 1964-1973, organized by Ryan Holmberg. These exhibitions investigate the graphic novel, comics, and other related media as artistic vehicles for self-expression, social activism, and political criticism.

Mon - Fri 11am-6pm
Sat 10am-5pm

The Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 23 -
September 27, 2014
Livre d'Artiste d'Aujourd'hui: Interdisciplinary Collaborations
What is a livre d'artiste? One could argue, not in absolute, that the livre d'artiste was "traditionally" put together by the publisher asking an artist and writer (who often didn't even know each other) to create work for a publication. The collaboration was usually an arranged one and the production value was usually of high quality produced in a limited run. For this exhibition, however, the curators are interested to see how artists, writers, performers, etc, have found ways to self-produce publications that embody the collaborative spirit embedded in the concept of the livre d'artiste. The exhibition will present the work of a true collaboration, not one artist responding to a finished work, but instead one in which both contributors have equal weight.
Collaborations being featured include: Rosaire Appel & Myrna Burks; Samanta Batra-Mehta & Sweta Srivastava Vikram; Rosemarie Chiarlone, Susan Weiner, Elaine Wright & Alfredo Useche; Béatrice Coron & Elizabeth DeSole; Martin Demaine, Erik Demaine & Micheal Benson; Rolando Estevez-Jordan & Ruth Behar; Anne Gilman & David Unger; Ximena Perez-Grobet & AJO (Maria Jose de la Hoz); Roni Gross, Peter Schell & Nancy Campbell; Mary Heebner, John Balkwill, Tomio Muneno, Tessa Tapscott & David Shelton; Wennie Huang & Ed Go; Despo Magoni & over 30 various collaborators; Iviva Olenick, Luke Hoorelbeke & Community Members; Robin Price & Joyce Cutler-Shaw; Felicia Rice, Monica Brown & Jenny Callañ aupa Huarhua; Miriam Schaer & Mary Florio; Susan Schwalb & Martin Boykan; Robbin Ami Silverberg & András Dés; Sarah Stengle & Michael Joseph; and Ewa Monika Zebrowski & Anne Michaels.
The exhibition will be travelling to MDC Galleries of Art + Design in Miami from November 17th, 2014 to March 20th, 2015. Presented to coincide with the Miami Book Fair International, there will be a related panel on paper and book arts in February. MDC Galleries of Art + Design is located at Centre Gallery (on the Miami Dade College Wolfson campus), at 300 NE Second Avenue in Miami.

Mon - Fri 11am-6pm
Sat 10am-5pm

The Center for Books Arts
28 West 27th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 23 -
December 14, 2014
Caricature, Fashion and Fantasy
This group of prints and drawings, chiefly from the 16th to 18th centuries, encompasses a broad span of social comment from caricatures to documentary realism. Various levels of society are represented: carousing peasants, ladies of fashion, celebrities or anonymous adolescents. Some examples are complex, offering thinly veiled criticism of religious or secular institutions, while others represent the animal world, both real and imaginary. Some works are by little known artists, others by more famous names, like Tiepolo for example, who did caricatures in "off duty" moments. Many combine keen observation with fantasy and humor in a way that transforms the everyday into the exotic.

Wed, 10 am—5 pm
Thurs/Fri, 10 am—9 pm
Sat/Sun, 10 am—5 pm

Free admission

Nelson-Atkins Building, P13
The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
4525 Oak Street
Kansas City, MO
Exhibit Midwest
July 25, 2014 -
January 11, 2015
Across the Indian Country: Photographs by Alexander Gardner, 1867-68
By the 1860s, the Plains Indians found themselves sandwiched in the middle of the country with white advancement on both sides. Rail lines cut directly through their hunting grounds–scattering the game necessary for survival. This exhibition highlights two rare bodies of work created by Alexander Gardner at this pivotal time: Across the Continent on the Kansas Pacific Railroad in 1867-68 and Scenes in the Indian Country in 1868.

The Across the Continent series was photographed first on the existing railroad line across Kansas (resulting in some of the earliest images of that state) and then along the proposed route to the Pacific Ocean. Gardner's photographs stress the benefits of railroad construction–once railroads were built, towns would follow–and suggest the possibility of successful Indian and settler coexistence.

In 1868, in an attempt to end conflict, an unprecedented gathering of tribal leaders from the Northern Plains assembled at Fort Laramie, Wyoming. For his Scenes in the Indian Country series, Gardner photographed the treaty negotiations between the government-led Indian Peace Commission and the tribes who agreed to give up land and move to reservations.

Wed, 10 am—5 pm
Thurs/Fri, 10 am—9 pm
Sat/Sun, 10 am—5 pm

Free admission

Bloch Building, Gallery L11
The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
4525 Oak Street
Kansas City, MO
Exhibit Midwest
July 26, 2014 -
March 01, 2015
The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters
A preeminent artist of belle époque Paris, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901) brought the language of the late-19th-century avant-garde to a broad public through his famous posters, prints, and illustrations for journals and magazines. A cultural nexus, he connected artists, performers, authors, intellectuals, and society figures of his day, creating a bridge between the brothels and society salons of the moment. His work allows entry into many facets of Parisian life, from politics to visual culture and the rise of popular entertainment in the form of cabarets and café-concerts. This exhibition, drawn almost exclusively from The Museum of Modern Art’s stellar collection of posters, lithographs, printed ephemera, and illustrated books, is the first MoMA exhibition in 30 years dedicated solely to Lautrec, and features over 100 examples of the best-known works created during the apex of his career.

Organized thematically, the exhibition explores five subjects that together create a portrait of Lautrec’s Paris. A section devoted to café-concerts and dance halls examines the rise of nightlife culture in France through the depiction of famous venues, including the celebrated Moulin Rouge. Another focuses on the actresses, singers, dancers, and performers who sparked the artist’s imagination and served as his muses, including Yvette Guilbert, acclaimed dancer Loie Fuller, and close friend Jane Avril. Lautrec’s sympathetic images of women are evident in a group of works that includes his landmark Elles portfolio, depicting prostitutes during nonworking hours, in quiet moments of introspection. Lautrec’s role in Paris’s artistic community is explored in a section devoted to his creative circle, highlighting designs for song sheets for the popular music that flooded Paris’s café-concerts, programs for the avant-garde theatrical productions that he attended, and his contributions to magazines and intellectual reviews. A final section looks at the pleasures of the capital, from horse racing at Longchamp and promenading on the Bois de Boulogne, to the new fad for ice skating and the enduring appeal of Paris’s culture of gastronomy.

The accompanying publication highlights the Museum’s collection of prints and posters by Lautrec, with an introductory essay on the artist and five illustrated thematic sections that explore belle époque Paris as seen through Lautrec’s eyes, by Sarah Suzuki.

The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 28 -
November 10, 2014
Printmakers of World War I
This VMFA exhibition marks the centenary of the commencement of World War I on July 28, 1914. The story of the so-called Great War is told through approximately 25 prints by renowned British and American artists such as Muirhead Bone, Kerr Eby, Childe Hassam, James McBey, and Claude Shepperson. The works depict scenes of combat in France and the Near East, life on the home front in the United States and England, and the war’s aftermath and its commemoration. All of the prints come from the Frank Raysor collection, a promised gift to the museum.

Free admission

Works on Paper Focus Gallery
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts
200 N. Blvd.
Richmond, VA
Exhibit South
July 29, 2014 -
February 15, 2015
Over Here: WWI and the Fight for the American Mind
World War I. The Great War. The War to End All Wars. The conflict that enveloped the globe from July 28, 1914, to November 11, 1918, backlit an intense home-front struggle as Americans debated their individual and collective relationship to the conflict. Should the United States be involved in the war? If so, then to what extent and in what capacity?

The vigorous—and, at times, vicious—public debate over these questions was facilitated by an unprecedented array of media and performance outlets, including such recent inventions as recorded sound and motion pictures. Throughout the period, government at all levels, in addition to private organizations and individual citizens, used these communication tools in an increasingly sophisticated manner, all in an effort to win the hearts and minds of the nation. Truly, never before in the country’s history had Americans been so widely, and energetically, courted. And never in its history had the concept of Americanism—of what it means to be an American—been so hotly contested.

Drawing from collections across The New York Public Library, Over Here: WWI and the Fight for the American Mind explores the manner in which public relations, propaganda, and mass media in its many forms were used to shape and control public opinion about the war while also noting social and political issues that continue to resonate, such as freedom of speech and the press, xenophobia, and domestic espionage.

Mon, Thu, Fri, & Sat 10am - 6pm
Tue & Wed 10am - 8pm
Sun CLOSED

Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
New York Public Library
Fifth Avenue at 42nd Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 29 -
November 14, 2014
The First Woman Graphic Novelist: Helena Bochořáková-Dittrichová
Helena Bochořáková-Dittrichová (1894–1980) was a Czech graphic artist whose 1929 novel Z mého dětství (From My Childhood) is widely acknowledged to be the first wordless novel created by a woman. Bochořáková-Dittrichová’s appealing and warm woodcut style was influenced by pioneering Belgian graphic artist Frans Masereel. This exhibition showcases five of her published novels as well as her unpublished book Malířka Na Cestách (The Artist on her Journey), which contains 52 original woodcuts about a young woman artist studying abroad, mirroring Bochořáková-Dittrichová’s own life at the beginning of her career.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

National Museum of Women in the Arts
1250 New York Ave NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
August 05 -
November 03, 2014
Your Country Calls! Posters of the First World War
Posters from World War I spotlight the use of graphic arts as propaganda

This summer marks the 100th anniversary of the start of World War I, the “Great War” that involved all the world’s major economic powers and claimed the lives of some 9 million combatants. To commemorate the anniversary, The Huntington presents a new exhibition that examines how World War I was waged not just by soldiers on the battlefield, but by citizens on the homefront through an innovative use of graphic arts that worked to stir patriotism and service through the war years that spanned 1914–18.

Drawn entirely from The Huntington’s collection of prints and ephemera, “Your Country Calls! Posters of the First World War” features approximately 50 colorful vintage posters designed to mobilize citizens into action for the collective effort to win the war.

“When World War I began, posters were already a powerful advertising tool and a successful medium of artistic expression,” said David Mihaly, the Jay T. Last Curator of Graphic Arts and Social History at The Huntington and curator of the exhibition. “They were able to be printed quickly and inexpensively, making posters the ideal choice for spreading wartime propaganda.”

The exhibition features the work of American artists such as James Montgomery Flagg (who created the iconic image of Uncle Sam announcing “I Want YOU for U.S. Army”), Charles Buckles Falls, and Edward Penfield, and their European counterparts including Francisque Poulbot, Alfred Roller, Mario Porgoni.

“These works are so stunning, powerful, and engaging, that it’s really no surprise they aroused quick and committed responses in their day,” said Mihaly, “and still elicit reactions today.”

Library, West Hall
The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
August 05, 2014 -
January 05, 2015
Highlights of American Drawings and Watercolors from The Huntington’s Art Collections
Thirty rarely seen masterworks from The Huntington’s significant collection of American drawings and watercolors are on view during this six-month-long exhibition. The installation highlights drawings by John Singer Sargent and Grant Wood, pastels by Mary Cassatt and Edwin Austin Abbey, and watercolors by Winslow Homer and Charles Burchfield. Some works will be rotated with others by the same artists in October 2014 for conservation reasons.

Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art, Susan and Stephen Chandler Wing
The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
August 09 -
November 02, 2014
READ MY PINS: THE MADELEINE ALBRIGHT COLLECTION
Featuring a collection of more than 200 symbolic and historically significant pins, this exhibit explores how Secretary of State Madeleine Albright used jewelry as a diplomatic, political and social tool.

In 1997, Albright was named the first female Secretary of State and became, at that time, the highest-ranking woman in the history of the U.S. government. While serving under President Bill Clinton, first as U.S ambassador to the United Nations, and then as Secretary of State, Albright became known for wearing brooches that purposefully conveyed her views about the situation at hand. "I found that jewelry had become part of my personal diplomatic arsenal" Secretary Albright has said. "While President George H.W. Bush had been known for saying 'Read my lips,' I began urging colleagues and reporters to 'Read my pins.'"

Sparkling with Albright's wit and energy -- the collection is notable for its historic significance as well as the expressive power of jewelry and its ability to communicate through a style and language of its own. The collection is distinctive and democratic --sometimes demure and understated, sometimes outlandish and outspoken -- spanning more than a century of jewelry design and including fascinating pieces from across the globe. The works on view are chosen for their symbolic value, and while some are fine antiques, many are costume jewelry. Together the pieces in this expressive collection explore the power of jewelry to communicate through a style and language of its own.

Over the years, Secretary Albright's pins became a part of her public persona, and they chart the course of an extraordinary journey, carving out a visual path through international and cultural diplomacy. A highlight of the exhibition will be the brooch that began Secretary Albright's unusual use of pins as a tool in her diplomatic arsenal. After Saddam Hussein's government-controlled press referred to her as a serpent in 1994, then U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Albright wore a golden snake brooch pinned to her suit for her next meeting on Iraq. READ MY PINS features the famous snake brooch among many other pins with similar stories -- some associated with important world events, others gifts from international leaders or valued friends.

The exhibition also showcases a group of Americana, which is at the center of the Madeleine Albright collection. One of her most original pieces is a pin made specifically for her. The silver brooch shows the head of Lady Liberty with two watch faces for eyes, one of which is upside down -- allowing both her and her visitor to see when it is time for an appointment to end. As demonstrated in this clever work, READ MY PINS explores Albright's ongoing impact on the field of jewelry design and collecting.

Regular Hours and Admission Apply

William J. vanden Heuvel Gallery
The Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum
4079 Albany Post Road
Hyde Park, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
August 12 -
November 11, 2014
From the Alps to the Ocean: Maps of the Western Front at the Harvard Map Collection
World War One is often described as the first truly modern war, a war where advances in technology had outpaced the tactical thinking of the day. The massive changes that occurred in the field of military technology were mirrored in the field of map mapmaking. New technologies led to new cartographic methods and techniques and to an increased reliance on maps. On the battlefield, cartographers were churning out maps of the trenches almost daily. At home, maps were being used to rally the home front in Europe and to try to convince the United States to join the Entente powers. Immediately after the war, maps were used to help decide how to redefine Europe. At the centennial of the start of the war, this exhibit explores the roles of maps and mapping on the battlefield and at home.

Mon, Fri, & Sat 9:00am - 5:00pm
Tue, Wed, & Thu 9:00am - 7:00pm
Sun CLOSED

Map Gallery Hall
Pusey Library
Harvard Yard
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
August 12 -
September 30, 2014
Silhouettes: From Craft to Art
This exhibition explores the production of hand-cut and printed silhouettes in books and manuscript albums from the late 1700s to the present, both as craft and as art forms in Europe and the United States. The 'craze' for silhouettes popularized this figurative genre among a wide audience at the end of the eighteenth-century. Amateurs and professionals alike made silhouettes for private use or widespread circulation. During the nineteenth century, the visual vocabulary of these figures expanded. While remaining a popular art, silhouette-making attracted the interest of artists. The exhibit includes well-known books about or including silhouettes such as those of Johann Caspar Lavater and Kara Walker, as well as lesser known items representative of the subject.

Mon, Fri, & Sat 9:00am - 5:00pm
Tue, Wed, & Thu 9:00am - 7:00pm
Sun CLOSED

Amy Lowell Room
Houghton Library
Harvard Yard
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
August 12 -
December 31, 2014
Theodore Roosevelt – "How I Love Sagamore Hill" by Xiomáro
Harvard University's Houghton Library opens the New Year with selections from this photographic series. The New York artist was commissioned by the National Park service to photograph the interiors of the president's "Summer Whitehouse" at what is now Sagamore Hill National Historic Site.

Xiomáro's photographs show the house in a historically rare condition: the 23 room mansion, usually chock full of furnishings and mementos, was nearly vacant as part of a three-year, $7.2 million structural rehabilitation. The last significant body of interior photographs, albeit fully-furnished, is at the Library of Congress and was created in 1966 by Samuel Gottscho.

Xiomáro's exhibit is timely in that filmmaker Ken Burns, a Harvard graduate, is releasing The Roosevelts, a new PBS documentary that explores the political dynasty of TR, FDR and Eleanor Roosevelt. The exhibit is also unique in that Xiomáro's photographs do not solely focus on TR, but also draw attention to his wife, children and servants to give a sense of what life was like in the household. "Even though the rooms are nearly vacant, the photographs reveal the imposing character of America's 26th president and the more intimate domestic nature of his family," explained the artist. "Some of these nuances are overwhelmed by a room's furnishings or inaccessible to visitors behind velvet rope barriers."

Mon, Fri, & Sat 9:00am - 5:00pm
Tue, Wed, & Thu 9:00am - 7:00pm
Sun CLOSED

Theodore Roosevelt Gallery
Pusey Library
Harvard Yard
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
August 12 -
December 14, 2014
Harvard College Annual International Photo Contest
Photos taken by Harvard students who have studied, worked, interned, or done research abroad during the past year are on exhibit. For more information on the contest, see the photo contest page.

Mon, Fri, & Sat 9:00am - 5:00pm
Tue, Wed, & Thu 9:00am - 7:00pm
Sun CLOSED

Level B, 1st & 3rd floor display cases
Lamont Library
Harvard Yard
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
August 12, 2014 -
May 09, 2015
2014 Philip Hofer Prize for Collecting Books or Art
The Philip Hofer prize is awarded each year to a student at Harvard whose collection of books or works of art best exemplifies the traditions of breadth, coherence, and imagination represented by Philip Hofer, A.B. '21, L.H.D. '67, founder and first Curator of the Department of Printing and Graphic Arts in the Houghton Library and Secretary of the Fogg Art Museum. The prize, which is to encourage student interest in collecting, was established in 1987 by Melvin R. Seiden, A.B. '52, L.L.B. '55. Students competing for the prize submit an annotated list or bibliography and an essay describing the scope, contents, and goal of the collection. On exhibition are samples of this year's first prize winning collection, , A History of the 1933 Goudey Baseball Card Set: From Artwork to Copyright Registration, submitted by Benjamin Lee, Class of 2017.

Mon, Fri, & Sat 9:00am - 5:00pm
Tue, Wed, & Thu 9:00am - 7:00pm
Sun CLOSED

3rd floor display cases
Lamont Library
Harvard Yard
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
August 12, 2014 -
May 09, 2015
2014 Undergraduate Book Collecting Prize
Established in 1977, the Visiting Committee Prize for Undergraduate Book Collecting recognizes and encourages book collecting by undergraduates at Harvard. Students competing for the annual prize submit an annotated bibliography and an essay on their collecting efforts, the influence of mentors, the experience of searching for, organizing and caring for items, and the future direction of the collection. On display are samplings of the collections of this year's prize-winning entries, along with personal commentary.

Mon, Fri, & Sat 9:00am - 5:00pm
Tue, Wed, & Thu 9:00am - 7:00pm
Sun CLOSED

2nd & 3rd floor display cases
Lamont Library
Harvard Yard
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
August 14 -
September 30, 2014
Small Wonders
Currently on display at the Library Company are 29 marvelous miniature books created by the members of the Delaware Valley Chapter of the Guild of Book Workers. Created in response to a challenge from the Guild to make books meeting the US definition of a miniature book----a book which measures less than three inches in each height, width, and thickness----the collection was initially exhibited at the Clarence Ward Art Library at Oberlin College.

The exhibition includes a wide variety of binding structures and unusual materials. There are accordion books, a Coptic binding, pop-up books, tiny fine bindings, and an illuminated manuscript that is a little over one half inch tall. One set of paper-covered nesting book boxes is made to resemble Russian dolls. Cover materials include papier-mâché and mother-of-pearl, as well as fake fur and googly eyes. One book in the collection is made from hotel soaps, toilet paper and dental floss and one contains toe and fingernail clippings. The playful and amazing miniatures, alike only in their shared smallness, are a tour-de-force of the book workers' arts.

The Library Company of Philadelphia
1314 Locust Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
August 20 -
October 06, 2014
Tanja Softić: Migrant Universe
Softić’s prints, drawings, and paintings combine images of natural and man-made structures with drawings based on appropriated visual material: medical and botanical illustrations, maps and charts, manuscript illuminations, and comic art. Her work addresses concepts of cultural hybridity, chaos, and memory. Her series, Migrant Universe, created from 2007 to 2011, consists of ten large mixed media works and is a “visual poem” about identity and the worldview of the immigrant.

In regards to her work, Softić states, “The visual vocabulary of the Migrant Universe drawings suggests a displaced existence: fragmented memories, adaptation, revival, and transformation. Because I do not live and work within the comfort or boundaries of the culture in which I first learned to observe, interpret, and engage the world, I have the arguable privilege of having lived more than one life. My memory is my virtual self and, paradoxically, my most authentic self. Yet, memory is a process that involves erosions and accretions that occur with any reconstructive, interpretative, or artistic act. One reconnects with what has been broken, fragmented, or overlaid. Remembering becomes an act of reconstruction, where one works with what is there and tries to visualize what has been lost. Because each act of memorization necessarily involves interpretation, there can be no objective recollection.”

Softić is Professor of Art, Department of Art and Art History, University of Richmond. Her work is included in numerous collections in the United States and abroad, among them the New York Public Library, Library of Congress Print Department, and New South Wales Gallery of Art in Sydney, Australia. She participated in the 12th International Print Triennial in Cracow, Poland, and won a first prize at the 5th Kochi International Triennial Exhibition of Prints, Ino-cho Paper Museum, in Kochi, Japan in 2002. Recently, she completed print projects at Flying Horse Press, Tamarind Institute, and Anderson Ranch's Patton Printshop. Softić is also a recipient of the Pollock-Krasner Grant, National Endowment for the Arts/Southern Arts Federation Visual Artist Fellowship, and Soros Foundation-Open Society Institute Exhibition Support Grant.

Free and open to the public

Harnett Museum of Art & Print Study Center
University of Richmond Museums
28 Westhampton Way
Richmond, VA
Exhibit South
August 20, 2014 -
July 06, 2015
The Temple of Flora: Prints by Robert John Thornton and Jim Dine
Dr. Robert John Thornton published The Temple of Flora (1799-1807), a botanical book of prints depicting
flora, information, commentary, and poetry. In 1984, American pop artist Jim Dine (born 1935) used the color mezzotints as models for his folio book “The Temple of Flora” also featuring etchings and poetry. The exhibition includes prints by Dine coupled with original Temple of Flora.
Free and open to the public.

Harnett Museum of Art
University of Richmond Museums
28 Westhampton Way
Richmond, VA
Exhibit South
August 20 -
September 21, 2014
Annual Student Exhibition
The exhibition highlights works selected by the studio art faculty of the University of Richmond’s Department of Art and Art History, and features artwork by studio art majors and minors along with non-majors enrolled during the University’s 2013 fall and 2014 spring semesters.

Free and open to the public

Harnett Museum of Art & Print Study Center
University of Richmond Museums
28 Westhampton Way
Richmond, VA
Exhibit South
August 20, 2014 -
January 24, 2015
American Ballet Theatre: Touring the Globe for 75 Years
In 1939, a group of dancers, choreographers, and producers associated with Russian-born Mikhail Mordkin's ballet company joined together to establish a new, innovative dance company they called Ballet Theatre. The company premiered in New York City on January 11, 1940, to great critical acclaim. Early in its organization, Ballet Theatre—renamed American Ballet Theatre (ABT) in 1957—began to tour, representing the United States both domestically and internationally. The exhibition highlights ABT's vibrant seventy-five year history with objects drawn primarily from the American Ballet Theatre Collection at the Library of Congress, as well as from the Library's extensive dance and music collections.

Performing Arts Reading Room, 1st Floor, James Madison Building
Library of Congress
101 Independence Avenue SE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
August 20, 2014 -
January 16, 2015
Context: Reading the Photography of Margaret Bourke-White
Margaret Bourke-White (1904-1971) was a celebrity behind, and in front of, the camera. As a photographer for Life magazine from the 1930s through the 1950s she documented unforgettable moments—African-American flood victims in Louisville, Kentucky, standing in a bread line beneath a banner that reads almost mockingly “There’s No Way Like the American Way”; just-liberated survivors of the Buchenwald Concentration Camp returning the camera’s gaze under an eerily cinematic light; Mahatma Gandhi sitting cross-legged on the floor reading, spinning wheel in the foreground. Bourke-White’s photographs helped shape the way millions of Americans experienced the Great Depression, the Second World War, and the world that followed.

In front of the camera she cultivated an image of herself as fearless, undaunted in pursuit of her “shot,” and fashionable, donning fine clothes and a coquettish smile. Oscar Graubner’s famous 1934 photograph of New York City’s Chrysler building shows her perched atop an Art Deco gargoyle staring down through the lens of her view camera at the street 61 stories below. A 1937 magazine profile called her the “camera queen” and positioned a well-coiffed Bourke-White with her camera in front of an industrial train yard. In 1959, when she was battling Parkinson’s Disease (it would eventually claim her life in 1971), Life ran a photo-essay on her pursuit of a cure.

After three decades in the public eye Bourke-White began to write her memoirs in the early 1950s. When Portrait of Myself finally appeared in 1963, she had already published ten books, countless essays, and been the subject of many interviews. In fact, but for the occasional gallery exhibition, text had always surrounded Bourke-White’s photographs, from her early days as a commercial photographer capturing the streamlined grace of the Pierce Arrow automobile in a sales brochure, to her profile of Otis Steele for Fortune magazine, to her pioneering 1937 collaboration with writer (and future husband) Erskine Caldwell, You Have Seen Their Faces. This exhibition explores how text “framed” the photography of Margaret Bourke-White and, ultimately, how she sought to transcend the limits of the medium that made her famous.

Special Collections Research Center Gallery
Syracuse University Libraries
222 Waverly Avenue
Syracuse, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
August 20 -
November 07, 2014
"To The Inhabitants of Great Britain": The Robert R. Livingston Letters
In the late spring of 1775, New York jurist Robert R. Livingston (1746-1813) drafted a letter titled “The Twelve United Colonies, by Their Delegates in Congress, to the Inhabitants of Great-Britain." Commissioned by the Second Continental Congress as an eleventh-hour attempt to reconcile with the mother country, it is a striking piece of testimony to the internal struggles of colonial leaders and patriots as they tried to develop a framework of reconciliation, and sheds new light on the period leading up to the Declaration of Independence and the final break with Great Britain. The letter was discovered last summer in the Morris-Jumel Mansion in New York City, which served as George Washington’s headquarters during the Revolutionary War, and was recently acquired by Brian Hendelson, a noted New Jersey-based private collector. Hitherto unknown and unstudied, the manuscript will be on view at New-York Historical in the Patricia D. Klingenstein Library, and will remain on loan to New-York Historical for purposes of study and display for two years.

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
August 20 -
October 26, 2014
New Netherland at 400: Unlocking the Secrets of the 1914 Time Capsule
The term “time capsule” was coined at the New York World’s Fair of 1939, but a quarter century earlier this richly ornamented bronze casket – possibly the oldest unopened time capsule in the world – was filled, sealed, and entrusted to the New-York Historical Society. A group of merchants, calling themselves the Lower Wall Street Business Men’s Association, launched it on May 23, 1914 as a part of the tercentenary celebrations of the New Netherland Company’s chartering in 1614 and the beginnings of Dutch North American colonialism. Ceremoniously enclosed by a former mayor, the chest was to remain sealed until 1974, the bicentennial of New York’s appeal for the colonies to form a union. Oversleeping its due date, the chest will finally be unlocked at a ceremony in October.

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
August 22 -
December 19, 2014
As the Ink Flows: Works from the Pen of William Steig
The exhibition explores the life and career of the artist, cartoonist, and children's book author/illustrator William Steig. The exhibition highlights materials from the recent gift of over 3,000 original drawings, notebooks and scrapbooks, correspondence, books, posters, and other materials made by Jeanne Steig, his widow, to the University of Pennsylvania Libraries, supplemented with loans from his family.

Pen and ink played a central role in William Steig's life, from childhood on. Interestingly, for someone who would become an important artist and gifted cartoonist for The New Yorker magazine, it was writing, not drawing that was his first creative outlet. The exhibition explores this world of pen and ink, of writing and drawing, to show how intertwined these activities were for William Steig, who became an author as well as an artist. Unlike many artists, who are not great readers, Steig consumed books, and the ideas they contained. The more one considers the range of his work, the more one can see that his artistry is ultimately informed by language, that is, by ideas that can be thought and written, and then translated into images.

The exhibition will examine the trajectory of Steig's career, from his family background and youth through his cartoons and covers for The New Yorker and other publications, to his books of symbolic drawings and his later work, culminating in his children's books.

Mon - Fri 10am - 5pm
Wedn 10am - 8pm

Goldstein Family Gallery
Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books & Manuscripts
Van Pelt Dietrich Library Center, 6th Floor
3420 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
August 22 -
November 30, 2014
A Brief History of New York: Selections from A History of New York in 101 Objects
Can one object define New York City? Can 101? New York Times urban affairs correspondent Sam Roberts has assembled a kaleidoscopic array of possibilities in a new book, A History of New York in 101 Objects. Featuring objects from the New-York Historical Society collection, this exhibition will assemble some of Roberts’s choices, which together constitute a unique history of New York. By turns provocative, iconic, and ironic, and winnowed from hundreds of possibilities, his selections share the criteria of having played some transformative role in the city’s history.

NEW-YORK HISTORICAL SOCIETY
170 Central Park West
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 04 -
October 10, 2014
The Moon Reader
Created by Philadelphia artist Teresa Jaynes, The Moon Reader is modeled after 19th-century primers in the Michael Zinman Collection of Printing for the Blind at The Library Company of Philadelphia. The multimedia installation invites participants to learn to read Moon, a raised-letter writing system for the blind invented by blind educator William Moon in 1845. The Reader includes two handmade books. One set in Moon Type with embossed illustrations and a translation set in both Braille and large print. An audio recording accompanies the pair. The activity – deciphering, translating and finally comprehending – will be a serene act of discovery. The Moon Reader seeks to challenge participants’ ideas about visual culture, in ways that elicit curiosity, humor, and empathy and to expand their understandings of historical and contemporary connotations of sight.

OPENING RECEPTION:
Tuesday, September 23, 2014
5:30 – 7:30 pm
The Library Company of Philadelphia
1314 Locust Street

Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 05 -
December 06, 2014
Water Paper Stone :: A Walk-Through Book
authored by Judy O'Shea

THE EXHIBITION:
Water Paper Stone: A Walk-Through Book by Judy O'Shea opens at San Francisco Center for the Book on September 5. The installation celebrates the experiences Judy writes about in her memoir Water Paper Stone. Art from 18 of the French and American artists who participated in the artist-in-residence Judy and her husband hosted in Plaisance, France are featured:

Judy O'Shea :: Chantal Armagnac :: Carole Beadle :: Richard Berger :: Kay Bradner :: Bernard Cauhape :: Catherine Choron-Baix :: Michel Cubilie :: Sylvie Gravellard :: Mariana Goodheart :: Francois Grand-Clement :: Charles Hobson :: Michel Hulliard :: Carolyn Miller :: Mike O'Shea :: Dan Pillers :: Jean-Michel Pret :: Inge Roberts :: Alice Wingwall

OPENING RECEPTION
Friday, September 5, 2014
6:00pm to 9:00pm

THE BOOK:
Judy O'Shea recently published a memoir of her experience running an artist-in-residence program in France for 17 years. The heart of Judy and her husband Mike’s residence program was the group of artists, American and French, who came together to work at La Pilande Basse, an 18th-century watermill in the Aveyron region of southern France that Judy and Mike restored as a base for art.

THE INSTALLATION:
Judy came up with the idea to create an artists’ book version of her memoir as a full-scale exhibition at the San Francisco Center for the Book. The scale of the exhibition would allow the viewer to wander through an enormous book: 15-foot covers, a 20-foot spine, and pages hanging from the rafters. The primary structure of the book would be constructed with paper that Judy makes by hand at her Inverness, California studio. Judy invited 17 artists (10 American and 7 French) to contribute the “pages” for this special artists’ book. The pages are as varied as the artists, but are all originally conceived for the site, and have a special dialogue that comes from collective experiences.

FREE PUBLIC LECTURE:
by Judy O'Shea
October 19, 2014
2:00pm
Koret Auditorium
San Francisco Public Library, Main Library

San Francisco Center for the Book
375 Rhode Island Street
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
September 06 -
October 11, 2014
Old and Curious Books form the collection of William Dailey
In an unusual departure from its program of exhibiting outsider art, the Good Luck Gallery will be reinventing itself as a bookstore and focusing on the collector as artist throughout the month of September, when personally selected works from the extensive trove of renowned book dealer William Dailey will be on display.

Throughout a lifetime spent in the service of literature, William has amassed major collections on alchemy, erotica, drugs and the occult. In 1973 he co-founded what at the time was the world’s largest collection of literature on the subject of psychoactive drugs - known as the LSD Library, it has subsequently been expanded upon and now resides at Harvard University. During the ‘70s and ‘80s, William published a series of exquisitely designed, limited edition hand-set books on his Press of the Pegacycle Lady imprint - with its charming epigraph, ‘Under the imprint of the knowing smile’ - which featured works by a wildly diverse group of authors that included Stephane Mallarme, Barry Humphries and Dory Previn, and featured collaborations with such artists as Wallace Berman and Don Bachardy.

After 30 years, William closed the doors of his highly regarded bookstore on Melrose in 2007, having published 70 catalogues of rare books and fine prints. He now operates as a private dealer and spends most of his time at a Spa in Desert Hot Springs that he won in a poker game. A passion for this new locale has inspired the accumulation of a collection of rare books and ephemera on the Southern California desert, and some of these will also be on display.

An environment conducive to the contemplation of fine literature will be created within the gallery, with books stacked, shelved and displayed under vitrines. Extended browsing is encouraged and white gloves will not be required. Books will be for sale with prices ranging from $15 to $1500. This is a rare opportunity for bibliophiles to peruse books from a celebrated and one-of-a-kind collection in a unique setting.

Reception: Saturday September 6th 7-10pm

The Good Luck Gallery
945 Chung King Road
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
September 09 -
December 15, 2014
Reading English: An Exhibition Celebrating the James Marshall & Marie-Louise Osborn Collection
This exhibition marks the 80th anniversary of the James Marshall and Marie-Louise Osborn Collection of English Literary and Historical Manuscripts, held at the Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library. Renowned for its holdings in in English manuscripts, archives, and annotated books, the Osborn Collection has had a formative influence on early mordern British scholarship. This was the intention of the collection's founder, James Marshall Osborn, who studied English Literature at the University of Oxford before settling at Yale. The exhibition introduces the collector alongside the collection: scholar and collector of early modern British manuscripts; colleague and friend of literary critics Cleanth Brooks, William Wimsatt, Robert Penn Warren, Maynard Mack, and Wilmarth Lewis; and active particpant in Yale University's emergence as the leading center for literary criticism in 20th-century America.

Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library
121 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
September 09 -
November 15, 2014
"The Common Law Epitomiz'd: Anthony Taussig's Law Books"
The exhibition showcases the printed books the Law Library acquired from the collection of Anthony Taussig, the greatest private collection of rare English law books and manuscripts ever assembled.

Anthony Taussig, a London barrister, built his outstanding collection of rare law books and manuscripts over a 35-year period.

The books on display include the very first printed book of English law, the first book on women's rights in English law, the first justice of the peace manual, notes from Sir William Blackstone's Oxford lectures, a trove of pamphlets on law reform, and a relic of the opening salvo in the struggle to abolish slavery. The acquisition was made possible by generous grants from Yale Law School's Oscar M. Ruebhausen Fund.

Running concurrently is "Uncommon Law: A Celebration of the Taussig Collection," an exhibition at Yale's Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library. The exhibition features Taussig's outstanding collection of legal manuscripts acquired by the Beinecke. It is on display September 5 through December 15.

Rare Book Exhibition Gallery, Level L2
Lillian Goldman Law Library
127 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
September 09 -
December 31, 2014
RARE LETTERPRESS SHAKESPEARE BY THE FOLIO SOCIETY
The Folio Society announced today that the only complete collection of its Letterpress Shakespeare editions outside of the United Kingdom, will be on display to the public at the Center for Fiction through the end of the year.

Since the First Folio in 1623 there have been countless editions of Shakespeare's works. The Folio Society wanted to do something unprecedented: to design an edition so pure, so simple, that the beauty of the text could be fully appreciated – an edition that would be as timeless as the text itself. The project was to occupy some of the Europe's finest book designers, typesetters, paper-makers, printers and binders for eight years.

The starting point was the text. Rather than keep text and commentary together, The Folio Society decided to put them in separate volumes. Out went the elements that clutter the page: footnotes and textual variants. All that remained was Shakespeare's words. Alongside the leather-bound primary volume is an annotated Oxford University Press edition, edited by eminent Shakespeare scholar, Stanley Wells.

“There was never any doubt about what printing process to use,” said Joe Whitlock Blundell, Production Director at The Folio Society. “For all the benefits of modern technology, letterpress is still unmatched in the visual and tactile pleasure it affords the reader. It would be slow, it would be expensive, it would be laborious, but it would give a beauty to each page, the beauty of fresh type crisply pressed into mould-made paper, which no other printing process could match.”

The Folio Society found four printing firms who had the necessary enthusiasm and expertise to produce the Letterpress Shakespeare: Hand & Eye Letterpress in London, Logan Press in Northamptonshire, Stan Lane's Stonehouse Fine Press in Gloucestershire and Offizin Haag-Drugulin in Germany – a firm that gained its reputation printing the first editions of Franz Kafka and Thomas Mann. When the printing was complete the type was melted down, never to be used again. The intricate and skilled task of casting and setting the hot metal type by hand fell to Stan Lane, a master compositor and type caster who has worked with letterpress for over 50 years.

Monday - Thursday 10:30am - 7:30pm
Friday 9:00am - 5:00pm
Saturday 11:00am - 3:00pm

The Center for Fiction
17 E. 47th Street (between Fifth & Madison)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 09 -
November 03, 2014
Your Country Calls! Posters of the First World War
In commemoration of the start of World War I in the summer of 1914, this centennial exhibition in the Library’s West Hall illustrates how a global war was waged not just by soldiers on battlefields and politicians in offices, but by civilian populations of men, women, and children on the home fronts of combatant nations including Canada, England, France, and the United States. Drawn entirely from The Huntington’s collection of prints and ephemera, “Your Country Calls! Posters of the First World War” features 50 colorful vintage posters designed to mobilize citizens into action for the collective effort to win the war.

Library, West Hall
The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
September 09, 2014 -
January 05, 2015
Highlights of American Drawings and Watercolors from The Huntington’s Art Collections
Thirty rarely seen masterworks from The Huntington’s significant collection of American drawings and watercolors are on view during this six-month-long exhibition. The installation highlights drawings by John Singer Sargent and Grant Wood, pastels by Mary Cassatt and Edwin Austin Abbey, and watercolors by Winslow Homer and Charles Burchfield. Some works will be rotated with others by the same artists in October 2014 for conservation reasons.

Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art, Susan and Stephen Chandler Wing
The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
September 10 -
November 29, 2014
The 75th Anniversary of the start of World War II
The Museum is exhibiting three critical documents from its archives in a special exhibition commemorating the 75th anniversary of the beginning of World War II. It is the first time these momentous documents are being exhibited in the Museum.

Exhibited For the First Time At The Museum of World War II

An original draft of the King's speech (August 25,1939), King George VI's famous live radio announcement to the British people that war was declared that day, September 3, 1939, with Germany. The King's words were a vital boost for morale at a moment of national uncertainty and fear; they were also a personal triumph for the King himself who suffered from a severe stammer. The story of this speech and the King's struggle with his stammer has become familiar to millions through the 2010 film, The King's Speech.

*A secret warning telegram (cipher) message to British forces (September 1, 1939) from the War office addressed to British troops throughout the world directing them to take defensive precautions to meet the likelihood of war with Germany and Italy.

75 Years Ago The Most Calamitous Event of the Century Began With A Simple Telegram: "Commence Hostilities At Once With Germany." A hand-written Naval Message (September 3, 1939) marked, "Most Immediate,"to "All concerned Home and Abroad from Admirality": "Commence Hostilities at once with Germany."

Germany's attack on Poland brought the inevitability that England and France had not wanted to face - the reality of a rearmed and united Germany. Political leaders had tried to ignore Hitler's words and actions as another war was unthinkable. War was not unthinkable to Hitler and other Nazi leaders; it was the chance to vindicate German honor and seek revenge against France, Germany's arch enemy and architect o the hated Versailles Treaty.

These documents show the grim reality of the time, as Britain is once again thrust to the brink of war, and the call to action as the outbreak of the greatest cataclysm in the history of the world begins.

Museum of World War II
just off Rt. 9 in Natick (across from the mall)
Natick, MA
Exhibit New England
September 10, 2014 -
January 31, 2015
OVER HERE: WORLD WAR I POSTERS FROM AROUND THE WORLD
The Boston Athenæum holds an extraordinary, but little known, collection of World War I posters. Consisting of nearly 1,800 posters from fourteen countries, this collection provides a unique graphic record of the War of Nations. The exhibition, Over Here: World War I Posters from around the World, timed to coincide with centennial observances of World War I, will feature highlights from the collection, including forty-four framed posters and cases filled with leaflets, postcards, and book and magazine illustrations.

Boston Athenæum
10½ Beacon Street
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
September 10, 2014 -
January 04, 2015
The Making of Gone With The Wind
Go behind the scenes of one of the classic films of Hollywood's Golden Age. Featuring more than 300 rarely seen and some never-before-exhibited materials, the exhibition is drawn entirely from the Ransom Center's collections and includes on-set photographs, storyboards, correspondence and fan mail, production records, makeup stills, concept art, costume sketches, audition footage, and producer David O. Selznick's memos. The green curtain dress and other gowns worn by Vivien Leigh are displayed together for the first time in more than 25 years.

Before a single frame of film was shot, Gone With The Wind was embroiled in controversy. Selznick struggled to balance his desire for authenticity with audience expectations of spectacle. Americans debated who should be cast as Rhett and Scarlett. There were serious concerns about how the 1939 film, based on the 1936 novel by Margaret Mitchell, would depict race, sex, and violence in the South during the U.S. Civil War and Reconstruction.

This insider view reveals why Gone With The Wind remains influential and controversial 75 years after it was released.

Extended Hours for Gone With The Wind (starting Sept. 9):
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, & Friday 10am – 5:00pm
Thursday 10am – 7pm
Saturday & Sunday Noon – 5:00pm

Member-only hours 10am - noon Saturday & Sunday

Free admission, donations welcome

TOURS:
Noon Daily
6pm Thursday
2pm Saturday
2pm Sunday

Gone With The Wind screentests will be shown in the Ransom Center's first-floor theater at 1:30pm and 3:30pm on weekends, immediately following the public tour.

The Ransom Center Galleries
Henry Ransom Center
The University of Texas at Austin
300 West 21st Street (21st & Guadalupe Streets)
Austin, TX
Exhibit Southwest
September 10 -
November 02, 2014
Radical Words: From Magna Carta to the Constitution
Throughout history, certain documents have been issued to claim or establish rights and to check abuses of power. To many people, the medieval English document known as Magna Carta, or The Great Charter, has become a potent symbol of political liberty and justice. In particular, the political leaders of the British colonies in America looked to Magna Carta as precedent for the development of charters and laws in their new realm. Over the centuries, the demands that government provide fair and just treatment to citizens have expanded far beyond the narrow slice of society protected by Magna Carta. Great strides have been made toward ensuring equality under the law and justice for all people, but the quest continues to this day, both in the United States and around the globe.

This exhibition brings together six important documents significant to American history and spanning more than eight centuries: Magna Carta, the Declaration of Independence, the Constitution, the Emancipation Proclamation, the Declaration of Rights of the Women of the United States, and the Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

Admission:
$20.00 per person

Always free for members, children under 18, and students with a valid ID.

July 1 - Oct 13
Open daily 10am – 5pm
Fridays in July & August 10am – 7pm

Oct 14 – June 30
Tues – Sun 10am – 5pm

The Clark Art Institute
225 South Street
Williamstown, MA
Exhibit New England
September 10 -
December 12, 2014
Welcome Additions
This exhibition highlights fifty rare books, manuscripts, broadsides, prints, and letters that were acquired by Bridwell Library Special Collections between 2008 and 2014. Produced in Europe and the Americas from the fifteenth to the nineteenth century, these works include late-medieval manuscripts, early printing, devotional manuals, books for worship, biblical translations, illustrated religious texts, Methodist writings, and printed ephemera. Each selected item is an authentic witness both to the history of written or printed communication and to important aspects of religious life in the past. Exhibited here for the first time, these recent acquisitions enhance the research potential of Bridwell Library’s holdings in a variety of important collecting areas.

The Elizabeth Perkins Prothro Galleries
Bridwell Library
Perkins School of Theology
Southern Methodist University
6005 Bishop Blvd.
Dallas, TX
Exhibit Southwest
September 10 -
December 05, 2014
Missionary Presses
This exhibition highlights Bibles and other religious texts in indigenous languages published by missionary presses in the nineteenth century. Printed throughout the world in a variety of languages and letterforms, these translations were disseminated for local use as an integral element of conversion efforts by various denominations. Reminders of the numerous difficulties of communicating across cultural, theological, and linguistic boundaries, these works testify to the series of collaborations between translators, native speakers, and printers whose combined efforts created the sacred and instructional works here on display.

Bridwell Library Entry Hall
Perkins School of Theology
Southern Methodist University
6005 Bishop Blvd.
Dallas, TX
Exhibit Southwest
September 11 -
December 13, 2014
InsideOUT Contemporary Bindings of Private Press Books
Fifty-nine binders and nine private presses from North America, Canada and Britain have collaborated to form an exhibition which demonstrates the relationship of the binding design to the printed book. Because many of the binders have chosen the same title to work on, it also highlights the differing approaches to the same text. Samples of the texts and illustrations are shown alongside the bindings. The relationship between private presses and bookbinders is longstanding and it is hoped that this extra element to the show will provide the viewer with a more rounded appreciation of the work on display. Curator of the exhibition is Lester Capon, Fellow of Designer Bookbinders, the organization that sponsored the competition for which these bindings were created.

Mon, Fri, & Sat 9:00am - 5:00pm
Tue, Wed, & Thu 9:00am - 7:00pm
Sun CLOSED

Edison Newman Room
Houghton Library
Harvard Yard
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
September 13 -
November 30, 2014
Full Circle: Works on Paper by Richard Pousette-Dart
Full Circle surveys the long and extremely prolific career of one of the twentieth century’s most creative draftsmen, Richard Pousette-Dart (American, 1916–1992). Focused on his works on paper, the exhibition explores his remarkably varied use of materials and techniques, which often involved layering and scraping, scribbling and dripping, dotting and blotting. Over the course of nearly seventy years, his imagery evolved through various approaches in an attempt “to express the spiritual nature of the universe.”

In the 1940s and 1950s, Pousette-Dart was associated with Abstract Expressionists like Mark Rothko, Jackson Pollock, and Robert Motherwell, artists with whom he exhibited in New York galleries. During this period, he created densely layered, semiabstract images that incorporated pictographic, geometric, and organic shapes emerging among spontaneous markings and multiple layers of pigment. His methods included automatic drawing as well as layering and dripping paint, practices most associated with Pollock. He also painted small, glowing watercolors inspired by Byzantine mosaics and Gothic stained-glass windows. Forms from these early works—circles and concentric circles, rectangles and squares, ovals and eye shapes—endured throughout the artist’s entire body of work.

In the 1960s, Pousette-Dart eliminated line and used carefully modulated dots of color to produce glowing auras of light. From about 1976 to the end of his career, his works on paper reveal myriad new approaches to radiant imagery along with an incredible diversity of materials often employed in novel combinations. These include evocative pencil drawings touched with white paint, delicate hand-colored etchings, bold black-and-white paintings of geometric forms, and colorful acrylics on handmade paper. Full Circle, which presents about sixty of the finest examples of Pousette-Dart’s works on paper as well as six of his notebooks, demonstrates that no matter how varied and complex his approaches, the sources of his inspiration remained intensely focused throughout his entire career.

Honickman & Berman Galleries, ground floor
Philadelphia Museum of Art
2600 Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 16 -
October 25, 2014
Marcel Storr: Reimagining Paris
An exhibition of approximately fifteen artworks.

Andrew Edlin Gallery is excited to announce Marcel Storr: Reimagining Paris, the first ever U.S. exhibition of works by the self-taught French artist whose unusual, painstakingly rendered drawings of churches and futuristic fantasy worlds have been shown only a few times in Europe since their discovery in the 1970s. A 78-page catalog with an essay by Anne Doran will be published in conjunction with the exhibition.

Opening Reception: Saturday, September 13th, 5 - 7pm

Andrew Edlin Gallery
134 Tenth Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 16, 2014 -
January 04, 2015
Call to Duty: World War Posters
This exhibition, highlighting more than 70 original World War I and World War II posters, many of which were donated by Captain Roswell C. Williams, Jr., and Raymond Schock, are drawn from The Museum's own permanent collection. These posters help to tell the story of the massive human efforts put forth during these two world wars. Originally displayed in public locations such as post offices, train stations, city halls, schools, and businesses, these war posters and the messages they communicated, were found throughout the United States.

This impressive selection explores themes of military recruitment; raising funds for war through government bonds and other methods; efforts on the home front like conservation and work ethic; campaigns by service organizations such as the Salvation Army, YMCA and Boy Scouts; and the role of women in the war effort. Many of the posters are American, but examples from Canada, France, Great Britain and other ally nations are also featured.

Artists such as J. C. Leyendecker, James Montgomery Flagg, Howard Chandler Christy, Edward Penfield, Francis Luis Mora, Jessie Wilcox Smith, and Norman Rockwell, among others, are included in this exhibition.

Second Floor Galleries
Reading Public Museum
500 Museum Road
Reading, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 17, 2014 -
January 03, 2015
Chicago, Europe, and the Great War
In the fall of 2014, the Newberry will mark the centennial of the start of World War I with two linked exhibitions and a series of related public programs.

Chicago, Europe, and the Great War draws on the Newberry’s collection to tell the story of Chicago’s many and varied connections to the conflict. Chicagoans reported and commented on the war, fought in it, supported it, and protested against it. Letters and photographs by servicemen; dispatches and drawings by reporters who covered the war for Chicago newspapers; writings from opponents of the war; photographs and letters documenting medical relief at the front; and posters and sheet music that encouraged food conservation, fundraising, and wartime patriotism—these are just some of the items attesting to both the sheer scale of the “Great War” and Chicago’s place within it.

Chicago’s Jane Addams and the settlement movement she led inspired Anne Morgan’s relief work in northern France and provided a model for what her volunteers accomplished there. Morgan’s efforts are chronicled in the companion exhibition, American Women Rebuilding France, 1917-1924. Chicago, Europe, and the Great War contextualizes Addams’s influence on Morgan’s work by showing how other Chicago club women, settlement workers, and Progressive reformers responded to the war crisis.

Free and open to the public.

Hermon Dunlap Smith Gallery
The Newberry
60 West Walton Street
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
September 17 -
October 11, 2014
Buzz Spector: New Work
Buzz Spector's excavations of books and reconstructions of libraries are well-known, but his work with found and altered volumes has always been accompanied by works on paper made out of elements from their dust jackets. As Spector has written, "books are formal presentations of text. They have titles, after all, and come jacketed, with paragraphs of introduction slipped between their covers and their pages." This new work features collages made from dust jacket elements in the front gallery, while in the main gallery are larger collages and drawings, a series of wall-mounted sculptures incorporating details of photographs of authors, plus a reinstallation of Frieze, the 60-foot long arrangement of photos of authors Spector showed at the Huntington Museum of Art last fall. Spector's ongoing meditation on reading and the culture of the book extends here to reflections on how-and when-writers become authors, how work of the imagination is performed via posing, and how the specialized, but also highly conventional, language of dust jacket blurbs can itself be excavated in search of new narrative meanings.

GALLERY TALK by Buzz Spector at Bruno David Gallery. Saturday, September 27 at 3 pm.

In the New Media Room, the gallery presents a new video work by Buzz Spector, "Selected Poems". Filmed and directed by Kellie Spano

Main Gallery & Front Room
Bruno David Gallery
3721 Washington Blvd. (in Grand Center)
Saint Louis, MO
Exhibit Midwest
September 19, 2014 -
January 18, 2015
Sacred Places, Sacred Books
Starting on 19 September, the MAS | Museum aan de Stroom and the Hendrik Conscience Heritage Library will present Sacred Places, Sacred Books, a fascinating exhibition on the three major religions: Judaism, Christianity and Islam. They differ from each other, but there are also some surprising similarities. Visitors embark on a journey of discovery to find out what the sacred books and sacred places mean today.

The exhibition in the autumn of 2014

The MAS and the Hendrik Conscience Heritage Library are looking forward to the dual exhibition, Sacred Places, Sacred Books. The MAS sheds light on pilgrimage to sacred places and shows how these sacred places have held a magnetic attraction for centuries. Visitors tread in pilgrims’ footsteps and follow their experiences through rare documents and valuable works of art from all over the world. The Nottebohm Hall in the Hendrik Conscience Heritage Library offers a unique insight into the form, content, use and study of the Tanakh, the Bible and the Qur'an. It is an exceptional dual exhibition with more than 200 art historical and valuable religious objects and books. There are several masterpieces from each religion.

Judaism, Christianity and Islam are well represented in Antwerp. The exhibition Sacred Places, Sacred Books is an ambitious project to which various heritage organisations and the three religious communities have contributed.

Sacred Places – MAS | Museum aan de Stroom

The MAS provides an insight into the living traditions of pilgrimage. Jewish, Christians and Muslims alike feel a strong attraction to places that are related to special objects or individuals or to historic events. Pilgrims make long journeys to experience the divine forces at work there. The exhibitions follows their journey from their departure and the visit of the sanctuary to their return home. It is a physical and spiritual journey which inspires a similar sentiment in pilgrims all over the world. Why do certain places exert such a pull on people? What makes places like Jerusalem, Rome or Mecca so special? Why do people visit the graves of saints? The visitor follows the pilgrims in the exhibition, and experiences their feelings of hope, ecstasy and purification.

Fringe activities

In the framework of the dual exhibition, Antwerpen Open has set up a cultural fringe programme together with several cultural partners in the city, including exhibitions in Museum Plantin-Moretus, the Monumental Churches of Antwerp and the Ruusbroec Society. There will be concerts and lectures in Amuz, Graindelavoix will give a performance, and the Berlin theatre company will perform “Jerusalem”. As well as this, several walks are being organised and fascinating encounters will take place in Antwerp's most beautiful churches, synagogues and mosques.

MAS | Museum aan de Stroom and the Hendrik Conscience Heritage Library
Hanzestedenplaats 1
Antwerpen, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
September 19, 2014 -
January 03, 2015
i found god in myself: The 40th Anniversary of Ntozake Shange's for colored girls
Since its debut performance in California in 1974, Shange’s work has captivated, provoked, inspired and transformed audiences all over the world. Turning to the choreopoem not simply as an engaging work of text or drama but as a well of social, political and deeply personal issues affecting the lives of women of color, the exhibition will feature 20 specially commissioned pieces in honor of each individual poem, additional non-commissioned artworks on display at satellite locations that address the work’s themes and archival material donated by Shange.

The exhibition’s title is drawn from one of the last lines recited in the finale poem a laying on of hands. The title suggests that navigating through the complexities of what it means to be of color and female is only enlightened by an understanding, acceptance and appreciation of self. With self-empowerment comes the process of “…moving to the ends of their own rainbows.” By presenting visual works from both women and men, all races and various generations, i found god in myself explores the universality inherent in Shange’s powerful message to the world.

A series of spoken word performances, screenings, panels, a community art project and a guided art crawl will accompany the exhibition.

Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture
Latimer/Edison Gallery
515 Malcolm X Blvd.
Manhattan, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 19 -
November 22, 2014
"Evermore: The Persistence of Poe"
The Edgar Allan Poe Collection of Susan Jaffe Tane

The Grolier Club’s exhibition “Evermore: The Persistence of Poe” is devoted to one of the most influential authors of the nineteenth century, Edgar Allan Poe. On view from September 17 through November 22, “Evermore” showcases a wide array of materials drawn from Grolier member Susan Jaffe Tane’s personal collection, widely recognized as the finest Poe collection in private hands.

Mon - Sat, 10am - 5pm

Free admission

Ground Floor Gallery
The Grolier Club
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 19 -
November 01, 2014
"Seamus Heaney: A Life Well Written"
Selections from the Collections of Carolyn & Ward Smith, Alan M. Klein, and Rand Brandes

Mon - Sat, 10am - 5pm

Free admission

Second Floor Gallery
The Grolier Club
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 20, 2014 -
January 11, 2015
ART=TEXT=ART: PRIVATE LANGUAGES / PUBLIC SYSTEMS
The exhibition explores the advent of language in the visual arts in post-war America and the simultaneous emergence of concrete poetry. These practices embraced language’s ability to carry multiple, even contradictory meanings, thus creating a space for individual acts of anti-conformist thought. Through words in art, flirtations with ideas unauthorized by then-dominant socio-political realities were allowed expression, especially among an early generation of LGBTQ artists.

Wed - Sat 11am - 5pm
Sun 1pm - 5pm

Free admission

UB Anderson Gallery
One Martha Jackson Place
Buffalo, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 24 -
October 24, 2014
Medieval and Renaissance Manuscripts
This exhibition will be the first of its kind to be staged by a major London gallery in a decade, and will showcase exceptional examples of the illuminated and written word dating from the 12th to 16th centuries – a number of them with fantastic histories and past owners. I enclose our press release with further details and a photosheet illustrating six of our highlights. I hope that you will be able to cover the exhibition. Please do not hesitate to contact me if you would like any further information or images.

Advance Press Viewing: Tue, 23rd September 10am - 2pm

Sam Fogg Ltd.
15D Clifford Street
London, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
September 25 -
October 18, 2014
CRW Nevinson
This will be the most comprehensive exhibition of Nevinson prints since the Leicester Galleries exhibition in 1977, Kettle’s Yard’s Retrospective Exhibition of Paintings, Drawings and Prints and the Imperial War Museum’s exhibition of CRW Nevinson – The Twentieth Century in 1999/2000.

The exhibition will also coincide with the launch of a new book CRW Nevinson –
The Complete Prints compiled by and with essays by Dr Jonathan Black,
published by Lund Humphries Publishing, London and Osborne Samuel gallery.
Following the exhibition at the gallery a selection of the remaining works will be
shown at the International Fine Prints Dealers Association’s annual fair from 5-9 November at the Park Avenue Armory, 643 Park Avenue at 67th St, New York, NY 10065 where the book will also be launched in the US.

Nevinson made 148 prints; etchings, drypoints, mezzotints and lithographs between 1916 and 1933. There is no doubt that his war experience greatly influenced his subject matter and he produced some of the most poignant images of war in printmaking history. These include the iconic Returning to the Trenches, 1916, Troops Resting, 1916, That Cursed Wood, 1918 and the set of six lithographs commissioned by the Ministry of Information titled Britain’s Efforts and Ideals: Building Aircraft that are all included in this exhibition.

In May 1919 Nevinson visited New York City for his exhibition at the Keppel
Gallery which was a critical and commercial success; the city was also a dizzying stimulus and resulted in a number of New York subjects in painting, later translated into various prints in all media rivalling work produced by any of his New Yorker contemporaries.

Equally stimulating were his prints in London, The Workers, 1919 shows a strike demonstration; London Bridges, c. 1920, London from Parliament Hill, c.1923, Waterloo Bridge from a Savoy Window, c.1924-26, Westminster from a Savoy Window, c.1924, Leicester Square, c.1926-27 and many more included in this exhibition. He was a devoted Francophile and a frequent visitor to Paris and included in the show are (From) A Paris Window, 1922, La Butte Montmartre, 1922, La Cité, Paris, c. 1926 among others.

Mon - Fri 10am - 6pm
Sat 10am – 2pm

Osborne Samuel Gallery
23A Bruton Street
London, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
September 25 -
November 09, 2014
From Here to Here: Richard McGuire Makes a Book
In 1990 a black-and-white comic by Richard McGuire, modestly titled "Here," appeared in RAW magazine. It was quickly recognized as a game-changing achievement in graphic narrative. To mark the Fall 2014 publication of Here as an all-new, full-color graphic novel and e-book, this exhibition explores the (re)invention of a contemporary classic.

Though the viewpoint in Here remains fixed on one corner of a living room, time in the story is boundless and elastic. Populating the space with multiple frames of action, dating from the ancient past to the distant future, McGuire conjures narratives, dialogues, and streams of association that unite moments divided by years and centuries. The exhibition combines original drawings for the strip and the novel with source photographs, books that influenced the form and content of McGuire's invention, and collages and sketchbooks that afford glimpses into his creative process.

Richard McGuire (b. 1957) is a creator of children's books, music (as a founding member of the band Liquid Liquid), toys, and animated films. He is a contributor to The New Yorker, McSweeney's, and The New York Times, among other publications.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5:00pm
Fri 10:30am - 9:00pm
Sat 10:00am - 6:00pm
Sun 11:00am - 6:00pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 26, 2014 -
January 18, 2015
The Untamed Landscape: Théodore Rousseau and the Path to Barbizon
With Camille Corot and Jean-François Millet, Théodore Rousseau (1812–67) ranks as one of the preeminent masters of the Barbizon School, a group of nineteenth-century French artists whose preferred subject was the primeval wooded landscape of the forest of Fontainebleau. The Barbizon School painters were greatly influenced by the Romantic movement, producing works inspired by the powerful forces of nature. Surprisingly, despite his pivotal role in French art and his profound impact on the development of landscape painting, Rousseau has never before been the subject of a monographic exhibition.

Comprising seventy works from private and public collections, including the Morgan Library & Museum, this exhibition will consider the artist's wide-ranging achievements as a draftsman and his particular approach to the open-air oil sketch. It will trace Rousseau's path to Barbizon—from his early oil sketches in the Ile-de-France to his mature works in the Auvergne, Normandy, and Fontainebleau forest—assessing the impact of the Dutch masters on the artist's landscape imagery. Rousseau's essays—some bucolic and evocative of a simpler, pre-industrial age, others brooding, moody, and redolent with lingering vestiges of Romanticism or testaments to the haunting majesty of the natural world—are both appealing and instructive. Collectively, this selection chronicles Rousseau's artistic practice and highlights his contribution to the shifting conception of landscape in the wake of the Industrial Revolution. The show will explore the range of techniques and handling of media, and the sense of poetic melancholy that permeates Rousseau's art. A fully illustrated scholarly catalogue accompanies the exhibition.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5:00pm
Fri 10:30am - 9:00pm
Sat 10:00am - 6:00pm
Sun 11:00am - 6:00pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 26, 2014 -
January 25, 2015
Cy Twombly: Treatise on the Veil
This exhibition showcases Cy Twombly's monumental painting Treatise on the Veil (Second Version), executed in Rome in 1970, and its related drawings, all from the Menil Collection in Houston. Not shown in New York City for nearly thirty years, and rarely on display at the Menil due to its size (nearly 33 feet in length), the painting marks a pivotal moment in the career of one of the most important artists to emerge in the wake of Abstract Expressionism. Inspired by a musical piece, Treatise on the Veil is a meditation on time and space. The preparatory drawings, which combine pencil, crayon, collage, tape, measurements and other inscriptions, offer a fascinating window into the artist's creative process.

Twombly (1928-2011) was born in Lexington, Virginia. He studied at the Boston Museum School of Fine Arts, New York's Art Students League, and at Black Mountain College, North Carolina, under Abstract Expressionists Robert Motherwell and Franz Kline. Early travels to Europe and North Africa nourished his interest in ancient art and mythology. In 1957, Twombly moved to Rome, where he lived most of his life. References to Antiquity and the Renaissance abound in his art, which is characterized by a rich repertoire of marks, scrawls, scribbles, doodles, and scratches – at once expressive of a gestural approach and of cultural symbols. The two paintings entitled Treatise on the Veil (the first version, of 1968, is in the Ludwig Museum in Cologne) are highlights of Twombly's "grey-ground" period which spanned from 1966 to the early 1970s, in which thin white lines running across a grey background convey an increasingly lyrical feel.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5:00pm
Fri 10:30am - 9:00pm
Sat 10:00am - 6:00pm
Sun 11:00am - 6:00pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 27, 2014 -
March 01, 2015
Hendrick Goltzius: Mythology and Truth
The prints by the Dutch engraver, draftsman, and painter Hendrick Goltzius (1558–1617) are dazzling for their technical refinement and provocative sensuality. An enormously talented portraitist and an eloquent narrator of ancient myths and religious legend, Goltzius was the equivalent of an art-world star of early modern Europe whose light has not faded over the last four hundred years. This introduction to Goltzius’s art focuses on prints that were recently donated to Bowdoin by Charles Pendexter and David P. Becker, Class of 1970.

Shaw Ruddock Gallery
Bowdoin College Museum of Art
9400 College Station
Brunswick, ME
Exhibit New England
September 27, 2014 -
January 05, 2015
John James Audubon and the Artist as Naturalist
In his famous publication The Birds of America (1827–1838), American naturalist and artist John James Audubon depicts over 400 species of North American birds with his life-size prints. The exhibition will feature Crystal Bridges’ double elephant folio copy of The Birds of America, re-issued by Audubon’s son in 1861, and will highlight several artworks related to the renowned publication, including:

Wild Turkey Cock, Hen and Young, which was painted during Audubon’s promotional tour in Edinburgh, Scotland in 1826 at a key moment in the artist’s career. This painting, part of the Crystal Bridges collection, is one of the few oil paintings by Audubon that are known to have survived. He used such paintings to raise funds and recruit subscribers for The Birds of America. Audubon created his bird studies using watercolor, pastel, pencil, and gouache. Wild Turkey Cock, Hen and Young is based on two watercolors that were among the first to be engraved for his famous collection of prints.

Wild Turkey (ca. 1845), on loan from the Gilcrease Museum for this exhibition, is an almost identical oil copy of the first plate of his The Birds of America. The American wild turkey was Audubon’s favorite subject and is the largest species in his publication.

Audubon’s oil painting Osprey and Weakfish, on loan from the National Gallery of Art, documents the artist’s skill in adding dramatic effects to his compositions, and will join the exhibition in November after a current loan concludes.

In addition, the exhibition features the New York Historical Society’s portrait of Audubon by his son John Woodhouse Audubon, works by Martin Johnson Heade, and Karl Bodmer, plus rare color plates by Mark Catesby and Alexander Wilson, artists who had in common a willingness to face challenges and take risks during their field studies and drawing expeditions to unexplored areas. Fidelia Bridges and Lucia Smith Carpenter Bliss, whose watercolors are included in the exhibition, were among the few successful 19th-century female artists who focused on smaller aspects of nature such as flower studies and birds and sought to express the truth and beauty of nature.

Colonial to Early 19th-century Art Gallery
Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art
600 Museum Way (off NE J Street)
Bentonville, AR
Exhibit South
September 29 -
November 09, 2014
Imprints and Impressions: Milestones in Human Progress
Highlights from the Rose Rare Book Collection

On loan from a local private collector, this faculty-selected exhibit will feature rare and near-priceless first editions, manuscripts, galley proofs, papyri and illustrations spanning the scholarly spectrum from philosophy to physics.

You will see seminal works from scholars in arts, sciences, history, education, literature and music. This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity you do not want to miss.

8pm Sept. 29 – Nov. 9, 2014

Free and open to the public

Roesch Library, 1st Floor Gallery
University of Dayton
300 College Park
Dayton, OH
Exhibit Midwest