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February 07, 2012 -
December 31, 2015
The Life of Art: Context, Collecting, and Display
From the time an object is made until the day it enters a museum's collection, it may be displayed, used, and perceived in different ways. The Life of Art takes selected objects from the Getty Museum's galleries and encourages visitors to sit down and spend time with them, offering the opportunity to examine them closely to understand how they were made and functioned, why they were collected, and how they have been displayed.

The J. Paul Getty Museum
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
January 30 -
November 15, 2014
From the Western Front and Beyond: The Writings of World War One
The New York Society Library is proud to present From the Western Front and Beyond: The Writings of World War One. It marks the one hundredth anniversary of the first major war of the twentieth century, a war that left millions dead and ravaged the landscape of the Western and Eastern Fronts. Here at the Library, our collection evokes this unforgettable legacy in the writings and literature that came from the trenches and bloodstained battlefields.

In 1914 when the guns of August shattered an uneasy peace, the war seemed at a comfortable distance from American shores, but Head Librarian Frank Bigelow saw the importance of books on the war meant to end all wars. The diverse volumes that Bigelow purchased in the years before, during and immediately following the Great War have laid the groundwork for our deep and varied collection, which has been enhanced since with later generations' perspectives.

This new and unique exhibition will include books from our special collections and open stacks, such as early editions of the legendary poets Rupert Brooke, Wilfred Owen, Robert Graves, and Siegfried Sassoon, and lesser-known accounts by Allied and German soldiers, ambulance drivers, stretcher bearers, nurses, priests, reporters, and artists. Also on display will be drawings by Muirhead Bone, an English artist who captured scenes of the towns and battlefields of France.

A softcover catalog accompanies the exhibition. It features contributions from authors Caroline Alexander (The War That Killed Achilles) and Adam Kirsch (Why Trilling Matters) about the war itself and its major writers.

A hundred years on, time has not dulled the urgency of these voices. We hope that From the Western Front and Beyond will remind us all of the literature that endured once the guns went silent.

Mon, Wed, Fri, Sat 9am - 5pm
Tue & Thu 9am - 7pm
Sun 1pm - 5pm

The New York Society Library
53 East 79th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 03 -
November 15, 2014
From the Western Front and Beyond: The Writings of World War One
The New York Society Library is proud to present From the Western Front and Beyond: The Writings of World War One. It marks the one hundredth anniversary of the first major war of the twentieth century, a war that left millions dead and ravaged the landscape of the Western and Eastern Fronts. Here at the Library, our collection evokes this unforgettable legacy in the writings and literature that came from the trenches and bloodstained battlefields.

In 1914 when the guns of August shattered an uneasy peace, the war seemed at a comfortable distance from American shores, but Head Librarian Frank Bigelow saw the importance of books on the war meant to end all wars. The diverse volumes that Bigelow purchased in the years before, during and immediately following the Great War have laid the groundwork for our deep and varied collection, which has been enhanced since with later generations' perspectives.

This new and unique exhibition will include books from our special collections and open stacks, such as early editions of the legendary poets Rupert Brooke, Wilfred Owen, Robert Graves, and Siegfried Sassoon, and lesser-known accounts by Allied and German soldiers, ambulance drivers, stretcher bearers, nurses, priests, reporters, and artists. Also on display will be drawings by Muirhead Bone, an English artist who captured scenes of the towns and battlefields of France.

A softcover catalog accompanies the exhibition. It features contributions from authors Caroline Alexander (The War That Killed Achilles) and Adam Kirsch (Why Trilling Matters) about the war itself and its major writers.

A hundred years on, time has not dulled the urgency of these voices. We hope that From the Western Front and Beyond will remind us all of the literature that endured once the guns went silent.

Both members and nonmembers are welcome to visit the exhibition any time the Library is open.

Mon, Wed, Fri, & Sat 9am - 5pm
Tue & Thu 9am - 7pm
Sun 1pm - 5pm

The New York Society Library
53 East 79th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 10 -
October 17, 2014
That’s So Gay: Outing Early America
Gay History in the Collections of the Library Company of Philadelphia

The exhibition That’s So Gay: Outing Early America will show that – like African Americana and women’s history – the abundance of resources documenting homosexuality at the Library Company merely needs to be revealed. To paraphrase the late gay activist Harry Hay (1912-2002), history knows more about gay people than it knows it knows.

How can we know whether someone was gay? There are many answers to that question, but ultimately we cannot know whether a person who lived in the past would be called lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgender today.

That does not mean, however, that we cannot study gay history. Individuals participated in same-sex relationships, wrote poems and novels celebrating such relationships, deviated from gender norms, and suffered for such deviance in ways that are well-documented in the historical record. Gayness can also be considered a shared cultural experience based on an intrinsically gay outlook on the world.

Library Company of Philadelphia
1314 Locust Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 24 -
August 11, 2014
Tomorrow Never Knows: The Beatles in Text & Image
On Sunday, February 9th 1964, The Beatles appeared on Ed Sullivan's weekly televised variety show. Over 73 million viewers tuned in to watch the relatively unknown pop music group from Liverpool, England. With their mesmerizing appearance on the Sullivan show, Beatlemania arrived in North America, the group would set the musical and cultural trends for the next seven years. Since the groups' breakup in 1970, the Fab Four's music, image and cultural relevance have endured. To celebrate the fiftieth anniversary of the Beatles arrival in America, the Kislak Center at the University of Pennsylvania is hosting an exhibition of books about and by The Beatles. The exhibit will trace the representation of the iconographic group through a number of formats and genres including mass market paper backs, periodicals, ephemera, and deluxe signed editions published by Genesis Publishing in the United Kingdom.

Since 1964 thousands of magazines and books have been published on The Beatles. While this statement on the volume of publications is impressive, few commentators have had reason to remark on the nature, range, and the physical design of books on the musical group until recently. Since the appearance of The Beatles "official" history entitled Anthology (1995), a folio volume lavishly illustrated and accompanied with a six volume video set and audio compilation, many publishers have followed suit producing increasingly sophisticated illustrated books on The Beatles and the individual members of the group: John Lennon, Paul McCartney, George Harrison, and Ringo Starr.

For many collectors and fans, the group's recorded music continues to be the object of primary interest, as it should. With the recent release of the digitally re-mastered albums in mono and stereo in 2009 and issued in three different formats ranging from audio CD, vinyl, and digital formats, their music has not only survived, but also enhanced through evolving technologies. Nevertheless, the iconic corpus of original singles and albums still possess an aura which might be compared to a first edition of a printed book.

Beyond the recorded music, there is a vast catalog of autographs, memorabilia, and ephemera that has been produced during the past fifty years. Authentic autographs and signatures of the Beatles are growing increasingly rare; indeed, they were growing rarer with the advent of Beatlemania in 1963. There has been an enormous appetite for Beatles everything. The group was marketed as a commodity from 1963 forward. Products translate into profits. The Beatles as a commodity has proven to be lucrative for both the manufacturers and the individual members of the group. A quick global search of the The Beatles in Ebay results in 70,000 results. The value of this inventory could be as much as one million dollars.

In addition to texts, the exhibition will include an array of illustrated books which present in a variety of formats an array of iconic images which form a meta-narrative of the groups public image as it evolved from 1964 to 1969. These images also are used in licensed products like puzzles, games, calendars, and other printed ephemera and objects

Thursday, February 27, 5:30pm
Exhibition Reception & Book Launch
Kamin Gallery
Van Pelt-Dietrich Library, first floor
Join us for the exhibition opening reception and the Philadelphia book launch of Jude Southerland Kessler's She Loves You, the third of her nine biographical novels on the life of John Lennon.

SYMPOSIUM: February 28 - March 1, 2014
Materiality and Meaning
Class of 1978 Pavilion, Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books and Manuscripts
Van Pelt-Dietrich Library, sixth floor
University of Pennsylvania
3420 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA

This symposium is being held in conjunction with the exhibition entitled Tomorrow Never Knows: The Beatles in Text and Image which will be on view in the University of Pennsylvania Libraries' Kamin Gallery located on the first floor of the Van Pelt-Dietrich Library from February 24 to August 11, 2014. The exhibition includes a range of text-based materials dating from 1964 to the present that illustrate the reception of the Beatles in the form of books, periodicals, ephemera, commercial products, memorabilia, and recordings

The purpose of the symposium is to examine the materiality of the texts and images and to explore the broader cultural meaning which can be derived from the study of books on the Beatles and to place these print artifacts in a larger cultural and social context.

Among the featured symposium participants includes Richard Langham, former EMI sound engineer who worked with The Beatles in 1963 and later at the end of their recording career as a group in 1968/1969.

Gallery Hours:
Mon - Fri, 9am - 6pm
Sat & Sun, by prior arrangement

Free and open to the public (please show photo ID at entrance)

Kamin Gallery
Van Pelt Dietrich Library Center, first floor
3420 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 01, 2014 -
January 04, 2015
Downton Abbey
Costumes of Downton Abbey is an original exhibition of exquisite designs from the award-winning television series. Approximately 40 historically inspired costumes from the television show will be displayed and supplemented by photographs and vignettes inspired by the fictional program and by real life at Winterthur.

Visitors will have a chance to step into and experience the world of Downton Abbey® and the contrasting world of Winterthur founder Henry Francis du Pont and his contemporaries in the first half of the 20th century.

In addition, Winterthur will host a wide range of lectures, workshops, and exciting events for adults and families focusing on entertaining and country house life in Britain and the United States.

A co-production of Carnival Films and Masterpiece, Downton Abbey depicts life in an aristocratic household of the fictional Earl and Countess of Grantham and is one of the most popular and critically acclaimed period dramas ever produced. It has won a Golden Globe Award for Best Miniseries and seven Emmys including a Primetime Emmy Award for Outstanding Miniseries. It was the most watched television series in both the UK and the U.S. and became the most successful British costume drama series since the 1981 television serial Brideshead Revisited. By the third series, it had become one of the most widely watched television shows in the world. The Guinness World Records recognized Downton Abbey as the most critically acclaimed English-language television series of 2011.

The costumes will be lent by Cosprop, the world’s leading costumier to film, television, and theater. Winterthur’s most popular exhibition, Fashion in Film, which attracted more than 42,000 people over its three-month run, also featured costumes by Cosprop.

Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library
5105 Kennett Pike
Wilmington, DE
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 22 -
November 02, 2014
New World, Old Maps
New World, Old Maps is a rotating display of the acclaimed historic map collection formed by Dallas Pratt, co-founder of the American Museum in Britain, Bath, and celebrates the new publication Mapping the New World – Renaissance Maps from the American Museum in Britain. Illustrating the changing shape of the Americas as Renaissance cartographers (working from ancient and medieval sources) learned more of the New World, this is the third in a series of extensively illustrated catalogues produced by Scala Arts and Heritage Publishers to showcase the core collections of the American Museum in Britain.

The ‘New World’ was constantly changing shape on maps made from the 15th to 17th centuries as European cartographers learned more from the navigators, who had ventured forth across the Atlantic in search of treasure – notably pearls, gold, and spices.

Tue - Sun 12 noon - 5pm
Closed Mondays except during August and Bank Holidays

American Museum in Britain
Claverton Manor
Bath, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
March 24, 2014 -
January 05, 2015
Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures
A signature can be as routine as a mark on a form or as extraordinary as a stroke of the pen that changes the course of history. For example, the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence simultaneously committed the brave act of treason against King George III and created a new nation.

Well-known signatures are found throughout the records of the National Archives. Equally important are the multitude of marks by people unknown to history. The documents signed by these individuals represent fascinating stories to be discovered.

“Making Their Mark: Stories Through Signatures” features original signatures from our nationwide holdings. From developing a signature style to signing groundbreaking policy into law, they illustrate the many ways people have “made their mark” on history.

10:00am - 5:30pm

Free admission

National Archives Museum
Constitution Avenue NW (between 7th & 9th Street)
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 26 -
November 02, 2014
Sendak in the '60s
midst the turbulence of 1960s America a quiet revolution took place where few expected it: the world of children’s books. Maurice Sendak was part of a vanguard of writers and illustrators transforming the American picture book and revolutionizing children’s culture in the ‘60s. He illustrated more than 30 books throughout the decade, including the character-driven The Sign on Rosie’s Door(1960), the painterly Mr. Rabbit and the Lovely Present (1962), and the controversial In the Night Kitchen (1970), as well as the beloved Nutshell Library (1962) and his most celebrated bestseller, Where the Wild Things Are (1963).

We may take these books for granted now but each was experimental in its day, breaking picture book conventions and defying expectations. In between the boldly colorful Wild Things and Night Kitchen, Sendak went through a “black-and-white” period, ignoring color altogether and producing some of his most haunting and nuanced drawings. This period coincided with immense personal losses, including the death of his mother and his beloved dog, as well as his father’s cancer and his own recuperation from a heart attack that nearly killed him. This exhibition is the first to explore how Sendak’s art reflected both social and personal turmoil throughout the decade.

MUSEUM HOURS
Tuesday — Noon - 5pm
Wednesday — Noon - 8pm
Thursday — Noon - 8pm
Friday — Noon - 5pm
Saturday — Noon - 6pm
Sunday — Noon - 6pm

Closed Mondays and National Holidays.

Rosenbach Museum & Library
2008-2010 Delancey Place
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 03 -
September 01, 2014
Now You See It: Photography and Concealment
Photography is a medium prized for its capacity to expose, lay bare, make visible. For many artists, the camera is, above all, a tool for revealing what would otherwise remain unnoticed. As Diane Arbus once said: "I really believe there are things which nobody would see unless I photographed them." At the root of this artistic impulse is a keen fascination with that which is hidden, obscure, or hitherto unseen. This exhibition presents a selection of contemporary photographs and video from the permanent collection that variously explores the medium's dynamic interplay between concealment and revelation.

Some of the artists featured here use the camera to reveal subjects or places ordinarily hidden, as in Vera Lutter's majestic view of the interior of a Pepsi-Cola bottling plant or Miguel Rio Branco's lush image of a tapestry's seamy underside. Others address instances of geopolitical obfuscation: Fazal Sheikh's aerial photographs of the Negev desert in southern Israel record the traces of Bedouin villages that have been transformed into forests or farmland, while Mishka Henner collects images of stylishly censored high-security sites on Google Earth. In Vault (2011), Thomas Demand takes his inspiration from current events, meticulously re-creating a storeroom in which thirty missing works of art were discovered during a recent police raid.

The tension between publicity and privacy—the simultaneous desire to be looked at and to evade the merciless gaze of the camera—animates the work of artists as diverse as Arbus, Lutz Bacher, Jack Pierson, and Taryn Simon. In her video, The Nightingale (2003), Grace Ndiritu explores the tradition of the veil and its complex poetics of exposure and effacement. Complementing the contemporary works on view is a selection of earlier photographs in which the primary subject is hidden or obscured—a brief anthology of playfulness, shame, and seduction.

HOURS:
Open 7 Days a Week
Sun – Thu 10am – 5:30pm*
Fri & Sat 10am – 9pm*
Closed Thanksgiving Day, December 25, January 1, and the first Monday in May

*Galleries are cleared fifteen minutes before closing.

Fee includes same-week admission to the Main Building and The Cloisters museum and gardens. There is no extra charge for entrance to exhibitions.

ADMISSION:
Adults $25
Seniors (65 & older) $17
Students $12*
Members (Join Now) Free
Children under 12 (accompanied by an adult) Free

*The Museum participates in several programs that include free admission for students. All New York City public school students, along with students from Bard Graduate Center, Barnard College, Columbia University, and the Institute of Fine Arts at New York University, may visit the Museum for free. Please check with your school administrator to see if your student ID allows free admission to the Museum.

Gallery 851
The Metropolitan Museum of Art
1000 Fifth Avenue (at 82nd Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 08 -
August 31, 2014
The Art of Eric Carle & Friends: What's Your Favorite Animal?
Eric Carle has partnered with fourteen leading illustrators to answer the enduring question, “What’s your favorite animal?" in a new book published by Henry Holt and Company. Contributions range from meticulously rendered artwork to quick, funny sketches with equally varied commentaries. The book, and this complementary exhibition, is a colorful, varied, and engaging omnibus that offers real insight into the lives and personalities of the artists. Contributors are Nick Bruel, Eric Carle, Lucy Cousins, Susan Jeffers, Steven Kellogg, Jon Klassen, Tom Lichtenheld, Peter McCarty, Chris Raschka, Peter Sis, Lane Smith, Erin Stead, Rosemary Wells, and Mo Willems. All royalties from the sale of the book benefit The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art.

Send us your favorite animal artwork to be included in our gallery!

West Gallery
The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
April 16 -
October 03, 2014
A Collection's Progress: The Lewis Walpole Library, 2000-2014
This new exhibition presents materials selected from the Library's collecting successes of the last fourteen years.

When Wilmarth Sheldon Lewis left his library to Yale in 1979 Lewis thought of his gift not as a finished monument but as a living thing that required growth and change lest it become, in his words, “static and moldy.” The exhibition presents materials selected from the LWL’s collecting successes of the last fourteen years. Together the objects on display argue forcefully for the Library’s conquest of stasis and mold, and each speaks eloquently of another time, its politics and conflicts, its arts, fashions, and pastimes.

Lewis Walpole Library
Yale University
154 Main Street
Farmington, CT
Exhibit New England
April 17 -
November 02, 2014
Sendak in the '60s
Amidst the turbulence of 1960s America a quiet revolution took place where few expected it: the world of children’s books. Maurice Sendak was part of a vanguard of writers and illustrators transforming the American picture book and revolutionizing children’s culture in the ‘60s. He illustrated more than 30 books throughout the decade, including the character-driven The Sign on Rosie’s Door(1960), the painterly Mr. Rabbit and the Lovely Present (1962), and the controversial In the Night Kitchen (1970), as well as the beloved Nutshell Library (1962) and his most celebrated bestseller, Where the Wild Things Are (1963).

We may take these books for granted now but each was experimental in its day, breaking picture book conventions and defying expectations. In between the boldly colorful Wild Things and Night Kitchen, Sendak went through a “black-and-white” period, ignoring color altogether and producing some of his most haunting and nuanced drawings. This period coincided with immense personal losses, including the death of his mother and his beloved dog, as well as his father’s cancer and his own recuperation from a heart attack that nearly killed him. This exhibition is the first to explore how Sendak’s art reflected both social and personal turmoil throughout the decade.

Rosenbach Museum & Library
2008-2010 Delancey Place
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 21 -
September 21, 2014
The Shot Heard Round the World: April 19, 1775
The Shot Heard Round the World: April 19, 1775 will follow an hour-by-hour account of the actions of British Regulars and Patriots on April 19th, 1775, presenting a chronological and geographical timeline of the day and representing many of the communities surrounding Boston – Lexington, Concord, Lincoln, Arlington (Menotomy), and Cambridge – whose militias played a prominent role in the day-long engagement.

Organized by Concord Museum curator David Wood and militaria expert Joel Bohy, the exhibition will draw from the Museum’s important collection, as well as a number of private and institutional collections.

Concord Museum
53 Cambridge Turnpike
Concord, MA
Exhibit New England
April 21, 2014 -
January 04, 2015
Focus on Nature XIII
Focus on Nature XIII features 91 natural and cultural history illustrations, representing the work of 71 illustrators from 15 different countries. The subjects represented are diverse, ranging from those only found in the artists’ home country to those that have a worldwide distribution. A special feature of FON XIII is a 3D illustration by Swiss artist Livia Maria Enderli of Neanderthal (Homo neanderthalensis). This reconstruction of a skull from an archaeological site in Uzbekistan in central Asia found in 1938 uses the latest technology available to artists and scientists.

Since its inception in 1990, the exhibit series Focus on Nature has reflected the standards, materials, and skills of contemporary natural history illustrators. It promotes awareness of a type of art that, although widely used in scientific publications, is not often seen by the general public.

Tue - Sun, 9:30am - 5pm
Closed Mondays
Closed Thanksgiving, Christmas, and New Year's Day

Free admission.
Donations are accepted at the door.

The Carousel is free. Donations are accepted.

Photography Gallery
New York State Museum
Cultural Education Center
222 Madison Avenue
Albany, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 23 -
August 09, 2014
Boston Athenæum in the 21st Century: Rare Books & Manuscripts
This Exhibition is a celebration of some of the most beautiful and important rare books and manuscripts acquired by the Library since 2000. Some were gifts to the Athenæum by generous donors. Most were purchased using the income from the numerous endowed book funds established by members and friends of the Library. These named book funds have been essential to the growth of the Library’s book collections and continue to honor the memory of those people who realized that important collections need to grow.

As befits the Athenæum’s extensive Rare Book and Manuscript Collections, these recent additions range widely in date and place of production. Many of the books to be exhibited are handsomely illustrated such as Thomas Pattison Yeats' Institutions of Entomology which is celebrated for the individual life-size paintings of insects that were added to the pages of the book by Louisa, Countess of Aylesford. La Création, which was printed in Paris by Francois-Louis Schmeid in 1928, is illustrated by numerous multicolored art deco woodblock print.

Fine bindings will also be featured in the exhibit. A particularly unusual one of engraved tortoise shell, dating from 1693, covers The Truest and Largest Account of the late Earthquake in Jamaica. Sybil Pye, a self taught English binder who was active in the first half of the 20th century created the distinctive binding for T. Sturge Moore's The Little School which was printed by the Eragny Press on vellum in 1905. This binding is illustrated on the cover of the Boston Athenæum’s wall calendar for 2014 which features some of the books that will be part of this exhibit.

ADMISSION: Members free; non-members $5.00

Boston Athenæum
10 1/2 Beacon Street
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
April 28 -
December 05, 2014
Body of Knowledge: A History of Anatomy (in 3 Parts)
"Body of Knowledge" explores the act of anatomizing not as a process of mapping a finite arrangement of bodily structures, but as a complex social and cultural activity. By means of a diachronic perspective, the exhibit narrative cuts through the multiplicity of anatomical practices, presenting three important moments in the history of anatomy: sixteenth century dissections and anatomical drawings, nineteenth century anatomical practices, and contemporary use of both cadavers and digital technology for anatomic education. "Body of Knowledge" hopes to capture the complexity of the many people, places, and meanings involved in human dissection.

The Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments
Harvard Museum of Science & Culture
Science Center 371
1 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
May 02 -
August 19, 2014
Comics Unmasked
Art and Anarchy in the UK

Featuring such iconic names as Neil Gaiman (Sandman), Alan Moore (Watchmen, V for Vendetta), Grant Morrison (Batman: Arkham Asylum) and Posy Simmonds (Tamara Drewe), this exhibition traces the British comics tradition back through classic 1970s titles including 2000AD, Action and Misty to 19th-century illustrated reports of Jack the Ripper and beyond.

Comics Unmasked is the UK’s largest ever exhibition of mainstream and underground comics, showcasing works that uncompromisingly address politics, gender, violence, sexuality and altered states. It explores the full anarchic range of the medium with works that challenge categorisation, preconceptions and the status quo, alongside original scripts, preparatory sketches and final artwork that demystify the creative process.

Enter the subversive and revelatory world of comics, from the earliest pioneers to today’s digital innovators.

PARENTAL GUIDANCE
Parental guidance is advised for visitors under 16 years of age due to the explicit nature of some of the exhibits on display. Within the exhibition, there is a separate section examining sexual themes which visitors can by-pass if they wish.

Exhibition opening hours
Mon - Fri: 10.00 - 18.00 (Tue: open until 20.00)
Sat: 10.00 - 17.00
Sun: 11.00 - 17.00

Last admission is an hour before closing.

Please be aware that the Library retains the right to request proof of age. Visitors under 16 years of age who are unaccompanied by an adult will not be admitted.

The British Library
96 Euston Road
London, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
May 02 -
August 16, 2014
Encounters: New Small Collections at Beinecke Library
An exhibition opening Friday at Yale University’s Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library presents 15 small, recently acquired collections that emphasize the richness and variety of the library’s holdings.

The exhibition, Encounters: New Small Collections at Beinecke Library, features materials covering an expansive range of history, art and culture. Thirteenth-century missals from a French cathedral are displayed alongside memorabilia from the Boy Scouts of America; correspondence documenting life in 1830s Texas is arranged beside advertisements from a New Haven-based toymaker; children’s photo books by famed photographer Edward Steichen are on view next to memorabilia from a Paris cabaret.

“Large, comprehensive archives and book collections tend to command the limelight, but curators are always on the hunt for interesting collections of any size or completeness,” says Timothy Young, curator of modern books and manuscripts, who organized the exhibition. “Many archives consist of just a single box – full of compelling evidence of a writer’s life or the history of a cultural moment. The collections displayed here, despite their modest size, offer exciting opportunities for research and learning.”

Exhibition Gallery
Monday - Thursday: 9 am to 7 pm
Friday: 9 am to 5 pm
Saturday: 12 pm to 5 pm

Reading Room Hours
Monday - Thursday: 9 am to 6:45 pm
Friday: 9 am to 4:45 pm

Beinecke Rare Book & Manuscript Library
121 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
May 07 -
August 22, 2014
Spanning the Centuries
An Exhibit of Recent Acquisitions, 1579-1868

With a vast and rich collection of materials spanning ten centuries, Historical & Special Collections (HSC), in the Harvard Law School Library, is a treasure trove for those interested in tracing the history and development of the law, legal education, law practice, and the history of Harvard Law School. Part of HSC’s mission is to collect these materials in a wide variety of formats, including printed books, handwritten manuscripts, paper and electronic documents, portraits, photographs, drawings, and artifacts. Another key part of our mission is to preserve these materials and make them freely available for research through cataloging, processing, and digitization.

On view are some of our recent acquisitions. Case 1 showcases books and bound manuscripts that provide clues about who owned them and how they were used, while Case 2 features the latest additions to our true crime collections. Here is a link to a blog post and a slide show of the exhibit. It was curated by Karen Beck, Historical & Special Collections.

Mon - Fri 9am - 5pm

Caspersen Room
Harvard Law School Library
1545 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
May 12 -
September 01, 2014
Peter Sis: Cartography of the Mind
Solo exhibition by Peter Sis, an internationally acclaimed artist, illustrator, writer and filmmaker, focuses on the artist’s poetic renditions of men’s unending quest for discovery. On view is a wide selection of his original drawings, watercolors and gouaches re-telling and re-imagining the stories of people, which changed with their adventures spirit the course of the history.

Czech Center New York
at the Bohemian National Hall (between 1st and 2nd Avenue)
321 East 73rd Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 15 -
August 10, 2014
“Of Green Leaf, Bird, and Flower”: Artists’ Books and the Natural World
This exhibition examines the intersections of artistic and scientific interest in the natural world from the sixteenth century to the present. Depictions of Britain’s countryside and its native plant and animal life will be explored through more than three hundred objects drawn primarily from the Center’s collections, ranging from centuries-old manuscripts to contemporary artists’ books.

“Of Green Leaf, Bird, and Flower” highlights the scientific pursuits in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries that resulted in the collecting and cataloging of the natural world. Also investigated will be the aesthetically oriented activities of self-taught naturalists during the Victorian era, particularly those of women who collected and drew specimens of butterflies, ferns, grasses, feathers, seaweed, and shells, and assembled them into albums and commonplace books.

On view will be examples of twentieth- and twenty-first-century artists’ books, including those of Eileen Hogan, Mandy Bonnell, Tracey Bush, John Dilnot, Sarah Morpeth, and Helen Douglas, that broaden the vision of the natural world to incorporate its interaction with consumer culture and with modern technologies. Works by these contemporary artists reveal a shared inspiration to record, interpret, and celebrate nature as in the work of their predecessors.

The exhibition features traditional bound books, drawings, and prints, as well as a range of more experimental media incorporating cut paper, wood, stone, natural specimens, sound, video, and interactive multimedia. A number of key historic works will be on loan from the Beinecke Rare Book and Manuscript Library. Examples of early microscopes used by natural historians will also be displayed, on loan from the Lentz Collection at the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History.

“Of Green Leaf, Bird, and Flower”: Artists’ Books and the Natural World is being organized by the Center and curated by Elisabeth Fairman, Senior Curator of Rare Books and Manuscripts. The accompanying book, published in association with Yale University Press, is being designed to evoke an early naturalist’s field guide.

Yale Center for British Art
1080 Chapel Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
May 20 -
November 30, 2014
Amherst
Harriet the Spy Turns Fifty

Louise Fitzhugh's Harriet the Spy turns fifty in 2014. To celebrate this golden anniversary, The Carle is organizing an exhibition of original drawings from the book. Initially, Harriet & Co. will return to New York City, premiering at The Forbes Galleries from March 7 to May 3, 2014. Subsequently, these drawings will be joined by those from the sequel, The Long Secret, and be on view from May 20 until November 30, 2014. Random House is publishing a 50th-anniversary commemorative edition with appreciations from, among others, Judy Blume and Lois Lowry.

Support for Harriet The Spy Turns Fifty has been generously provided by Random House Children’s Books

Central Gallery
The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
May 20 -
September 07, 2014
Gatsby to Garp: Modern Masterpieces from the Carter Burden Collection
Between 1973 and 1996 Carter Burden, a cultural benefactor and former New York City councilman, assembled the greatest collection of modern American literature in private hands. This exhibition brings together nearly one hundred outstanding works from the collection, including first editions, manuscripts, letters, and revised galley proofs. Authors featured in this unparalleled exhibition are some of the twentieth century's most celebrated—William Faulkner, F. Scott Fitzgerald, Allen Ginsberg, Ernest Hemingway, Langston Hughes, John Irving, Henry James, Jack Kerouac, Norman Mailer, Toni Morrison, J. D. Salinger, Gertrude Stein, John Steinbeck, John Updike, Tennessee Williams, and Richard Wright, among others.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

$18 Adults
$12 Children (13–16)
$12 Seniors (65 and over)
$12 Students (with current ID)
Free to members & children 12 & under (must be accompanied by an adult)
Admission is free on Fridays from 7pm - 9pm
Admission to the McKim rooms only is without charge during the following times: Tue 3pm - 5pm; Fri 7pm - 9pm; Sun 4pm - 6pm
Admission is not required to visit the Morgan Shop, Morgan Dining Room, and Morgan Café.

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 22 -
August 30, 2014
D-Day - June 6, 1944
D-Day 70th Anniversary Exhibit, includes items from the museum's archive that have not previously been seen in public.

SCHEDULED VISITS take place five days a week: Tuesday - Saturday. The best times to try scheduling a visit are on Wednesdays and Saturdays, although other days can be arranged.

It is required that you bring the printed and signed Release and Waiver when you arrive. The waiver form must be printed in advance and filled out before entering the museum.

A MINIMUM CONTRIBUTION of $25 is necessary to support the overhead necessary to have the museum open for visitors. Checks can be made payable to The Museum of World War II.

Route 9 (across from the Natick Mall)
Natick, MA
Exhibit New England
May 30 -
September 14, 2014
Miracles in Miniature: The Art of the Master of Claude de France
The Master of Claude de France was one of the last great French illuminators. His was a fine and delicate style, characterized by the use of subtle lilacs, mauves and roses, juxtaposed with chartreuse and royal blue—all applied in tiny, almost invisible brushstrokes. The Claude Master flourished in Tours (in the Loire valley) for only about twelve years (ca. 1508-1520), leaving behind a small but exceptional oeuvre.

Over the last several years, the Morgan has acquired a critical mass of the Claude Master's work, of which nearly two dozen items will be featured in this exhibition. The centerpiece is the Prayer Book of Claude de France, one of two tiny, jewel-like manuscripts that he painted for the queen of France and after which the artist was named. The Prayer Book was a personal commission by Queen Claude (first wife of King François I) around the time of her coronation in 1517. The manuscript measures a mere 2 ¾ by 2 inches, but it includes an amazing 132 miniatures. Encoded within the tiny book are images that reflect the queen's private anxieties, including her fear that she might have inherited from her mother, Anne de Bretagne (twice queen of France), the inability to bear healthy sons. Visitors will have the opportunity to access all of the Prayer Book's miniatures via an iPad in the gallery.

Also on view will be twelve newly discovered calendar miniatures by the Claude Master, which the Morgan recently acquired. These works will be complimented by loans from private collectors and from the Free Library of Philadelphia. Manuscripts by Jean Bourdichon, the Claude Master's teacher, and by Jean Poyer and Jacques Ravaud, two artists active in Tours who influenced him, will also be displayed.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

$18 Adults
$12 Children (13–16)
$12 Seniors (65 & over)
$12 Students (with current ID)
Free to members & children 12 & under (must be accompanied by an adult)

Admission is free on Fridays from 7 pm - 9pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 31 -
September 15, 2014
Small Prints, Big Artists: Masterpieces from the Renaissance to Baroque
Small Prints, Big Artists presents more than 200 masterworks from Carnegie Museum of Art’s exceptional collection of over 8,000 prints, many of which have not been on view in decades.

The intimately scaled woodcuts, engravings, and etchings reveal the development of printmaking as a true art form, from 15th-century Northern Europe, through the masterful innovations of Albrecht Dürer and Rembrandt, to the fantastical prints of Canaletto, Tiepolo, and Piranesi in the 18th century.

Artists began to make prints in the middle of the 15th century, mainly as devotional images included in religious volumes or as small individual sheets handed out to pilgrims at monasteries and shrines. By the year 1500, a new art form and a new means of communicating ideas was born—one that had as great an impact in its time as the Internet has had in our own. Small Prints, Big Artists traces the development of prints over the centuries, exploring the evolution of printmaking techniques and unlocking the images’ hidden meanings. It offers a unique opportunity to discover works by some of the best-known artists of the Renaissance and beyond.

This exhibition is organized by Linda Batis, independent curator.

HOURS:
Mon, 10am – 5pm
Tue, Closed
Wed, 10am – 5pm
Thu, 10am – 8pm
Fri, 10am – 5pm
Sat, 10am – 5pm
Sun, noon – 5pm

ADMISSION (includes Carnegie Museum of Natural History):
Adults: $17.95
Seniors (65+): $14.95
Students with ID/Children age 3–18: $11.95
Members and children under 3: Free

Heinz Galleries A&B
Carnegie Museum of Art
4400 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 03 -
August 31, 2014
Glenn Horowitz Bookseller Teams with Grey Area in East Hampton This Summer
Glenn Horowitz Bookseller is pleased to join forces with art and design consultancy Grey Area at our East Hampton bookstore and gallery this summer.

With art as a starting point, Grey Area seeks to push the limits of creative engagement and expression through collaboration, installation, and programming. For our 87 Newtown Lane location, they have developed a stimulating calendar of unique exhibitions and events, including pop-ups with Project No. 8, Mondo Cane, and Kinder Modern, as well as an installation by artist duo Jonah Freeman and Justin Lowe. The programming will also feature rare books and ephemera specially selected to complement the items on display.

Glenn Horowitz Bookseller
East Hampton Gallery
87 Newtown Lane
East Hampton, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 06 -
September 14, 2014
Marks of Genius: Treasures of the Bodleian Library
Marks of Genius presents some of the greatest achievements of human creativity, from the beginning of recorded information up to the industrial era, as preserved in the incomparable collections of Oxford University's Bodleian Library. The exhibition features approximately sixty rare and exceptional objects from diverse disciplines that serve as points of departure for exploring some of the fundamental meanings of genius.

The ways in which genius has been cultivated, recognized, and venerated will be explored through such works as early manuscripts of Euclid's Elementa and Gregory I's Regular Pastoralis, the oldest book written in English; an Arabic manuscript book of constellations; a unique papyri of Sappho's poems; the copyright deposit copy of Shakespeare's First Folio; a thirteenth-century manuscript of the Magna Carta; the definitive account of Aztec civilization; the manuscript of Handel's Messiah; J.R.R. Tolkien's drawings for The Hobbit; and Mary Shelley's manuscript draft of Frankenstein.

Marks of Genius travels exclusively to the Morgan before returning to the Bodleian Library to mark the opening of a new building devoted to its special collections.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

$18 Adults
$12 Children (13–16)
$12 Seniors (65 & over)
$12 Students (with current ID)
Free to members & children 12 & under (must be accompanied by an adult)

Admission is free on Fridays from 7 pm - 9pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 09 -
August 30, 2014
Spiritualists, Sorcerers, and Stage Magicians
Magic and the Supernatural at the Lilly Library

The exhibition showcases the Library’s wide-ranging and eclectic holdings on magic and the supernatural, from 17th-century treatises on witchcraft to modern-day comic books.

Special reception
Sat, June 21 6:00 - 8:00pm

Lilly Library Main Gallery
Indiana University
1200 East Seventh Street
Bloomington, IN
Exhibit Midwest
June 14 -
August 30, 2014
Darker Shades of Red: Soviet Propaganda Art from the Cold War Era
The new exhibition, Darker Shades of Red offers visitors a rare opportunity to revisit and analyze the Cold War period through the exploration of the Soviet Union’s official brand. Strikingly graphic and explicit in its socialist message, the collection reveals the economic, social and political ideology of the Soviet Union from the mid 1940s to 1990.

The evolution of Soviet poster art can be traced back to the two oldest traditions of Russian graphic art—the lubok and the painted religious icon. Dating back to the early seventeenth century, the lubok (an illustrated woodcut or print) typically combined images with text.

From the Bolshevik Revolution onward, the poster has been an influential source for Soviet dogma. Leaders consigned a high priority on communicating the ideas of revolution, socialism and social responsibility to its citizenry. Posters were used to direct and manipulate mass consciousness in accordance with Communist Party objectives. Allegorical images of Soviet leaders, soldiers, workers, and peasants were common heroic themes; images of machinery symbolized productivity in industry and farming. Locomotives, sputniks and rockets insinuated a collectivized sense of progress and achievement. This nationalistic information was communicated to the public through vibrant compositions combining figures, text (often poetry) and geometric blocks of strong color.

Post World War II tensions between the Soviet Union and the West lead to the beginning of the Cold War. Fear of nuclear proliferation and anti-west attitudes were often reflected in Soviet posters during the decades that followed. Civil defense posters explained how to prepare for a nuclear attack. Caricatures of American and British leaders depicted the West and its political structure as the enemy of the Soviet people.

Propaganda images also trickled down into the homes and day-to-day lives of the people. All schools, shops, factories, apartment buildings and public spaces were speckled with Soviet imagery. In this closed society, there were no competing images; people were exposed only to what was seen as fulfilling the goals of the Party. Common objects such as postcards and even children’s books had to reinforce Communist objectives. By observing these official images, we are given an insider’s perspective into life in a authoritarian, autocratic society.

The objects in Darker Shades are drawn from the private collection of Gary Hollingsworth, a Florida art restorer who traveled extensively in the former Soviet Union. The exhibit includes 55 original Soviet posters (w/ translations) and assorted ephemera like medals and orders, statuettes and factory banners.

HOURS:
Tuesday - Friday 11am - 3pm
Saturday 9am - 3pm
Open Thursday evenings until 7pm

ADMISSION:
Free to Members or with Admission
Adults $7, Seniors (59 and over) $5
Students (with ID) & children (3-17) $2
Children under 3 FREE
Group Rates available

Museum of Russian Icons
203 Union Street
Clinton, MA
Exhibit New England
June 15 -
August 31, 2014
I’ll Make a Ghost of Him: Joyce Haunted by Shakespeare
Of all Joyce’s predecessors, Shakespeare was the greatest and most complicated, serving as an artistic father, guide and literary ideal. In his masterpiece Ulysses, Joyce quotes from and refers to Shakespeare, but also paraphrases and emulates him, creating a vibrant relationship between one age of creativity and another.

This unique exhibition places pages from Joyce’s manuscript side-by-side with the plays and poems that inspired it. Setting the stage with visuals of Shakespearean scenes like those from Hamlet, where the ghost of King Hamlet silently directs the action of the play, it invites visitors to discover Shakespeare’s presence in the text of Ulysses , and reveals how the living Joyce was haunted by Elizabethan literary history.

Rosenbach Museum & Library
2008-2010 Delancey Place
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 16 -
September 14, 2014
Gustave Doré (1832–1883): Master of Imagination
Draftsman, painter and sculptor, Gustave Doré is arguably the most renowned illustrator of all time. Organized in collaboration with the Musée d’Orsay in Paris, this exhibition will be the first comprehensive retrospective devoted to this major artist and will include prints, drawings, paintings and sculpture. A hundred works, ranging from spectacular panoramas to intimate studies, will be brought together to illustrate Doré’s great artistic diversity. Unswayed by new trends, Doré was guided principally by his own extraordinary imagination and, intriguingly, has become a fertile source of inspiration to many 20th and 21st-century artists and filmmakers. Gustave Doré: Master of Imagination promises to be an enjoyable visual tour de force for all ages.

Hours
Sun 10am - 5pm
Mon 10am - 5pm
Tue 10am - 5pm
Wed 10am - 5pm
Thu 10am - 8pm
Fri 10am - 5pm
Sat 10am - 5pm

National Gallery of Canada
380 Sussex Drive
Ottawa, Ontario, CANADA
Exhibit International
June 16 -
August 15, 2014
Les fleurs du mal by Charles Baudelaire, illustrations by Emile Bernard
Les Fleurs du Mal, the most famous work of the poet Charles Baudelaire (1821–1867), was published in 1857. Many of the themes of his poems are similar to those of his contemporary, the painter Gustave Doré: modern life, cities and crowds, good and evil. They are brought to life by the vivid woodcut illustrations made by artist Émile Bernard (1868-1941) for a fine edition published in 1916.

Hours
Sun 10am - 5pm
Mon 10am - 5pm
Tue 10am - 5pm
Wed 10am - 5pm
Thu 10am - 8pm
Fri 10am - 5pm
Sat 10am - 5pm

NGC Library and Archives
National Gallery of Canada
380 Sussex Drive
Ottawa, Ontario, CANADA
Exhibit International
June 20, 2014 -
January 11, 2015
A Certain Slant of Light: Spencer Finch at the Morgan
American artist Spencer Finch (b. 1962) will unveil a new, site-specific, large-scale installation at the Morgan inspired by its great collection of medieval Books of Hours—beautiful, hand-painted works that served as personal prayer books for different times of the day and different periods of the year. Taking advantage of the Morgan's four-story, glass-enclosed Gilbert Court, Finch will apply films of color to the windows and hang additional glass panes in the center of the Court to create a kind of calendar based on the movement of the sun.

Finch plans to cover or hang the panes of glass in groupings by month with each having a palette that corresponds to the time of the year. For example, November would be "harvesting" and the colors of the month will be based on the colors of the harvest. The installation also calls for what the artist is identifying as "red-letter days." Marking secular holidays the artist considers significant—such as Sir Isaac Newton's birthday on January 4—red-colored glass would align with the sun's arc across Gilbert Court at noon on these days. The precise measurements required to create the installation at the Morgan are a hallmark of Finch's work. At the same time, his installations emphasize movement and change, capturing fleeting moments of sublime beauty.

This exhibition is made possible in part by a gift from Susanna and Livio Borghese, in honor of Parker Gilbert and in appreciation of his many contributions to the Morgan Library & Museum, with additional generous support from Mickey Cartin; the Charles E. Pierce, Jr. Fund for Exhibitions; James Cohan Gallery; Christopher Scholz and Inés Elskop; Nancy Schwartz; and Rhona Hoffman Gallery, Chicago.

HOURS:
Tuesday through Thursday: 10:30am - 5pm
Friday: 10:30am - 9pm
Saturday: 10am - 6pm
Sunday: 11am - 6pm

ADMISSION:
$18 Adults
$12 Children (13–16)
$12 Seniors (65 and over)
$12 Students (with current ID)
Free to members and children 12 and under (must be accompanied by an adult)
Admission is free on Fridays from 7pm - 9pm
Admission to the McKim rooms only is without charge during the following times: Tuesday, 3pm - 5pm; Friday, 7pm - 9pm, Sunday, 4pm - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 21 -
August 24, 2014
NO (A MASTERLESS UNIVERSE): JASON ROY
No (A Masterless Universe) is an exercise in weakening the fetters of power within our restricted cosmos using painted, drawn and bound sigils. The artist flirts with repeated attempts to relieve the stresses of living in a limitless universe, fraught with empty desire, habitual violence and law. Through painted incantation, echoing affirmation, totemic defiance, and denial, we find freedom from negative energy, bad vibes, fathers, cops, fear, masculinity, lies, reptilian overlords, buttheads, boneheads, yo-yos, and jerks.

Using found and ephemeral materials the artist concurrently questions the limits of governing forces mentioned above as well as the physical limits of the materials themselves.

No (A Masterless Universe) combines paintings on newsprint, hand-colored screen prints on cardboard and paper, pennant flags, and three new artist book editions published exclusively for this exhibition. The combative theme is paralleled by the artist's repetitive execution, exhausting each medium through dozens of incarnations of synonymous subject matter. Exhibiting all repetitive and honest trials, the amassed serial artwork becomes a solidified regiment against the sullied and corrupt forces that wish to control. It is an attempt to manifest a freedom that may only exist on a blank page.

No (A Masterless Universe) is Jason Roy's first solo-exhibition and the third in a series of one person shows dedicated to Brooklyn based artists exhibiting audacity and prolific outcome in the self publishing community. Jason Roy studied printmaking at the State University of New York at Purchase College. He has since continued printing his own artwork, comics, and t-shirts as well as collaborating with other artists and musicians. He is also an educator with an emphasis on instructing others in renegade screen-printing and heretic art production.

Gallery Hours: Thursday - Tuesday 12 - 5pm

Opening Reception + Book Launch, Saturday June 21; 7 - 10pm

Booklyn Artists Alliance
37 Greenpoint Avenue
4th fl, Ste. E4G (Box #23)
Brooklyn, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 23 -
October 31, 2014
Enduring War: Grief, Grit and Humour
A major part of the Library's contribution to the First World War Centenary, Enduring War examines how people coped with life during the war: from moments of patriotic fervour to periods of anxious inactivity, shock and despair.

Through posters, poetry, books and pamphlets from the period, the exhibition considers attempts to boost morale at home and in the field, as well as presenting individual responses to the conflict, such as letters from Indian soldiers on the Western Front, schoolboys' descriptions of Zeppelin raids over London and examples of the black humour expressed in trench journals.

The exhibition also showcases the Library's work for Europeana 1914-1918, a major pan-European project to digitise more than 400,000 items from World War One through an audiovisual art installation.

A series of public events, artistic performances and discussions accompany the exhibition, as well as a programme for schools and teachers.

Admission free

Folio Society Gallery
The British Library
96 Euston Road
London, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
June 23, 2014 -
March 15, 2015
Warhol On Vinyl: The Record Covers, 1949-1987+
Andy Warhol envisioned the record cover as a means to popularize his name as an artist and, once he reached iconic status in the 1960s, used it to directly impact popular culture. Designed to be collected by the masses, the records—numbering more than fifty— reinforce his maxim “repetition adds up to reputation.” While only a fortunate few own a Warhol painting, millions own his design for Rolling Stones’ Sticky Fingers.

The exhibition is drawn from the Cranbrook Art Museum’s preeminent collection of record covers by Andy Warhol, a recent gift by Frank M. Edwards and Ann M. Williams, and premieres three recently discovered covers that have never before been exhibited, including a cover recently discovered last year. Cranbrook has also been loaned a copy of the one-of-a-kind "Night Beat" album cover, making this the most comprehensive exhibition of authenticated record covers to date. The album covers range from the extremely rare to the widely recognizable; together they offer a unique lens to survey the artist’s career from a young graphic designer to a cultural phenomenon. At the same time, the exhibition documents the history of the mass-produced vinyl record and the zeitgeist of these eras through the inclusion of music, video and artworks from the Art Museum’s extensive Andy Warhol collection. Listening booths in the gallery will allow viewers to play select albums, thereby producing an experience between the cover art and the music—rock, classical, opera, jazz, soul, experimental—the way Warhol intended. The exhibition also includes album covers by other musicians that have controversially appropriated Warhol’s imagery and testify to his influence on subsequent generations.

Cranbrook Art Museum
39221 Woodward Avenue
Bloomfield Hills, MI
Exhibit Midwest
June 24 -
October 31, 2014
Once There Were Billions: Vanished Birds of North America
Once an amazing diversity of birds—some in breathtaking abundance—inhabited the vast forests and plains of North America. But starting around 1600, species began to disappear, as humans altered habitats, over-hunted, and introduced predators.

A notable extinction occurred 100 years ago, with the death of Martha the Passenger Pigeon, the last member of a species that once filled America’s skies.

The story of the last Passenger Pigeon and the disappearance of the Great Auk, Carolina Parakeet, and Heath Hen reveal the fragile connections between species and their environment. Illustrations come from the Biodiversity Heritage Library, a global project that is changing the way research is done by digitizing and freely sharing biodiversity publications with scientists and other users around the world.

"The Lost Bird Project" at the Smithsonian
Smithsonian Indoor and Outdoor Exhibits Showcase Extinct Birds

The Smithsonian Libraries and Smithsonian Gardens present “The Lost Bird Project,” an exhibit by artist Todd McGrain, March 27 through March 15, 2015. This project recognizes the tragedy of modern extinction by immortalizing North American birds that have been driven to extinction. It will feature large-scale bronze sculptures of the Carolina Parakeet, the Labrador Duck, the Great Auk, the Heath Hen and the Passenger Pigeon.

Ground Floor
National Museum of Natural History
1000 Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 28 -
November 02, 2014
Simms Taback: Art by Design
To celebrate the gift of a significant part of Simms Taback’s archive, the museum is mounting an exhibition, Simms Taback: Art by Design. It will be on view from June 27 until October 19, 2014. The exhibition will survey Simms’s eight major books, including his Caldecott Medal Book, Joseph Had a Little Overcoat, and his Honor Book, I Know an Old Lady Who Swallowed a Fly. Taback's irrepressible humor shines through in his colorful, beautifully crafted compositions, and important messages abound. This show is the second in an ongoing series highlighting the permanent collection and it will be accompanied by a sixteen-page illustrated brochure with an essay by Chief Curator, Nick Clark.

Support for Simms Taback: Art by Design has been generously provided by Penguin Young Readers Group

East Gallery
The Eric Carle Museum of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
June 30 -
August 31, 2014
Someday is Now: The Art of Corita Kent
Someday is Now: The Art of Corita Kent is the first full-scale survey of more than thirty years of work by Corita Kent (1918-1986). A teacher at Immaculate Heart College in Los Angeles and a civil rights, feminist, and anti-war activist, Corita, as she is commonly referred to, was one of the most popular American graphic artists of the 1960s and 1970s. Throughout her rich and varied career, she made thousands of posters, murals, and signature serigraphs that combine her passions for faith and politics. Reflecting larger questions and concerns of the 1960s, her images remain iconic symbols of that turbulent time. Corita's earnest, collaborative approach to art-making—combining faith, politics, and teaching with messages of acceptance and hope—continues to be a potent influence for many artists working today.

The first major museum exhibition to survey Corita's entire career, Someday is Now features over 200 serigraph prints including early abstractions and text pieces as well as more lyrical works made in the 1970s and 1980s. In addition, the exhibition presents rarely exhibited drawings and photographs Corita used for teaching and documentary purposes. These works provide a telling and visually stimulating record of 1960s politics, visual styles, and pop culture.

Museum of Contemporary Art Cleveland
11400 Euclid Avenue
Cleveland, OH
Exhibit Midwest
July 01 -
October 26, 2014
Heralds and Heraldry in Shakespeare's England
Discover the colorful world of heralds and their rivals, all competing to profit from the craze for coats of arms that seized England under Elizabeth I. Books explaining heraldry's complex rules, manuscripts illustrating actual coats of arms, and documents from professional heralds attempting to regulate heraldic practice show an ambitious world eager to display success and status.

Folger Great Hall
Folger Shakespeare Library
201 East Capitol Street, SE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 03 -
September 01, 2014
Magna Carta: Cornerstone of Liberty
See a rare copy of England's Magna Carta along with the Sons of Liberty Bowl, drafts of Declaration of Independence, and more symbols of liberty and justice.

One of only four surviving copies of the original Magna Carta—a document written in 1215 that is the foundation for many liberties that Americans enjoy—travels to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, this summer for a special exhibition in the Art of the Americas Wing. An inspiration for the US Constitution and Bill of Rights, the exemplar typically housed in the Lincoln Cathedral in Lincolnshire, England, is on view at the MFA this summer in partnership with the Massachusetts Historical Society and the Massachusetts House of Representatives. Magna Carta—Latin for “Great Charter”— joins other historical loans as well as portraits and works of art from the Museum’s collection—including the MFA’s Sons of Liberty Bowl (1768) by Paul Revere, which is engraved with the words "Magna/Charta" and "Bill of/Rights"—to tell the story of patriots and revolutionaries who fought for freedom in the face of tyranny. The exhibition also includes portraits, marble busts, and historical documents related to several of the Founding Fathers, presidents, and abolitionists, particularly from Massachusetts, who were inspired by the liberties enshrined in Magna Carta.

Mon–Tue: 10am – 4:45pm
Wed–Fri: 10am – 9:45pm
Sat–Sun: 10am – 4:45pm

Members FREE
Adults $25
Seniors (65+) $23
Students (18+) $23
Youths 7–17* FREE*
Children 6 and under FREE
*Weekdays after 3 pm, weekends, and Boston public school holidays; otherwise $10.

Edward and Nancy Roberts Family Gallery (Gallery LG26)
Museum of Fine Arts - Boston
Avenue of the Arts
465 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
July 04 -
October 13, 2014
Madeline in New York: The Art of Ludwig Bemelmans
To celebrate the 75th anniversary of Madeline’s publication, the New-York Historical Society will honor the beloved schoolgirl and her creator Ludwig Bemelmans with an exhibition of more than 90 original artworks.

In addition to drawings from all six Madeline books, the exhibition will also feature Bemelmans' drawings of the old Ritz Hotel in New York, murals from a rediscovered Paris bistro, panels from the Onassis yacht, and a cache of fabrics based on an early picture book.

Tue - Thu, & Sat 10am - 6pm
Fri - 10am - 8pm
Sun - 11am - 5pm
Mon - CLOSED

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West
at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 04 -
October 13, 2014
Madeline in New York: The Art of Ludwig Bemelmans
To celebrate the 75th anniversary of Madeline’s publication, the New-York Historical Society will honor the beloved schoolgirl and her creator Ludwig Bemelmans with an exhibition of more than 90 original artworks.

In addition to drawings from all six Madeline books, the exhibition will also feature Bemelmans' drawings of the old Ritz Hotel in New York, murals from a rediscovered Paris bistro, panels from the Onassis yacht, and a cache of fabrics based on an early picture book.

Related Programs:
Madeline's Tea Party: Wednesdays 3pm – 5pm
July 16
August 13
September 10
October 8

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West
at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 07 -
September 28, 2014
FABELO'S ANATOMY
Roberto Fabelo’s images appear to us from a different dimension. Strangely beautiful nude female torsos, sometimes winged, at other times sporting beaks, peer out of pages from ancient texts that seem to describe these haunting and unusual creatures. The metamorphosis of these human figures into Fabelo’s unique creatures parallels the transformation that takes place in the viewer who is forced to question their own perceptions of fantasy and reality.

Fabelo’s Anatomy offers a glimpse into the complex world of imagery emerging from the mind of one of Cuba’s most compelling artists. This cameo exhibition at MOLAA is the first solo museum exhibition of the artist’s work in the U.S.

HOURS
Wed, Thu, Sat & Sun 11am - 5pm
Fri (extended hours) 11am - 9pm
Mon & Tue Closed

ADMISSION
General Admission $9.00
Seniors $6.00
Students $6.00
MOLAA Members FREE
Children under 12 years FREE
Free Admission Every Sunday
Free Admission the fourth Friday of every month between 5 - 9pm

Temporary Gallery
Museum of Latin American Art
628 Alamitos Avenue
Long Beach, CA
Exhibit West
July 07 -
November 13, 2014
What Did Renaissance Printmakers Make of Antiquity?
Around 1500 Italian artists became so competitive that they even tried to surpass famous artists from ancient times. The Renaissance, a modern name for this period encompassing the 15th to late 16th centuries throughout Europe, refers to the rebirth of Classical forms of learning and artistic expression. Artists active during this time, especially in Rome, witnessed first-hand the rediscovery of ancient sculptures such as the colossal Hellenistic (c. 323–31 B.C.) marble Laöcoon group, which Michelangelo himself inspected soon after it was unearthed in 1506. Printed reproductions circulated soon thereafter, including two in this gallery rotation, one of which is a lively woodcut lampooning the study of antiquity by recasting the writhing, heroic figures as hairy apes.

The Renaissance artist was frequently praised as the "new Apelles," who had once been painter to Alexander the Great. An extended historical description survives of one of Apelles's paintings about a false judgment made on an innocent man. The cast from that lost composition populates several different prints in this rotation and inspired many paintings as well.

In the case of ancient paintings and sculptures, pictures for the Renaissance artist were indeed worth more than a thousand words, for they were worth recreating. These attempts to understand ancient sculpture and recreate lost paintings underscore the Renaissance artist's deep investment in the past.

Open daily 10:30–5:00
Thursday until 8:00
General admission to the Art Institute of Chicago is free to Illinois residents every Thursday from 5 - 8pm.
An additional fee for special exhibitions may be applied.

Gallery 205A
The Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
July 07 -
October 12, 2014
What May Come: The Taller de Gráfica Popular and the Mexican Political Print
The most influential and enduring progressive printmaking collective of its time, the Taller de Gráfica Popular (the Popular Graphic Art Workshop) or TGP, created some of the most memorable images in mid-century printmaking. This Mexico City–based workshop took up the legacy of the famous Mexican broadside illustrator José Guadalupe Posada, creating prints, posters, and illustrated publications that were popular, affordable, legible, politically topical, and, above all, formally compelling. This exhibition includes over 100 works from the Art Institute’s rich holdings—one of the most significant TGP collections in the United States—demonstrating why this collective boasted such international influence and inspired the establishment of print collectives around the world.

Founded in 1937 by Leopoldo Méndez, Luis Arenal, and American-born Pablo O’Higgins, the TGP emerged and evolved in the crucible of antifascist and leftist politics in Mexico in the period surrounding World War II. This milieu shaped not only the workshop’s dedication to a collective printmaking model but also its production aimed at both “the people” and discerning collectors, a strategy necessitated by the era’s quickly changing political tides. The collective created works for groups spanning the leftist and progressive political spectrum, including the government of Lázaro Cárdenas and his successors, the Mexican Communist Party, major trade unions, and antifascist organizations.

During the TGP’s heyday, from its founding until the 1950s, the workshop produced thousands of prints, primarily linocuts and lithographs, for everything from ephemeral handbills and newspapers to political and advertising posters to luxe portfolios and printed books. Favoring an expressive, realist visual language, its work addressed a wide range of socially engaged themes, including Mexican history and culture, political satires both local and international (including calavera broadsides), rural and urban scenes of daily life, and agitprop prints. The members of the workshop, a core of about 40 during its height, produced both individual and collective works and welcomed numbers of foreign members and guest artists—from Elizabeth Catlett to Josef Albers—to use the workshop in order to collaborate on prints and create individual pieces.

Showcasing the TGP’s prolific and varied output, What May Come is organized into thematic sections such as Chicago connections to the TGP, antifascism, national history, daily life, caricature, and popular visual traditions. A Spanish-English catalogue accompanies the exhibition, which also features bilingual labeling.

Open daily 10:30–5:00
Thursday until 8:00
General admission to the Art Institute of Chicago is free to Illinois residents every Thursday from 5 - 8pm.
An additional fee for special exhibitions may be applied.

Galleries 124–127
The Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
July 07 -
October 12, 2014
Saul Steinberg: Commemorating the 100th Anniversary of His Birth
Saul Steinberg (1914–1999) had one of the most remarkable and varied careers in postwar American art. He is as equally renowned for the covers and drawings that appeared in The New Yorker for nearly six decades as for the drawings, paintings, prints, collages, and sculptures that earned him over 80 solo exhibitions across the world throughout his lifetime. While he was committed to the act of drawing in an era dominated by large-scale painting and sculpture, he explored any visual idiom that met his immediate needs, constantly crossing boundaries into uncharted artistic territory and freely conflating high and low art. As a result Steinberg’s art resists classification, as he himself knew: “I don’t quite belong to the art, cartoon, or magazine world, so the art world doesn’t quite know where to place me.” He nevertheless crafted a rich and ever-evolving oeuvre that found full expression through his various parallel careers and is famed internationally for giving graphic definition to the postwar age.

The Art Institute is thrilled to announce a remarkable gift from the Saul Steinberg Foundation of 54 works on paper, including five masks, by this amazingly versatile artist. In celebration of this significant addition to the collection and in honor of Steinberg’s 100th birthday, this focused installation presents five works from the recent gift—each capturing a distinct style and working method from Steinberg’s long and varied career—alongside three works already in the museum’s collection. The earliest work in the installation is the 1952 collage Downtown Building, which transforms two 19th-century engravings—of an organ and a display cabinet—into a building through the addition of inked doorways and an urban streetscape, while the latest work is the 1989 drawing Las Vegas (which became a 1992 New Yorker cover), a satirical take on the United States’ national icons with a skeleton-faced cowboy, a soldier in camouflage, Abraham Lincoln, Lady Liberty, a Klansman, and Mickey Mouse—all posing as sphinxes along the Las Vegas highway. As wide-ranging stylistically as they are chronologically, the works in this selection demonstrate the rich visual imagination, boundless wit, and keen cultural critique of Steinberg’s art, offering a brief but rich overview of this uncategorizable artist.

Open daily 10:30–5:00
Thursday until 8:00
General admission to the Art Institute of Chicago is free to Illinois residents every Thursday from 5 - 8pm.
An additional fee for special exhibitions may be applied.

Gallery 124A
The Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
July 07 -
September 28, 2014
Sharp, Clear Pictures: Edward Steichen’s World War I and Condé Nast Years
At the start of World War I in 1914, Edward Steichen was a pioneering champion of art photography—catapulting to fame as a leading member of the Photo Secessionists and as cofounder of the trailblazing magazine Camera Work. Yet by the early 1920s, Steichen had rejected the soft focus, dreamy landscapes and portraits of his early years in favor of realist photographs made for informational purposes or popular consumption. This turning point was first marked by his role in World War I as chief of the Photographic Section of the American Expeditionary Forces from 1917 to 1919; it was fully realized in his subsequent work as lead photographer at Condé Nast publications from 1923 to 1937.

While on military duty, Steichen helped adapt aerial photography for intelligence purposes, implementing surveillance programs that had a lasting impact on modern warfare. He later reflected: “The wartime problem of making sharp, clear pictures from a vibrating, speeding airplane ten to twenty thousand feet in the air had brought me a new kind of technical interest in photography. . . . Now I wanted to know all that could be expected from photography.” Steichen began to value photography’s capacity to transmit and encode information, and he soon proved his savvy as a collaborator and producer rather than a solitary auteur—new skills that enabled his subsequent groundbreaking career in magazines. Upon his return to New York in 1923, Steichen joined Condé Nast publications, creating iconic fashion photographs and celebrity portraits for Vogue and Vanity Fair. Over a period of nearly 15 years he created images that redefined the field through their clever use of modernist aesthetics and advertising tactics, becoming an influential impresario who promoted photography as a mass-media tool.

Focusing on rarely seen Steichen photographs drawn from the Art Institute’s collection, this exhibition includes a unique album of over 80 World War I aerial photographs assembled and annotated by Steichen himself as well as a group of iconic glamour portraits and fashion photographs done for Condé Nast, featuring notable figures such as Greta Garbo, Fred Astaire, and Gloria Swanson.

Open daily 10:30–5:00
Thursday until 8:00
General admission to the Art Institute of Chicago is free to Illinois residents every Thursday from 5 - 8pm.
An additional fee for special exhibitions may be applied.

Galleries 1–4
The Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
July 07 -
October 26, 2014
Mind’s Eye: Masterworks on Paper from David to Cézanne
From quick sketches to watercolors, works by artists such as Edgar Degas, Paul Cézanne, Vincent van Gogh, Edouard Manet, Jacques-Louis David, Théodore Géricault, and Eugène Delacroix are brought together in the DMA-organized exhibition Mind’s Eye: Masterworks on Paper from David to Cézanne. Drawn from the Dallas Museum of Art’s collection, as well as from several private collections, the exhibition features more than 100 works on paper, many of which are rarely on view, in various media by 70 artists. Mind’s Eye offers new insights into the working methods and practices of these artists, providing an intimate view of their approach to art making while also presenting the drawings and watercolors as finished works of art in their own right.

Monday: Closed
Tue 11am – 5pm
Wed 11am – 5pm
Thu 11am – 9pm
Fri* 11am – 5pm
Sat 11am – 5pm
Sun 11am – 5pm

*Late Night Fridays (third Friday of the month, excluding December), the Museum is open until midnight

Special exhibition admission is $8
DMA Partners: FREE
Children 11 and under: FREE

Dallas Museum of Art
1717 North Harwood
Dallas, TX
Exhibit Southwest
July 09, 2014 -
January 18, 2015
Bescribbled, Nibbled, and Dog-Eared: Early American Children’s Books
“It is quite normal for a bouncing bibliophile of twelve months to teethe on the hard board corners of, for instance, a copy of Cinderella,” wrote Dr. A. S. W. Rosenbach (1876—1952). As one of the first serious collectors of American children’s books, Rosenbach knew that pristine survivals of such books were rare and prized. But they were also fascinating windows into American history, education, and literature. Taking up a collection begun by his uncle, Moses Polock, Dr. Rosenbach bought and sold these tiny books dating from 1682 to 1836, making an historic donation of 816 children’s books to the Free Library of Philadelphia in 1947 and assisting other collectors in refining their own holdings. This exhibition explores the history of these early children’s books from the religious tracts of Puritan printers to the adventure novels of the 19th century, while introducing visitors to Dr. Rosenbach’s passion for these dog-eared gems.

Rosenbach Museum & Library
2008-2010 Delancey Place
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 10 -
October 26, 2014
Virginia Woolf: Art, Life and Vision
Virginia Woolf was one of the most important and celebrated writers of the twentieth century. This extensive exhibition of portraits and rare archival material will explore her life and achievements as a novelist, intellectual, campaigner and public figure.

Curated by biographer and art historian Frances Spalding, the exhibition includes distinctive portraits of Woolf by her Bloomsbury Group contemporaries Vanessa Bell and Roger Fry and photographs by Beresford and Man Ray, as well as intimate images recording her time spent with friends and family. Woolf’s early life and literary achievements, alongside lesser known aspects of her time in London and political views, are brought into focus through in-depth research and a remarkable array of personal objects including letters, diaries and books.

Daily 10.00 – 18.00
Closure commences at 17.50

Thursdays and Fridays until 21.00
Closure commences at 20.50

Last admission to the exhibition is 1 hour before the Gallery closes.

National Portrait Gallery
St Martin's Place
London, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
July 10 -
September 14, 2014
On 52nd Street: The Jazz Photography of William P. Gottlieb
On 52nd Street: The Jazz Photography of William P. Gottlieb features forty vintage photographs of jazz musicians in performance from the collection of the photographer’s family. William P. Gottlieb (1917–2006) began photographing jazz musicians in 1938 to illustrate a weekly feature he wrote for The Washington Post. Over the next decade he created almost 2,000 portraits of more than 250 musicians. This exhibition brings together Gottlieb’s photographic portraits of jazz musicians whose rebellious self-expression, charisma, edge, and mystery made them American icons.

RELATED PROGRAMMING
Thu, July 10, 2014 6pm - 8pm
Members' Reception and Tour

Museum members are invited to a reception and presentation celebrating the exhibition. Join us for refreshments and hors d'ouevres at 6:00 p.m., followed by a tour of the exhibition led by Frank Goodyear, co-director of the Bowdoin College Museum of Art at 7:00 pm.

Not a member? Free membership is available.

Thu, August 14 7pm
Jazz Duo
Hannah Judd and Tate Gale will play within the exhibition.

Thu, September 11, 2014 7pm
Thursday Night Salon

Frank Goodyear, co-director of the Bowdoin College Museum of Art, will lead a tour of the exhibition.

Shaw Ruddock Gallery
Bowdoin College Museum of Art
9400 College Station
Brunswick, ME
Exhibit New England
July 11, 2014 -
February 01, 2015
Chester Beatty’s A to Z: from Amulet to Zodiac
A is for Amulet, B is for Beatty, C is for Calligraphy . . ., Chester Beatty’s A to Z will take you on a journey through a selection of highlights, showcasing the breadth and quality of this wonderful collection.

This curators’ choice show is a visual treat with universal appeal. Featuring works that are seldom on display, the exhibition presents an opportunity to explore the threads that link cultures across the Western, Islamic and East Asian worlds.

A is for Amulet and the exhibition displays exquisite examples of these seventeenth- to nineteenth- century protective charms from the Christian, Hebrew, Islamic and Hindu faiths.

E is for Embroidery and the objects on view include European sixteenth- to eighteenth-century covers for almanacs and devotional works, as well as eighteenth- and nineteenth-century embroidered badges worn to indicate status in the Chinese imperial court.

T is for Travel and among the early printed travel books is a rare 1576 guide to the ‘most famous islands of the world’ with a chapter devoted to Ireland.

B is for Beatty and M is for Mining, and rarely seen material from the Library’s Archives offer a glimpse into Chester Beatty’s family and professional life.

Chester Beatty Library
Dublin Castle
Dublin, IRELAND
Exhibit International
July 23 -
September 27, 2014
Zines+ and the World of ABC No Rio
Zine is an abbreviation of the term fanzine, and in describing its history and uses Thomas Paine and Benjamin Franklin are commonly cited, often alongside 1970's punk music. By straddling the line between functional brochure and works of art realized in book form, the zine has retained its popularity even as the internet has largely become the preferred method of self-publishing. Zines+ and The World of ABC No Rio, organized by Jason Lujan, is an exhibition that goes beyond the mere form of the zine, which is usually a cheaply-made and priced publication, often in black and white, mass-produced via a photocopier, and bound with staples. The exhibit presents and explains a range of these self-same printed materials, mixing both artists' original creations with items from the ABC No Rio zine library archives, covering subject matter from arts-community history to political commentary.
The zines will be shown in the context of art in book form. The overall aesthetic reflects a Do-It-Yourself approach, firmly rooted in a downtown New York scene that celebrates volunteerism, art, and activism. The zine form lends itself as a tool for community activism and empower-ment. And, through this exhibition that community's voice, the lower eastside downtown scene, is clearly articulated.
The Center is pleased to present this engaging exhibition which builds upon The Center's recent exhibitions of similar vein, such as No More Drama: The Saga Continues, organized by Edwin Ramoran; From Bande Dessinée to Artist's Book: Testing the Limits of Franco-Belgian Comics, organized by Catherine Labio; and Garo Manga: The First Decade, 1964-1973, organized by Ryan Holmberg. These exhibitions investigate the graphic novel, comics, and other related media as artistic vehicles for self-expression, social activism, and political criticism.

Mon - Fri 11am-6pm
Sat 10am-5pm

The Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 23 -
September 27, 2014
Livre d'Artiste d'Aujourd'hui: Interdisciplinary Collaborations
What is a livre d'artiste? One could argue, not in absolute, that the livre d'artiste was "traditionally" put together by the publisher asking an artist and writer (who often didn't even know each other) to create work for a publication. The collaboration was usually an arranged one and the production value was usually of high quality produced in a limited run. For this exhibition, however, the curators are interested to see how artists, writers, performers, etc, have found ways to self-produce publications that embody the collaborative spirit embedded in the concept of the livre d'artiste. The exhibition will present the work of a true collaboration, not one artist responding to a finished work, but instead one in which both contributors have equal weight.
Collaborations being featured include: Rosaire Appel & Myrna Burks; Samanta Batra-Mehta & Sweta Srivastava Vikram; Rosemarie Chiarlone, Susan Weiner, Elaine Wright & Alfredo Useche; Béatrice Coron & Elizabeth DeSole; Martin Demaine, Erik Demaine & Micheal Benson; Rolando Estevez-Jordan & Ruth Behar; Anne Gilman & David Unger; Ximena Perez-Grobet & AJO (Maria Jose de la Hoz); Roni Gross, Peter Schell & Nancy Campbell; Mary Heebner, John Balkwill, Tomio Muneno, Tessa Tapscott & David Shelton; Wennie Huang & Ed Go; Despo Magoni & over 30 various collaborators; Iviva Olenick, Luke Hoorelbeke & Community Members; Robin Price & Joyce Cutler-Shaw; Felicia Rice, Monica Brown & Jenny Callañ aupa Huarhua; Miriam Schaer & Mary Florio; Susan Schwalb & Martin Boykan; Robbin Ami Silverberg & András Dés; Sarah Stengle & Michael Joseph; and Ewa Monika Zebrowski & Anne Michaels.
The exhibition will be travelling to MDC Galleries of Art + Design in Miami from November 17th, 2014 to March 20th, 2015. Presented to coincide with the Miami Book Fair International, there will be a related panel on paper and book arts in February. MDC Galleries of Art + Design is located at Centre Gallery (on the Miami Dade College Wolfson campus), at 300 NE Second Avenue in Miami.

Mon - Fri 11am-6pm
Sat 10am-5pm

The Center for Books Arts
28 West 27th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 23 -
December 14, 2014
Caricature, Fashion and Fantasy
This group of prints and drawings, chiefly from the 16th to 18th centuries, encompasses a broad span of social comment from caricatures to documentary realism. Various levels of society are represented: carousing peasants, ladies of fashion, celebrities or anonymous adolescents. Some examples are complex, offering thinly veiled criticism of religious or secular institutions, while others represent the animal world, both real and imaginary. Some works are by little known artists, others by more famous names, like Tiepolo for example, who did caricatures in "off duty" moments. Many combine keen observation with fantasy and humor in a way that transforms the everyday into the exotic.

Wed, 10 am—5 pm
Thurs/Fri, 10 am—9 pm
Sat/Sun, 10 am—5 pm

Free admission

Nelson-Atkins Building, P13
The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
4525 Oak Street
Kansas City, MO
Exhibit Midwest
July 25, 2014 -
January 11, 2015
Across the Indian Country: Photographs by Alexander Gardner, 1867-68
By the 1860s, the Plains Indians found themselves sandwiched in the middle of the country with white advancement on both sides. Rail lines cut directly through their hunting grounds–scattering the game necessary for survival. This exhibition highlights two rare bodies of work created by Alexander Gardner at this pivotal time: Across the Continent on the Kansas Pacific Railroad in 1867-68 and Scenes in the Indian Country in 1868.

The Across the Continent series was photographed first on the existing railroad line across Kansas (resulting in some of the earliest images of that state) and then along the proposed route to the Pacific Ocean. Gardner's photographs stress the benefits of railroad construction–once railroads were built, towns would follow–and suggest the possibility of successful Indian and settler coexistence.

In 1868, in an attempt to end conflict, an unprecedented gathering of tribal leaders from the Northern Plains assembled at Fort Laramie, Wyoming. For his Scenes in the Indian Country series, Gardner photographed the treaty negotiations between the government-led Indian Peace Commission and the tribes who agreed to give up land and move to reservations.

Wed, 10 am—5 pm
Thurs/Fri, 10 am—9 pm
Sat/Sun, 10 am—5 pm

Free admission

Bloch Building, Gallery L11
The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
4525 Oak Street
Kansas City, MO
Exhibit Midwest
July 26, 2014 -
March 01, 2015
The Paris of Toulouse-Lautrec: Prints and Posters
A preeminent artist of belle époque Paris, Henri de Toulouse-Lautrec (1864–1901) brought the language of the late-19th-century avant-garde to a broad public through his famous posters, prints, and illustrations for journals and magazines. A cultural nexus, he connected artists, performers, authors, intellectuals, and society figures of his day, creating a bridge between the brothels and society salons of the moment. His work allows entry into many facets of Parisian life, from politics to visual culture and the rise of popular entertainment in the form of cabarets and café-concerts. This exhibition, drawn almost exclusively from The Museum of Modern Art’s stellar collection of posters, lithographs, printed ephemera, and illustrated books, is the first MoMA exhibition in 30 years dedicated solely to Lautrec, and features over 100 examples of the best-known works created during the apex of his career.

Organized thematically, the exhibition explores five subjects that together create a portrait of Lautrec’s Paris. A section devoted to café-concerts and dance halls examines the rise of nightlife culture in France through the depiction of famous venues, including the celebrated Moulin Rouge. Another focuses on the actresses, singers, dancers, and performers who sparked the artist’s imagination and served as his muses, including Yvette Guilbert, acclaimed dancer Loie Fuller, and close friend Jane Avril. Lautrec’s sympathetic images of women are evident in a group of works that includes his landmark Elles portfolio, depicting prostitutes during nonworking hours, in quiet moments of introspection. Lautrec’s role in Paris’s artistic community is explored in a section devoted to his creative circle, highlighting designs for song sheets for the popular music that flooded Paris’s café-concerts, programs for the avant-garde theatrical productions that he attended, and his contributions to magazines and intellectual reviews. A final section looks at the pleasures of the capital, from horse racing at Longchamp and promenading on the Bois de Boulogne, to the new fad for ice skating and the enduring appeal of Paris’s culture of gastronomy.

The accompanying publication highlights the Museum’s collection of prints and posters by Lautrec, with an introductory essay on the artist and five illustrated thematic sections that explore belle époque Paris as seen through Lautrec’s eyes, by Sarah Suzuki.

The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 28 -
November 10, 2014
Printmakers of World War I
This VMFA exhibition marks the centenary of the commencement of World War I on July 28, 1914. The story of the so-called Great War is told through approximately 25 prints by renowned British and American artists such as Muirhead Bone, Kerr Eby, Childe Hassam, James McBey, and Claude Shepperson. The works depict scenes of combat in France and the Near East, life on the home front in the United States and England, and the war’s aftermath and its commemoration. All of the prints come from the Frank Raysor collection, a promised gift to the museum.

Free admission

Works on Paper Focus Gallery
Virginia Museum of Fine Arts
200 N. Blvd.
Richmond, VA
Exhibit South
July 29, 2014 -
February 15, 2015
Over Here: WWI and the Fight for the American Mind
World War I. The Great War. The War to End All Wars. The conflict that enveloped the globe from July 28, 1914, to November 11, 1918, backlit an intense home-front struggle as Americans debated their individual and collective relationship to the conflict. Should the United States be involved in the war? If so, then to what extent and in what capacity?

The vigorous—and, at times, vicious—public debate over these questions was facilitated by an unprecedented array of media and performance outlets, including such recent inventions as recorded sound and motion pictures. Throughout the period, government at all levels, in addition to private organizations and individual citizens, used these communication tools in an increasingly sophisticated manner, all in an effort to win the hearts and minds of the nation. Truly, never before in the country’s history had Americans been so widely, and energetically, courted. And never in its history had the concept of Americanism—of what it means to be an American—been so hotly contested.

Drawing from collections across The New York Public Library, Over Here: WWI and the Fight for the American Mind explores the manner in which public relations, propaganda, and mass media in its many forms were used to shape and control public opinion about the war while also noting social and political issues that continue to resonate, such as freedom of speech and the press, xenophobia, and domestic espionage.

Mon, Thu, Fri, & Sat 10am - 6pm
Tue & Wed 10am - 8pm
Sun CLOSED

Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
New York Public Library
Fifth Avenue at 42nd Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 29 -
November 14, 2014
The First Woman Graphic Novelist: Helena Bochořáková-Dittrichová
Helena Bochořáková-Dittrichová (1894–1980) was a Czech graphic artist whose 1929 novel Z mého dětství (From My Childhood) is widely acknowledged to be the first wordless novel created by a woman. Bochořáková-Dittrichová’s appealing and warm woodcut style was influenced by pioneering Belgian graphic artist Frans Masereel. This exhibition showcases five of her published novels as well as her unpublished book Malířka Na Cestách (The Artist on her Journey), which contains 52 original woodcuts about a young woman artist studying abroad, mirroring Bochořáková-Dittrichová’s own life at the beginning of her career.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

National Museum of Women in the Arts
1250 New York Ave NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
August 09 -
November 02, 2014
READ MY PINS: THE MADELEINE ALBRIGHT COLLECTION
Featuring a collection of more than 200 symbolic and historically significant pins, this exhibit explores how Secretary of State Madeleine Albright used jewelry as a diplomatic, political and social tool.

In 1997, Albright was named the first female Secretary of State and became, at that time, the highest-ranking woman in the history of the U.S. government. While serving under President Bill Clinton, first as U.S ambassador to the United Nations, and then as Secretary of State, Albright became known for wearing brooches that purposefully conveyed her views about the situation at hand. "I found that jewelry had become part of my personal diplomatic arsenal" Secretary Albright has said. "While President George H.W. Bush had been known for saying 'Read my lips,' I began urging colleagues and reporters to 'Read my pins.'"

Sparkling with Albright's wit and energy -- the collection is notable for its historic significance as well as the expressive power of jewelry and its ability to communicate through a style and language of its own. The collection is distinctive and democratic --sometimes demure and understated, sometimes outlandish and outspoken -- spanning more than a century of jewelry design and including fascinating pieces from across the globe. The works on view are chosen for their symbolic value, and while some are fine antiques, many are costume jewelry. Together the pieces in this expressive collection explore the power of jewelry to communicate through a style and language of its own.

Over the years, Secretary Albright's pins became a part of her public persona, and they chart the course of an extraordinary journey, carving out a visual path through international and cultural diplomacy. A highlight of the exhibition will be the brooch that began Secretary Albright's unusual use of pins as a tool in her diplomatic arsenal. After Saddam Hussein's government-controlled press referred to her as a serpent in 1994, then U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Albright wore a golden snake brooch pinned to her suit for her next meeting on Iraq. READ MY PINS features the famous snake brooch among many other pins with similar stories -- some associated with important world events, others gifts from international leaders or valued friends.

The exhibition also showcases a group of Americana, which is at the center of the Madeleine Albright collection. One of her most original pieces is a pin made specifically for her. The silver brooch shows the head of Lady Liberty with two watch faces for eyes, one of which is upside down -- allowing both her and her visitor to see when it is time for an appointment to end. As demonstrated in this clever work, READ MY PINS explores Albright's ongoing impact on the field of jewelry design and collecting.

Regular Hours and Admission Apply

William J. vanden Heuvel Gallery
The Franklin D. Roosevelt Presidential Library and Museum
4079 Albany Post Road
Hyde Park, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
August 22 -
December 19, 2014
As the Ink Flows: Works from the Pen of William Steig
The exhibition explores the life and career of the artist, cartoonist, and children's book author/illustrator William Steig. The exhibition highlights materials from the recent gift of over 3,000 original drawings, notebooks and scrapbooks, correspondence, books, posters, and other materials made by Jeanne Steig, his widow, to the University of Pennsylvania Libraries, supplemented with loans from his family.

Pen and ink played a central role in William Steig's life, from childhood on. Interestingly, for someone who would become an important artist and gifted cartoonist for The New Yorker magazine, it was writing, not drawing that was his first creative outlet. The exhibition explores this world of pen and ink, of writing and drawing, to show how intertwined these activities were for William Steig, who became an author as well as an artist. Unlike many artists, who are not great readers, Steig consumed books, and the ideas they contained. The more one considers the range of his work, the more one can see that his artistry is ultimately informed by language, that is, by ideas that can be thought and written, and then translated into images.

The exhibition will examine the trajectory of Steig's career, from his family background and youth through his cartoons and covers for The New Yorker and other publications, to his books of symbolic drawings and his later work, culminating in his children's books.

Mon - Fri 10am - 5pm
Wedn 10am - 8pm

Goldstein Family Gallery
Kislak Center for Special Collections, Rare Books & Manuscripts
Van Pelt Dietrich Library Center, 6th Floor
3420 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic