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February 07, 2012 -
December 31, 2015
The Life of Art: Context, Collecting, and Display
From the time an object is made until the day it enters a museum's collection, it may be displayed, used, and perceived in different ways. The Life of Art takes selected objects from the Getty Museum's galleries and encourages visitors to sit down and spend time with them, offering the opportunity to examine them closely to understand how they were made and functioned, why they were collected, and how they have been displayed.

Tue – Fri & Sun 10am – 5:30pm
Sat 10am – 9pm
Mon Closed

Free admission

The J. Paul Getty Museum
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
August 12, 2014 -
May 09, 2015
2014 Philip Hofer Prize for Collecting Books or Art
The Philip Hofer prize is awarded each year to a student at Harvard whose collection of books or works of art best exemplifies the traditions of breadth, coherence, and imagination represented by Philip Hofer, A.B. '21, L.H.D. '67, founder and first Curator of the Department of Printing and Graphic Arts in the Houghton Library and Secretary of the Fogg Art Museum. The prize, which is to encourage student interest in collecting, was established in 1987 by Melvin R. Seiden, A.B. '52, L.L.B. '55. Students competing for the prize submit an annotated list or bibliography and an essay describing the scope, contents, and goal of the collection. On exhibition are samples of this year's first prize winning collection, , A History of the 1933 Goudey Baseball Card Set: From Artwork to Copyright Registration, submitted by Benjamin Lee, Class of 2017.

Mon, Fri, & Sat 9:00am - 5:00pm
Tue, Wed, & Thu 9:00am - 7:00pm
Sun CLOSED

3rd floor display cases
Lamont Library
Harvard Yard
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
August 12, 2014 -
May 09, 2015
2014 Undergraduate Book Collecting Prize
Established in 1977, the Visiting Committee Prize for Undergraduate Book Collecting recognizes and encourages book collecting by undergraduates at Harvard. Students competing for the annual prize submit an annotated bibliography and an essay on their collecting efforts, the influence of mentors, the experience of searching for, organizing and caring for items, and the future direction of the collection. On display are samplings of the collections of this year's prize-winning entries, along with personal commentary.

Mon, Fri, & Sat 9:00am - 5:00pm
Tue, Wed, & Thu 9:00am - 7:00pm
Sun CLOSED

2nd & 3rd floor display cases
Lamont Library
Harvard Yard
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
August 20, 2014 -
July 06, 2015
The Temple of Flora: Prints by Robert John Thornton and Jim Dine
Dr. Robert John Thornton published The Temple of Flora (1799-1807), a botanical book of prints depicting
flora, information, commentary, and poetry. In 1984, American pop artist Jim Dine (born 1935) used the color mezzotints as models for his folio book “The Temple of Flora” also featuring etchings and poetry. The exhibition includes prints by Dine coupled with original Temple of Flora.
Free and open to the public.

Harnett Museum of Art
University of Richmond Museums
28 Westhampton Way
Richmond, VA
Exhibit South
August 20, 2014 -
July 06, 2015
The Temple of Flora: Prints by Robert John Thornton and Jim Dine
Dr. Robert John Thornton published The Temple of Flora (1799-1807), a botanical book of prints depicting flora, information, commentary, and poetry. In 1984, American pop artist Jim Dine (born 1935) used the color mezzotints as models for his folio book “The Temple of Flora” also featuring etchings and poetry. The exhibition includes prints by Dine coupled with original Temple of Flora.

Joel and Lila Harnett Museum of Art
28 Westhampton Way
University of Richmond
Richmond, VA
Exhibit South
November 17, 2014 -
May 08, 2015
Doris Lee: American Painter and Illustrator
Doris Emrick Lee (1905–1983) was an American painter and illustrator best known for her painting Thanksgiving, which won the prestigious Logan Prize at the Art Institute of Chicago in 1935. In her wide-ranging career, she painted murals for the United States Post Office buildings, participated in annual exhibitions at the Carnegie Institute in Washington, D.C., created commissioned work for Life magazine, and illustrated children’s books. Lee’s art was also featured on greeting cards, calendars, menus, pottery, and fabric. This exhibition showcases photographs, sketches, and objects from the Doris Lee Papers housed in the Betty Boyd Dettre Library and Research Center.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

National Museum of Women in the Arts
1250 New York Ave NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
December 08, 2014 -
May 08, 2015
Doris Lee: American Painter and Illustrator
Doris Emrick Lee (1905–1983) was an American painter and illustrator best known for her painting Thanksgiving, which won the prestigious Logan Prize at the Art Institute of Chicago in 1935. In her wide-ranging career, she painted murals for the United States Post Office buildings, participated in annual exhibitions at the Carnegie Institute in Washington, D.C., created commissioned work for Life magazine, and illustrated children’s books. Lee’s art was also featured on greeting cards, calendars, menus, pottery, and fabric. This exhibition showcases photographs, sketches, and objects from the Doris Lee Papers housed in the Betty Boyd Dettre Library and Research Center.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

National Museum of Woman in the Arts
1250 New York Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
December 12, 2014 -
September 04, 2015
Public Eye: 175 Years of Sharing Photography
Thanks to the development of new technology and social media, more photographs are created, viewed, and shared today than ever before. Public Eye, the first-ever retrospective survey of photography organized by NYPL, takes advantage of this moment to reframe the way we look at photographs from the past. What are some of the platforms and networks through which photographs have been shared? In what ways have we, as photography’s public and one of its subjects, been engaged over time? To what ends has the street served as a venue for photographic practice since its beginnings? And, of more recent concern, are we risking our privacy in pursuit of a more public photography? Ranging from photography’s official announcement in 1839 to manifestations of its current pervasiveness, this landmark exhibition, drawn entirely from the Library’s collections, explores the various ways in which photography has been shared and made public. Photography has always been social.

Free public tours of the exhibition are available at 12:30 and 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and at 3:30 p.m. on Sunday.

Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
New York Public Library
Fifth Avenue at 42nd Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
December 20, 2014 -
July 26, 2015
The Language of Xu Bing
Xu Bing’s first solo presentation in Los Angeles explores the artist’s two-decade-long career. One of the most active and influential Chinese artists living today, Xu Bing received his training in the Printmaking Department at the Central Academy of Fine Arts (CAFA) in Beijing. Book from the Sky, an installation of books and scrolls printed with more than 4,000 fake Chinese characters, captivated the burgeoning art community in China in the mid-1980s. Since then, Xu has been investigating the significance and meaning of language.

This exhibition highlights works such as the video The Character of Characters, the artist’s magnum opus and a personal account of the significance of Chinese language and characters through history, culminating with their significance to Chinese society today. The installation Square Word Calligraphy Classroom, composed of tracing books with Xu Bing’s invented calligraphy, was created to help English speakers understand the language and the art of Chinese calligraphy. The work is on view in the Boone Children's Gallery, where visitors are invited to take up a brush and practice his calligraphy.

Mon, Tue, Thu: 11am – 5pm
Wed: CLOSED
Fri: 11am – 8pm
Sat, Sun: 10am – 7pm

$15 Adults
$10 Seniors (62+) & Students with valid ID
Free Children (17 and under)
Free Members

Hammer Building, Level 2
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
5905 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
January 12 -
May 02, 2015
Starry Messengers: Signs and Science from the Skies
Throughout the ages, we have looked to the night sky in a search for meaning. Comets, meteors, eclipses, and other celestial events have been used by scientists to better understand the physical universe, by sages to predict the future, and by writers seeking inspiration. Starry Messengers brings together books and manuscripts from Houghton's collections that demonstrate how these events were understood in the early modern world.

Please join us for an exhibition opening reception on Tuesday, February 10 from 5:00-7:00 p.m. in the Edison and Newman Room.

Edison and Newman Room
Houghton Library
Harvard Yard (between Widener & Lamont libraries)
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
January 16 -
June 01, 2015
Hidden Beauty: Exploring The Aesthetics Of Medical Science
This collaborative project by a scientist and artist asks the reader to consider the aesthetics of human disease, both within and beyond the context of our preconceived social systems. Disease is a dynamically powerful force of nature that acts without regard to race, religion or culture. These forces create visually stunning patterns with a remarkable ability to evoke human emotion in isolation that differs when viewed in the context of the disease that produced the image. We see beauty in the delicate lacework of fungal hyphae invading a blood vessel, the structure of the normal cerebellum, and the desperate drive of metastasizing cancer cells. However, the appreciation of the imagery produced by disease is bittersweet; we simultaneously experience the beauty of the natural world and the pain of those living with these disease processes. Ultimately, this series of images will leave the viewer with an appreciation of visual beauty inherent within the medical sciences.

Mon - Sun 10am–5pm

The Mutter Museum
19 S. 22nd Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 20 -
August 28, 2015
The Automobile: Design Considerations and Local Manifestations
Syracuse, New York, has had a number of industrial associations. Perhaps it was first known as the “Salt City.” It was also known for being at the center of a large canal system. Over the years, Syracuse was also prominently connected with the manufacture of typewriters, shotguns, shoes, plows, carriages, automobiles, and air conditioners. This exhibition focuses upon the automobile and its local industrial manifestations, but also explores some of the automobile construction concepts represented in the Special Collection Research Center’s industrial design collections. Material related to the most famous of Syracuse’s automobile lines, the air-cooled Franklin car with its remarkably flexible and durable wooden frame, is one of the highlights of this exhibition.

Among the designers represented in our collections, Howard A. Darrin, Claude Hill, Raymond Loewy, Budd Steinhilber, and Walter Dorwin Teague are known for their contributions to the development of the automobile. For example, Howard A. Darrin was known for his designs for exotic luxury and sports cars. Claude Hill created some important concept car designs. Raymond Loewy’s photographs document a number of striking Studebaker model designs. Budd Steinhilber was a member of the design team for the revolutionary rear-engined 1948 Tucker automobile, and Walter Dorwin Teague designed for both the Ford Motor Company and the Marmon Motor Company. Some of these designers’ concepts are on view here in the form of drawings, sketches, and photographs.

Included in this exhibition are images from a photographic album from the summer of 1905 with 784 photographs chronicling an automobile tour through Europe. A curious circumstance about the album is that while some of the locations in the album are identified, including London, Cambridge, Windsor, Le Mans, Nantes, Paris, Reims, Strasbourg, Vienna, Prague, Dresden, Berlin, Seville, and Granada, there are no other names in it, and there is no information about its creators. The University Archives in the Syracuse University Libraries also contributed photographs and cartoons that captured the presence of the automobile on campus. This exhibition could not purport to touch upon all dimensions of the development of the automobile in Syracuse, but our hope is that it provides a sampling of the ways in which the automobile evolved in Syracuse and a glimpse into the innovations of some of the most significant mid-twentieth-century automobile designers prominently represented in our collections.

Reception: January 22, 2015 / 6:00 pm (Immediately following the lecture by Kevin Borg) / Sixth floor gallery / Bird Library

Special Collections Research Center Gallery
Syracuse University Libraries
222 Waverly Avenue
Syracuse, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 22 -
May 14, 2015
And The Word Is…
This exhibition explores the use of religious text in contemporary art, from the straightforward to the ironic. It includes a broad range of media and approaches. Sandow Birk (Los Angeles, CA) will display work from his American Qur’an series; Johanna Bresnick (New Haven, CT) and Michael Cloud Hirschfeld (New York City) are exhibiting a sculptural work with Hebrew and English text from Leviticus; Martin Brief (St. Louis, MO) will include painstakingly detailed text-based drawings; Stephanie Kirk (Philadelphia) documents the changing messages found on religious signs; Nicholas Kripal (Philadelphia) will install one of his word-based floor pieces; Carole P. Kunstadt (West Hurley, NY) will offer book arts-based work that draws from the Hebrew Bible; and David Stephens (Philadelphia) will display Braille-based sculptures connected to well-known Bible parables.

Monday-Friday
9:00am – 5:00pm

Opening Night Reception
Thursday, January 22, 6 – 8pm

Free admission

Gershman Gallery
401 South Broad Street (Broad & Pine Streets)
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 23 -
June 07, 2015
Lincoln Speaks: Words that Transformed a Nation
This exhibition focuses on Abraham Lincoln's mastery of language and how his words changed the course of history. Today, nearly 150 years after the end of the Civil War, he remains an exemplar of exalted leadership in a time of great crisis and people the world over continue to look to him as a standard-bearer for principled governance. Lincoln Speaks explores Lincoln as a writer and public speaker whose eloquence shaped the nation and the world, in his time and in ours.

Drawing upon the Gilder Lehrman Institute's renowned collection of American historical documents, as well as the Shapell Foundation, Harvard College Library, the Library of Congress, and the Morgan's collection of Lincoln manuscripts and letters, the exhibition is organized thematically and chronologically. It includes photographic portraits and books owned and used by Lincoln, and highlights the range of Lincoln's rhetorical powers, from the elevated language of his proclamations and great speeches to his forceful, incisive military memos and the intimate prose of personal letters to family and friends. Lincoln drew upon his powers as a writer and orator to sustain the country during its greatest crisis and to inspire Americans to embrace the ultimate purpose of the Civil War: the end of slavery. The show coincides with the 150th anniversary of the end of the Civil War and Lincoln's assassination, and assesses the scale of Lincoln's achievement, and his national and global legacy, through the power of his words.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5:00pm
Fri 10:30am - 9:00pm
Sat 10:00am - 6:00pm
Sun 11:00am - 6:00pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue (at 36th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 24 -
May 04, 2015
Samuel F. B. Morse’s “Gallery of the Louvre” and the Art of Invention
Samuel F. B. Morse, of Morse code fame, may be better known as an inventor, but he began his career as a painter. This exhibition focuses exclusively on his masterwork, Gallery of the Louvre (1831–1833), featuring great paintings from the Louvre’s collection. The six-by-nine- foot canvas depicts masterpieces by Leonardo da Vinci, Titian, Caravaggio, Rubens, and Van Dyck, among others, in a configuration deliberately fabricated by Morse. Gallery of the Louvre underwent extensive conservation before being exhibited from 2011 to 2013 at the Yale University Art Gallery, the National Gallery of Art, and the Pennsylvania Academy of the Fine Arts, during which it was the subject of scholarly investigation and dialogue, culminating in an anthology of essays due out this fall. The exhibition’s presentation at The Huntington, organized by and with support from the Terra Foundation for American Art, marks the beginning of a multi-year, nine-venue tour of the United States.

Virginia Steele Scott Galleries of American Art
Susan and Stephen Chandler Wing
The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
January 24 -
May 10, 2015
Backstage Pass: Baron Wolman and the Early Years of Rolling Stone
This exhibition allows guests to explore how photographers and editors of Rolling Stone guided the creation of the "rockstar" persona, from concert, to cover, to icon. Immortalized by writers, filmmakers, and musicians from Stephen King to Dr. Hook, the cover of Rolling Stone magazine has embodied generations of popular culture.

Contextualized in 35 framed photographs, contact sheets, and original covers, Backstage Pass presents an intimate view during a crucial period of cultural transformation in American history. Feeding the heightened political and cultural climate of the time, featured artists Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, and Frank Zappa came to represent generational ideas through music, words, and visual imagery.

Open Daily - 11am - 5pm

$10 ADULTS (18-64 years) $6 SENIORS/CHILDREN & COLLEGE STUDENTS (w/ID)
Free CHILDREN (3 & under) Free MEMBERS

Meinig Gallery: First Floor
Reading Public Museum
500 Museum Road
Reading, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 24 -
June 07, 2015
Margaret Bourke-White: From Cornell Student to Visionary Photojournalist
Before she became a world-famous photographer for Time Life, Margaret Bourke-White (1904–1971) graduated from Cornell in 1927. While on campus, she employed a second-hand Reflex camera, a gift from her mother, to capture University buildings in sunlight or shadow or snow, as seen in the selection of rare early images to the right. “It was the beauty of Cornell and of its environs,” she said in 1933, “that was the deciding factor in [my] choice of photography as a life work.” Over the next thirty years, she enjoyed returning to campus regularly to lecture and show her new work.

This exhibition provides the unusual opportunity to view the entire span of Bourke-White’s remarkable career, from the campus views she sold both to classmates and to Cornell publications, through her work in architectural and industrial photography, to the images she made as a photojournalist in the United States and overseas. Bourke-White brought to her work a polished, formal sense of composition, an intuitive understanding of the elements in a successful photo-essay, and a deeply humanitarian sensibility—combined with her own recognition that she was recording history as it happened.

In 1936, Bourke-White’s photographs of Fort Peck Dam and the nearby boomtown of Wheeler, Montana, were the cover image and lead story for the first issue of LIFE Magazine. This was only one of many “firsts” she accomplished during a remarkable run: she was the first photographer hired by Henry Luce for Fortune magazine (1929); the first Western photographer allowed into the Soviet Union (1930); and the first woman photographer for Luce’s new venture, LIFE Magazine (1936). During World War II, she was the first female war correspondent and the first woman to receive permission to work in combat zones.

In 1971, shortly after her death, Cornell’s Andrew Dickinson White Museum hosted the first comprehensive exhibition of Bourke-White’s photography. The works on view then were not vintage prints, but instead were made in 1965 from Bourke-White’s negatives with her oversight and permission. The present show incorporates a combination of vintage prints—the first prints made from a negative—and those printed in 1965 and presented to the University as a gift from Bourke-White and LIFE. It is fitting that Cornell, on its Sesquicentennial, should pay tribute to the career of an exceptional pioneer of photojournalism.

Moak, Class of 1953 & Schaenen Galleries
Johnson Museum of Art
114 Central Avenue
Ithaca, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 28 -
September 01, 2015
Bibliothecaphilia

bibliotheca
From the Greek βιβλιοθήκη, meaning library. “Traditionally, collection of books used for reading or study, or the building or room in which such a collection is kept.”

-philia
From the Greek φιλία, meaning friendship. A suffix meaning “friendly feeling toward,[…] tendency toward, […or] abnormal appetite or liking for.”

For centuries, libraries have exerted a quiet sort of gravity, pulling us in with the promise that for a while, in the hushed, book-filled corridors, we can exceed ourselves. But, in this age of eBooks and library apps, does the physical and philosophical space of the library remain relevant? And what qualities define a library? Can libraries exist digitally, or be constituted of things other than books? The six artists in Bibliothecaphilia, explore the medium and ethos of libraries: institutions straddling the public and private spheres, the escapism that libraries offer, libraries’ status as storehouses for physical books — and thus for experiences and knowledge — and the way that these objects circulate and are re-used. Participating artists include Clayton Cubitt, Jonathan Gitelson, Susan Hefuna, Meg Hitchcock, Dan Peterman, and Jena Priebe.

The exhibition coincides with a year-long initiative at Williams College (including the Williams College Museum of Art and Clark Art Institute) dedicated to books, libraries, and information. It focuses on exploring the diverse ways in which people preserve and convey ideas, creative works, data, and other forms of information. The project features a wide array of public presentations, performances, courses, and exhibitions (including at the Williams College Museum of Art and Clark Art Institute) that imagine the theme from many perspectives.

Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art
1040 Mass MoCA Way
North Adams, MA
Exhibit New England
February 01 -
June 30, 2015
Crossing the Delaware: New Jersey Women of the Book at Lafayette College
Selected works of four New Jersey women artists—MaryAnn Miller, Liz Mitchell, Maria Pisano, and Maryann Riker—are featured in a special invitational exhibit this spring in Skillman Library. On display are over fifty striking artists’ books and other works on paper created by these four accomplished artists. Although at first glance it may be difficult to find a common thread among the rich array of materials and formats that appear in these works, it is their storytelling that acts as the unifying element among all four artists. They all tell deeply felt stories about past and present histories—both personal and collective.

The work of MaryAnn Miller is inspired by her love of literature and reading the daily news. Her intensely realized works often tell stories about the treatment of women, ranging from the effects of war to the abandonment of a daughter in a convent. She also recounts how coal played a part in her family history. Liz Mitchell shares her memories and experiences through her art. She draws source materials from personal history, current events, dreams and myths. Several of her works are based on her dreams recorded in journals over a span of years. Her interest in fairytales inspired her retelling of the Grimm Brothers story of the twelve dancing princesses. Maria Pisano explores the nature of time, memory, and history. Her works record the complex layers of experiences whether she is telling a story of her own personal journey or remembering the collective trauma and loss experienced by a nation in a single day. Maryann Riker collects everyday ephemera—buttons, vintage advertisements, old photographs, ribbons, lace, jewelry—and creates colorful, whimsical books that suggest lighthearted stories, but that invariably convey thoughtful messages about gender, race, and consumerism.

Book Artists' Panel Discussion, Wednesday, March 25, 4:15 p.m., Gendebien Room, Skillman Library

Please join MaryAnn Miller, Liz Mitchell, Maria Pisano, and Maryann Riker for a lively panel on the making of artists' books from A to Z. The moderator will be Karen Guancione, another New Jersey "woman of the book," whose interdisciplinary work includes printmaking, papermaking, and the book arts. A reception will follow the panel discussion.

Skillman Library
Lafayette College
730 High Street
Easton, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 01 -
August 02, 2015
From the Library: Florentine Publishing in the Renaissance
With neither a unified state nor even a common vernacular language among the various regions of the Italian peninsula, printing presses were established in every city and in many smaller towns. The needs of the population, the disposition of the scholarly community, and the availability of source material would have all affected local book markets. Florence was undoubtedly the cultural beacon of Europe in the Renaissance—a city with a humanist tradition dating to the late thirteenth century, where much vernacular literature originated, the scientific method was cultivated, and artistic development flourished. Surprisingly the printing press, though a catalyst for spreading these new ideas throughout Europe, took longer to catch on in this city at the heart of Tuscany, a region with an insular culture and close ties to the church. When it did, the books produced there remained mostly scholarly and religious works with little embellishment or illustration until the mid-sixteenth century.

This exhibition presents a variety of books from the late fifteenth through the early seventeenth century and explores the development of publishing related to the artistic and scholarly community in Florence. With active academic organizations and a community of highly skilled artists, Florentine scholars had a unique relationship with the more prolific Venetian presses. Though never approaching the innovation of Venice, the printers of Florence gradually established their own tradition. Theoretical treatises, literary and historical works, and festival books were all popular fare in Florence and evolved over time. Especially relevant to art history are the editions of Giorgio Vasari’s Lives, which first appeared in Florence in the sixteenth century, the material published in conjunction with Michelangelo’s funeral in 1564, and theoretical works by the likes of Leon Battista Alberti and Benedetto Varchi.

10am - 5pm Monday through Friday
(this exhibition is not open on weekends)

West Ground Floor Gallery 21
National Gallery of Art
National Mall (between 3rd & 9th Streets NW)
6th Street & Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 05 -
August 15, 2015
Readers Make Their Mark: Annotated Books at the New York Society Library
The Library celebrates the opening of its new exhibition with a reception for members and their guests. It will feature remarks by co-curators Erin Schreiner, Frederic Clark, and Madeline McMahon.

OPENING RECEPTION
Wednesday, February 4, 2015 - 6:00pm
For Members & Their Guests
Members' Room
Free of Charge
Advance Registration Required

Mon & Fri 9:00am - 5:00pm
Tue, Wed, & Thu 9:00am - 8:00pm
Sat & Sun 11:00am - 5:00pm

THE NEW YORK SOCIETY LIBRARY
53 East 79th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 06 -
June 07, 2015
Hebrew Illumination in Our Time: The Art of Barbara Wolf
Hebrew Illumination in Our Time: The Art of Barbara Wolff offers startling illuminations—recent gifts to the Morgan—created by this contemporary artist. The ten folios of "You Renew the Face of the Earth" illustrate passages from Hebrew Psalm 104, a celebration of all creation, with images illuminated in silver, gold, and platinum foils. In the seventeen bifolios comprising the Rose Haggadah, Wolff, while rooted in the tradition of illustrated Haggadot, presents a modern interpretation of the texts used at the Passover Seder.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5:00pm
Fri 10:30am - 9:00pm
Sat 10:00am - 6:00pm
Sun 11:00am - 6:00pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue (at 36th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 06 -
May 03, 2015
Drawn, Cut & Layered: The Art of Werner Pfeiffer
For more than 50 years, Werner Pfeiffer (German-American, born 1937) has experimented with the multiple uses of paper as both a canvas and a structural material. Much of his work as a sculptor, printmaker and painter suggests a fascination with machines and machine-like constructions. His drawings are schematic, his dimensional works project into space claiming their own territory and his complex artist books have moving parts. He is fascinated by puzzles and contradictions, metaphors and wordplay, and this curiosity serves in turn to inspire works that are thought-provoking in themselves. A prodigious artist, Pfeiffer’s works on paper have been shown and collected internationally. The nearly 200 limited-edition works of art in this exhibition include drawings, dimensional prints, 3D collage and sculptural and experimental books.

Tue & Wed 10am – 4pm
Thu & Fri 10am – 9pm
Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun noon – 5pm
Mon - Closed

Free admission

Canaday Gallery
Toledo Museum of Art
2445 Monroe Street
Toledo, OH
Exhibit Midwest
February 07 -
May 31, 2015
(Re)Discovering the “New World”: Maps & Sea Charts from the Age of Exploration
Featuring more than 30 European-made maps and sea charts inspired by New World exploration, and published between 1511 and 1757, this exhibition presents a fascinating study in geographic and human progress, as well as a feast for the eyes. Many of the woodcuts and metal plate engravings have original hand-applied color, as color printing was not yet available.

"These ancient maps represent Renaissance-period attempts by European ateliers to edify their clientele by revealing our ‘new’ hemisphere and its approaches, as discoveries and claims came ashore from those daring enough to pack their sea bags and head for the unknown," says Jack A. Somer, who owns the collection. Somer has organized the show at the Bruce Museum along with Anne von Stuelpnagel, the Museum’s director of exhibitions.

"More than five hundred years ago, two European empires began daringly and competitively seeking the most efficient seaborne routes to the riches of Arabia and The Orient—Spain sailing west, Portugal sailing east," Somer explains. "Mapmakers back home—nearly all landlubbers happy to sit by the fire— scrambled to gather the latest explorers’ reports so they could draw up-to-date maps and sell them to the wealthy as bound atlases. Keep in mind that these atlases were massive compendia that glorified leather-filled libraries and enriched cultural reputations. Maps weren’t always just an app on your iPhone."

Mon - Closed
Tue - Sun 10am - 5pm
Doors close 1/2 hour before closing, Last admission 4:30 pm

$7.00 - Adults
$6.00 - Students (5-22 w/ valid ID)
$6.00 - Seniors (65 & up)
Free - Museum members & children under 5

Free individual admission on Tuesday.

Bruce Museum
1 Museum Drive
Greenwich, CT
Exhibit New England
February 10 -
July 06, 2015
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland
The Ransom Center celebrates 150 years of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland with an exhibition for the curious and curiouser of all ages. Learn about Lewis Carroll and the real Alice who inspired his story. See one of the few surviving copies of the first edition of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. Discover the rich array of personal and literary references that Carroll incorporated throughout Alice. Explore the surprising transformations of Alice and her story as they have traveled through time and across continents. Follow the White Rabbit's path through the exhibition, have a tea party, or watch a 1933 paper filmstrip that has been carefully treated by Ransom Center conservators. The Center's vast collections offer a new look at a story that has delighted generations and inspired artists from Salvador Dalí to Walt Disney.

Harry Ransom Center
The University of Texas at Austin
300 West 21st Street (21st & Guadalupe Streets)
Austin, TX
Exhibit Southwest
February 12 -
June 14, 2015
Vassar College Archives and Special Collections Library exhibition celebrates the 150th anniversary of the publication of Alice in Wonderland
A rabbit hole. Bizarre physical transformations. Riddles. These are some of the elements of fantasy that define Lewis Carroll’s classic story Alice in Wonderland, which turns 150 this year.

To commemorate this anniversary and participate in worldwide celebrations of the book, the Vassar College Archives and Special Collections Library is launching an exhibition, The Age of Alice: Fairy Tales, Fantasy, and Nonsense in Victorian England. The show features an early printing of Alice as well as an exploration of other works of fantasy from the same period. All of the pieces on display are from Vassar’s extensive children’s book collection.

Free and open to the public

Vassar College Libraries
Box 20, 124 Raymond Avenue
Poughkeepsie, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 14 -
May 24, 2015
The Janus Press at Sixty
The Janus Press was started in Monterey in 1954 by Claire Van Vliet with the first publication on Valentine’s Day 1955 in San Diego. This exhibition celebrates the 60th Anniversary of The Janus Press with a selection of six books from each of the six decades. The Janus Press prints limited editions of (mostly) contemporary poets with original images in paper and all the printmaking media. The press focuses on the form of the book being dictated by the content and that has led to the development of innovative book structures.

Mon - Sun 10am - 5:30pm

OPENING RECEPTION
Saturday, February 14, 2015
6pm - 9pm
The opening reception is open to the public, please RSVP.

San Francisco Center for the Book
375 Rhode Island Street (between 16th and 17th Streets)
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
February 14 -
May 01, 2015
The Most Secret Top Secret
The German Enigma Code Machines

A Special Exhibition of the most comprehensive collection in America, outside of the National Security Agency, of German Enigma code machines from World War II.

Nine different original code machines, including 1 of 3 known Enigmas with a printer; 1 of 5 known Siemen’s 10-rotor code machines made for the German High Command; and a very rare U-Boat 4-rotor Enigma, virtually unbreakable until Alan Turing’s intuitive genius and the capture of a U-Boat’s code books are on display. Visitors are able to operate an original German Army 3-rotor Enigma, as seen in “The Imitation Game.”

The exhibition includes an original Enigma code sheet from a U-Boat sunk off the East Coast of the U.S. and British code breaking sheets of the final messages of the war. Also in the exhibition: German short wave radios used by the military to transmit Enigma codes (ironically marked: “Warning: the enemy is listening”) and posters, warning that spies are listening and cautioning the Germans about the need for secrecy at all times.

SCHEDULED VISITS take place five days a week: Tuesday - Saturday. The best times to try scheduling a visit are on Wednesdays and Saturdays, although other days can be arranged. The time visitors spend is individual but our average visit is 3 ½ hours.

REQUIRED FORMS:
Release and Waiver is available at our website. It is required that you bring the printed and signed Release and Waiver when you arrive. The waiver form must be printed in advance and filled out before entering the museum.

A MINIMUM CONTRIBUTION of $25 per person is necessary to support the overhead necessary to have the museum open for visitors.

Persons younger than 18 years old need to be accompanied by a parent. The museum is not entertainment, it is serious, and we welcome any young person with that attitude.

Museum of World War II
#8 Mercer Road
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
February 16 -
May 10, 2015
Ink and Gold: Art of the Kano
Ink and Gold explores the stunning artistry of the esteemed Kano painters, the most enduring and influential school of painting in Japanese history. Established by Kano Masanobu in the fifteenth century, the lineage created and upheld standards of artistic excellence in Japan for nearly five hundred years. The exhibition presents more than 120 works of art spanning the school’s long and illustrious history with a focus on large-scale, gold leaf folding screens and sliding doors designed for residences of Japan’s ruling elite. This exhibition, which also includes ink paintings, hanging scrolls, and folding fans, is the first outside Japan—and the first anywhere since 1979—to so fully examine the Kano painters’ legacy.

Originally limited to successive generations of the Kano family, the lineage soon developed into an academy of professional artists patronized by the Tokugawa shogunate, the military rulers of Japan from 1615 to 1868. Kano painters gained prominence during a period that witnessed extensive building projects after nearly a century of civil wars, which had damaged or destroyed many temples and residences. Powerful military families rebuilt their dwellings as impressive castles and homes, which they then decorated with large-scale paintings by Kano artists. With oversize animals, figures, and landscapes set against a background of lustrous gold leaf, these works are symbolic of the ruling class’s aspirations for power and grandeur.

With the fall of the shogunate in 1868, Kano artists lost their official patrons. By the end of the century, Japan had emerged on the world stage after nearly three hundred years of self-imposed isolation. Among the ideas and influences introduced to the country were painting styles and formats from the West, which Kano-trained artists used to breathe new life into the tradition.

nk and Gold is drawn primarily from Japanese collections, with loans from US museums and contributions from the Philadelphia Museum of Art’s permanent collection. Additionally, a broad range of programs such as film screenings, family celebrations, performances, lectures, and dining events will be offered throughout the run of the exhibition.

Dorrance Special Exhibition Galleries, first floor
Philadelphia Museum of Art
2600 Benjamin Franklin Parkway
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 21 -
May 31, 2015
Burnishing the Night: Baroque to Contemporary Mezzotints from the Collection
Excelling in eerie effects and seductive textures, the late 17th-century medium of mezzotint blossomed from an amateur fascination and hobby of members of the nobility to the 18th century’s most popular reproductive printmaking method. Mezzotint engraving allowed artists to burnish soft highlights and volume into a textured copper plate that would otherwise print in a solid tone. This shading method contrasted dramatically with the standard intaglio medium, which involved either painstakingly incising engraved lines with a burin (a metal-cutting tool) or etching looser lines into a plate with acid. Ideal for nocturnal scenes, portraits, reproductions of paintings, lush landscapes, and garish anatomical and botanical studies, the versatile medium later lent itself to color printing and remains in use today.

Burnishing the Night brings together mezzotint prints, books with mezzotint illustrations, and other works on paper from the permanent collection that span the medium’s predominantly Northern European origins through its worldwide use in the 20th century. Several works in the show are by Irish mezzotint engravers, especially Thomas Frye, whose imaginative head studies will also be featured in this spring’s highly anticipated exhibition Ireland: Crossroads of Art and Design, 1690–1840. Frye’s evocative Young Man with a Candle from 1760 demonstrates the liquid effects made possible by the mezzotint medium, from the bulging, startled eyes to the dancing candlelit shadows and dripping wax. The viewer waits with bated breath along with this startled youth, enjoying the theatrical uncertainty of a ghost story, printed in velvet tones.

A complementary and concurrent installation in Gallery 208A, Printing Darkness and Light in the Dutch Republic, details how Rembrandt and other artists created their own dramatic “Dark Manner” or “Night Pieces” without the use of mezzotint.

Open daily 10:30am – 5pm
Thursday until 8pm

Free Winter Weekdays 2015
From Monday, January 5, through Tuesday, February 10, museum admission is free to Illinois residents every weekday—all day long.

Free Thursday Evenings
General admission to the Art Institute of Chicago is free to Illinois residents every Thursday from 5pm to 8pm.

Galleries 125–127
Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
February 25 -
June 07, 2015
Salt and Silver: Early Photography 1840 – 1860
This is the first exhibition in Britain devoted to salted paper prints, one of the earliest forms of photography. A uniquely British invention, unveiled by William Henry Fox Talbot in 1839, salt prints spread across the globe, creating a new visual language of the modern moment.
This revolutionary technique transformed subjects from still lifes, portraits, landscapes and scenes of daily life into images with their own specific aesthetic: a soft, luxurious effect particular to this photographic process.
The few salt prints that survive are seldom seen due to their fragility, and so this exhibition, a collaboration with the Wilson Centre for Photography, is a singular opportunity to see the rarest and best early photographs of this type in the world.

10.00–18.00 daily

Adult £12.00 (without donation £10.90)
Concession £10.50 (without donation £9.50)

Help Tate by including the voluntary donation to enable Gift Aid

No booking fees with this exhibition

Under 12s go free (up to four per parent or guardian). Family tickets available by telephone or in the gallery.

Combined tickets are available with Sculpture Victorious, and can be booked online via Sculpture Victorious.

Tate Britain
Millbank
London, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
February 27 -
September 07, 2015
The Art Books of Henri Matisse
An exhibition of art books by one of the greatest artists of the 20th century, Henri Matisse (1869-1954), opens at the Bechtler Museum of Modern Art February 27. Drawn from the Bank of America Collection, The Art Books of Henri Matisse includes 80 framed original illustrations with text from some of Matisse’s most significant books. Best known for his boldly colored paintings, Matisse created a body of work that also included drawings, prints, cut-outs and sculpture, as well as costume and stage set designs. The artist didn’t create illustrated books until his late 60s, but the same flowing lines that characterized his oils and pencil studies were carried over to the printmaking medium.

Four of Matisse’s art books are featured in the exhibition, including Jazz, one of the most celebrated artists’ books in the history of modern art. It features one of Matisse’s most widely reproduced images – the iconic illustration of Icarus as a languid black figure with a red circle at his heart, plunging downwards against a royal blue night sky, surrounded by yellow stars. In addition to the core group of Matisse works, a limited number of artists’ books from the Bechtler Museum of Modern Art’s permanent collection will also be on view.

Mon 10am - 5pm
Tue Closed
Wed 10am - 5pm
Thu 10am - 5pm
Fri 10am - 5pm
Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 12pm - 5pm

Fourth-Floor Gallery
Bechtler Museum of Modern Art
420 South Tryon Street
Charlotte, NC
Exhibit South
February 27 -
May 31, 2015
The Complete Audubon: THE BIRDS OF AMERICA
The Birds of America, by John James Audubon, contains some of the most famous and spectacular prints ever made. The images have been reproduced countless times, and Audubon’s name has become synonymous with antique bird prints and modern environmental conservation. The beauty of the original prints, however, far exceeds the reproductions.

In 1820 John James Audubon began his masterpiece, The Birds of America. He devoted all his time to painting birds, with the intent of printing as engravings life-size portraits of all the kinds of birds to be found in the United States. Unable to secure financial backing in America, Audubon went to Europe in 1826. There he found both subscribers and engravers for the project. The first prints were made that same year.

The Birds of America consists of 435 prints of 457 species, one hybrid and five unidentified birds. Life-size, black and white engravings were made based on Audubon’s original drawings (most now at the New York Historical Society), and hand water-colored. The prints were issued in sets of five, depicting one large, two medium and two small birds. Eighty-seven sets of five were completed between 1826 and 1838. Fewer than 175 folios of all 435 prints were completed. Few than 100 complete sets remain.

For the first time, HistoryMiami will display the entire Elephant Folio in one exhibition. This is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to see all 435 prints in one blockbuster exhibition.

The prints will be arranged as John James Audubon intended them to be seen, in their original order, in the sets of five he selected for their aesthetic appeal. The show will open with print 1, the Wild Turkey, and work its way to the final set of five prints—including the spectacular American Flamingo (print 431) and the improbable American Dipper (print 435).

In addition to the complete first edition of The Birds of America, the second edition will be shown. The seven volumes of the Octavo Edition will be displayed in cases, each open to one of the lithographs. Every few days, a curator will turn the pages, so that by exhibition’s end, all 500 lithographs will have been shown.

Other rare books and prints may also be displayed, with the final selection to be made in the near future.

Monday - Saturday, 10am to 5pm
Sunday, Noon to 5pm

HistoryMiami members are always admitted to the Museum for free except during special events.

Adults $8
Seniors and Students with ID $7
Children (6-12) $5
Children under 6 FREE
Archives & Research Center Pass $8

HistoryMiami
Miami-Dade Cultural Center
101 West Flagler Street
Miami, FL
Exhibit South
February 28 -
May 17, 2015
Machine Age Modernism: Prints from the David Cowin Collection
Machine Age Modernism, a special presentation of prints from the Daniel Cowin Collection, captures the tumultuous aesthetic and political climate of the years before, during, and after World Wars I and II in Britain. Today known as the Machine Age, this was an era that embraced industry and mechanization. New modes of communication and transportation infused with the aura of speed and efficiency—radios, trains, automobiles, airplanes—transformed the landscape of the country.

This exhibition features a wide range of vanguard imagery produced during the period, including themes such as cityscapes, war, industrial technology, rural farming, sport, and leisure activity. During World War I, two British printmakers, Edward Wadsworth and C. R. W. Nevinson, depicted Britain’s military efforts, portraying soldiers at the front, war ships, and manufacturing projects in support of the war effort. In the following decades, another group of artists began to explore their changing world with a new medium, the linocut. Students at the progressive Grosvenor School of Modern Art in London learned to make prints from common linoleum flooring. Sybil Andrews, Claude Flight, Lill Tschudi, and others made technically experimental prints whose vibrant colors and geometric forms bridged abstraction and representation. They chose to embrace craft-like execution that encouraged simplicity. The works featured in this exhibition are filled with the energy and excitement of the Machine Age and exemplify how artists found inspiration in the modern world.

Tue - Sun 10am - 5pm

$20 Admission
Always free for members, children under 18, and students with a valid ID

The Clark Art Institute
225 South Street
Williamstown, MA
Exhibit New England
March 01, 2015 -
January 03, 2016
A Colorful Folk: Pennsylvania Germans & the Art of Everyday Life
This comprehensive exhibition explores the unique world of the Pennsylvania Germans and their colorful folk art, including decorated manuscripts (fraktur), textiles, furniture, metalwork, and pottery. Embellished with hearts, flowers, birds, and other traditional motifs, these objects reveal a love of color, design, and whimsy. Most are functional, but others were made “just for nice” and attest to the Pennsylvania Germans’ penchant for decorating virtually everything—from a tiny pincushion to the side of a barn.

A Colorful Folk sheds new light on Pennsylvania German folk art and presents more than 125 objects—many never before exhibited or published. Highlights include rare and important examples of fraktur, ranging from elaborate birth and baptismal certificates (made primarily by members of the German Lutheran and Reformed faiths) to an extraordinary religious text made by Mennonite schoolmaster Andreas Kolb. A painted chest decorated in 1783 by fraktur artist Henrich Otto with floral motifs and a pair of camels will also be displayed. Textiles are also prominently featured, including dazzling examples of needlework, quilted objects, and clothing such as an embroidered wedding handkerchief and apron from Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The tools and techniques used by fraktur artists will also be explored in addition to issues of authenticity, forgery, and revivals.

Most objects in the exhibition are drawn from Winterthur’s permanent collection, which now includes the fraktur and textile collection of the late Pastor Frederick S. Weiser, a legendary scholar and collector of Pennsylvania German folk art. More than a dozen private collectors and institutions also loaned important works of art.

An illustrated, 64-page catalogue will accompany the exhibition, presenting new scholarship and many never-before-published objects.

A related conference will be held March 5–8, 2015.

Related exhibitions will be on view at the Philadelphia Museum of Art from February 1–April 26, 2015 and the Free Library of Philadelphia from March 2–July 16, 2015.

Winterthur is closed to the public for our annual seasonal closing but will reopen on March 1, 2015, for the start of our spring season. Members continue to have grounds and garden access while we are closed, dawn to dusk, every day. Please show your membership card at the guard stand at the front gate.

Tuesday–Sunday, 10:00 am–5:00 pm
Last house tour tickets sold at 3:15 pm. Museum Store and Bookstore open Tuesday–Sunday, 10:00 am–5:30 pm.

Closed Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day

Library
Monday–Friday, 8:30 am–4:30 pm
Closed holidays

Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library
5105 Kennett Pike (Route 52)
Winterthur, DE
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 01 -
June 30, 2015
Chihuly Drawings
Museum of Glass is proud to present Chihuly Drawings. This new exhibition, organized across mediums—graphite, charcoal, and acrylic—will show work that directly represents the energy behind Dale Chihuly’s artistic process. He describes this energy as “spontaneous, fast, immediate,” and this thirty-five- year survey of over 180 drawings conveys this immediacy as never seen before. The excitement of Chihuly’s two- dimensional work is in its unpredictability and organic expressiveness—the same elements that distinguish the artist’s signature work in glass.

Regarded in the art world as someone who has transcended the craft medium, the drawings show Chihuly’s evolution and range as an artist. Guest Curator Barry Rosen worked extensively with Chihuly to select the pieces for this exhibition.

Chihuly Drawings will be accompanied by an audio tour accessible to visitors with smartphones through the STQRY app, as well as docent-led tours of the exhibition and the Chihuly artwork in the Tacoma Museum District including the Chihuly Bridge of Glass.

Museum of Glass
1801 Dock Street
Tacoma, WA
Exhibit West
March 02 -
June 12, 2015
In the Library: The Robert L. Feller and Ruth M. Johnston Feller Collection
Dr. Robert Feller is a giant in the field of conservation science. His work helped to define the field, contributing to our knowledge of varnishes, color, the damaging effects of light exposure, and polymer and paper degradation. Publishing over 130 articles on these topics and more, Feller’s focus was always on the practical application of scientific methods to the work of conservators and included the testing and introduction of Acryloid B-72 to the field. Feller was named the first technical advisor for conservation and curatorial activities for the National Gallery of Art in 1950, and in 1976 he became the founding director of the Research Center on the Materials of the Artist and Conservator at Carnegie Mellon University. He has been recognized with awards from numerous conservation and scientific organizations, and the lifetime achievement award presented by the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works is named for him.

What was less known until recent years is that Feller was also a bibliophile. He and his wife Ruth M. Johnston Feller amassed a collection of over 2,500 books over more than 50 years. The collection focused on the science and technology of color; history and manufacture of paints, varnishes and textiles; and treatises on painting, printmaking and sculpture. In 2013 he donated this entire collection and ancillary material to the National Gallery of Art Library in his name and the name of his late wife. Over 200 of the books in this collection are rare volumes from the seventeenth, eighteenth and nineteenth century and add to already strong holdings in these areas making the National Gallery one of the major repositories for scholars researching these topics. Highlights of this exhibition include his notebook on samples taken in Florence where he worked with conservators responding to the flood of 1966, several examples of hand painted color samples, and series of several editions of important artist manuals and instruction books.

10am - 5pm Monday through Friday
(this exhibition is not open on weekends)

East Building Study Center
National Gallery of Art
National Mall (between 3rd & 9th Streets NW)
6th Street & Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 05 -
June 07, 2015
PAST FUTURES: Science Fiction, Space Travel, and Postwar Art of the Americas
This groundbreaking exhibition explores the impact of the Space Race, science fiction, and the explosive growth of Cold War-era technological innovation on avant-garde artists of the Americas from the 1940s to the 1970s. Past Futures investigates how artists from the United States and several Latin American countries interpreted notions of conquest, discovery, and crossing into new territories—both terrestrial and celestial.

Programming

March 4, 2015 | 5:30 p.m. | BCMA
Members’ Preview: Past Futures: Science Fiction, Space Travel, and Postwar Art of the Americas

Sarah Montross, Andrew W. Mellon post-doctoral curatorial fellow and curator of the groundbreaking exhibition, Past Futures: Science Fiction, Space Travel, and Postwar Art of the Americas, will provide a preview tour of the exhibition exclusively for Museum members. Refreshments will be served following the tour. RSVPs are requested, but not required.


March 5, 2015| 6:30 p.m. | BCMA
Music at the Museum: “Sebastian Bach to 2001: A Space Odyssey”

George Lopez, Beckwith Artist-in-Residence, presents an evening of “Futurist music” and close encounters with the “alien” in the history of musical evolution. Presented in conjunction with Past Futures: Science Fiction, Space Travel, and Postwar Art of the Americas. This event is free but tickets are required as seating is limited. Free tickets are required as seating is limited. Tickets available at the Museum Shop beginning January 19, 2015.


March 26, 2015 | 4:30 p.m. | Kresge Auditorium, Visual Arts Center
“Latitude 0’08791: Latin American Artists and Science Fiction”

This keynote lecture by Gabriel Pérez-Barreiro, Ph.D., director of the Cisneros Foundation, will explore the ways in which various artists from Latin America used science and space travel as metaphors for expressing present day realities and imagined futures. Presented in conjunction with the exhibition Past Futures: Science Fiction, Space Travel, and Postwar Art of the Americas. RSVPs are requested, but not required.


March 26, 2015 | 5:30 p.m. to 7:00 p.m. | BCMA
Spring Open House at the Bowdoin College Museum of Art

Celebrate spring and new exhibitions at the Museum of Art, especially Past Futures: Science Fiction, Space Travel, and Postwar Art of the Americas.

March 31, 2015 | 7:00 p.m. | Kresge Auditorium, Visual Arts Center
Film Screening: “Nostalgia for the Light”

In this enthralling and award-winning documentary, Chilean master director Patricio Guzmán explores how astronomical observations of distant galaxies, the deep past of pre-Columbian archaeology, and the remnants of Chile’s painful political history converge in the Atacama desert, the world’s driest region. Followed by a discussion with Allen Wells, Roger Howell, Jr. professor of history, Sarah Childress, visiting assistant professor of cinema studies, and Sarah Montross, Andrew W. Mellon post-doctoral curatorial fellow. RSVPs are requested, but not required.

April 8, 2015 | 4:30 p.m. | BCMA
Gallery Conversation: Past Futures: Science Fiction, Space Travel, and Postwar Art of the Americas
Arielle Saiber, associate professor, romance languages and Sarah Montross, Andrew W. Mellon post-doctoral curatorial fellow discuss various aspects of the exhibition, Past Futures: Science Fiction, Space Travel, and Postwar Art of the Americas.

April 30, 2015 | 4:30–6:30 p.m | Kresge Auditorium, Visual Arts Center
Artist's Lecture by Saya Woolfalk
New York-based artist Saya Woolfalk will deliver an artist's talk in connection with the exhibition "Past Futures: Science Fiction, Space Travel, and Postwar Art of the Americas."

Bernard and Barbro Osher Gallery
Halford Gallery
Focus Gallery
Center Gallery
Bowdoin College Museum of Art
9400 College Station
Brunswick, ME
Exhibit New England
March 05 -
June 02, 2015
250 Years of Blackstone’s Commentaries
This year is the 250th anniversary of the publication of Sir William Blackstone’s Commentaries on the Laws of England, the single most influential book in the history of Anglo-American law. The Yale Law Library, home to the world’s largest collection of Blackstone’s works, is marking the anniversary with an exhibition, “250 Years of Blackstone’s Commentaries.”

More than 40 items, all from the Yale Law Library’s collection, depict the origins of the Commentaries, its remarkable success as a textbook, and its impact on both legal and popular culture. The items include a volume annotated by one of Blackstone’s students, a legal treatise with Blackstone’s own handwritten marginalia, the first English editions of the Commentaries, early Irish and American pirated editions, abridgments, teaching aids, student manuscripts, critiques, translations (into French, German, Italian, and Chinese), and a 1963 liquor advertisement.

The exhibition is curated by Wilfrid Prest and Michael Widener. Prest, Professor Emeritus of History and Law at the University of Adelaide, is the author of William Blackstone: Law and Letters in the Eighteenth Century (Oxford University Press, 2008), the definitive biography of Blackstone, and numerous other works on Blackstone. Widener is the Rare Book Librarian at the Lillian Goldman Law Library, Yale Law School, and is on the faculty of the Rare Book School, University of Virginia.

In conjunction with the exhibition, the Yale Law Library will host a talk on April 17 by Cristina Martinez of Carleton University, who contributed “Blackstone as Draughtsman: Picturing the Law” to the collection edited by Prest, Re-Interpreting Blackstone’s Commentaries (2014). Her talk will be accompanied by Mark Weiner’s video, “Blackstone Goes Hollywood,” which includes an interview with Prest.

The exhibition will travel to London, where it will be on view September through November 2015 at the library of the Honourable Society of the Middle Temple, which was Blackstone’s Inn of Court. From December 2015 to February 2016 it will be at the Sir John Salmond Law Library, University of Adelaide.

Rare Book Exhibition Gallery
Level L2, Lillian Goldman Law Library
Yale Law School
127 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
March 07 -
August 16, 2015
Warhol by the Book
Andy Warhol lived and breathed books. From his student days in the 1940s to his death in 1987, Warhol experimented wildly with form and content, turning traditional notions of media and authorship on their heads. He co-produced a satirical cookbook mocking fashionable French recipes; held coloring parties for crowdsourcing his own promotional books; and designed a pop-up “children’s book for hipsters” featuring sound recordings, holograms, and a do-it-yourself nose job.

Warhol by the Book is organized by The Andy Warhol Museum, one of four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh. The first US exhibition to focus on Warhol’s book work, it features more than 400 objects including unique and unpublished materials, and highlights WCMA’s important holdings given by Richard F. Holmes ’46.

The exhibition debuts at WCMA and will travel to the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh where it will be on view from October 9, 2015-January 10, 2016.

Celebrate the Opening
Friday, Mar 6, 6pm
Warhol & the Stuff of Books, the first in a series of conversations, with drinks and mingling to follow.

Free & open to the public

Williams College Museum of Art
15 Lawrence Hall Drive, Suite 2
Williamstown, MA
Exhibit New England
March 13 -
September 01, 2015
Magna Carta: Law, Liberty, Legacy
To mark the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta we are holding a once-in-a-lifetime exhibition - book now!

Foundation of democracy or rallying cry for modern rights? One of the world’s most famous documents, Magna Carta has inspired some of today’s fundamental liberties. Yet it started as a practical solution to a political crisis 800 years ago.

Since 1215, Magna Carta has evolved from a political agreement to an international symbol of freedom. Uncover the story of how its power has been used – and abused – from its genesis through to today’s popular culture, in the largest exhibition ever staged about this world-famous document.

Explore centuries of dramatic history, from King John, medieval battles, revolution, wars, empire and the struggle for the right to vote, right up to today’s satirical commentaries Together, for this once-in-a-lifetime moment, are the iconic documents and artefacts that tell the story of Magna Carta: stunning manuscripts, paintings, statues, royal relics and two of the four original 1215 copies of Magna Carta, as well as Jefferson’s handwritten copy of the Declaration of Independence and one of the original copies of the US Bill of Rights on display in the UK for the first time.

The exhibition will be at the heart of a wider Magna Carta programme at the Library, with a series of public events, a conference, a learning programme and an online legacy for Magna Carta in 2015 and beyond. British artist Cornelia Parker has been specially commissioned to create a new artwork, which will be unveiled at the British Library on 15 May 2015 and remain on display until 24 July.


Magna Carta learning programme

To accompany the exhibition, we are offering a programme of student workshops and teacher conferences to support the delivery of History at Key Stages 2-5 and Citizenship at Key Stages 3-5. We are also encouraging schools to participate in a project to debate students’ rights and responsibilities in the digital space.

PACCAR Gallery
The British Library
96 Euston Road
London, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
March 14 -
June 14, 2015
Tall Tales and Short Tales: The Art of Uri Shulevitz
The Carle is pleased to present Tall Tales and Short Tales: The Art of Uri Shulevitz, a retrospective of the acknowledged master in celebration of his 80th year. Organized by Curator Emeritus, Nick Clark, the exhibition will comprise approximately 90 works surveying Shulevitz’s career as a picture-book artist and will include a selection of his independent art. Shulevitz garnered the Caldecott medal for his Fool of the World and the Flying Ship in 1969 and won Caldecott honors in 1979, 1999, and 2009—most recently for his How I Learned Geography, a poignant memoir of the trials of his youth and how a map fueled his curiosity and imagination. Working in a wide variety of media, the artist demonstrates remarkable versatility as he interprets an equally wide range of literature. An illustrated catalogue with an essay by Clark accompanies the exhibition.

Tue. – Fri. 10am – 4pm
Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

The Eric Carle Museum
of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
March 19 -
August 23, 2015
Ships, Clocks & Stars: The Quest for Longitude
For centuries, longitude (east-west position) was a matter of life and death at sea. Ships that went off course had no way to re-discover their longitude. With no known location, they might smash into underwater obstacles or be forever lost at sea.

Ships, Clocks & Stars: The Quest for Longitude, produced by the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, England, celebrates the 300th anniversary of the British Longitude Act of 1714, which offered a huge reward for any practical way to determine longitude at sea. The longitude problem was so difficult that—despite the reward—it took five decades to solve it.

Through extraordinary, historic materials—many from the collection of the National Maritime Museum—the exhibition tells the story of the clockmakers, astronomers, naval officers, and others who pursued the long "quest for longitude" to ultimate success.

Among its highlights are clockmaker John Harrison's H4 marine timekeeper, the culmination of his life's work; astronomical tables developed by Nevil Maskelyne, the Astronomer Royal; paintings from Captain Cook's Pacific voyages; and more.

Digital displays throughout the exhibition bring key longitude concepts and materials to light. For those seeking additional activities, try our related Family Programs or come to the "Ships, Clocks, and Stars" concerts by the Folger Consort.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm - 5pm

Free admission

Great Hall
Folger Shakespeare Library
201 East Capitol Street SE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 20 -
October 11, 2015
Painting Paradise: The Art of the Garden
Whether a sacred sanctuary, a place for scientific study, a haven for the solitary thinker or a space for pure enjoyment and delight, gardens are where man and nature meet.

Painting Paradise: The Art of the Garden reveals the way in which gardens have been celebrated in art across four centuries.

Bringing together paintings, botanical studies, drawings, books, manuscripts and decorative arts, the exhibition explores the changing character of the garden from the 16th to the early 20th century. It includes works by Leonardo da Vinci, Maria Sibylla Merian and Carl Fabergé, and some of the earliest and rarest surviving depictions of gardens and plants.

Open daily, 10:00-17:30
Last admission 16:30

Admission prices
Adult £10.00
Concessions £9.20
Under 17/Disabled £5.20
Under 5 Free

The Queen's Gallery
Buckingham Palace
London, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
March 21 -
October 12, 2015
The Civil War and the Making of Modern Washington
Washington, D.C. underwent remarkable changes, both physically and politically, as a result of the American Civil War. The Civil War and the Making of Modern Washington will examine the city’s transformations from the beginning of the war to Reconstruction through maps, prints, and illustrations of the federal buildings, barracks, hospitals, hotels, and markets constructed to accommodate a ballooning population. The exhibition will also explore Washington’s role as a laboratory for social and political changes during this transformative period in American history.

The George Washington University Museum
The Textile Museum
701 21st Street, NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 21 -
October 12, 2015
Seat of Empire: Planning Washington, 1790–1801
Washington, D.C. was the result of political compromise and artistic imagination. In 1792, George Washington charged French-born architect Pierre “Peter” Charles L’Enfant with a momentous task: to envision the capital of a new nation from a swath of private properties and plantations at the confluence of two rivers. Seat of Empire: Planning Washington, 1790–1801 will present historical maps and related images that tell the story of this early experiment in urban design that shaped the landscape of our nation’s capital.

The George Washington University Museum
The Textile Museum
701 21st Street, NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 21 -
June 14, 2015
J.C. Leyendecker and The Saturday Evening Post
Admired by Norman Rockwell as a master in the field, Joseph Christian Leyendecker (1874 –1951) was one of the preeminent American illustrators of the early twentieth century. Often remembered for his beautifully conceived posters and advertisements, particularly those featuring The Arrow Collar Man, he also created 322 covers for The Saturday Evening Post—one more than Rockwell’s 321. This special exhibition features each of J.C. Leyendecker’s legendary Post cover tearsheets. Gifted to the Norman Rockwell Museum by William Hargreaves, they are testament to the artist’s exceptional vision, dedication, and skill. Leyendecker’s Post covers reflect the social and cultural history of his times, featuring such memorable characters as his popular New Year’s Baby, Santa Claus, and the stylish men and women who became his hallmark. A selection of original paintings by the artist will also be on view.

Nov – Apr: open daily:
Weekdays: 10am - 4pm
Weekends & holidays: 10am - 5pm

May – Oct & holidays:
open daily: 10am – 5pm

Members FREE
Adults $17.50
Seniors (65+) $16.00
College students with ID $10.00
Children/teens 6 — 18 $5.00
Children 5 and under FREE

Norman Rockwell Museum
9 Route 183
Stockbridge, MA
Exhibit New England
March 26 -
June 28, 2015
Bound to Be Held: A Book Show
Bound to Be Held: A Book Show will celebrate the book as object. Josh Greene, a San Francisco artist who creates social interactions, turns the Swig Gallery into a place where both celebrities and private individuals publically present books that have been important to their lives, and shared readings take place over the run of the show. The exhibition, in two parts (Read by Famous and The Library of Particular Significance), gently coerces the visitor to think about how we interact with one another in the museum space.

Monday 11am–5pm
Tuesday 11am–5pm
Wednesday Closed
Thursday 11am–8pm
Friday 11am–5pm
Saturday 11am–5pm
Sunday 11am–5pm

The Museum is closed the first day of Passover, July 4, the first day of Rosh Hashanah, Yom Kippur, Thanksgiving, and New Year's Day.

Adults $12
Seniors (65 years & older) $10
Students $10
Ages 18 & Under Free
Members Free
Thursdays After 5pm $5
Discounts for Groups of 10 or more

Contemporary Jewish Museum
736 Mission Street
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
March 26 -
May 23, 2015
Victorian Connections
The Literary and Artistic Circles of William and Helen Allingham from the Collections of Grolier Club Members

The Grolier Club invites you to step back in time to the world of the Victorians.

The Anglo-Irish poet William Allingham (1824–1889) was a fascinating, if now little remembered, man of letters. A recognized critic and editor, a compulsive letter writer, and the keeper of one of the great literary diaries of the nineteenth century, Allingham was referred to by Yeats as “my master in Irish verse.” His books included two which remain famous (and collectible) for their illustrations—The Music-Master (1855), the first important Pre-Raphaelite book, with wood-engravings by John Everett Millais, Arthur Hughes, and D. G. Rossetti; and In Fairyland (1870), a masterpiece of Victorian color printing illustrated by Richard Doyle.

Allingham’s wife Helen (1848–1926) more than matched her husband in talent. One of the most successful women artists of the time, she produced the illustrations to Thomas Hardy’s Far from the Madding Crowd (Hardy was so impressed he wished to marry her!) and went on to become famous for her delicate watercolors of the English countryside. This remarkable couple knew, singly and together, just about everyone in Victorian arts and letters—from Charles Dickens, Robert and Elizabeth Barrett Browning, and George Eliot to Kate Greenaway, Thomas and Jane Welsh Carlyle, Alfred Tennyson, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Nathaniel Hawthorne, and all the artists and writers associated with the Pre-Raphaelites.

This exhibition, drawn entirely from the collections of Grolier Club members, is the first in the United States be devoted to the two Allinghams. It features their own work (some of it collaborative) and extends to represent, through association copies, manuscripts, and portraits, the Allinghams’ circles of friends and associates.

Most of the 100 items on display have never been shown in public before. Highlights include William Allingham’s commonplace book (containing a transcription of the first letter from D. G. Rossetti to Robert Browning) and his copies of Shelley and Whitman; the baby book for the Allinghams’ son, Gerald, with unpublished on-the-spot accounts of Tennyson, Carlyle, and George Eliot; Mark Twain’s annotated copy of William Allingham’s 1907 Diary; D. G. Rossetti’s original design for Allingham’s Day and Night Songs; watercolors and a sketchbook by Helen Allingham; rare photographs by Julia Margaret Cameron and Lewis Carroll; and drawings by Kate Greenaway, Edward Burne-Jones, and John Butler Yeats.

Second Floor Gallery
The Grolier Club
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 26 -
May 30, 2015
TRUE MONOTYPES
International Print Center New York announces the exhibition True Monotypes in our gallery at 508 West 26th Street in Chelsea- continuing our 15th Anniversary programming. True Monotypes will explore the world of monotypes; both emerging and established artists will be represented.

The following artists will be included:
Rita Ackermann, Chuck Arnoldi, Romare Bearden, Cecily Brown, Gregory Crane, Paul DeRuvo, Valentina DuBasky, Joellyn Duesberry, Carroll Dunham, Mary Frank, Lawrence Gipe, Sue Heatley, Jasper Johns, Jane Kent, Joyce Kozloff, Maya Lin, Judith Linhares, Eddie Martinez, Michael Mazur, Kate McCrickard, James Nares, Anne Neely, John Newman, Elizabeth Peyton, Matt Phillips, Susan Rothenberg, Sara Sanders, Dana Schutz, Richard Segalman, Stuart Shils, Steven Sorman, David Storey, Philip Taaffe, Donald Traver, Mary Jo Vath, Chuck Webster, William Weege, Christopher Wool, and Lisa Yuskavage.

International Print Center New York
508 West 26th Street, Room 5A
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 26 -
October 08, 2015
Women in Cartography: Celebrating 400 Years of Unsung Contributions to the Mapping World
This exhibition recognizes and celebrates the long overlooked role of women in the world of mapping; bringing their stories, accomplishments, and most importantly their maps to light. Curated by Alice Hudson, former Chief of the Map Division at the New York Public Library, Women in Cartography showcases the works of better-known women cartographers such as Marie Tharp, who, in partnership with Bruce Heezen, created the first scientific map of the entire ocean floor, and, Agnes Sinclair Holbrook who created the Hull-House maps, statistical cartographic presentations of social data from the immigrant rich Near West Side neighborhoods of Chicago.

Join us in celebrating these remarkable women and their maps, dating from Coletta van den Keere’s engraved portrait of Jodocus Hondius ca. 1613 to Claire Kiedrowski’s modern GIS and LiDAR work for Kappa Mapping in Maine.

Tue 10am – 4pm
Wed 10am – 4pm
Thu 10am – 8pm
Sat 10am - 2pm

Free and open to the public

Osher Map Library
Portland Campus
University of Southern Maine
314 Forest Avenue
Portland, ME
Exhibit New England
April 03 -
August 23, 2015
Basquiat: The Unknown Notebooks
Brooklyn-born artist Jean-Michel Basquiat filled numerous notebooks with poetry fragments, word play, sketches, and personal observations ranging from street life and popular culture to themes of race, class, and world history. The first major exhibition of the artist's notebooks, Basquiat: The Unknown Notebooks features 160 pages of these rarely seen documents, along with related works on paper and large-scale paintings.

A self-taught artist with encyclopedic and cross-cultural interests, Basquiat was influenced by comics, advertising, children's sketches, Pop art, hip-hop, politics, and everyday life. Basquiat: The Unknown Notebooks emphasizes the distinct interplay of text and images in Basquiat’s art, providing unprecedented insight into the importance of writing in the artist’s process. The notebook pages on display contain early renderings of iconic imagery—teepees, crowns, skeleton-like figures, and grimacing faces—that also appear throughout his large-scale works, as well as an early drawing related to his series of works titled Famous Negro Athletes.

Wed, 11am – 6pm
Thu, 11am – 10pm
Fri – Sun, 11am – 6pm

Morris A. and Meyer Schapiro Wing, 4th Floor
Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway
Brooklyn, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 04 -
July 21, 2015
Spreading Devotion: Japanese and European Religious Prints
Both in the East and in the West, religious images and texts were made readily accessible and understandable to wider audiences through the medium of print. In East Asia, religious instruction grew hand in hand with printing from the eighth century on; illustrated Buddhist sutra texts still survive from these early days. In Europe, it was not until the 1490s that the first book was printed in metal movable type, but notably that book was the Gutenberg Bible. This exhibition, a first-of-its-kind collaboration between the departments of Prints and Drawings and Asian Art, brings together works from both collections to explore the rich printed traditions
that were fostered by devotional practices.

Beyond the Gutenberg Bible, printing revolutionized Western religious customs, with broadsides and pamphlets flourishing by the thousands. Even illiterate audiences understood didactic images, and woodblocks were printed cheaply alongside reusable metal type. Collectible prints of haloed patron saints could be acquired at pilgrimage sites and devoutly touched to the saint’s remains, or assembled into wall decorations structured like altarpieces. A panoramic woodcut of the city of Jerusalem included in the exhibition is the culminating illustration of a 1486 book about pilgrimage to the Holy Land that allowed the armchair reader a sense of being physically present in far-off places mentioned in the Bible.

In Japan, prints were used in a parallel fashion to spread Buddhist teachings. Among the works featured in the exhibition are one of a million small eighth-century wood pagodas containing a printed prayer for peace, a set of large-scale woodblock printed and hand-painted images of deities for use in temple ceremonies, and examples of charms acquired by pilgrims at various temple sites. The latter exemplifies how Christianity and Buddhism brought about similar social practices, despite their many differences in thought.

Fittingly this coming-together of Eastern and Western prints is presented in the Clarence Buckingham Gallery for Japanese Prints. One of the museum’s earliest and most important donors, Buckingham collected both Old Master and Japanese prints, and examples of each are on display in this unique presentation.

Open daily 10:30am – 5pm
Thursday until 8pm

Free Winter Weekdays 2015
From Monday, January 5, through Tuesday, February 10, museum admission is free to Illinois residents every weekday—all day long.

Free Thursday Evenings
General admission to the Art Institute of Chicago is free to Illinois residents every Thursday from 5pm to 8pm.

Gallery 107
Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
April 07 -
August 30, 2015
The Art of Eric Carle: Bugs, Beetles, and Butterflies
As a child, Eric Carle became very interested in small animals, a curiosity sparked by his father, who would take him on walks in the woods and fields, exploring the tiny creatures that lived there. In Eric’s own words, “I remember the excitement of lifting stones or peeling back the bark of dead trees to discover the living things that crawled, crept, and scurried about there.” In Bugs, Beetles, and Butterflies, The Carle celebrates the wings, stings, and crawling things that have appeared throughout his work, ranging from allergy tab advertisements he created in the late 1960s to familiar picture book favorites including The Very Hungry Caterpillar and The Grouchy Ladybug.

Tue. – Fri. 10am – 4pm
Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

The Eric Carle Museum
of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
April 08 -
July 26, 2015
The Contained Narrative: Defining the Contemporary Artist’s Book
At the most fundamental level, a book is a contained narrative. The container, that which holds the content, may be two covers connected by a spine on a traditional codex, a wrapper around a deck of cards, a box holding loose elements, a digital device, or even the walls of a room. In each of these permutations, the message of the artist, the narrative, is expressed within a finite space.

Within this context, the term “narrative” refers to content expressed sequentially. Much like films, books are time-based experiences. As readers, we are manipulated by the artist who controls pacing, recognition, associations, and comprehension through a multitude of methods. Images may be repeated, page configurations may change, text may be obscured, information may be hidden and slowly revealed, and we may be forced to physically engage with a work beyond the simple act of turning a page. In all cases, this intimate relationship between the artist and the reader amplifies the communicative power of this unique art form.

Using an expansive definition of “book” is essential when examining and discussing contemporary artists’ books. As a multidisciplinary and interactive art form, books continue to evolve as artists challenge formal conventions and explore new methods of communication. This is not to say that all book artists have abandoned tradition. The book arts ¬- printing, binding, papermaking, typography and graphic design – continue to thrive. The use of traditional methods to communicate contemporary content can be both powerful and engaging. And when new means of expression are combined with strong craftsmanship, the impact of artist’s books, in all their derivations, increases exponentially.

While their interdisciplinary underpinnings and dynamic nature make it challenging, a closer examination of artists’ books is facilitated by classification. Several broad categories emerge: the book bound and unbound; the book as object, the book as metaphor; the book as environment; environment as book; the virtual book; the book as score and performance; and the book as community and collaboration.

Presented in coordination with Book Art Biennial 2015
Opening reception Friday, May 8; 6-9pm
Closing reception Friday, July 24; 6-9pm as part of the Book Arts Art Crawl

Mon – Sat 9:30am - 6:30pm
Tues (open late) 9:30am - 9pm
Sun noon - 5pm

Gallery admission is always free

MCBA Star Tribune Foundation Gallery
Minnesota Center for Book Arts
1011 Washington Avenue S. #100
Minneapolis, MN
Exhibit Midwest
April 09 -
May 02, 2015
THE IDDA COLLECTION ROMANESQUE BIBLICAL MANUSCRIPTS c. 980 to 1240
In this exhibition and catalogue of "The Idda Collection," LES ENLUMINURES presents sixteen extraordinary early manuscripts representing the transmission and use of the Bible from the Dark Ages into the twelfth-century Renaissance.

The manuscripts were the property of a European family, and are named after Saint Idda, the only Swiss female saint, a pious and beautiful countess who left her abusive husband, dwelled in the forest, and subsequently became a Benedictine nun. The collection they assembled reflects the monastic study and ornamentation of the Scriptures in the cloisters of medieval Germany, Italy and Spain.

This exhibition allows a glimpse directly into the treasure chests of Romanesque Europe. Included here are two early Gospel lectionaries from the Iberian Peninsula, two exceptional Psalters, biblical commentaries from some of the most important monasteries of twelfth-century Europe, and four glossed books of the Bible. Some are exquisitely decorated and in precious bindings. All are in beautiful condition.

The pinnacle of this collection is the famous tenth-century Liesborn Gospel Book, an Ottonian Gospel Book presented by an abbess to her convent of nuns. The last (and indeed only) time that this manuscript appeared in a bookseller’s catalogue was in the possession of Messrs Rosenbach in 1945, when it was described in capital letters as “ONE OF THE MOST VALUABLE MANUSCRIPTS OF THE GOSPELS IN PRIVATE HANDS.” If that was valid seventy years ago, it is even truer now.

Tue - Sat 10am - 6pm

Opening Reception
Wed, April 8th 6pm - 9pm

LES ENLUMINURES
23 East 73rd Street, 7th Floor
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 10 -
July 03, 2015
Katherine Mansfield and the "Blooms-berries"
Celebrated short story writer Katherine Mansfield has generally been relegated to the fringe of literary modernism, especially among the influential Bloomsbury Group, who referred to her as the “little colonial.” Katherine Mansfield and the “Blooms-berries” displays a selection of Mansfield’s letters and notebooks which provide a context for better understanding her fiction and which reveal her complexity as both an individual and writer. This mini-exhibition complements the other exhibition in the East Gallery, commemorating the Newberry career of James M. Wells, who acquired the Mansfield materials for the library.

Free and open to the public.

East Gallery
The Newberry
60 West Walton Street
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
April 10 -
July 03, 2015
Chicago's Great 20th-Century Bookman
The Newberry Career of James M. Wells

This memorial exhibition celebrates the life and work of James M. Wells (1917 - 2014), one of the most recognized rare-book specialists in the United States. In 1951 Wells joined the staff of the Newberry, where he established his expertise in the history of printing and calligraphy. Wells served as custodian of the John M. Wing Foundation on the History of Printing throughout his 33-year career at the library, also serving as associate librarian and then vice president, and as the first George Amos Poole III Curator of Rare Books and Manuscripts.

The exhibition highlights Wells’s contributions to the Newberry, including his acquisition of significant collection material (such as antiquarian books, cartographic materials, and modern literary manuscripts), the publications he authored and edited, and his relationships with key friends and donors to the library. This show coincides with two other exhibitions which feature materials acquired by Wells: Ephemeral by Design: Organizing the Everyday and Katherine Mansfield and the “Blooms-berries.”

Free and open to the public.

East Gallery
The Newberry
60 West Walton Street
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
April 10 -
July 03, 2015
Ephemeral by Design: Organizing the Everyday
Ephemera are traces of the everyday—materials, usually printed, designed to be read or consumed in some way and then discarded. From bus tickets to party invitations, dance cards to advertisements, these items form the texture of social and commercial exchange. As such, the ephemera on display in Ephemeral by Design: Organizing the Everyday reveal different cultural values of the past: reading habits, consumer preferences, aesthetic sensibilities. Whether studied as forensic evidence of a bygone era or as a link in the progression of printing history, ephemera can almost always be appreciated for their wry messages, bold color schemes, or innovative designs.

Ephemeral by Design displays some of the highlights from an ongoing project to catalog nearly 30,000 items from the Newberry’s John M. Wing Foundation on the History of Printing. The Wing collection embraces numerous kinds of ephemera, including, but not limited to type specimens, advertising trade cards, letterheads, and stationery.

Free and open to the public

Smith Gallery
The Newberry
60 West Walton Street
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
April 11, 2015 -
January 05, 2016
Do The Spirits Return?: From Dark Arts to Sleight of Hand in Early 20th Century Stage Magic
Today, we think of magic as pleasurable sleight of hand with a dash of neuroscience; acts which amuse and astound. But for centuries, the word “magic” evoked more powerful ideas: control over the boundaries between life and death, witchcraft and satanism, the sacred power of relics and amulets, the healing arts of shamans, and the deceptive practices of confidence men. This pre-rational history of “magic” lies just beneath the surface of the golden age of stage magic, as perfectly exemplified by the life and work of Howard Thuston (1869–1936) a former con man, carnival speiler and missionary student who became one of the most famous magicians of his time with a reputation surpassing that of his chief rival Harry Houdini. “Do The Spirits Return?” will explore the surprising intersections between spiritualism, torture theatre, dark arts and early 20th century stage magic as seen in the work of Howard Thurston via stunning, never before exhibited original posters, artworks, artifacts, props, photographs and ephemera drawn from the astounding collection of over 50,000 artifacts amassed by Brooklyn native Rory Feldman.

Wed - Mon, 12:00pm - 6:00pm
Tue, CLOSED

Admission to the Museum & Library is $8. Seniors and students are $6, and children 12 and under are free.

The Morbid Anatomy Museum
424 Third Avenue (corner of 7th Street)
Brooklyn, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 14 -
September 06, 2015
Light, Paper, Process: Reinventing Photography
At a time when digital technologies offer increasingly sophisticated options for producing, storing, and disseminating images, a number of artists have turned their attention to exploring the essence of photography, distilling it to its basic components of light-sensitive emulsions and chemical development. These artists may use hand-coated or expired papers, archival negatives, or custom-built cameras, or they may eschew the use of a camera or film altogether. All revel in materials and process, employing darkroom techniques that shift our understanding of photography away from a medium that merely records the world.

Tue – Fri & Sun 10am – 5:30pm
Sat 10am – 9pm
Mon Closed

Free admission

West Pavilion, Lower Level
The Getty Center
1200 N. Sepulveda Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
April 15 -
May 14, 2015
The Art of American Bookcovers 1875 – 1930 with Richard Minsky
A complementary exhibit will be available for viewing by appointment only.

LECTURE:
On April 22, 2015 at 5:30 p.m. in the Lownes Room of the John Hay Library, Richard Minsky will give a talk, “The Art of American Bookcovers 1875 – 1930: One Hundred Great Covers from the Brown University Library.” Minsky will look at selections of books from the Library’s holdings that exemplify book cover styles and their changes during this time period. A Q&A, book sale and signing, and reception will follow the talk. This event is free and open to the public.

In his presentation, Minsky will discuss how Modernism entered the American home on book covers. Proto-Constructivism and Futurism came in 1880, Art Nouveau in 1881. Surrealism and Abstraction in 1904. This period saw the transition from covers designed by die-engravers to those created by visual artists, many of whom were women. The presentation will include stunning examples from Eastlake style, Arts and Crafts, Aesthetic movement, Poster style and Social Realism.

Richard Minsky is an internationally known book artist, author, historian, curator, and bibliographer. Minsky is the author of American Decorated Publishers’ Bindings 1872-1929, The Art of American Book Covers 1875-1930, The Art of the American Book, The Golden Age of American Book Design, The Book Cover Art of Thomas Watson Ball, and American Trade Bindings with Native American Themes, 1875-1933. In 1974 he founded the Center for Book Arts in New York City, the first organization of its kind.

Lownes Room
Brown University
John Hay Library
20 Prospect Street
Providence, RI
Exhibit New England
April 15, 2015 -
March 31, 2018
America in Circulation: A History of US Currency
Exhibit will feature the collection of Mark R. Shenkman

Visitors will have the opportunity to view hundreds of beautiful and rare examples of American paper money and to explore them in more depth through large interactive touch screen displays.

From Colonial times, American money has told a fascinating and detailed story of the country’s struggles and successes. Pivotal moments in history have led to changes in the nation’s money, as crises have brought about innovation. Often local and national currencies competed and coexisted with each other, while economic depression, war and counterfeiting drove constant advances in design.

“Today, there are only seven notes in circulation. Yet most Americans don’t realize that both the banks and the government were issuing many different types of currency for most of our nation’s first 150 years,” said Museum President David Cowen. “The notes in this exhibit tell the story of the development of America, and their striking beauty makes them pieces of art in and of themselves.”

The exhibition will feature approximately 250 notes spanning from the Colonial era to the present day. Highlights include rare examples of currency bearing the signatures of signers of the US Constitution and Declaration of Independence; a complete set of notes from the Educational Series of 1896, renowned for being the most beautiful paper money in American history; and rare examples of high denomination notes including $5,000 and $10,000 bills.

Tues–Sat 10am – 4pm

MUSEUM OF AMERICAN FINANCE
48 Wall Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 17 -
June 27, 2015
LINDA CARREIRO: INSIDE OUT OF WORDS
Calling attention to both reading and the material form of a book, Linda Carreiro’s work provokes questions of what constitutes a book. Employing Jacques Derrida’s concept on “the inside out of language,”, Carreiro underscores that text is a construct, a material that can be formed and re-formed; when removed from the pages of a book, the words can be viewed as unfixed, malleable material. If one tries to firmly position a text one position, the “inside” (or center) always changes its orientation. Derrida’s term is given resonance within the Center for Book Arts gallery, where language is playfully enacted upon and physicalized.

Mon-Fri 11am - 6pm
Sat 10am - 5pm

The Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 17 -
June 27, 2015
THEN & NOW: TEN YEARS OF RESIDENCIES AT THE CENTER FOR BOOK ARTS
This exhibition examines two of the Center’s core programs: the Artist-in-Residence Workspace Grant program and the Scholarship for Advanced Study in Book Arts. As part of the Center’s 40th anniversary year, selected work will be shown from approximately 50 artists who participated in these programs over the last ten years.

For each participating artist, work completed during his/her past residency will be presented along with new work. Artists included are: Manuel Acevedo, Tomie Arai, Katie Baldwin, Stephanie Beck, Emily Blair, Terry Boddie, Amy Chan, Cecile Chong, Ana Cordeiro, Cesar Cornejo, Donald Daedalus, Aurora De Armendi, Prudence Dudan, Dahlia Elsayed, Nicolás Dumit Estévez, Frances Gallardo, Chitra Ganesh, Hadassa Goldvicht. Tal Halpern, Josh Harris, Pablo Helguera, Wayne Hodge, Kyle Holland, Wennie Huang, Yoko Inoue, Katarina Jerinic, Jennie C. Jones, Rajkamal Kahlon, Gautam Kansara, Jessica Lagunas, Catarina Leitao, Liz Linden, Celine Lombardi, Jason Lujan, Lee Marchalonis, Kimberly McClure, Sarah McDermott, Colin McMullen, Ivan Monforte, Carlos Motta, Shervone Neckles, Heidi Neilson, Asuka Ohsawa, Sara Parkel, Shani Peters, Kameelah Rasheed, Taylor Reid, Benjamin Reynaert, Julie Schumacher, Zoë Sheehan Saldaña, Karina Skvirsky, Natalie Stopka, Tattfoo Tan, Amanda Thackray, Juana Valdes, Angie Waller, James Walsh, Jenifer Wightman, and Liz Zanis.

Mon-Fri 11am - 6pm
Sat 10am - 5pm

Main Gallery
The Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th St, 3rd Flr
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 17 -
June 27, 2015
2014 ARTISTS-IN-RESIDENCE
Each year, as part of the Center’s Artist-in-Residence Workspace Grant program, up to five New York-based emerging artists are offered space, time and support to explore the production and exhibition of artists’ books and related work in year-long residencies. The purpose of this program is to promote experimentation in making book art by artists representing a diversity of fields and backgrounds.

In 2014, Damali Abrams, Emmy Catedral, Heidi Lau, Eto Ottigbe, and Seldon Yuan were selected as artists-in-residence. This group show will feature the work completed by these artists last year at the Center.

Mon-Fri 11am-6pm
Sat 10am-5pm

The Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th St, 3rd Flr
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 17 -
July 19, 2015
Beyond Bosch: The Afterlife of a Renaissance Master in Print
The Netherlandish master Hieronymus Bosch (c. 1450−1516) captured the imaginations of his Renaissance patrons with paintings of hellfire and hybrid monsters, and his reputation has only grown since. In the wake of his death, Bosch became nothing short of a highly desirable brand, a bestseller among sixteenth-century artists. This exhibition explores arguably the most powerful engine that fomented the artist's afterlife: his transmission through the growing and highly sophisticated market for European prints.

Printmaking flourished in Bosch's lifetime, but only a small handful of engravings by his contemporary Alart du Hameel have any potential connection with Bosch himself. The Boschian print phenomenon truly exploded after the artist's death in the mid-16th century under the aegis of the pioneering Antwerp print publisher Hieronymus Cock, and maintained force into the 17th century. These later prints are not literal reproductions of known works by the artist. Rather, they are images inspired by Bosch's unique legacy of artistic invention. A key figure in this phenomenon was the great Antwerp artist Pieter Bruegel the Elder, who figured himself as "a second Bosch" when he launched his own career in print at Hieronymus Cock's publishing house.

This exhibition of Boschian prints draws almost exclusively from a private collection, with a handful of strategic loans, in order to tell the story of Bosch's afterlife in print for the first time. It will demonstrate the many ways prints could popularize an artist like Bosch, transforming his name into an international brand associated with everything from monstrous drolleries to moral dramas, and serving as a launching ground for many artists after him.

Tue – Sun 10am – 5pm
Fri 10am – 9pm
Mon Closed
Closed Thanksgiving Day & Christmas Day.
The Museum is open New Year’s Day and Memorial Day.

Admission to the Museum is free every day.
Admission to featured exhibitions is free on Friday. Limit 6 tickets per person.

Advanced tickets are recommended

Galleries 234 & 235
Saint Louis Art Museum
One Fine Arts Drive
Forest Park
Saint Louis, MO
Exhibit Midwest
April 23 -
June 06, 2015
KEITH SMITH: The Fabric Works, 1964-1980
Throughout his career, Keith Smith (b.1938) has taken a non-purist approach to photography, printmaking, and bookmaking. The current exhibition, Smith’s third solo show with the gallery, features his earliest works on fabric.

When Smith moved to Rochester in 1974 to teach at the Visual Studies Workshop, he arrived with only a sewing machine and a mattress. The son of a seamstress (Smith’s mother helped make some of the quilts in this exhibition), thread, stitching, and fabric became an important component and binding material in his work. Additionally, the quilt format offered another dimension to explore his fascination with time and movement as elements in his image-making process. Smith contact-printed entire strips of film on light-sensitized fabric, preferring the experience of multiple frames of time to the traditional photographic approach of isolating and enlarging single images.

n the current exhibition, portraits and self-portraits predominate including a life size image-transfer on bridal satin created by color-photocopying a nude model in segments. Never shying from utilizing new technology in his work, the Color-in Color copier process invented by 3M was especially of interest to Smith in the early 1970s when it was first developed. These experimental images were displayed in a 1974 exhibition in collaboration with Sonia Landy Sheridan at the Museum of Modern Art.

Despite his preference to seclude himself as an artist, Keith Smith’s influence as a teacher and author on the subjects of alternative bookbinding and book structure is widespread. He has made over 300 unique artist books and has authored nine books on bookmaking. Smith has taught at the Visual Studies Workshop, the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, and the University of Illinois. He is a recipient of two Guggenheim Fellowships, a National Endowment of the Arts grant and a Pollock-Krasner Foundation grant.

Keith Smith’s work is in the collections of leading international public and private collections, including the Art Institute of Chicago; Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; The Morgan Library, New York; Museum of Fine Arts, Houston; Museum of Modern Art, New York; The New York Public Library, New York; The Getty Museum, Los Angeles; and the Victoria and Albert Museum, London.

Tue - Sat, 10-6pm

Bruce Silverstein
535 West 24th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 03 -
July 26, 2015
Drawing in Silver and Gold: Leonardo to Jasper Johns
This first comprehensive exhibition to examine the history of metalpoint—the art of drawing with a metal stylus on a specially prepared ground—presents some 90 drawings from the late Middle Ages to the present, from the collections of the British Museum, the National Gallery of Art, and other major museums in the United States and Europe. Often regarded as a limited and unforgiving medium, metalpoint is actually capable of a surprising range of effects, as seen in these drawings by Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, Rogier van der Weyden, Albrecht Dürer, Rembrandt van Rijn, and Jasper Johns, among others.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 11am – 6pm

West Building Ground Floor
National Gallery of Art
National Mall (between 3rd & 9th Streets NW)
6th Street & Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 03 -
July 26, 2015
In Light of the Past: Twenty-Five Years of Photography at the National Gallery of Art
Some 150 masterpieces will be featured from the National Gallery's photography collection, all acquired within the last quarter century. Highlighting exquisite nineteenth-century and turn-of-the-century pictorialist works; exceptional examples of international modernism of the 1920s and 1930s and seminal mid-twentieth-century American photography; as well as photographs exploring new directions in color and conceptual art in the 1970s and 1980s, the exhibition demonstrates the richness of the National Gallery’s photography collection and showcases the vitality of the medium as an art form from the its birth through the end of the twentieth century.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 11am – 6pm

West Ground Floor Galleries
National Gallery of Art
National Mall (between 3rd & 9th Streets NW)
6th Street & Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 07 -
September 04, 2015
Up Close and Personal: Intimate Devotions and Everyday Objects from Late Antiquity
How was religion lived at the private level of the household or individual? Much of our perception of religion in Late Antiquity stems from the official and monumental art associated with Greco-Roman religions, Judaism, or Christianity. Temples, imposing statues, churches, catacombs, and cemeteries can give the impression of communal religion practiced on a grand, public scale. By contrast, small, personal objects that served a variety of devotional purposes provide insight into the private piety of a broad spectrum of Late Antique religious practices. Individuals of all levels of society made use of such items as jewelry and oil lamps bearing religious symbols, souvenirs from various shrines, statuettes of the gods for domestic shrines, items of clothing with mythological figures, and amulets meant to repel danger or the evil eye. Such objects allow an intimate look at daily life and ordinary devotional practices of men and women from the past and give insight into the ways religion was lived. The pieces in this exhibit are ideal for viewing, up close and personal, in the intimate space of the Vanderbilt Art Gallery.

This exhibition is the second in a partnership between the History of Art department and the Fine Arts Gallery, which results in a student-curated exhibition.
The exhibit grows out of a semester-long course, “Exhibiting Historical Art,” taught by a faculty member in the department. The class allows students the rare opportunity to get ‘up close and personal’ with art objects, through research and physical study, and to think through every aspect of their display and presentation to the public. As a group they have selected objects from Vanderbilt Fine Arts Gallery’s permanent collection and supplemented them with numerous loans from the Toledo Museum of Art and private collections.

Summer Gallery Hours (May 1 - August 20, 2014)
Tue - Fri 12-4pm
Sat 1-5pm
Sun & Mon Closed

Academic Year Gallery Hours (August 21, 2015 -April 30, 2015)
Mon - Fri 11-4pm
Sat & Sun 1-5pm

Free & open to the public

Vanderbilt University Fine Arts Gallery
Cohen Memorial Hall
1220 21st Avenue South
Nashville, TN
Exhibit South
May 08 -
July 26, 2015
Reader’s Art: Concealed, Confined and Collected
Opening reception Friday, May 8 in coordination with The Contained Narrative

Minnesota Center for Book Arts presents Readers Art: Concealed, Confined and Collected, a juried exhibition exploring artists’ books that use found or custom-made containers to support narrative and content. The exhibition will be presented May 8 through July 26, 2015, with an opening reception on Friday, May 8, 2015. This exhibition is presented in collaboration with the College of Book Art Association and Susan Hensel Gallery.

For many years, Susan Hensel Gallery presented annual thematic exhibitions under the “Readers Art” umbrella. As the new home of these popular shows, MCBA is dedicated to continuing Hensel’s tradition of supporting new voices, emerging artists and collegiate students.

Readers Art: Concealed, Confined and Collected will be on view during MCBA’s Book Art Biennial, July 25-26, 2015, and will be used as a visual resource to inform discussion during the event’s symposium. For more information regarding the Book Art Biennial.

Mon – Sat 9:30am - 6:30pm
Tues (open late) 9:30am - 9pm
Sun noon - 5pm

Gallery admission is always free

MCBA Star Tribune Foundation Gallery
Minnesota Center for Book Arts
1011 Washington Avenue S. #100
Minneapolis, MN
Exhibit Midwest
May 09 -
November 29, 2015
Gray Matter: David Macaulay’s Black and White
The Carle is pleased to announce it will host an exhibition of the original art from David Macaulay’s Caldecott award-winning Black and White. The exhibition which will be on view from May 9 to November 29, 2015 is a partial celebration of the 25th anniversary of the book’s publication. Heralded as one of the first post-modern picture books where a unified linear narrative was rejected, the book comprises four possible stories arranged in four panels per page which the reader can read according to their preference. In his acceptance speech, Macaulay praised the committee for its choice of such a seemingly unorthodox book. The visitor will be able to gain a deeper understanding of Macaulay’s process through the wealth of preliminary material.

Tue. – Fri. 10am – 4pm
Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

The Eric Carle Museum
of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
May 11 -
November 13, 2015
Vanessa Bell’s Hogarth Press Designs
Vanessa Bell (1879–1961) was an English painter, designer, and important member of the Bloomsbury roup, a cluster of culturally influential figures in early 20th-century London. Throughout her career she designed many book jackets and illustrations for Hogarth Press, a British publishing house founded by Bell’s sister, author Virginia Woolf, and Leonard Woolf. This exhibition showcases several examples of Bell’s exquisite, yet simple, designs.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

National Museum of Woman in the Arts
1250 New York Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 11, 2015
In the Library: Clifford Burke’s Cranium Press
Join us for an informal gathering in the library to view works from the Book Club’s collection.

5 - 7pm

Free & open to the public but seating is limited. RSVP is recommended.

The Book Club of California
312 Sutter Street, Suite 500 (cross street Grant)
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
May 13 -
August 01, 2015
The Grabhorn Press, 1920-1965

Ground Floor Gallery
The Grolier Club
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 16 -
November 01, 2015
FRIDA KAHLO: Art, Garden, Life
The New York Botanical Garden announces its major 2015 exhibition, FRIDA KAHLO: Art, Garden, Life, focusing on the iconic artist's engagement with nature in her native country of Mexico. Opening on May 16 and remaining on view through November 1, the exhibition will be the first solo presentation of Kahlo's work in New York City in more than 25 years, and the first exhibition to focus exclusively on her intense interest in the botanical world.

Visitors to the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory will walk through a stunning flower show reimagining Kahlo's studio and garden at the Casa Azul (Blue House) in Coyoacán, Mexico City. Curated by distinguished art historian and specialist in Mexican art, Adriana Zavala, Ph.D., the multifaceted exhibition will include a rare display of more than a dozen original Kahlo paintings and works on paper on view in the LuEsther T. Mertz Library's Art Gallery at the Garden. Accompanying events invite visitors to learn about Kahlo's Mexico and her enduring cultural influence through poetry, lectures, "Frida al Fresco" evenings, Mexican-inspired shopping and dining experiences, and hands-on art activities for kids.

The New York Botanical Garden
2900 Southern Blvd.
Bronx, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 17 -
September 07, 2015
Yoko Ono: One Woman Show, 1960–1971
The Museum of Modern Art presents its first exhibition dedicated exclusively to the work of Yoko Ono, taking as its point of departure the artist’s unofficial MoMA debut in late 1971. At that time, Ono advertised her “one woman show,” titled Museum of Modern [F]art. However, when visitors arrived at the Museum there was little evidence of her work. According to a sign outside the entrance, Ono had released flies on the Museum grounds, and the public was invited to track them as they dispersed across the city. Now, over 40 years later, Yoko Ono: One Woman Show, 1960–1971 surveys the decisive decade that led up to Ono’s unauthorized exhibition at MoMA, bringing together approximately 125 of her early objects, works on paper, installations, performances, audio recordings, and films, alongside rarely seen archival materials. A number of works invite interaction, including Painting to Be Stepped On (1960/1961) and Ono’s groundbreaking performance, Bag Piece (1964). The exhibition draws upon the 2008 acquisition of the Gilbert and Lila Silverman Fluxus Collection Gift, which added approximately 100 of Ono’s artworks and related ephemera to the Museum’s holdings.

During the first 11 years of her extensive career, Ono moved among New York, Tokyo, and London, serving a pioneering role in the international development of Conceptual art, experimental film, and performance art. Her earliest works were often based on instructions that Ono communicated to viewers in verbal or written form. Painting to Be Stepped On (1960/1961), for example, invited viewers to tread upon a piece of canvas placed directly on the floor. Though easily overlooked, the work radically questioned the division between art and the everyday by asking viewers to participate in its completion. At times poetic, humorous, sinister, and idealistic, Ono’s early text-based works anticipated the objects that she presented throughout the decade, including Grapefruit (1964), her influential book of instructions; Apple (1966), a solitary piece of fruit placed on a Plexiglas pedestal; and Half-A-Room (1967), an installation of bisected domestic objects.

The exhibition also explores Ono’s seminal performances and films, including Cut Piece (1964) and Film No. 4 (1966/1967). In Cut Piece, Ono confronted issues of gender, class, and cultural identity by asking viewers to cut away pieces of her clothing as she sat quietly on stage. Two years later Ono made Film No. 4, which again centered on the body, though to much different effect. The film—a sequence of naked, moving buttocks—signaled Ono’s desire to break down class hierarchies by focusing on a universally shared feature. At the end of the decade, Ono’s collaborations with John Lennon, including Bed-In (1969) and the WAR IS OVER! if you want it (1969–) campaign, boldly communicated her commitment to promoting world peace. Upon returning to New York in the early 1970s, Ono—like the flies purportedly released at MoMA—had infiltrated the public realm; her artwork appeared on billboards and in newspapers and she performed internationally with her Plastic Ono Band.

The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue, featuring three newly commissioned essays that evaluate the cultural context of Ono’s early years, and five sections reflecting her geographic locations during this period and the corresponding evolution of her artistic practice. Each chapter includes an introduction by a guest scholar, artwork descriptions, primary documents culled from newspapers and magazines, and a selection by the artist of her texts and drawings.

Sun - Thu 10:30am – 5:30pm
Fri 10:30am – 8:00pm
Sat 10:30am – 5:30pm

Free - Members
$5 - Guests of Members
$25 - Adults
$18 - Seniors (65 and over with ID)
$14 - Students (full-time with current ID)
Free - Children (16 and under)
This policy does not apply to children in groups.

The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art Exhibition Gallery, sixth floor
11 West 53rd Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 18 -
August 24, 2015
Alice in Bookland: Fine Press Editions
Alice in Bookland celebrates the 150th anniversary (“sesquicen-Tenniel”) of the original Macmillan publication of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland in 1865. Once thought of as a quaint Victorian children’s book, Alice is now the most quoted novel in existence, and among the most widely illustrated and translated. Since the publication of Martin Gardner’s Annotated Alice in 1960, it is also one of the most studied by the academic community, and continues to be a much beloved presence in our culture, with many adaptations in cinema, theater, musicals, opera, and ballet, on websites and merchandise, and more. Lewis Carroll Societies thrive in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Japan, and Brazil. Naturally, the book has a long bibliophilic history as well. Though collectors may especially desire one of the suppressed first printings, one copy of which sold for $1.5 million in 1998, this exhibition focuses on the fine press editions.

After the copyright of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland expired in 1907, a host of editions, authorized and not, sprang forth. Many of these are on view in the exhibition. They include a version illustrated by Arthur Rackham, the limited edition bearing the illuminations of Salvador Dalí (1969), a Black Sun Press volume with pictures by Marie Laurencin (1930), and the Cheshire Cat Press editions (1988 and 1998), hand-typeset on handmade paper with fine bindings by Eleanor Ramsey.

Carroll wrote many works besides Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, including its 1872 companion Through the Looking-glass. Further out on the proverbial limb are thirty-six lithographs by Max Ernst, who illustrated one chapter of Wonderland, among other works, in his Lewis Carroll’s Wunderhorn; Carroll’s great nonsense poem “The Hunting of the Snark,” with images by Max Ernst, Byron Sewell, Barry Moser, Nicholas Perry, Harold Jones, and others; and a volume called Notes de Zoologie (Baby Lone, 1988), illustrated by Pétra Werlé, with fine binding by Jill-Oriane Tarlau. A fine press book called Illustrating Alice (Artists’ Choice, 2013) discusses the many artists across the globe and over the last century-and-a-half who have given their own particular interpretations to the Alice books. (A forthcoming volume, Alice in a World of Wonderlands: The Translations of Lewis Carroll’s Masterpiece [The Grolier Club/Oak Knoll, Fall, 2015], has a bibliography that lists over 7,500 editions with more than 1,000 published illustrators in languages other than English!)

This exhibition comprises works from the Burstein Collection of Lewis Carroll, now numbering 3,500 books by, about, or inspired by Carroll—not to mention innumerable tchotchkes. It was started by Book Club of California member Sandor Burstein with a single volume he purchased in Portugal in 1974 to memorialize his trip, although his love for Carroll dates back to his childhood. His son, Mark, now curates the collection. The Book Club of California would like to gratefully acknowledge Sandor and Mark Burstein for making the exhibition possible, as well as BCC member Malcolm Whyte who suggested the exhibition and helped choose the books and design their display.

Exhibition Opening: Monday, May 18, 5 - 7pm.

The Book Club of California
312 Sutter Street, Suite 500 (cross street Grant)
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
May 22 -
September 12, 2015
“REPORTING VIETNAM”
On Friday, May 22, the Newseum will open “Reporting Vietnam,” a provocative new exhibit that marks the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War, America’s first televised war. The exhibit explores the dramatic stories of how journalists brought news about the war to a divided nation.

Powerful photos and news footage, evocative music and more than 90 compelling artifacts, historic newspapers and magazines will take visitors back to experience a time when America was at war and young people were rejecting the conservative values of their parents.

Set to a soundtrack of protest songs, the exhibit opens with an exploration of the culture clash that emerged in the 1960s as seen through mainstream and counterculture publications of the day. “Reporting Vietnam” challenges perceptions that linger 50 years after U.S. troops arrived in Vietnam, and poses the question “Did the press lose the war?”

Included are more than 100 dramatic images, including memorable Pulitzer Prize-winning photographs that have come to symbolize the struggle both in Vietnam and at home. Interactive kiosks in the exhibit showcase interviews with the Pulitzer Prize-winning photographers who took some of the most iconic images of the war, and the memorable protest songs that provided the soundtrack for a generation.

As part of the exhibit, the museum’s Robert H. and Clarice Smith Big Screen Theater will feature an original documentary chronicling the war’s most pivotal moments. Two other original films explore the protest movement at home and how television forever changed the way Americans receive news from the battlefield.

The Newseum education department will supplement the exhibit with resources on-site, online and in the community. Classes and gallery exploration guides will examine many of the exhibit’s themes, including how the media influence public opinion, media ethics and the challenges of reporting during a war. The Newseum will also present a series of public programs featuring journalists, the military and others discussing the coverage, impact and legacy of the Vietnam War.

Open daily from 9am - 5pm

ADMISSION
Purchase a ticket, and the next day’s visit is free!

Adults, 19 - 64: $22.95 + tax
Seniors, 65 & older: $18.95 + tax
Youth, 7 - 18: $13.95 + tax
Children, 6 & younger: Free

Discounts for military, college students, and AAA members are available only at our admissions desk with applicable ID.

Level 6
Newseum
555 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 22 -
September 20, 2015
Hidden Likeness: Photographer Emmet Gowin at the Morgan
One of the most original and influential photographers of his generation, Emmet Gowin (born 1941) is also among the most attuned to the deep historical life of images. For this spellbinding exhibition—the first exploration of his career at a New York museum—Gowin has combined favorites and rarities from five decades of work with objects drawn from throughout the collections of the Morgan. Included are ancient Near Eastern seals and tablets, Medieval illuminations, rare printed books, musical manuscripts, and master drawings by artists from Botticelli and Rembrandt to Blake and Mondrian. Gowin's photographs include searching portraits of his wife, Edith, and their extended family, "working landscapes" where nature and humanity have shaped one another for centuries, and aerial views of sites shaped by modern-era catastrophes ranging from volcanic activity to nuclear testing.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5:00pm
Fri 10:30am - 9:00pm
Sat 10:00am - 6:00pm
Sun 11:00am - 6:00pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue (at 36th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 26 -
October 18, 2015
In Focus: Animalia
Photographs of animals have circulated since the early history of the medium, initially focusing on those that were tame, captive, or dead. Advancements in camera and film technologies enabled precise recordings of beasts in motion and, eventually, in their natural habitats. Spanning the history of photography, this exhibition examines the expanding tradition of animal representation through the works of artists such as Adolphe Braun, Lisette Model, Horatio Ross, Taryn Simon, Sandy Skoglund, and Alfred Stieglitz, among others.

Tue – Fri & Sun 10:00am – 5:30pm
Sat 10:00am – 9:00pm
Closed Mondays

Free admission

West Pavilion, Lower Level
The Getty Center
1200 N Sepulveda Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
May 29 -
September 20, 2015
William Caxton and the Birth of English Printing
About 1474 something never seen in print before rolled off the press: the English language. William Caxton, an English merchant and diplomat, had recently learned of the new technology of print invented by Johann Gutenberg twenty years before, and Caxton capitalized on the commercial opportunity offered by this revolutionary invention. William Caxton and the Birth of English Printing celebrates this foundational moment in the history of English literature and language. Caxton published key works of English literature, such as Chaucer and Malory, as well as short religious and didactic texts, many of which he translated from French or Latin. Through his publishing activity, Caxton also helped to stabilize the English language by promoting a single dialect, and through print this dialect became more prevalent and helped to form the basis of our modern language.

As artifacts of nationalistic importance, Caxton imprints have been choice prizes for collectors since the 18th century. Pierpont Morgan favored Caxton over Gutenberg as a founder of printing and strove to acquire a premiere collection of his work. The Morgan has the third largest collection of Caxtons in the world, preserved for their literary, linguistic, and historical significance.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue (at 36th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 30 -
September 30, 2015
Scorsese Collects
In celebration of director Martin Scorsese’s enduring commitment to the preservation of international film culture, MoMA presents 34 works from the Scorsese Poster Collection. The installation is centered around a rare, billboard-size poster for the 1951 film Tales of Hoffmann, and features other large-format pieces representing the work of directors such as Michael Powell (The Red Shoes, 1948), Max Ophuls (The Earrings of Madame de..., 1953) and Jacques Tourneur (I Walked with a Zombie, 1943), and key designers, such as Italy’s Anselmo Ballester and Britain's Peter Strausfeld. In addition to European art house and American genre films, Raoul Walsh’s silent classic The Regeneration (1915) and Howard Hawks’s Scarface (1932) (represented by a rare lobby card) are included. The exhibition will be accompanied by the film series Scorsese Screens in August 2015.

Sun - Thu 10:30am – 5:30pm
Fri 10:30am – 8:00pm
Sat 10:30am – 5:30pm

Member Early Hours: 9:30am – 10:30am daily

Adults $25
Seniors (65 & over with ID) $18
Students (full-time with current ID) $14
Children (16 & under) Free
This policy does not apply to children in groups.

Members Free
Guests of Members $5

Admission is free for all visitors during UNIQLO Free Friday Nights, held every Friday evening from 4:00 to 8:00pm.
Tickets for UNIQLO Free Friday Nights are not available in advance. Your UNIQLO Free Friday Night ticket permits you to all other Museum galleries, exhibitions, and films.

Theater 2 Gallery, T2
Theater 1 Gallery, T1
The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic