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February 07, 2012 -
December 31, 2015
The Life of Art: Context, Collecting, and Display
From the time an object is made until the day it enters a museum's collection, it may be displayed, used, and perceived in different ways. The Life of Art takes selected objects from the Getty Museum's galleries and encourages visitors to sit down and spend time with them, offering the opportunity to examine them closely to understand how they were made and functioned, why they were collected, and how they have been displayed.

Tue – Fri & Sun 10am – 5:30pm
Sat 10am – 9pm
Mon Closed

Free admission

The J. Paul Getty Museum
1200 Getty Center Drive
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
March 14, 2014 -
August 31, 2015
The Journals of Duncan Phillips
Duncan Phillips was a prolific writer. Starting in his days as a student at Yale, Phillips wrote about art and literature, recounted trips abroad, and recorded his dreams for his museum. He generated lists of works desired and works acquired; once the museum opened, he detailed how the paintings spoke to each other when hung in the galleries. Meticulously cared for in the Phillips archives, the texts from the 1900s to 1930s show the development of his collecting vision and his passion for art.

Tue ‒ Sat 10am ‒ 5pm
Sun Noon ‒ 7pm
Thu extended hours 5 ‒ 8:30pm*

Closed Mondays, New Year’s Day, Independence Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve, and Christmas Day

*On the first Thursday of every month, daytime admittance ends at 5 pm due to the regularly scheduled Phillips after 5 events. Admission after 5 pm is restricted to members and Phillips after 5 ticket holders.

Reading Room
Phillips Collection
1600 21st Street NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 10, 2014 -
January 02, 2016
Civil Rights Act of 1964: A Long Struggle for Freedom
This exhibition, which commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the landmark Civil Rights Act of 1964, explores the events that shaped the civil rights movement, as well as the far-reaching impact the act had on a changing society. The act is considered the most significant piece of civil rights legislation since Reconstruction. It prohibits discrimination on the basis of race, color, religion, sex, or national origin in voting, public accommodations, public facilities, public education, federally funded programs, and employment. Audiovisual stations throughout the exhibition present archival footage of the era, as well as contemporary interviews with civil rights leaders and activists reflecting on the civil rights era.

Southwest Gallery
Second Floor, Thomas Jefferson Building
Library of Congress
First St. SE, between Independence Ave. & East Capitol St.
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
September 26, 2014 -
August 09, 2015
Time Covers the 1960s
Week in and week out, Time magazine covered the 1960s using all manner of covers created by some of the foremost artists of the day. This exhibition of original cover art from the museum’s Time collection will explore a selection of the major newsmakers, trends and happenings that defined the 1960s, known as the “Age of Aquarius.” It began with the Kennedy inauguration and a presidency nicknamed “Camelot” and ended with “one giant leap for mankind,” as Apollo 11 ferried people to the surface of the moon and back. In the intervening years, Time covered the Cold War, Cuban Missile Crisis, escalation of the Vietnam War, civil rights, the women’s movement and cultural phenomena such as the Beatles, hippies and the sexual revolution.

11:30am - 7pm daily
Closed December 25

National Portrait Gallery
Eighth and F Streets NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
October 01, 2014 -
August 31, 2015
“Who shall tell the story?”: Voices of Civil War Virginia
The Civil War’s impact on the culture, politics, and geography of Virginia cannot be overemphasized: battles ravaged the landscape, blockades and other political maneuvers transformed the economy, and profound regional tensions resulted in the creation of West Virginia. This exhibition seeks to reveal how Virginia was changed by the war, focusing on the voices of those who experienced it. Letters, diaries, scrapbooks, maps, newspapers, songsheets, broadside advertisements, photographs, and physical artifacts drawn from across Special Collections’s rich holdings in the period reveal the lived experience of war.

The exhibition’s title is drawn from a manuscript of Walt Whitman who, soon after witnessing a battle in Virginia, wrote,

Who shall tell the story?…We talk I say of stories of this war—have histories of this war already; and shall have books of full detail, hundreds of them. In printed books, full histories of this war will come. O heavens! What book can give the history of this war?

The war stories in this exhibition include those of Confederate and Union soldiers, working women and war widows, black troops and southern Union sympathizers, enslaved people and prisoners of war, schoolchildren and University of Virginia students, poets and musicians, wounded soldiers and nurses. Diverse and contradictory, this plurality of stories confirms the continuing relevance of Whitman’s question.

Mary and David Harrison Institute for American History, Literature, and Culture
University of Virginia Library
160 McCormick Road
Charlottesville, VA
Exhibit South
December 12, 2014 -
September 04, 2015
Public Eye: 175 Years of Sharing Photography
Thanks to the development of new technology and social media, more photographs are created, viewed, and shared today than ever before. Public Eye, the first-ever retrospective survey of photography organized by NYPL, takes advantage of this moment to reframe the way we look at photographs from the past. What are some of the platforms and networks through which photographs have been shared? In what ways have we, as photography’s public and one of its subjects, been engaged over time? To what ends has the street served as a venue for photographic practice since its beginnings? And, of more recent concern, are we risking our privacy in pursuit of a more public photography? Ranging from photography’s official announcement in 1839 to manifestations of its current pervasiveness, this landmark exhibition, drawn entirely from the Library’s collections, explores the various ways in which photography has been shared and made public. Photography has always been social.

Free public tours of the exhibition are available at 12:30 and 3:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday, and at 3:30 p.m. on Sunday.

Stephen A. Schwarzman Building
New York Public Library
Fifth Avenue at 42nd Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
December 17, 2014 -
October 18, 2015
World War I and the Rise of Modernism
In commemoration of the World War I Centennial, this exhibition explores the impact of the Great War on the art and artists of that tumultuous era.

Part one examines the art of the German Expressionists, French Cubists, Italian Futurists, British Vorticists and American artists as they responded to pre-war industrialism and urban energy. Part two explores the course of modernism during the devastating war years. Part three focuses on the two main artistic directions that emerged after the war. While French Surrealism probed the irrationality that had led to war, artists at the German Bauhaus embraced rational principles of efficiency and economy, as they sought to build anew.

In collaboration with the National World War I Museum at Liberty Memorial, the Kansas City Symphony, the Kansas City Ballet and the Lyric Opera.

Wed 10am — 5pm
Thu & Fri, 10am — 9pm
Sat & Sun 10am — 5pm

Closed Mon & Tue, New Year's Day, July 4, Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve & Christmas Day

Free admission
Parking $8 | Free for members

Galleries P31, P34
Nelson-Atkins Building
The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
4525 Oak Street
Kansas City, MO
Exhibit Midwest
January 16 -
October 25, 2015
Freedom Journey 1965: Photographs of the Selma to Montgomery March by Stephen Somerstein
This exhibit features the stunning and historic photographs of Stephen Somerstein, documenting the Selma to Montgomery Civil Rights March in March 1965. Somerstein was a student in City College of New York’s night school and Picture Editor of his student newspaper when he traveled to Alabama to document the March.

He joined the marchers and gained unfettered access to everyone from Martin Luther King Jr. to Rosa Parks, James Baldwin, and Bayard Rustin. “I had five cameras slung around my neck,” he recalled. Over the five-day, 54-mile march, Somerstein took about four hundred photographs including poignant images of hopeful blacks lining the rural roads as they cheered on the marchers walking past their front porches and whites crowded on city sidewalks, some looking on silently-others jeering as the activists walked to the Alabama capital. Somerstein sold a few photographs to The New York Times Magazine, Public Television and photography collectors, but none were exhibited until 2010, when he participated in a civil rights exhibition at the San Francisco Art Exchange.

Rather than choosing photography as a career, Somerstein became a physicist and worked at the Harvard-Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory and at Lockheed Martin Company. It was only after his retirement in 2008 that he returned to his photography remarking that he wanted “to have exhibitions of my work and that I realized that I had numerous iconic as well as historic photographs.” Among those photographs were his moving photographs of that memorable march to Montgomery in 1965.

Tue - Thu & Sat 10am - 6pm
Fri 10am - 8pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 17 -
August 03, 2015
CHANGING PERSPECTIVES OF NATIVE AMERICANS
The artworks in this focused exhibition—created by both European and Euro-American artists—reflect shifting attitudes toward Native Americans over the course of the nineteenth century. The very earliest images are documentary: recording characteristics and customs of the native residents of North America. In the wake of Indian Removal after 1830, the documentary emphasis grew into more romantic renderings, shaped by the idea of the “Noble Savage” who lived in nature beyond civilization’s corrupting influences. Imbued with classical attributes inspired by Greek and Roman sculpture, Native Americans in American art were not only ennobled, but also framed as America’s ancient and wild counterpart to Europe’s founding civilizations. By the late nineteenth century, when Native populations had been forced onto reservations and their traditional tribal identities largely suppressed, artists responded with a nostalgia for the past and tried to recapture what they considered the exotic and romantic lifestyles of Native Americans in picturesque images of a past untouched by the present.

Mon & Thu 11am - 6pm
Wed & Fri 11am - 9pm
Sat & Sun 10am - 6pm
Tue CLOSED

Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art
600 Museum Way
Bentonville, AR
Exhibit South
January 20 -
August 28, 2015
The Automobile: Design Considerations and Local Manifestations
Syracuse, New York, has had a number of industrial associations. Perhaps it was first known as the “Salt City.” It was also known for being at the center of a large canal system. Over the years, Syracuse was also prominently connected with the manufacture of typewriters, shotguns, shoes, plows, carriages, automobiles, and air conditioners. This exhibition focuses upon the automobile and its local industrial manifestations, but also explores some of the automobile construction concepts represented in the Special Collection Research Center’s industrial design collections. Material related to the most famous of Syracuse’s automobile lines, the air-cooled Franklin car with its remarkably flexible and durable wooden frame, is one of the highlights of this exhibition.

Among the designers represented in our collections, Howard A. Darrin, Claude Hill, Raymond Loewy, Budd Steinhilber, and Walter Dorwin Teague are known for their contributions to the development of the automobile. For example, Howard A. Darrin was known for his designs for exotic luxury and sports cars. Claude Hill created some important concept car designs. Raymond Loewy’s photographs document a number of striking Studebaker model designs. Budd Steinhilber was a member of the design team for the revolutionary rear-engined 1948 Tucker automobile, and Walter Dorwin Teague designed for both the Ford Motor Company and the Marmon Motor Company. Some of these designers’ concepts are on view here in the form of drawings, sketches, and photographs.

Included in this exhibition are images from a photographic album from the summer of 1905 with 784 photographs chronicling an automobile tour through Europe. A curious circumstance about the album is that while some of the locations in the album are identified, including London, Cambridge, Windsor, Le Mans, Nantes, Paris, Reims, Strasbourg, Vienna, Prague, Dresden, Berlin, Seville, and Granada, there are no other names in it, and there is no information about its creators. The University Archives in the Syracuse University Libraries also contributed photographs and cartoons that captured the presence of the automobile on campus. This exhibition could not purport to touch upon all dimensions of the development of the automobile in Syracuse, but our hope is that it provides a sampling of the ways in which the automobile evolved in Syracuse and a glimpse into the innovations of some of the most significant mid-twentieth-century automobile designers prominently represented in our collections.

Reception: January 22, 2015 / 6:00 pm (Immediately following the lecture by Kevin Borg) / Sixth floor gallery / Bird Library

Special Collections Research Center Gallery
Syracuse University Libraries
222 Waverly Avenue
Syracuse, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 20 -
September 30, 2015
Lincoln’s Unfinished Work
On January 31, 1865 the United States Congress passed the 13th Amendment, ending slavery in America. President Lincoln would not live to see the final ratification of the Amendment. He was assassinated on April 14 and a shocked nation mourned his death.

Cornell University Library marks the 150th anniversary of these historic events with an exhibition featuring Cornell’s manuscript of the 13th Amendment to the United States Constitution—one of only 14 copies signed by Lincoln—together with other rare documents and artifacts associated with Lincoln’s funeral.

As the House of Representatives debated over the 13th Amendment, another piece of legislation was being introduced in the New York State Senate by Ezra Cornell and Andrew Dickson White, the bill that constituted the Charter for Cornell University, which was signed into law by Governor Reuben E. Fenton on April 27, 1865.

Mon - Fri 9am - 5pm

Open Sat, June 6, 10:30am - 5pm
Closed July 3

Level 2B
Carl A. Kroch Library
Cornell University Library
Cornell University
Ithaca, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
January 28 -
September 01, 2015
Bibliothecaphilia

bibliotheca
From the Greek βιβλιοθήκη, meaning library. “Traditionally, collection of books used for reading or study, or the building or room in which such a collection is kept.”

-philia
From the Greek φιλία, meaning friendship. A suffix meaning “friendly feeling toward,[…] tendency toward, […or] abnormal appetite or liking for.”

For centuries, libraries have exerted a quiet sort of gravity, pulling us in with the promise that for a while, in the hushed, book-filled corridors, we can exceed ourselves. But, in this age of eBooks and library apps, does the physical and philosophical space of the library remain relevant? And what qualities define a library? Can libraries exist digitally, or be constituted of things other than books? The six artists in Bibliothecaphilia, explore the medium and ethos of libraries: institutions straddling the public and private spheres, the escapism that libraries offer, libraries’ status as storehouses for physical books — and thus for experiences and knowledge — and the way that these objects circulate and are re-used. Participating artists include Clayton Cubitt, Jonathan Gitelson, Susan Hefuna, Meg Hitchcock, Dan Peterman, and Jena Priebe.

The exhibition coincides with a year-long initiative at Williams College (including the Williams College Museum of Art and Clark Art Institute) dedicated to books, libraries, and information. It focuses on exploring the diverse ways in which people preserve and convey ideas, creative works, data, and other forms of information. The project features a wide array of public presentations, performances, courses, and exhibitions (including at the Williams College Museum of Art and Clark Art Institute) that imagine the theme from many perspectives.

Massachusetts Museum of Contemporary Art
1040 Mass MoCA Way
North Adams, MA
Exhibit New England
January 31 -
August 17, 2015
Sketch to Structure
Get an inside look at the architectural design process with over 100 original objects.

Sketch to Structure unfolds the architectural design process to show how buildings take shape. With sketches, plans, blueprints, renderings, and models from the Heinz Architectural Center collection, this exhibition reveals that architectural design, from initial concept to client presentation, isn’t straightforward.

Beautiful hand-drawn sketches by Lorcan O’Herlihy show an architect quickly capturing ideas about shapes and color. Pencil drawings of the Los Angeles County Hall of Records by Richard Neutra show a master draftsman at work. And watercolors by Steven Holl of a client’s home render in beautiful detail, on a single sheet of paper, the planned building’s exterior, floor plan, and elevation. Through these and other objects from every stage of the design process, Sketch to Structure presents the ingenious ways that architects and firms accumulate ideas and whittle them down, ultimately solving design challenges for their clients.

Mon 10am – 5pm
Tue 10am – 5pm
Wed 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 8pm
Fri 10am – 5pm
Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun noon – 5pm

Adults: $19.95
Seniors (65+): $14.95
Students with ID/Children age 3–18: $11.95
Members & children under 3: Free

50% off regular admission weekdays after 3pm

Heinz Architectural Center
Carnegie Museum of Art
4400 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 01 -
August 02, 2015
From the Library: Florentine Publishing in the Renaissance
With neither a unified state nor even a common vernacular language among the various regions of the Italian peninsula, printing presses were established in every city and in many smaller towns. The needs of the population, the disposition of the scholarly community, and the availability of source material would have all affected local book markets. Florence was undoubtedly the cultural beacon of Europe in the Renaissance—a city with a humanist tradition dating to the late thirteenth century, where much vernacular literature originated, the scientific method was cultivated, and artistic development flourished. Surprisingly the printing press, though a catalyst for spreading these new ideas throughout Europe, took longer to catch on in this city at the heart of Tuscany, a region with an insular culture and close ties to the church. When it did, the books produced there remained mostly scholarly and religious works with little embellishment or illustration until the mid-sixteenth century.

This exhibition presents a variety of books from the late fifteenth through the early seventeenth century and explores the development of publishing related to the artistic and scholarly community in Florence. With active academic organizations and a community of highly skilled artists, Florentine scholars had a unique relationship with the more prolific Venetian presses. Though never approaching the innovation of Venice, the printers of Florence gradually established their own tradition. Theoretical treatises, literary and historical works, and festival books were all popular fare in Florence and evolved over time. Especially relevant to art history are the editions of Giorgio Vasari’s Lives, which first appeared in Florence in the sixteenth century, the material published in conjunction with Michelangelo’s funeral in 1564, and theoretical works by the likes of Leon Battista Alberti and Benedetto Varchi.

10am - 5pm Monday through Friday
(this exhibition is not open on weekends)

West Ground Floor Gallery 21
National Gallery of Art
National Mall (between 3rd & 9th Streets NW)
6th Street & Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 02 -
October 25, 2015
Literary Landscapes: Maps from Fiction
Maps of imaginary places have accompanied literature for centuries. Visualizing the fanciful worlds described in works of fiction sets the stage for events taking place in a story and often provides insight into the characters themselves.

In this exhibition of forty items, visitors will discover maps from a variety of fictional genres, learn how authors create imaginary worlds, and appreciate why descriptive geography is essential to the story. People and creatures—even those who exist only in tales—are related to place, and maps of their imaginary worlds allow readers to be transported into the geography of fantasy.

Mon – Thu 10am – 7pm
Fri – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 1 – 5pm

Norman B. Leventhal Map Center
Central Library in Copley Square
Boston Public Library
700 Boylston Street
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
February 05 -
August 15, 2015
Readers Make Their Mark: Annotated Books at the New York Society Library
The Library celebrates the opening of its new exhibition with a reception for members and their guests. It will feature remarks by co-curators Erin Schreiner, Frederic Clark, and Madeline McMahon.

OPENING RECEPTION
Wednesday, February 4, 2015 - 6:00pm
For Members & Their Guests
Members' Room
Free of Charge
Advance Registration Required

Mon & Fri 9:00am - 5:00pm
Tue, Wed, & Thu 9:00am - 8:00pm
Sat & Sun 11:00am - 5:00pm

THE NEW YORK SOCIETY LIBRARY
53 East 79th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 12, 2015 -
February 15, 2016
Freedom Just Around the Corner: Black America from Civil War to Civil Rights
A chronicle of the African American experience told from the perspective of stamps and mail. Includes letters carried by enslaved Americans, mail to and from famous leaders of the civil rights movement, and a significant selection of original artwork for the USPS Black Heritage stamp series from the Postmaster General’s Collection.

Open daily 10am - 5:30pm
(except December 25)

Free admission

Smithsonian's National Postal Museum
2 Massachusetts Avenue NE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
February 13 -
December 11, 2015
Finding our Way: An Exploration of Human Navigation
This intriguing exhibition explores both the biological underpinnings of human navigation and its technological history, from the sea-faring cultures of the southern Pacific to early European mariners. Compelling mounted specimens from Harvard’s Museum of Comparative Zoology help tell the story of the human navigational instinct, deeply rooted in animal biology. Viewing accurate scale models of sailing canoes and nautical stick charts from the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, visitors will marvel at how expert navigators, using a relatively simple toolkit, successfully negotiated the complex archipelagos of the southern Pacific.

The exhibition traces the evolution of European celestial navigation, from the quadrant and astrolabe to the cross staff, octant, and sextant and showcases an array of variations in navigational instrument design. The exhibition displays diverse navigational methods used by fourteenth- to nineteenth-century mariners—including compasses and various dead-reckoning tools, as well as nautical atlases, maps, piloting books, and astrological texts borrowed from the Harvard Map Collection and the Houghton Library Archives.

Mon - Fri 9am - 4pm
Closed on University Holidays

Free & open to the public
Children must be escorted by an adult

Special Exhibits Gallery, 2nd Floor
Science Center 371
Harvard Museum of Science & Culture
1 Oxford Street
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
February 18 -
December 31, 2015
Occupied Cuba, 1898-1902: Photographs from the Theodore Roosevelt Collection
The years between the end of the Cuban War of Independence in 1898, facilitated by United States involvement as part of the Spanish-American War, and the proclamation of the Cuban Republic in 1902, were a time of much change and transition in Cuba. After the last of the Spanish troops left Cuba in 1898, the United States took over the governance of Cuba. Occupied Cuba brings together some documentary photographs of this time gathered from Harvard’s Theodore Roosevelt Collection.

Theodore Roosevelt Gallery
Pusey Library
Harvard University Libraries
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
February 27 -
September 07, 2015
The Art Books of Henri Matisse
An exhibition of art books by one of the greatest artists of the 20th century, Henri Matisse (1869-1954), opens at the Bechtler Museum of Modern Art February 27. Drawn from the Bank of America Collection, The Art Books of Henri Matisse includes 80 framed original illustrations with text from some of Matisse’s most significant books. Best known for his boldly colored paintings, Matisse created a body of work that also included drawings, prints, cut-outs and sculpture, as well as costume and stage set designs. The artist didn’t create illustrated books until his late 60s, but the same flowing lines that characterized his oils and pencil studies were carried over to the printmaking medium.

Four of Matisse’s art books are featured in the exhibition, including Jazz, one of the most celebrated artists’ books in the history of modern art. It features one of Matisse’s most widely reproduced images – the iconic illustration of Icarus as a languid black figure with a red circle at his heart, plunging downwards against a royal blue night sky, surrounded by yellow stars. In addition to the core group of Matisse works, a limited number of artists’ books from the Bechtler Museum of Modern Art’s permanent collection will also be on view.

Mon 10am - 5pm
Tue Closed
Wed 10am - 5pm
Thu 10am - 5pm
Fri 10am - 5pm
Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 12pm - 5pm

Fourth-Floor Gallery
Bechtler Museum of Modern Art
420 South Tryon Street
Charlotte, NC
Exhibit South
March 01, 2015 -
January 03, 2016
A Colorful Folk: Pennsylvania Germans & the Art of Everyday Life
This comprehensive exhibition explores the unique world of the Pennsylvania Germans and their colorful folk art, including decorated manuscripts (fraktur), textiles, furniture, metalwork, and pottery. Embellished with hearts, flowers, birds, and other traditional motifs, these objects reveal a love of color, design, and whimsy. Most are functional, but others were made “just for nice” and attest to the Pennsylvania Germans’ penchant for decorating virtually everything—from a tiny pincushion to the side of a barn.

A Colorful Folk sheds new light on Pennsylvania German folk art and presents more than 125 objects—many never before exhibited or published. Highlights include rare and important examples of fraktur, ranging from elaborate birth and baptismal certificates (made primarily by members of the German Lutheran and Reformed faiths) to an extraordinary religious text made by Mennonite schoolmaster Andreas Kolb. A painted chest decorated in 1783 by fraktur artist Henrich Otto with floral motifs and a pair of camels will also be displayed. Textiles are also prominently featured, including dazzling examples of needlework, quilted objects, and clothing such as an embroidered wedding handkerchief and apron from Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. The tools and techniques used by fraktur artists will also be explored in addition to issues of authenticity, forgery, and revivals.

Most objects in the exhibition are drawn from Winterthur’s permanent collection, which now includes the fraktur and textile collection of the late Pastor Frederick S. Weiser, a legendary scholar and collector of Pennsylvania German folk art. More than a dozen private collectors and institutions also loaned important works of art.

An illustrated, 64-page catalogue will accompany the exhibition, presenting new scholarship and many never-before-published objects.

A related conference will be held March 5–8, 2015.

Related exhibitions will be on view at the Philadelphia Museum of Art from February 1–April 26, 2015 and the Free Library of Philadelphia from March 2–July 16, 2015.

Winterthur is closed to the public for our annual seasonal closing but will reopen on March 1, 2015, for the start of our spring season. Members continue to have grounds and garden access while we are closed, dawn to dusk, every day. Please show your membership card at the guard stand at the front gate.

Tuesday–Sunday, 10:00 am–5:00 pm
Last house tour tickets sold at 3:15 pm. Museum Store and Bookstore open Tuesday–Sunday, 10:00 am–5:30 pm.

Closed Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day

Library
Monday–Friday, 8:30 am–4:30 pm
Closed holidays

Winterthur Museum, Garden & Library
5105 Kennett Pike (Route 52)
Winterthur, DE
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 02 -
August 21, 2015
Illuminated Printing: William Blake and the Book Arts
William Blake (1757-1827) was a British poet, painter, engraver, and printer. Blake developed an unorthodox method of printmaking called relief etching, which he referred to as “illuminated printing.” Using this process, Blake created such powerful works as The Marriage of Heaven and Hell and Songs of Innocence and of Experience. Blake’s practices of crafting a dialog between text and image and controlling all aspects of book production are reflected in the individualist spirit of today’s book arts. This exhibit includes examples from the Special Collections of the Haas Family Arts Library of work by contemporary artists who have been influenced by William Blake’s legacy.

This exhibition is a companion to the first major collaborative exhibition between the Yale University Art Gallery and the Yale Center for British Art: The Critique of Reason: Romantic Art, 1760–1860, on view at the Yale University Art Gallery from March 6 - July 26, 2015. The Haas Family Arts Library actively supports arts-area research by members of the Yale, national, and international communities.

Mon - Fri 8:30am - 5pm

Robert B. Haas Library
Yale University Libraries
180 York Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
March 06, 2015 -
January 10, 2016
Spirited Republic: Alcohol in American History
Since the first European settlers arrived, Americans have enjoyed a drink. At times, many of us have enjoyed a lot of drinks. But other Americans, fearing the harm alcohol could do to society and to individuals, have tried to limit or even stop our drinking defining when and where we could consume alcohol.

These two, different views of alcoholic beverages run throughout American history. Sometimes they have existed in relative peace; at other times they have been at war. “Spirited Republic: Alcohol in American History” uses National Archives documents and artifacts to show how government programs and policies changed over time and to illustrate the wide variety of views Americans hold about alcohol. The stories they tell echo today’s debates on regulation of drinking and the legalization of drugs.

Open 7 days a week: 10am - 5:30pm

Free & open to the public

Lawrence F. O’Brien Gallery
National Archives Museum
Constitution Avenue NW (between 7th & 9th St.)
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 07 -
August 16, 2015
Warhol by the Book
Andy Warhol lived and breathed books. From his student days in the 1940s to his death in 1987, Warhol experimented wildly with form and content, turning traditional notions of media and authorship on their heads. He co-produced a satirical cookbook mocking fashionable French recipes; held coloring parties for crowdsourcing his own promotional books; and designed a pop-up “children’s book for hipsters” featuring sound recordings, holograms, and a do-it-yourself nose job.

Warhol by the Book is organized by The Andy Warhol Museum, one of four Carnegie Museums of Pittsburgh. The first US exhibition to focus on Warhol’s book work, it features more than 400 objects including unique and unpublished materials, and highlights WCMA’s important holdings given by Richard F. Holmes ’46.

The exhibition debuts at WCMA and will travel to the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh where it will be on view from October 9, 2015-January 10, 2016.

Celebrate the Opening
Friday, Mar 6, 6pm
Warhol & the Stuff of Books, the first in a series of conversations, with drinks and mingling to follow.

Free & open to the public

Williams College Museum of Art
15 Lawrence Hall Drive, Suite 2
Williamstown, MA
Exhibit New England
March 13 -
September 01, 2015
Magna Carta: Law, Liberty, Legacy
To mark the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta we are holding a once-in-a-lifetime exhibition - book now!

Foundation of democracy or rallying cry for modern rights? One of the world’s most famous documents, Magna Carta has inspired some of today’s fundamental liberties. Yet it started as a practical solution to a political crisis 800 years ago.

Since 1215, Magna Carta has evolved from a political agreement to an international symbol of freedom. Uncover the story of how its power has been used – and abused – from its genesis through to today’s popular culture, in the largest exhibition ever staged about this world-famous document.

Explore centuries of dramatic history, from King John, medieval battles, revolution, wars, empire and the struggle for the right to vote, right up to today’s satirical commentaries Together, for this once-in-a-lifetime moment, are the iconic documents and artefacts that tell the story of Magna Carta: stunning manuscripts, paintings, statues, royal relics and two of the four original 1215 copies of Magna Carta, as well as Jefferson’s handwritten copy of the Declaration of Independence and one of the original copies of the US Bill of Rights on display in the UK for the first time.

The exhibition will be at the heart of a wider Magna Carta programme at the Library, with a series of public events, a conference, a learning programme and an online legacy for Magna Carta in 2015 and beyond. British artist Cornelia Parker has been specially commissioned to create a new artwork, which will be unveiled at the British Library on 15 May 2015 and remain on display until 24 July.


Magna Carta learning programme

To accompany the exhibition, we are offering a programme of student workshops and teacher conferences to support the delivery of History at Key Stages 2-5 and Citizenship at Key Stages 3-5. We are also encouraging schools to participate in a project to debate students’ rights and responsibilities in the digital space.

PACCAR Gallery
The British Library
96 Euston Road
London, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
March 19 -
August 23, 2015
Ships, Clocks & Stars: The Quest for Longitude
For centuries, longitude (east-west position) was a matter of life and death at sea. Ships that went off course had no way to re-discover their longitude. With no known location, they might smash into underwater obstacles or be forever lost at sea.

Ships, Clocks & Stars: The Quest for Longitude, produced by the National Maritime Museum in Greenwich, England, celebrates the 300th anniversary of the British Longitude Act of 1714, which offered a huge reward for any practical way to determine longitude at sea. The longitude problem was so difficult that—despite the reward—it took five decades to solve it.

Through extraordinary, historic materials—many from the collection of the National Maritime Museum—the exhibition tells the story of the clockmakers, astronomers, naval officers, and others who pursued the long "quest for longitude" to ultimate success.

Among its highlights are clockmaker John Harrison's H4 marine timekeeper, the culmination of his life's work; astronomical tables developed by Nevil Maskelyne, the Astronomer Royal; paintings from Captain Cook's Pacific voyages; and more.

Digital displays throughout the exhibition bring key longitude concepts and materials to light. For those seeking additional activities, try our related Family Programs or come to the "Ships, Clocks, and Stars" concerts by the Folger Consort.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm - 5pm

Free admission

Great Hall
Folger Shakespeare Library
201 East Capitol Street SE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 20 -
October 11, 2015
Painting Paradise: The Art of the Garden
Whether a sacred sanctuary, a place for scientific study, a haven for the solitary thinker or a space for pure enjoyment and delight, gardens are where man and nature meet.

Painting Paradise: The Art of the Garden reveals the way in which gardens have been celebrated in art across four centuries.

Bringing together paintings, botanical studies, drawings, books, manuscripts and decorative arts, the exhibition explores the changing character of the garden from the 16th to the early 20th century. It includes works by Leonardo da Vinci, Maria Sibylla Merian and Carl Fabergé, and some of the earliest and rarest surviving depictions of gardens and plants.

Open daily, 10:00-17:30
Last admission 16:30

Admission prices
Adult £10.00
Concessions £9.20
Under 17/Disabled £5.20
Under 5 Free

The Queen's Gallery
Buckingham Palace
London, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
March 21 -
October 12, 2015
The Civil War and the Making of Modern Washington
Washington, D.C. underwent remarkable changes, both physically and politically, as a result of the American Civil War. The Civil War and the Making of Modern Washington will examine the city’s transformations from the beginning of the war to Reconstruction through maps, prints, and illustrations of the federal buildings, barracks, hospitals, hotels, and markets constructed to accommodate a ballooning population. The exhibition will also explore Washington’s role as a laboratory for social and political changes during this transformative period in American history.

The George Washington University Museum
The Textile Museum
701 21st Street, NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 21 -
October 12, 2015
Seat of Empire: Planning Washington, 1790–1801
Washington, D.C. was the result of political compromise and artistic imagination. In 1792, George Washington charged French-born architect Pierre “Peter” Charles L’Enfant with a momentous task: to envision the capital of a new nation from a swath of private properties and plantations at the confluence of two rivers. Seat of Empire: Planning Washington, 1790–1801 will present historical maps and related images that tell the story of this early experiment in urban design that shaped the landscape of our nation’s capital.

The George Washington University Museum
The Textile Museum
701 21st Street, NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 21 -
September 20, 2015
Marks of Genius: Masterpieces from the Collections of the Bodleian Libraries
In over four centuries the Bodleian Libraries have assembled, through gift and purchase, an unparalleled collection of books and manuscripts that can be called works of genius. From Shakespeare's First Folio to the Kennicott Bible, this show-stopping exhibition considers how common attitudes towards genius are manifested in the physical form of a number of remarkable books, maps and manuscripts held in the Libraries' collections, and explores ways in which the works of genius found in a university library can be acquired, collected and read.

Mon - Fri 10am - 5pm
Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 11am - 5pm

Free admission

Exhibition Galleries
Weston Library
Bodleian Library
Old Schools Quad
Catte Street
Oxford, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
March 21, 2015 -
March 19, 2016
Pointing Their Pens: Herblock and Fellow Cartoonists Confront the Issues
Editorial cartoonists, like all Americans, do not always agree with one another. Issues on which the nation was particularly divided in the twentieth century—the question of U.S. intervention prior to entering World War II, the Red Scare, the Cold War, the Vietnam War, the Watergate scandal, and events in the Middle East—provide the framework for this exhibition. These topics were particularly fertile ground for editorial cartoonists.

The exhibition offers viewers an extensive opportunity to experience the work of Herbert L. Block (1909–2001)—commonly known as Herblock—alongside the work of his contemporaries over the period of four decades and provides visual insights into key moments that shaped the United States in the twentieth century. Pointing Their Pens draws from the comprehensive collections of cartoon art acquired by the Library of Congress since the early 1900s, including the Herbert L. Block Collection and the Art Wood Collection of Cartoon and Caricature.

Graphic Arts Galleries, Ground Floor, Thomas Jefferson Building
Library of Congress
First St. SE, between Independence Ave. & East Capitol St.
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
March 24 -
September 05, 2015
The Handel and Haydn Society: Bringing Music to Life for 200 Years
Founded in Boston in 1815, the Handel and Haydn Society is America’s oldest continuously performing arts organization. The Bicentennial Exhibition draws from Handel and Haydn’s extensive archives–including materials housed at Boston Public Library–and wide community to tell the story of its 200 years. Its musical legacy embodies the cultural heritage and development of the city and the nation.

Mon – Thu 9am - 9pm
Fri – Sat 9am – 5pm
Sun 1 – 5pm

Cheverus Room
Central Library in Copley Square
Boston Public Library
700 Boylston Street
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
March 26 -
October 08, 2015
Women in Cartography: Celebrating 400 Years of Unsung Contributions to the Mapping World
This exhibition recognizes and celebrates the long overlooked role of women in the world of mapping; bringing their stories, accomplishments, and most importantly their maps to light. Curated by Alice Hudson, former Chief of the Map Division at the New York Public Library, Women in Cartography showcases the works of better-known women cartographers such as Marie Tharp, who, in partnership with Bruce Heezen, created the first scientific map of the entire ocean floor, and, Agnes Sinclair Holbrook who created the Hull-House maps, statistical cartographic presentations of social data from the immigrant rich Near West Side neighborhoods of Chicago.

Join us in celebrating these remarkable women and their maps, dating from Coletta van den Keere’s engraved portrait of Jodocus Hondius ca. 1613 to Claire Kiedrowski’s modern GIS and LiDAR work for Kappa Mapping in Maine.

Tue 10am – 4pm
Wed 10am – 4pm
Thu 10am – 8pm
Sat 10am - 2pm

Free and open to the public

Osher Map Library
Portland Campus
University of Southern Maine
314 Forest Avenue
Portland, ME
Exhibit New England
March 26 -
October 22, 2015
Women in Cartography: Celebrating 400 Years of Unsung Contributions to the Mapping World
This exhibition recognizes and celebrates the long overlooked role of women in the world of mapping; bringing their stories, accomplishments, and most importantly their maps to light. Curated by Alice Hudson, former Chief of the Map Division at the New York Public Library, Women in Cartography showcases the works of better-known women cartographers such as Marie Tharp, who, in partnership with Bruce Heezen, created the first scientific map of the entire ocean floor, and, Agnes Sinclair Holbrook who created the Hull-House maps, statistical cartographic presentations of social data from the immigrant rich Near West Side neighborhoods of Chicago.

Tue 10am – 4pm
Wed 10am – 4pm
Thu 10am – 8pm
Sat 10am - 2pm

Free & open to the public

Osher Map Library
Smith Center for Cartographic Education
UM campus
University of Southern Maine
Portland, ME
Exhibit New England
March 28 -
September 21, 2015
Between Modernism and Tradition: British Works on Paper, 1914- 1948
Early 20th-century modernism in Britain drew its inspiration from avant-garde art movements in France, Germany, and Italy (especially Cubism and Futurism), though it took on its own idiosyncratic forms, the best known of which was Vorticism, a dynamic style of jarring colors and bold lines that embraced modernity and the machine age. But Britain’s hold on modernism was more fragile than in continental Europe, and the tension between tradition and the avant-garde (signified particularly by a resistance to abstraction) was more pronounced there. This exhibition of about two dozen drawings, watercolors, and prints, drawn from The Huntington’s collections, explores the great range of artistic styles employed by British artists through a period of dramatic social upheaval and change.

Huntington Art Gallery
West Wing, Second Floor
The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
March 30, 2015 -
May 08, 2016
Mathew Brady’s Photographs of Union Generals
Mathew Brady’s Photographs of Union Generals is a part of the NPG’S series of exhibitions marking the 150th anniversary of the Civil War. Although Brady may be best known for his photographic documentation of the Civil War, his New York and Washington, DC galleries also did a brisk business throughout the conflict by producing studio portraits of the ever-changing roster of Union Army generals.

Featuring modern prints made from Brady’s original glass-plate negatives in the National Portrait Gallery’s Frederick Hill Meserve Collection, this installation includes portraits of many of the North’s military leaders, from George McCellan and Ambrose Burnside to William Tecumseh Sherman and Ulysses Grant.

11:30am - 7pm daily
Closed December 25

National Portrait Gallery
Eighth and F Streets NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 03 -
August 23, 2015
Basquiat: The Unknown Notebooks
Brooklyn-born artist Jean-Michel Basquiat filled numerous notebooks with poetry fragments, word play, sketches, and personal observations ranging from street life and popular culture to themes of race, class, and world history. The first major exhibition of the artist's notebooks, Basquiat: The Unknown Notebooks features 160 pages of these rarely seen documents, along with related works on paper and large-scale paintings.

A self-taught artist with encyclopedic and cross-cultural interests, Basquiat was influenced by comics, advertising, children's sketches, Pop art, hip-hop, politics, and everyday life. Basquiat: The Unknown Notebooks emphasizes the distinct interplay of text and images in Basquiat’s art, providing unprecedented insight into the importance of writing in the artist’s process. The notebook pages on display contain early renderings of iconic imagery—teepees, crowns, skeleton-like figures, and grimacing faces—that also appear throughout his large-scale works, as well as an early drawing related to his series of works titled Famous Negro Athletes.

Wed, 11am – 6pm
Thu, 11am – 10pm
Fri – Sun, 11am – 6pm

Morris A. and Meyer Schapiro Wing, 4th Floor
Brooklyn Museum
200 Eastern Parkway
Brooklyn, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 04 -
September 21, 2015
Fish Stories: Early Images of American Game Fish
Game Fishes of the United States, one of the largest and most spectacular of American sporting books, was printed in 1879 -1880 at the zenith of late nineteenth-century American chromolithography. The work, which is included in the Crystal Bridges Library collection, features 20 gorgeous color plates based on the original watercolor paintings by well-known sporting artist Samuel Kilbourne, with text written by ichthyologist George Brown Goode, head of the fish research programs of the US Fish Commission and the Smithsonian. The color plates capture a number of distinctly American fishes in their natural surroundings, including the striped bass, sheepshead, bluefish, weakfish, red snapper, pompano, and brook trout. Each fish’s shimmering colors and delicate scales are amazingly vivid. This classic collection elegantly conveys the drama of sport fishing and highlights the exploration and celebration of nature in American art—one of the major themes in Crystal Bridges’ permanent collection. Samuel Kilbourne (1836 -1881) was a native of Bridgetown, Maine. He was trained as a landscape painter and painted a variety of landscapes until about 1858 when he took up the painting of fish. He painted on commission for both scientists and sportsmen, but he is remembered as part of the tradition of American sporting art. He had just completed the series of illustrations for Game Fish of the United States at the time of his death.

Mon & Thu 11am - 6pm
Wed & Fri 11am - 9pm
Sat & Sun 10am - 6pm
Tue CLOSED

Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art
600 Museum Way
Bentonville, AR
Exhibit South
April 07 -
August 30, 2015
The Art of Eric Carle: Bugs, Beetles, and Butterflies
As a child, Eric Carle became very interested in small animals, a curiosity sparked by his father, who would take him on walks in the woods and fields, exploring the tiny creatures that lived there. In Eric’s own words, “I remember the excitement of lifting stones or peeling back the bark of dead trees to discover the living things that crawled, crept, and scurried about there.” In Bugs, Beetles, and Butterflies, The Carle celebrates the wings, stings, and crawling things that have appeared throughout his work, ranging from allergy tab advertisements he created in the late 1960s to familiar picture book favorites including The Very Hungry Caterpillar and The Grouchy Ladybug.

Tue. – Fri. 10am – 4pm
Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

The Eric Carle Museum
of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
April 08 -
August 02, 2015
The Divine Comedy: Heaven, Purgatory, and Hell Revisited by Contemporary African Artists
Curated by the internationally acclaimed writer and art critic Simon Njami, this dramatic multi-media exhibition reveals the ongoing global relevance of Dante Alighieri’s 14th century epic as part of a shared intellectual heritage. Including original commissions and renowned works of art by approximately 40 of the most dynamic contemporary artists from 19 African nations and the diaspora, this visually stunning exhibition will be the first to take advantage of the museum’s pavilion and stairwells, as well as galleries on the first and third floors.

Celebrated artists like Kader Attia, Wangechi Mutu, and Yinka Shonibare explore the themes of paradise, purgatory, and hell with video, photography, printmaking, painting, sculpture, fiber arts, and mixed media installation. In so doing, they probe diverse issues of politics, heritage, history, identity, faith, and the continued power of art to express the unspoken and intangible.

10am – 5:30pm daily
Closed December 25

Free admission

Pavilion, stairwells, & galleries on the first and third floor
National Museum of African Art
950 Independence Avenue SW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 11, 2015 -
January 05, 2016
Do The Spirits Return?: From Dark Arts to Sleight of Hand in Early 20th Century Stage Magic
Today, we think of magic as pleasurable sleight of hand with a dash of neuroscience; acts which amuse and astound. But for centuries, the word “magic” evoked more powerful ideas: control over the boundaries between life and death, witchcraft and satanism, the sacred power of relics and amulets, the healing arts of shamans, and the deceptive practices of confidence men. This pre-rational history of “magic” lies just beneath the surface of the golden age of stage magic, as perfectly exemplified by the life and work of Howard Thuston (1869–1936) a former con man, carnival speiler and missionary student who became one of the most famous magicians of his time with a reputation surpassing that of his chief rival Harry Houdini. “Do The Spirits Return?” will explore the surprising intersections between spiritualism, torture theatre, dark arts and early 20th century stage magic as seen in the work of Howard Thurston via stunning, never before exhibited original posters, artworks, artifacts, props, photographs and ephemera drawn from the astounding collection of over 50,000 artifacts amassed by Brooklyn native Rory Feldman.

Wed - Mon, 12:00pm - 6:00pm
Tue, CLOSED

Admission to the Museum & Library is $8. Seniors and students are $6, and children 12 and under are free.

The Morbid Anatomy Museum
424 Third Avenue (corner of 7th Street)
Brooklyn, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 11 -
October 18, 2015
Exhibit: One-of-a-Kind: Unique Photographic Objects from the Center for Creative Photography
This exhibition challenges the expectation that photographs are infinitely reproducible multiples. Typically photographs are printed from a negative or digital capture, and can be produced in editions ranging from a few prints to several hundred. However, some photographic processes – including daguerreotypes, tintypes, and Polaroid prints – produce only a single, one-of-a-kind object.

In other cases, artists choose to use materials in a way that produces a unique artwork, such as sculpting and collaging with or painting and drawing on photographs. The exhibition will include works from the entire history of the photographic medium, from the 1840s to the present day. Unique photographs by David Emitt Adams, Pierre Cordier, Betty Hahn, Bill Jay, Chris McCaw, Joyce Neimanas, Susan Rankaitis and Andy Warhol will be included.

Mon & Tue Closed
Wed 10am - 9pm
Thu 10am - 5pm
Fri 10am - 5pm
(First Fridays: 10am - 10pm)
Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 12pm - 5pm

Doris and John Norton Gallery for the Center for Creative Photography
Phoenix Art Museum
1625 N. Central Avenue
Phoenix, AZ
Exhibit Southwest
April 13 -
August 07, 2015
The Image Affair: Dreyfus in the Media, 1894-1906
The Image Affair: Dreyfus in the Media, 1894-1906 examines the infamous wrongful conviction for treason, and eventual exoneration, of Jewish officer Alfred Dreyfus as it played out in the French media at the turn of the last century. This exhibition traces the greatest scandal of fin-de-siècle France through the diverse body of images that proliferated in a country divided by anti-semitism, nationalistic fervor, juridical malpractice, and military misconduct. Encompassing the full range of the period's print culture including the illustrated press, broadsheets, photography, postcards, films and even board games, the exhibition draws almost entirely from the Lorraine Beitler Collection of the Dreyfus Affair at the University of Pennsylvania, one of the largest such collections in the world. The images and objects assembled represent a range of opposing viewpoints from the Dreyfusard and Anti-Dreyfusard camps—at turns documentary and satirical, hateful and humorous. The Image Affair encourages a critical examination of an event that engaged and galvanized French and international publics alike, emphasizing the key role that new media technologies played in its unfolding.

Mon - Fri 9am-5pm
Sat & Sun, by prior arrangement

Free & open to the public

Kamin Gallery
Kislak Center
Van Pelt-Dietrich Library
University of Pennsylvania Libraries
3420 Walnut Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 14 -
September 06, 2015
Light, Paper, Process: Reinventing Photography
At a time when digital technologies offer increasingly sophisticated options for producing, storing, and disseminating images, a number of artists have turned their attention to exploring the essence of photography, distilling it to its basic components of light-sensitive emulsions and chemical development. These artists may use hand-coated or expired papers, archival negatives, or custom-built cameras, or they may eschew the use of a camera or film altogether. All revel in materials and process, employing darkroom techniques that shift our understanding of photography away from a medium that merely records the world.

Tue – Fri & Sun 10am – 5:30pm
Sat 10am – 9pm
Mon Closed

Free admission

West Pavilion, Lower Level
The Getty Center
1200 N. Sepulveda Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
April 15, 2015 -
March 31, 2018
America in Circulation: A History of US Currency
Exhibit will feature the collection of Mark R. Shenkman

Visitors will have the opportunity to view hundreds of beautiful and rare examples of American paper money and to explore them in more depth through large interactive touch screen displays.

From Colonial times, American money has told a fascinating and detailed story of the country’s struggles and successes. Pivotal moments in history have led to changes in the nation’s money, as crises have brought about innovation. Often local and national currencies competed and coexisted with each other, while economic depression, war and counterfeiting drove constant advances in design.

“Today, there are only seven notes in circulation. Yet most Americans don’t realize that both the banks and the government were issuing many different types of currency for most of our nation’s first 150 years,” said Museum President David Cowen. “The notes in this exhibit tell the story of the development of America, and their striking beauty makes them pieces of art in and of themselves.”

The exhibition will feature approximately 250 notes spanning from the Colonial era to the present day. Highlights include rare examples of currency bearing the signatures of signers of the US Constitution and Declaration of Independence; a complete set of notes from the Educational Series of 1896, renowned for being the most beautiful paper money in American history; and rare examples of high denomination notes including $5,000 and $10,000 bills.

Tues–Sat 10am – 4pm

MUSEUM OF AMERICAN FINANCE
48 Wall Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 16 -
December 27, 2015
From Aesop To Updike Edward Gorey’s Book Cover Art
Edward Gorey is well know for over 100 written and illustrated works (though not all titles are books) including The Gashlycrumb Tinies and The Doubtful Guest. The author-artists set and costume designs for his award-winning Broadway Dracula, and his animated sequences to PBS Mystery! boosted his creative achievements.

However, this output overshadows his achievements as a much-in-demand illustrator for other authors. While Gorey was busy creating his world of stiff Victorians, sinister Edwardians, doomed infants, strange creatures, stifling interiors and mysterious landscapes, he was also busy creating a significant body of commercial book design for a variety of authors and publishers. Our 2015 exhibit, From Aesop to Updike: Edward Goreys Book Cover Art & Design is a varied sampling of almost five decades of commercial workan integral component (and not just an intriguing sideline) of Edward Gorey's artistry.

April 16 - June 28
Thu/Fri/Sat: 11:00 - 4:00
Sun: 12:00 - 4:00

July 1 - October 11
Wed/Thu/Fri/Sat: 11:00 - 4:00
Sun: 12:00 - 4:00

October 16 - December 27
Fri/Sat: 11:00 - 4:00
Sun: 12:00 - 4:00

Adults: $8.00
Students & Seniors (65+): $5.00
Children 6-12 years old: $2.00
Children under 6 are free

The Edward Gorey House
8 Strawberry Lane
Yarmouth Port, MA
Exhibit New England
April 25 -
August 09, 2015
Take One: Contemporary Photographs
Examine the emergence of photography as a key medium of contemporary art during the last forty years.

This is the first in a two-part series of exhibitions to feature photographs made since roughly 1975. Together these presentations offer two views of a period in which photography emerged as a key medium of contemporary art.

By the last decades of the twentieth century, photography had established traditions of genre and craftsmanship, which an increasing number of artists chose to engage, revise, or reject. Taking inspiration from Conceptual art and other developments of the 1970s, artists including Jan Dibbets, John Divola, and Blythe Bohnen looked to photography as a means of recording or exploring experimental actions rather than making conventionally beautiful still lifes, landscapes, or portraits. Artists also questioned the idea of the photograph as a neutral mirror of reality. Cindy Sherman, David Wojnarowicz, Andreas Gursky, and others focused attention on the role of pictures and picture-making technologies in modern politics and society, taking the visual language of films and magazines as a point of reference and subject of critique. Meanwhile, photographers such as Robert Adams, David Goldblatt, and Judith Joy Ross have continued to explore the medium’s established terrain, using the camera to create insightful and provocative pictures of our relationships with one another, everyday spaces, history, and the land.

Today, all of these strategies are available to artists using photography, and new approaches continue to emerge. Take One touches on many important trends, featuring images by artists ranging from Lucas Samaras and Robbert Flick to An-My Lê, Moyra Davey, and Elaine Stocki. As photographers extend and revamp the traditions of the medium, where do we stand and where might we go from here?

Mon Closed *
Tue – Sun 10am – 5pm
Wed & Fri evenings Closed

*Holiday Hours
Closed: 4th of July, Thanksgiving Day, & Christmas Day

Open normal hours on the following holidays:
New Year’s Day
Martin Luther King Jr. Day
Presidents’ Day
Memorial Day
Labor Day
Columbus Day

Access for two consecutive days to Museum’s main building, Perelman Building, Rodin Museum, and historic houses Mount Pleasant and Cedar Grove

Adults: $20
Seniors (65 & over): $18
Students (with valid ID): $14
Youth (13–18): $14
Children (12 & under): Free
Members (Join): Free

First Sunday of Every Month and Every Wednesday after 5:00 p.m.: Pay What You Wish
What does Pay What You Wish mean? We ask that it starts at a penny but support us with whatever amount you wish.

★ The Philadelphia Museum of Art is proud to participate in Blue Star Museums, and is offering free admission to all active duty military personnel and their families from Memorial Day, May 25, 2015, through Labor Day, September 7, 2015.

Julien Levy Gallery, 1st floor
Perelman Building
Philadelphia Museum of Art
6th St. and the Benjamin Franklin Pkwy.
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
April 25 -
October 12, 2015
Andy Warhol: Campbell's Soup Cans and Other Works, 1953–1967
Andy Warhol’s Campbell’s Soup Cans is the signature work in the artist’s career and a landmark in MoMA’s collection. The 1962 series of 32 paintings is the centerpiece in this focused collection exhibition of Warhol's work during the crucial years between 1953 and 1967. The Soup Cans mark a breakthrough for Warhol, when he began to apply his seminal strategies of serial repetition and reproduction to key subjects derived from American commodity culture. Warhol also developed his signature use of the flat, uniform aesthetic of photo-screenprinting just after he completed the Soup Cans. For the first time at MoMA, the 32 Soup Cans are shown in a line (rather than a grid), echoing the way they were first exhibited at the Ferus Gallery, Los Angeles, in 1962. The exhibition also includes drawings and illustrated books Warhol made in the 1950s, when he started his career as a commercial artist, and other paintings and prints from the 1960s, when he became a beacon of the Pop art movement.

The Paul J. Sachs Prints and Illustrated Books Galleries, second floor
Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 02 -
November 29, 2015
We Are One: Mapping America’s Road from Revolution to Independence
Featuring 60 maps and 40 prints, paintings and objects, this major gallery exhibition traces the American story from the French and Indian War to the creation of a new national government and the founding of Washington, D.C. as its home.

Mon – Thu 10am – 7pm
Fri – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 1 – 5pm

McKim Exhibition Hall
Central Library in Copley Square
Boston Public Library
700 Boylston Street
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
May 07 -
September 04, 2015
Up Close and Personal: Intimate Devotions and Everyday Objects from Late Antiquity
How was religion lived at the private level of the household or individual? Much of our perception of religion in Late Antiquity stems from the official and monumental art associated with Greco-Roman religions, Judaism, or Christianity. Temples, imposing statues, churches, catacombs, and cemeteries can give the impression of communal religion practiced on a grand, public scale. By contrast, small, personal objects that served a variety of devotional purposes provide insight into the private piety of a broad spectrum of Late Antique religious practices. Individuals of all levels of society made use of such items as jewelry and oil lamps bearing religious symbols, souvenirs from various shrines, statuettes of the gods for domestic shrines, items of clothing with mythological figures, and amulets meant to repel danger or the evil eye. Such objects allow an intimate look at daily life and ordinary devotional practices of men and women from the past and give insight into the ways religion was lived. The pieces in this exhibit are ideal for viewing, up close and personal, in the intimate space of the Vanderbilt Art Gallery.

This exhibition is the second in a partnership between the History of Art department and the Fine Arts Gallery, which results in a student-curated exhibition.
The exhibit grows out of a semester-long course, “Exhibiting Historical Art,” taught by a faculty member in the department. The class allows students the rare opportunity to get ‘up close and personal’ with art objects, through research and physical study, and to think through every aspect of their display and presentation to the public. As a group they have selected objects from Vanderbilt Fine Arts Gallery’s permanent collection and supplemented them with numerous loans from the Toledo Museum of Art and private collections.

Summer Gallery Hours (May 1 - August 20, 2014)
Tue - Fri 12-4pm
Sat 1-5pm
Sun & Mon Closed

Academic Year Gallery Hours (August 21, 2015 -April 30, 2015)
Mon - Fri 11-4pm
Sat & Sun 1-5pm

Free & open to the public

Vanderbilt University Fine Arts Gallery
Cohen Memorial Hall
1220 21st Avenue South
Nashville, TN
Exhibit South
May 08, 2015 -
January 24, 2016
How Posters Work
How Posters Work shows how dozens of different designers—from prominent pioneers like Herbert Matter, Paul Rand, Philippe Apeloig and M/M (Paris), to lesser-known makers—have mobilized principles of composition, perception and storytelling to convey ideas and construct experiences.

Featuring more than 125 posters from Cooper Hewitt’s permanent collection, the exhibition demonstrates how some of the world’s most creative designers have employed design principles to produce powerful acts of visual communication.

The exhibition is organized into 14 subsections: focus the eye, overwhelm the eye, use text as image, overlap, cut and paste, assault the surface, simplify, tell a story, amplify, double the meaning, manipulate scale, activate the diagonal, make eye contact and make a system.

Some of the posters on view include:

Paula Scher’s 1994 poster for “Him” at The Public Theater
Lucian Bernhard’s 1909–1910 “Adler” poster
Michael Bierut’s 1999 poster “Light/Years”
Ladislav Sutnar’s 1958 work “Addo-x”
Frederick Siebel’s 1942 “Someone Talked”

Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum
2 East 91st Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 08 -
September 13, 2015
Georgia O’Keeffe: Line, Color, Composition
The power of Georgia O’Keeffe’s artwork derives from her mastery of essential elements of art making: line, color, and composition. To understand the richness of Georgia O’Keeffe’s artistic practice, this exhibition reveals her disciplined drawing practice, dramatic color palette, and innovative sense for composition through paintings and drawings that span her career. The presentation offers fresh insight into the importance of line in her work—from preliminary sketches and drawings, to the fluid, seemingly effortless outlines that define regions of her canvas and divide her compositions into dynamic zones of color, be it the curve of a flower petal, the horizon of a landscape, or the contour of an abstract form. A brilliant colorist, O’Keeffe created strong, vibrant works with colors that glow with energy and vitality. Holding all of this together in harmonious balance is her sense for composition. Time and time again in her work, we see an artist pushing the boundaries, in some cases quite literally with lines and forms racing off the edge of the canvas, yet somehow she always manages to maintain a sense of stability and produce works that are visually engaging. O’Keeffe’s facility with a variety of media—pastel, charcoal, watercolor, and oil—combined with her sense for line, color, and composition to produce deceptively simple works. Her confidence in handling these elements makes her style of painting look effortless. Our intent with this exhibition is not to eliminate the mystery of her artwork, but rather to deepen the appreciation of her skill and unique talents as one of the most technically proficient and artistically innovative artists of the twentieth century.

O’Keeffe’s drawing practice was the lens for each new experience and her sketches form a journal of her explorations. The artist was steadfast in her commitment to the discipline of drawing, which she adopted early in her career. O’Keeffe developed a personal vocabulary of abstract forms and composition strategies as she acquired the principles taught by Arthur Wesley Dow. Dow encouraged an intellectual and imaginative process of making art grounded in personal expression and harmonious design. In 1962, O’Keeffe remembered his influence. “… I had a technique for handling oil and watercolor easily; Dow gave me something to do with it.” She recorded her keen visual perceptions in sketchbooks for sixty years. The drawings demonstrate her process of distilling the natural world into abstract compositions of lines that form shapes and contours while eliminating distracting details, a process of identifying the very essence of a given location or subject. This practice allowed her to achieve a composition that can be simultaneously abstract and true to the natural world.

For example, included are the exhibition are two preparatory drawings and their related painting, Blue, Black and Grey of 1960, which reveal her sensitivity to abstract forms in the natural world and her debt to Dow, five decades after studying his methods. In the first drawing, firm clear lines trace the contour of the abstract shapes she observed in the landscape. The second drawing shows variations of shade and massing, reflecting the Japanese design concept of “notan” (“dark, light”), which Dow taught as an essential element, along with line and color, in producing harmonious pictures. O’Keeffe’s drawings demonstrate how she transformed her observations into abstract forms and masses. After making preparatory drawings, O’Keeffe outlined her compositions on canvas with charcoal before painting and applying color. Infrared photographs of her artwork show that her painted surfaces are quite faithful to the drawings underneath. She painted with conviction and the finished work of art seldom varies from her initial concept. This constancy in her artistic practice is evident throughout her life and is the subject of this exhibition.

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THURSDAY, JUNE 18, 9am – 4:30pm
Inspired by O’Keeffe: Composition and Color Workshop

Museum Education Annex
123 Grant Avenue

Cost: $95; Members, $85. Box lunch and art materials provided.

Learn about Georgia O’Keeffe’s art and life from Anna Koster, who served as O’Keeffe’s weekend companion in 1976. Art lessons will focus on composition and color. We’ll start with an exercise that influenced O’Keeffe, given to her by her teacher Arthur Wesley Dow. Try another exercise prescribed by O’Keeffe herself. Take home your own art inspired by O’Keeffe’s favorite subjects, art, and artistic philosophy, but reflecting your aesthetic and spirit. The workshop is open to participants of all skill levels, from those with no previous art experience to accomplished artists. Since her time with O’Keeffe, Koster has enjoyed a life and career focused on art, and earned an MFA in Fine Arts from San Jose State University.
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Museum Hours:
Sun 9am - 5pm
Mon 9am - 5pm
Tue 9am - 5pm
Wed 9am - 5pm
Thu 9am - 5pm
Fri 9am - 7pm
Sat 9am - 5pm

Georgia O’Keeffe Museum
217 Johnson Street
Sante Fe, NM
Exhibit Southwest
May 09 -
November 29, 2015
Gray Matter: David Macaulay’s Black and White
The Carle is pleased to announce it will host an exhibition of the original art from David Macaulay’s Caldecott award-winning Black and White. The exhibition which will be on view from May 9 to November 29, 2015 is a partial celebration of the 25th anniversary of the book’s publication. Heralded as one of the first post-modern picture books where a unified linear narrative was rejected, the book comprises four possible stories arranged in four panels per page which the reader can read according to their preference. In his acceptance speech, Macaulay praised the committee for its choice of such a seemingly unorthodox book. The visitor will be able to gain a deeper understanding of Macaulay’s process through the wealth of preliminary material.

Tue. – Fri. 10am – 4pm
Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

The Eric Carle Museum
of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
May 09 -
August 02, 2015
Rolling Hills, Satanic Mills: The British Passion for Landscape
Rolling Hills, Satanic Mills: The British Passion for Landscape is an extraordinary exhibition that traces the development of landscape painting in Britain through the Industrial Revolution and the eras of Romanticism, Impressionism, and Modernism, to the postmodern and post-industrial imagery of today.

Composed of more than 60 works of art selected from the remarkable collection of the National Museum Wales, the exhibition includes major oil paintings, watercolors, drawings, and photographs, offering fresh insight into the changing relationship between artists and the landscape, as well as the evolving tastes of wealthy collectors.

Beginning with Old Masters Claude Lorrain (1604–1682) and Salvator Rosa (1615–1673), the exhibition features an international roster of artists, from famed British painters Joseph Wright of Derby (1734–1797), John Constable (1776–1837), Thomas Gainsborough (1727–1788), and J. M. W. Turner (1775–1851), to Impressionists Claude Monet (1840–1926) and Alfred Sisley (1839–1899).

A summer exhibition experience at the Frick that includes dining, shopping, evening hours on Fridays, and a wide array of public programs, Rolling Hills, Satanic Mills provides a rare opportunity for western Pennsylvania residents to see these paintings outside their home at the National Museum Wales.

Tue - Sun 10am - 5pm
Fridays, 10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Closed Monday

Frick members: FREE
Non-members: $10
Youth (8 - 16): $5
Age 7 and under: FREE
Active-Duty Military & Families: FREE

The Frick Pittsburgh
7227 Reynolds Street
Pittsburgh, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 10 -
August 02, 2015
Ed Moses: Drawings from the 1960s & 70s
Ed Moses has been a significant figure in contemporary art in Los Angeles since his first solo exhibition at Ferus Gallery in 1958. Since the very beginning, drawing has been central to Moses’s practice. From his large, all-over graphite drawings of roses from the 1960s to his signature diagonal grids of the 1970s and beyond, Moses’s work has always been grounded in graphic experimentation.

The first museum presentation of the artist’s drawings since 1976, Ed Moses: Drawings from the 1960s and 70s is comprised of approximately 100 works from LACMA’s collection, the artist’s own holdings, and those of other museums and private collections.

Complementing Ed Moses is Drawing in L.A.: The 1960s and 70s, which features drawings from LACMA’s collection by other Los Angeles–based artists.

Mon, Tue, & Thu: 11am – 5pm
Wed: Closed
Fri: 11am – 8pm
Sat & Sun: 10am – 7pm

$15 Adults
$10 Seniors (62+) & Students with valid ID
Free Children (17 and under), Members, & Active-duty military personnel including National Guard & Reserve, & their families*

Admission includes access to LACMA's collection galleries and temporary exhibitions with an extra charge for entrance to specially ticketed exhibitions.

* Memorial Day through Labor Day (Monday, May 25 through Monday, September 7, 2015) as part Blue Star Museums. Admission does not include specially ticketed exhibitions.


BCAM, Level 2
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
5905 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
May 10 -
August 02, 2015
Drawing in L.A.: The 1960s & 70s
Drawing practices in Los Angeles varied tremendously during the 1960s and 1970s. Culled from LACMA’s collection and select local holdings, Drawing in L.A.: The 1960s and 70s features work by nearly 50 artists who approach drawing in numerous media and styles. Works range in technique from charcoal and ink to collage and xerography, and encompass realism, conceptual drawings and abstraction. The exhibition includes drawings by well known artists, and others who have long been neglected.

The exhibition provides a unique opportunity to see the wide variety of drawings that were being made in Los Angeles at an exciting time in the city's artistic history. The companion exhibition Ed Moses: Drawings from the 1960s and 70s features the work of a significant figure in contemporary art in Los Angeles.

Mon, Tue, & Thu: 11am – 5pm
Wed: Closed
Fri: 11am – 8pm
Sat & Sun: 10am – 7pm

$15 Adults
$10 Seniors (62+) & Students with valid ID
Free Children (17 and under), Members, & Active-duty military personnel including National Guard & Reserve, & their families*

Admission includes access to LACMA's collection galleries and temporary exhibitions with an extra charge for entrance to specially ticketed exhibitions.

* Memorial Day through Labor Day (Monday, May 25 through Monday, September 7, 2015) as part Blue Star Museums. Admission does not include specially ticketed exhibitions.

BCAM, Level 2
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
5905 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
May 11 -
November 13, 2015
Vanessa Bell’s Hogarth Press Designs
Vanessa Bell (1879–1961) was an English painter, designer, and important member of the Bloomsbury roup, a cluster of culturally influential figures in early 20th-century London. Throughout her career she designed many book jackets and illustrations for Hogarth Press, a British publishing house founded by Bell’s sister, author Virginia Woolf, and Leonard Woolf. This exhibition showcases several examples of Bell’s exquisite, yet simple, designs.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

National Museum of Woman in the Arts
1250 New York Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 13 -
August 01, 2015
The Grabhorn Press, 1920-1965

Ground Floor Gallery
The Grolier Club
47 East 60th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 15 -
September 01, 2015
75th Anniversary: The Day the World Changed, May 10, 1940
Hitler Attacks, Churchill Rises From the Ashes of Appeasement

A special exhibition featuring letters written by Churchill to the Prime Minister of France as the Allies are evacuating Dunkirk and, within a short time, as France is falling, including one of Churchill’s most significant letters ever about why the British can no longer send troops to help as they are needed in England to protect the British who will soon be standing alone.

Also included are German invasion maps of the Low Countries and photographs taken by invading German soldiers.

The Museum of WWII - Boston
#8 Mercer Road
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
May 15 -
August 15, 2015
My Own Master: Resistance to American Slavery
This exhibition explores how enslaved African Americans, helped by their free and freed counterparts, challenged slavery’s governance over their bodies and lives. Some such efforts are widely known, such as ingenious escapes and wide-scale insurrections. Other, more subtle forms of revolt are less familiar, such as cases of free blacks emancipating other blacks, or examples of a slave deftly manipulating her owners’ actions in written correspondence. Published memoirs and manifestoes by free Blacks and escaped slaves alike were themselves wielded as powerful rhetorical weapons in the fight for freedom.

Drawing from the Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library’s rich holdings, this exhibition complements our other current exhibition, “Who shall tell the story?: Voices of Civil War Virginia,” extending the story of the defeat of slavery backwards several decades and foregrounding the transformative actions of enslaved individuals and communities.

Albert and Shirley Small Special Collections Library
University of Virginia Library
160 McCormick Road,
Charlottesville, VA
Exhibit South
May 16 -
November 01, 2015
FRIDA KAHLO: Art, Garden, Life
The New York Botanical Garden announces its major 2015 exhibition, FRIDA KAHLO: Art, Garden, Life, focusing on the iconic artist's engagement with nature in her native country of Mexico. Opening on May 16 and remaining on view through November 1, the exhibition will be the first solo presentation of Kahlo's work in New York City in more than 25 years, and the first exhibition to focus exclusively on her intense interest in the botanical world.

Visitors to the Enid A. Haupt Conservatory will walk through a stunning flower show reimagining Kahlo's studio and garden at the Casa Azul (Blue House) in Coyoacán, Mexico City. Curated by distinguished art historian and specialist in Mexican art, Adriana Zavala, Ph.D., the multifaceted exhibition will include a rare display of more than a dozen original Kahlo paintings and works on paper on view in the LuEsther T. Mertz Library's Art Gallery at the Garden. Accompanying events invite visitors to learn about Kahlo's Mexico and her enduring cultural influence through poetry, lectures, "Frida al Fresco" evenings, Mexican-inspired shopping and dining experiences, and hands-on art activities for kids.

The New York Botanical Garden
2900 Southern Blvd.
Bronx, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 16 -
November 01, 2015
Frida Kahlo: Art, Garden, Life
This blockbuster exhibition is the first to examine Frida Kahlo’s keen appreciation for the beauty and variety of the natural world, as evidenced by her home and garden as well as the complex use of plant imagery in her artwork. Featuring a rare display of more than a dozen original Kahlo paintings and works on paper, this limited six-month engagement also reimagines the iconic artist’s famed garden and studio at the Casa Azul, her lifelong home in Mexico City.
Accompanying events invite visitors to learn about Kahlo’s life and enduring cultural influence through music, lectures, Frida al Fresco evenings, Mexican-inspired shopping and dining experiences, and hands-on art activities for kids. As a complement to your visit, use our new mobile guide to see rare photos and footage, listen to expert commentary, and create your own Frida Selfie to share with friends.

Tue – Sun 10am – 6pm & the following holiday Mondays:
May 25 (Memorial Day)
September 7 (Labor Day)
October 12 (Columbus Day)

The LuEsther T. Mertz Library Art Gallery, 4th Floor
& Ross Gallery
New York Botanical Garden
2900 Southern Blvd.
Bronx, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 17 -
September 07, 2015
Yoko Ono: One Woman Show, 1960–1971
The Museum of Modern Art presents its first exhibition dedicated exclusively to the work of Yoko Ono, taking as its point of departure the artist’s unofficial MoMA debut in late 1971. At that time, Ono advertised her “one woman show,” titled Museum of Modern [F]art. However, when visitors arrived at the Museum there was little evidence of her work. According to a sign outside the entrance, Ono had released flies on the Museum grounds, and the public was invited to track them as they dispersed across the city. Now, over 40 years later, Yoko Ono: One Woman Show, 1960–1971 surveys the decisive decade that led up to Ono’s unauthorized exhibition at MoMA, bringing together approximately 125 of her early objects, works on paper, installations, performances, audio recordings, and films, alongside rarely seen archival materials. A number of works invite interaction, including Painting to Be Stepped On (1960/1961) and Ono’s groundbreaking performance, Bag Piece (1964). The exhibition draws upon the 2008 acquisition of the Gilbert and Lila Silverman Fluxus Collection Gift, which added approximately 100 of Ono’s artworks and related ephemera to the Museum’s holdings.

During the first 11 years of her extensive career, Ono moved among New York, Tokyo, and London, serving a pioneering role in the international development of Conceptual art, experimental film, and performance art. Her earliest works were often based on instructions that Ono communicated to viewers in verbal or written form. Painting to Be Stepped On (1960/1961), for example, invited viewers to tread upon a piece of canvas placed directly on the floor. Though easily overlooked, the work radically questioned the division between art and the everyday by asking viewers to participate in its completion. At times poetic, humorous, sinister, and idealistic, Ono’s early text-based works anticipated the objects that she presented throughout the decade, including Grapefruit (1964), her influential book of instructions; Apple (1966), a solitary piece of fruit placed on a Plexiglas pedestal; and Half-A-Room (1967), an installation of bisected domestic objects.

The exhibition also explores Ono’s seminal performances and films, including Cut Piece (1964) and Film No. 4 (1966/1967). In Cut Piece, Ono confronted issues of gender, class, and cultural identity by asking viewers to cut away pieces of her clothing as she sat quietly on stage. Two years later Ono made Film No. 4, which again centered on the body, though to much different effect. The film—a sequence of naked, moving buttocks—signaled Ono’s desire to break down class hierarchies by focusing on a universally shared feature. At the end of the decade, Ono’s collaborations with John Lennon, including Bed-In (1969) and the WAR IS OVER! if you want it (1969–) campaign, boldly communicated her commitment to promoting world peace. Upon returning to New York in the early 1970s, Ono—like the flies purportedly released at MoMA—had infiltrated the public realm; her artwork appeared on billboards and in newspapers and she performed internationally with her Plastic Ono Band.

The exhibition is accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue, featuring three newly commissioned essays that evaluate the cultural context of Ono’s early years, and five sections reflecting her geographic locations during this period and the corresponding evolution of her artistic practice. Each chapter includes an introduction by a guest scholar, artwork descriptions, primary documents culled from newspapers and magazines, and a selection by the artist of her texts and drawings.

Sun - Thu 10:30am – 5:30pm
Fri 10:30am – 8:00pm
Sat 10:30am – 5:30pm

Free - Members
$5 - Guests of Members
$25 - Adults
$18 - Seniors (65 and over with ID)
$14 - Students (full-time with current ID)
Free - Children (16 and under)
This policy does not apply to children in groups.

The International Council of The Museum of Modern Art Exhibition Gallery, sixth floor
11 West 53rd Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 17 -
October 04, 2015
From Bauhaus to Buenos Aires: Grete Stern and Horacio Coppola
From Bauhaus to Buenos Aires: Grete Stern and Horacio Coppola is the first major exhibition to focus on the German-born Grete Stern and the Argentinean Horacio Coppola, two leading figures of avant-garde photography who established themselves on both sides of the Atlantic. The exhibition begins in the late 1920s with each artist’s initial forays into photography and typographic design. In Berlin in 1927, Stern began taking private classes with Walter Peterhans, who was soon to become head of photography at the Bauhaus. A year later, in Peterhans’s studio, she met Ellen (Rosenberg) Auerbach, with whom she opened a pioneering studio specializing in portraiture and advertising. Named after their childhood nicknames, the studio ringl + pit embraced both commercial and avant-garde loyalties, creating proto-feminist works. In Buenos Aires during the same period, Coppola initiated his photographic experimentations, exploring his surroundings and contributing to the discourse on modernist practices across media in local cultural magazines. In 1929 he founded the Buenos Aires Film Club to introduce the most innovative foreign films to Argentine audiences. His early works show the burgeoning interest in new modes of photographic expression that led him to the Bauhaus in 1932, where he met Stern and they began their joint history.

Following the close of the Bauhaus and amid the rising threat of the Nazi powers in 1933, Stern and Coppola fled Germany. Stern arrived first in London, where her friends included activists affiliated with leftist circles and where she made her now iconic portraits of German exiles, including those of Bertolt Brecht and Karl Korsch. After traveling through Europe, camera in hand, Coppola joined Stern in London, where he pursued a modernist idiom in his photographs of the fabric of the city, tinged alternately with social concern and surrealist strangeness.

In the summer of 1935, Stern and Coppola embarked for Buenos Aires, where they mounted an exhibition in the offices of the avant-garde magazine Sur, announcing the arrival of modern photography in Argentina. The unique character of Buenos Aires was captured in Coppola’s photographic encounters from the city’s center to its outskirts, and in Stern’s numerous portraits of the city’s intelligentsia, from feminist playwright Amparo Alvajar to essayist Jorge Luis Borges to poet-politician Pablo Neruda. The exhibition ends in the early 1950s, with Stern’s forward-thinking Sueños (Dreams), a series of photomontages she contributed to the popular women’s magazine Idilio, portraying women’s dreams mobilized by the unfulfilled promises of the Peronist regime in Argentine society with urgency and surreal wit.

The exhibition is accompanied by a major publication edited by Roxana Marcoci and Sarah Meister with a selection of original texts by Stern and Coppola translated into English by Rachel Kaplan. The catalogue will consist of three essays on the artists written by the exhibition curators and scholar Jodi Roberts. Special thanks to the Estate of Horacio Coppola and Galerie Jorge Mara— La Ruche.

The Edward Steichen Photography Galleries, third floor
The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53 Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 18 -
August 24, 2015
Alice in Bookland: Fine Press Editions
Alice in Bookland celebrates the 150th anniversary (“sesquicen-Tenniel”) of the original Macmillan publication of Lewis Carroll’s Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland in 1865. Once thought of as a quaint Victorian children’s book, Alice is now the most quoted novel in existence, and among the most widely illustrated and translated. Since the publication of Martin Gardner’s Annotated Alice in 1960, it is also one of the most studied by the academic community, and continues to be a much beloved presence in our culture, with many adaptations in cinema, theater, musicals, opera, and ballet, on websites and merchandise, and more. Lewis Carroll Societies thrive in the United States, Canada, the United Kingdom, Japan, and Brazil. Naturally, the book has a long bibliophilic history as well. Though collectors may especially desire one of the suppressed first printings, one copy of which sold for $1.5 million in 1998, this exhibition focuses on the fine press editions.

After the copyright of Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland expired in 1907, a host of editions, authorized and not, sprang forth. Many of these are on view in the exhibition. They include a version illustrated by Arthur Rackham, the limited edition bearing the illuminations of Salvador Dalí (1969), a Black Sun Press volume with pictures by Marie Laurencin (1930), and the Cheshire Cat Press editions (1988 and 1998), hand-typeset on handmade paper with fine bindings by Eleanor Ramsey.

Carroll wrote many works besides Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland, including its 1872 companion Through the Looking-glass. Further out on the proverbial limb are thirty-six lithographs by Max Ernst, who illustrated one chapter of Wonderland, among other works, in his Lewis Carroll’s Wunderhorn; Carroll’s great nonsense poem “The Hunting of the Snark,” with images by Max Ernst, Byron Sewell, Barry Moser, Nicholas Perry, Harold Jones, and others; and a volume called Notes de Zoologie (Baby Lone, 1988), illustrated by Pétra Werlé, with fine binding by Jill-Oriane Tarlau. A fine press book called Illustrating Alice (Artists’ Choice, 2013) discusses the many artists across the globe and over the last century-and-a-half who have given their own particular interpretations to the Alice books. (A forthcoming volume, Alice in a World of Wonderlands: The Translations of Lewis Carroll’s Masterpiece [The Grolier Club/Oak Knoll, Fall, 2015], has a bibliography that lists over 7,500 editions with more than 1,000 published illustrators in languages other than English!)

This exhibition comprises works from the Burstein Collection of Lewis Carroll, now numbering 3,500 books by, about, or inspired by Carroll—not to mention innumerable tchotchkes. It was started by Book Club of California member Sandor Burstein with a single volume he purchased in Portugal in 1974 to memorialize his trip, although his love for Carroll dates back to his childhood. His son, Mark, now curates the collection. The Book Club of California would like to gratefully acknowledge Sandor and Mark Burstein for making the exhibition possible, as well as BCC member Malcolm Whyte who suggested the exhibition and helped choose the books and design their display.

Exhibition Opening: Monday, May 18, 5 - 7pm.

The Book Club of California
312 Sutter Street, Suite 500 (cross street Grant)
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
May 18 -
September 09, 2015
Poplin and Paper: Four Centuries of Fashion in Print.
The term “fashion plate” is layered with meanings. It is a portrait depicting an outfit that a clothier can supply. It is also frequently used to describe someone who wears the latest styles. But a plate is also a printing term, describing an illustration transferred to paper during the printing process.

This exhibition explores the evolution of these relationships among fashion and print, ideas and images, and their producers and consumers. The exhibition begins with early modern surveys of national costumes, which sought to codify the diverse cultures that Europeans encountered around the world. It then traces emerging relationships among fashion plates and the periodical press, commercialism and the performing arts, and the subsequent evolution of various communities of readers and consumers. It culminates in the emergence of fashion photography, a new medium of expression for fashion in print that still shapes and responds to its viewers today.

Mon - Fri 8:30am - 5pm
We are closed on University of Illinois holidays.

3rd floor (Room 346)
Rare Books & Manuscript Library
University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Libraries
1408 W. Gregory Drive
Urbana, IL
Exhibit Midwest
May 20 -
September 05, 2015
Such a curious dream!
Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland at 150

This exhibition will feature unique, colorful and curious Carrolliana from the early 1860s to the present. Drawn largely from the fabulous collection compiled by Harvard alumnus Harcourt Amory, the exhibition will include original drawings by illustrator John Tenniel, foreign editions of the book, parodies, theatrical works and ephemera. Not to be missed: Alice Liddell’s own copy of the suppressed first edition.

Edison and Newman Room
Houghton Library
Harvard University Libraries
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
May 22 -
September 12, 2015
“REPORTING VIETNAM”
On Friday, May 22, the Newseum will open “Reporting Vietnam,” a provocative new exhibit that marks the 50th anniversary of the Vietnam War, America’s first televised war. The exhibit explores the dramatic stories of how journalists brought news about the war to a divided nation.

Powerful photos and news footage, evocative music and more than 90 compelling artifacts, historic newspapers and magazines will take visitors back to experience a time when America was at war and young people were rejecting the conservative values of their parents.

Set to a soundtrack of protest songs, the exhibit opens with an exploration of the culture clash that emerged in the 1960s as seen through mainstream and counterculture publications of the day. “Reporting Vietnam” challenges perceptions that linger 50 years after U.S. troops arrived in Vietnam, and poses the question “Did the press lose the war?”

Included are more than 100 dramatic images, including memorable Pulitzer Prize-winning photographs that have come to symbolize the struggle both in Vietnam and at home. Interactive kiosks in the exhibit showcase interviews with the Pulitzer Prize-winning photographers who took some of the most iconic images of the war, and the memorable protest songs that provided the soundtrack for a generation.

As part of the exhibit, the museum’s Robert H. and Clarice Smith Big Screen Theater will feature an original documentary chronicling the war’s most pivotal moments. Two other original films explore the protest movement at home and how television forever changed the way Americans receive news from the battlefield.

The Newseum education department will supplement the exhibit with resources on-site, online and in the community. Classes and gallery exploration guides will examine many of the exhibit’s themes, including how the media influence public opinion, media ethics and the challenges of reporting during a war. The Newseum will also present a series of public programs featuring journalists, the military and others discussing the coverage, impact and legacy of the Vietnam War.

Open daily from 9am - 5pm

ADMISSION
Purchase a ticket, and the next day’s visit is free!

Adults, 19 - 64: $22.95 + tax
Seniors, 65 & older: $18.95 + tax
Youth, 7 - 18: $13.95 + tax
Children, 6 & younger: Free

Discounts for military, college students, and AAA members are available only at our admissions desk with applicable ID.

Level 6
Newseum
555 Pennsylvania Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 22 -
September 20, 2015
Hidden Likeness: Photographer Emmet Gowin at the Morgan
One of the most original and influential photographers of his generation, Emmet Gowin (born 1941) is also among the most attuned to the deep historical life of images. For this spellbinding exhibition—the first exploration of his career at a New York museum—Gowin has combined favorites and rarities from five decades of work with objects drawn from throughout the collections of the Morgan. Included are ancient Near Eastern seals and tablets, Medieval illuminations, rare printed books, musical manuscripts, and master drawings by artists from Botticelli and Rembrandt to Blake and Mondrian. Gowin's photographs include searching portraits of his wife, Edith, and their extended family, "working landscapes" where nature and humanity have shaped one another for centuries, and aerial views of sites shaped by modern-era catastrophes ranging from volcanic activity to nuclear testing.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5:00pm
Fri 10:30am - 9:00pm
Sat 10:00am - 6:00pm
Sun 11:00am - 6:00pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue (at 36th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 22 -
October 12, 2015
The Hirschfield Century: The Art of Al Hirschfield
Al Hirschfeld (1903–2003) brought a distinct style to celebrity drawings, making his work instantly recognizable —to be “Hirschfelded” was a sign that a performer had arrived. Now for the first time, nine decades of Hirschfeld’s work will be on display at the New-York Historical Society in The Hirschfeld Century: The Art of Al Hirschfeld, a multimedia exhibition organized in partnership with The Al Hirschfeld Foundation and in conjunction with Alfred A. Knopf’s publication of curator David Leopold’s groundbreaking book on the artist. The exhibition of over 100 original works includes many highlights from Hirschfeld’s prolific career with a special emphasis on the New York Times—where he was a contributor for over seven decades. Come see the art that defined New York popular culture and made the 1900s The Hirschfeld Century.

Tue - Thu & Sat 10am - 6pm
Fri 10am - 8pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 26 -
October 18, 2015
In Focus: Animalia
Photographs of animals have circulated since the early history of the medium, initially focusing on those that were tame, captive, or dead. Advancements in camera and film technologies enabled precise recordings of beasts in motion and, eventually, in their natural habitats. Spanning the history of photography, this exhibition examines the expanding tradition of animal representation through the works of artists such as Adolphe Braun, Lisette Model, Horatio Ross, Taryn Simon, Sandy Skoglund, and Alfred Stieglitz, among others.

Tue – Fri & Sun 10:00am – 5:30pm
Sat 10:00am – 9:00pm
Closed Mondays

Free admission

West Pavilion, Lower Level
The Getty Center
1200 N Sepulveda Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
May 29 -
September 20, 2015
William Caxton and the Birth of English Printing
About 1474 something never seen in print before rolled off the press: the English language. William Caxton, an English merchant and diplomat, had recently learned of the new technology of print invented by Johann Gutenberg twenty years before, and Caxton capitalized on the commercial opportunity offered by this revolutionary invention. William Caxton and the Birth of English Printing celebrates this foundational moment in the history of English literature and language. Caxton published key works of English literature, such as Chaucer and Malory, as well as short religious and didactic texts, many of which he translated from French or Latin. Through his publishing activity, Caxton also helped to stabilize the English language by promoting a single dialect, and through print this dialect became more prevalent and helped to form the basis of our modern language.

As artifacts of nationalistic importance, Caxton imprints have been choice prizes for collectors since the 18th century. Pierpont Morgan favored Caxton over Gutenberg as a founder of printing and strove to acquire a premiere collection of his work. The Morgan has the third largest collection of Caxtons in the world, preserved for their literary, linguistic, and historical significance.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue (at 36th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 30 -
September 30, 2015
Scorsese Collects
In celebration of director Martin Scorsese’s enduring commitment to the preservation of international film culture, MoMA presents 34 works from the Scorsese Poster Collection. The installation is centered around a rare, billboard-size poster for the 1951 film Tales of Hoffmann, and features other large-format pieces representing the work of directors such as Michael Powell (The Red Shoes, 1948), Max Ophuls (The Earrings of Madame de..., 1953) and Jacques Tourneur (I Walked with a Zombie, 1943), and key designers, such as Italy’s Anselmo Ballester and Britain's Peter Strausfeld. In addition to European art house and American genre films, Raoul Walsh’s silent classic The Regeneration (1915) and Howard Hawks’s Scarface (1932) (represented by a rare lobby card) are included. The exhibition will be accompanied by the film series Scorsese Screens in August 2015.

Sun - Thu 10:30am – 5:30pm
Fri 10:30am – 8:00pm
Sat 10:30am – 5:30pm

Member Early Hours: 9:30am – 10:30am daily

Adults $25
Seniors (65 & over with ID) $18
Students (full-time with current ID) $14
Children (16 & under) Free
This policy does not apply to children in groups.

Members Free
Guests of Members $5

Admission is free for all visitors during UNIQLO Free Friday Nights, held every Friday evening from 4:00 to 8:00pm.
Tickets for UNIQLO Free Friday Nights are not available in advance. Your UNIQLO Free Friday Night ticket permits you to all other Museum galleries, exhibitions, and films.

Theater 2 Gallery, T2
Theater 1 Gallery, T1
The Museum of Modern Art
11 West 53rd Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
May 30, 2015 -
February 07, 2016
Various Small Fires (Working Documents)
Various Small Fires (Working Documents) brings together artworks and documents from the LACMA archives to tell unusual or overlooked stories of the museum’s first 50 years. Ranging from items that outline a robot roaming the galleries to a Rembrandt painting traveling in disguise to a dog working as a security guard, this exhibit flares up minor, formative, and occasionally incendiary stories that have informed LACMA’s history.

To illuminate these anecdotes and to spark dialogues between objects and documents, Various Small Fires also features works in our collections by artists Reverend Ethan Acres, Barbara Bloom, Chris Burden, Michael Crowe, Eugenio Dittborn, Louise Lawler, Allan McCollum, Maria Nordman, Claes Oldenburg, Terrence O’ Shea, Jackson Pollock, Sanford Roth, Ed Ruscha, James Welling, and possibly George Brecht.

Additionally, the exhibition presents 50 portraits of people looking at art at LACMA—one per year, from 1965 through 2015.

Mon, Tue, & Thu: 11am – 5pm
Wed: Closed
Fri: 11am – 8pm
Sat & Sun: 10am – 7pm

$15 Adults
$10 Seniors (62+) & Students with valid ID
Free Children (17 and under), Members, & Active-duty military personnel including National Guard & Reserve, & their families*

Admission includes access to LACMA's collection galleries and temporary exhibitions with an extra charge for entrance to specially ticketed exhibitions.

* Memorial Day through Labor Day (Monday, May 25 through Monday, September 7, 2015) as part Blue Star Museums. Admission does not include specially ticketed exhibitions.

Art of the Americas Building, Level 3
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
5905 Wilshire Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
June 01 -
August 31, 2015
Magna Carta and the Changing Face of Revolt
Marking the 800th anniversary of Magna Carta, this special exhibition will feature the only surviving 1216 issue of the charter.

Magna Carta was first sealed in 1215 by King John. The concession it has come to represent – that all authority can be limited by law – was extracted from the king by a group of barons who chose political engagement over passive obedience. As such they were acting no longer as loyal subjects, but as rebellious citizens.

Magna Carta and the Changing Face of Revolt explores the charter as part of a long history of the contested identity of the citizen, stretching from the Wars of the Roses to the Great Reform Act and from the Suffragettes to the Occupy Movement. Who has the right to speak and act against authority? Are there limits on what citizens can say and do? Over time, citizenship included the ‘people’ as well as the aristocracy, and non-elites demanded and secured political participation, rights, and liberties. But within this broad historical narrative, citizenship has never had a single, fixed meaning and the idea of what makes a citizen, and so what makes a rebel, remains contested even today.

The unique charter, on loan from the collections of Durham Cathedral, will be shown alongside objects from Durham University’s collections and loans from other regional and national museums and libraries.

Durham University and Durham Cathedral will run a fascinating programme of activities and events alongside the exhibition, from public lectures and family activities, to hands-on workshops and re-enactment events.

Mon - Sun from 10:00 - 18:00

Palace Green Library
Palace Green
Durham, England, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
June 04 -
September 05, 2015
Thrills & Chills! The Fantastic World of the American Circus
The traveling circus reached its peak of popularity in the first half of the twentieth century and while a few remain, it has largely disappeared from the experience of the average American. For over a half-century, though, the circus was one of the primary ways for Americans to participate in a growing leisure culture. The circus came to them, the biggest ones travelling by rail to towns and cities across the country, and on “Circus Day,” entire cities would shut down, freeing up citizens to fill the 10,000 seats under the Big Top. It was an imaginative experience, with great feats of man and beast and sideshows that expanded one’s notions of the limits of science. Posters that advertised circus acts and banners giving a teaser to the wonders of sideshows are as colorful as the spectacles they promise and the true focus of Thrills & Chills! The Fantastic World of the American Circus. The exhibition includes vintage posters from the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus and the Beatty-Cole Circus that are in the collection of the Fine Arts Gallery and have never before been exhibited. Additionally, vintage sideshow banners from a private collection and contemporary ones by artist Glen C. Davies, historical photographs and a fun house mirror from the collection of the Tennessee State Museum will be displayed.

Summer Gallery Hours (May 1 - August 20, 2014)
Tue - Fri 12-4pm
Sat 1-5pm
Sun & Mon Closed

Academic Year Gallery Hours (August 21, 2015 -April 30, 2015)
Mon - Fri 11-4pm
Sat & Sun 1-5pm

Free & open to the public

Vanderbilt University Fine Arts Gallery
Cohen Memorial Hall
1220 21st Avenue South
Nashville, TN
Exhibit South
June 04, 2015 -
January 02, 2016
First Among Many: The Bay Psalm Book and Early Moments in American Printing
A new exhibition will tell the story of early printing in the American colonies, spanning 100 years, as printing evolved from a colonial necessity to the clarion of freedom.

At the centerpiece of the exhibition will be two copies of the Bay Psalm Book, officially titled "The Whole Booke of Psalmes Faithfully Translated into English Metre" (1640). One copy will be drawn from the Rare Book and Special Collections Division at the Library of Congress. The second copy, which belongs to Rubenstein, will be on display from June 4 through Saturday, Aug. 8. Americans will see these texts together for the first time. Both copies were at one time in the library of the Rev. Thomas Prince and, therefore, originally part of the historic Old South Church Library in Boston.

In the exhibition, The Bay Psalm Book will be seen as launching an approach to publication that was particular to colonial America. Early American printing often was rugged, immediate and practical, fueled by a sense of purpose and devotion. Publications—sermons, pamphlets, newspapers, broadsides—gave shape to the American cause and ideology.

Printing was brought to English North America in 1638. Stephen Daye, a locksmith by training, was under contract to establish a press in North America upon his arrival. In 1640, less than two years after landing in Massachusetts Bay, Daye and his son Matthew printed "The Whole Booke of Psalmes Faithfully Translated into English Metre," the first book printed in what is now the United States. The Bay Psalm Book emerged as the first among many landmark American printings—materials that registered American thought, devotion and revolution. Only 11 copies of The Bay Psalm Book from 1640 are known to exist today.

Approximately 30 additional Library of Congress treasures will be on display, including the Dunlap Broadside of the Declaration of Independence (1776); "Poor Richard’s Almanac" by Benjamin Franklin (1741 and 1742); "Common Sense" by Thomas Paine (1776); "The Federalist," essays by Alexander Hamilton, James Madison and John Jay (1788); "Poems on Various Subjects, Religious and Moral" by Phillis Wheatley (1773); "The Power of Sympathy," the first novel printed in the colonies (1789); samples of colonial newspapers from Boston, New York, Philadelphia and Williamsburg, Virginia; and the Algonquian Indian Bible, translation by John Eliot (1663).

Mon - Sat 8:30am - 4:30pm

Free and open to the public

South Gallery
Second Level, Thomas Jefferson Bldg.
Library of Congress
10 First Street SE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 04, 2015 -
November 30, 2017
British Guiana One-Cent Magenta: The World’s Most Famous Stamp
The 1856 British Guiana One-Cent Magenta is displayed in the museum’s William H. Gross Stamp Gallery. This exhibition of the stamp is the longest and most publicly accessible showing ever.

Open daily 10am - 5:30pm
(except December 25)

Free admission

Smithsonian's National Postal Museum
2 Massachusetts Avenue NE
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 05 -
September 13, 2015
Super Natural
The National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA) presents Super Natural, an exhibition focusing on historical and contemporary women artists’ unrestrained absorption with nature. Rather than merely document beauty, artists in this exhibition engage with the natural world as a place for exploration and invention. The exhibition’s paintings, sculptures, photographs and videos present singular plant specimens, little-seen creatures, invented beasties and the artists’ own bodies tucked into the natural landscape.

Super Natural underscores the way in which historical women artists’ renderings of nature directly inspire today’s artists.

Composed of art from the museum’s collection as well as loans from notable private lenders, Super Natural includes 50 works and installations by 25 artists, including Louise Bourgeois, Ana Mendieta, Maria Sibylla Merian, Patricia Piccinini, Rachel Ruysch, Kiki Smith and Sam Taylor-Johnson.

This exhibition will provide context to NMWA’s biennial exhibition Organic Matters—Women to Watch 2015, on view at the same time, which explores the complex relationships between women, art and nature.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

National Museum of Women in the Arts
1250 New York Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 06 -
September 07, 2015
American Epics: Thomas Hart Benton and Hollywood
This is the first major exhibition on Thomas Hart Benton (1889-1975) in more than 25 years and the first to explore important connections between Benton's art and the movies. After working briefly in the silent film industry, Benton became acutely aware of storytelling's shift toward motion pictures and developed a cinematic style of painting that melded European art historical traditions and modern movie production techniques. In paintings, murals, drawings, prints and illustrated books, Benton reinvented national narratives for 20th-century America and captivated the public with his visual storytelling.

Tue - Sun 10am - 5pm
3rd Thu of every month 10am - 9pm
Mon Closed (*except holidays)

*Open the following holidays:
Labor Day: Mon, September 7, 2015
Columbus Day: Mon, October 12, 2015

The museum will be open Saturday, July 4, 10am - 5pm

Special Exhibition Galleries
The Peabody Essex Museum
East India Square (161 Essex St)
Salem, MA
Exhibit New England
June 06 -
September 13, 2015
American Moments: Photographs from The Phillips Collection
In celebration of recent major gifts, The Phillips Collection presents for the first time a major photography exhibition drawn exclusively from the museum’s permanent collection. American Moments: Photographs from The Phillips Collection features more than 130 photographs by 33 artists that showcase the strength and variety of the museum’s fast-growing photography collection through examples of Modernism, street photography, documentary expression, and photojournalism.

These remarkable new additions guide the broad themes of the exhibition. The city became one of America’s most potent symbols after World War I, and photographs by Berenice Abbott, Margaret Bourke-White, Lewis Hine, Clarence John Laughlin, and Paul Strand, among others, capture its sense of wonder. Their abstractions of buildings and machinery—tightly cropped compositions taken at unconventional angles—evoke signs of invention and industry. Abbott documented the transformation of New York City into a modern urban center with impressive photographs of the skyscrapers that replaced older buildings. Louis Faurer’s bustling street scenes and crowded spaces lit by movie marquees offer a different point of view, capturing the energy and nightlife of Times Square. Other images explore the expressive potential of land and nature; an inspiration to many of the great Modernist photographers including Ansel Adams, Harry Callahan, Alfred Stieglitz, Brett Weston, and Edward Weston.

The exhibition highlights photographs of urban and rural scenes taken on travels across America for the federal government, as magazine commissions, and as private work. Sent to the field to frame images of middle-class life during and after World War II, Bubley, drawn to the world of the everyday, responded with photographs of women at work. Documentary photographers Jack Delano, Walker Evans, and Life magazine contributor Alfred Eisenstaedt also recorded the changing face of the workforce during this time. Traveling along Route 1, Abbott took photos from Maine to Florida, expertly capturing the essence of small-town America, while William Christenberry, Bruce Davidson, Eisenstaedt, and Lee Friedlander transformed vernacular subjects into engaging social commentaries. Portraits by Arnold Newman offer a glimpse into the character of the artist. Other photographs show intimate scenes of familial connection inspired by the snapshot and moving images that broadly consider issues of identity, representation, and memory such as those in Davidson’s East 100th Street series.

These gifts—many on view at the museum for the first time—distill key narratives taken during a time of immense change and transformation in the United States, and enrich the museum’s commitment to modern and contemporary photography.

Tue ‒ Sat 10am ‒ 5pm
Sun Noon ‒ 7pm
Thu extended hours 5 ‒ 8:30pm*

Closed Mondays, New Year’s Day, Independence Day, Thanksgiving Day, Christmas Eve, and Christmas Day

*On the first Thursday of every month, daytime admittance ends at 5 pm due to the regularly scheduled Phillips after 5 events. Admission after 5 pm is restricted to members and Phillips after 5 ticket holders.

Reading Room
Phillips Collection
1600 21st Street NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 07 -
October 18, 2015
Recent Acquisitions of Italian Renaissance Prints: Ideas Made Flesh
Prints played a pivotal role in the development and transmission of Italian Renaissance style. Because many of these 16th-century prints reproduce the designs of other artists, they have often been undervalued. Yet the sophistication and beauty with which they translate even the most complex idea into sensuous form had no precedent and have few equals. This can be appreciated only in rare, early impressions of these prints. In recent years the Gallery has been fortunate to acquire a surprising number of such impressions. This exhibition presents some two dozen, reflecting the principal styles and numerous major masters of the period.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 11am – 6pm

West Building
National Gallery of Art
National Mall (between 3rd & 9th Streets NW)
6th Street & Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 09 -
September 13, 2015
Landscape Drawings in The Frick Collection
Depicting quotidian life in the country, urban scenes, and imagined views of timeless Arcadian realms, this selection of rarely exhibited landscape drawings from the Frick’s small but superb collection of works on paper reveals thematic continuities across four centuries. The presentation features the Frick’s newly acquired View of Dieppe Harbor of 1873 by Antoine Vollon, the generous gift of Dr. Carol Forman Tabler. The watercolor finds an ideal context among drawings by Vollon’s contemporaries and forebears — including Claude, Corot, and Whistler — with whom he shared a drive to investigate the technical possibilities for representing on paper the textures and intangible atmospheric effects of the three-dimensional world.

Tue - Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

The Frick Collection
1 East 70th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 09 -
September 06, 2015
Deciphering Ulysses: A Playful Introduction to Joyce’s Novel
Want to solve the puzzle of James Joyce’s Ulysses? You are in good company. “I've put in so many enigmas and puzzles that it will keep the professors busy for centuries,” Joyce notoriously boasted. This exhibit offers a playful and interactive introduction to cracking the code of Ulysses. When it was first published in 1922, British censors believed that the book was written in spy code. Though they may have been a tad paranoid, it is true that codes, enigmas, puzzles, and ciphers are pervasive in Joyce’s text. In fact, protagonist Leopold Bloom’s address, 7 Eccles Street, was originally the home of Joyce’s friend J.F. Byrne, a pioneering cryptographer who invented a machine for producing a supposedly “unbreakable” cipher.

In “Deciphering Ulysses” visitors are invited to learn about the famous novel as they decode Leopold Bloom’s clandestine letters, explore his recreated desk drawer, read what the United States Court of Appeals had to say about Joyce’s enigmas, and glimpse an early reader’s arsenal of maps and charts for understanding the text. You may not definitively solve the puzzle of Ulysses, but you will experience first-hand the delight Joyce took in play, with every reading of his novel yielding new combinations, outcomes, insights, and meanings.

Tuesday — Noon - 5pm
Wednesday — Noon - 8pm
Thursday — Noon - 8pm
Friday — Noon - 5pm
Saturday — Noon - 6pm
Sunday — Noon - 6pm

Closed Mondays and National Holidays.

Rosenbach Members: Free
Adults: $10.00
Seniors (ages 65 & older): $8.00
Students & Children: $5.00
Children under 5: Free

Rosenbach Museum & Library
2008-2010 Delancey Place
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 11 -
September 16, 2015
A Damned Serious Business: Waterloo 1815, the battle and its books
A Damned Serious Business’ draws on the rich and varied collections of Cambridge University Library to highlight written records, maps and book arts relating to the Battle of Waterloo and the era in which it played so decisive a part.

Monday - Friday
09.00 - 18.00
Saturday
09.00 - 16.30

Milstein Exhibition Centre
Cambridge University Library
West Road
Cambridge, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
June 12 -
September 08, 2015
Life Lines: Portrait Drawings from Dürer to Picasso
Life Lines explores the role of drawing in portraiture, focusing in particular on the relationship between artist and sitter. Spanning five centuries, the drawings in the show range from Dürer’s moving likeness of his brother Endres to Picasso’s highly expressive sketch of the actress Marie Derval. Life Lines considers self-portraits, portraits of family and friends as well as more formal portraits. Some of the drawings served as preparatory studies for paintings or sculptures, while others are finished work in their own right. What all of them share, however, is that they record a likeness of someone worth remembering. They bear testimony to a deeply human sentiment, the desire to leave a mark.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue at 36th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 13 -
October 12, 2015
Magna Carta: Law and Legend, 1215-2015
This exhibition celebrates the 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta by exploring the language and ideology of constitutionalism (both written and unwritten) and the rule of law. While the cornerstone of the exhibition is The Huntington's 13th-century draft of the Magna Carta, the themes move beyond Medieval England to explore the relevance of Magna Carta to later English history, the history of the United States, and the modern world, drawn from various areas of the Huntington’s collections. The exhibition also delves into the legend and popular perceptions of Magna Carta. Over the past eight centuries Magna Carta, as a concept, holds a powerful and empowering place in the imaginations of thinkers, artists, and rebels, demonstrating how people across time have offered unique interpretations of this significant document.

Library, West Hall
The Huntington Library, Art Collections, and Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
June 13 -
August 23, 2015
Weird, Wild & Wonderful
The New York Botanical Garden Second Triennial Exhibition

This exhibition is open on weekends only.

The eccentric beauty of the plant kingdom is celebrated in this traveling exhibition of botanical art, presented by The New York Botanical Garden in conjunction with the American Society of Botanical Artists (ASBA). The juried show, curated by the ASBA, includes 47 contemporary works by artists from Australia, Canada, India, Japan, the United Kingdom, and the United States. “Weird, Wild & Wonderful” made its debut at The New York Botanical Garden in spring of 2014, and will conclude a four-month run at the Minnesota Landscape Arboretum before coming to The Huntington.

Botanical artists have traditionally depicted conventionally beautiful flora. This exhibition showcases nature’s oddities, plants of charismatic quirkiness that have a bizarre beauty all their own. The visually stunning artworks, from the bristly Violet Hedgehog Mushroom (Sarcodon fuscoindicum) by Lucy Martin to Asuka Hishiki’s charmingly misshapen Heirloom Tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), are rendered in a range of media including watercolor, oil, colored pencil, tempera, graphite, gouache, acrylic, aquatint etching, and pen and ink.

SYMPOSIUM:
The Huntington will co-host a symposium about weird and wonderful plants on July 23–26, partnering with the ASBA and the Botanical Artists Guild of Southern California (BAGSC, the local ASBA chapter). For details and registration information, visit the ASBA’s website. In conjunction with “Weird, Wild & Wonderful, ” the BAGSC will present a supplemental display from Aug. 1–9 in Banta Hall that will include demonstrations and lectures about botanical art and specimens of botanical curiosities.

Brody Botanical Center
Flora-Legium
The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
June 13 -
October 12, 2015
Magna Carta: Law and Legend, 1215-2015
This exhibition celebrates the 800th anniversary of the Magna Carta by exploring the language and ideology of constitutionalism (both written and unwritten) and the rule of law. While the cornerstone of the exhibition is The Huntington's 13th-century draft of the Magna Carta, the themes move beyond Medieval England to explore the relevance of Magna Carta to later English history, the history of the United States, and the modern world, drawn from various areas of the Huntington’s collections. The exhibition also delves into the legend and popular perceptions of Magna Carta. Over the past eight centuries Magna Carta, as a concept, holds a powerful and empowering place in the imaginations of thinkers, artists, and rebels, demonstrating how people across time have offered unique interpretations of this significant document.

Library, West Hall
The Huntington Library, Art Collections and Botanical Gardens
1151 Oxford Road
San Marino, CA
Exhibit West
June 15 -
September 20, 2015
The Art of Baseball
As baseball season approaches, the Concord Museum presents an exciting new exhibition, The Art of Baseball, exploring the many ways that artists have passionately responded to America’s national pastime. The exhibition includes nearly 50 works of fine and folk art from a private collection, as well as Boston Red Sox artifacts from the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum and a private collection. Historian, Concord resident, and lifelong baseball fan Doris Kearns Goodwin is Honorary Curator. The exhibition celebrates baseball’s rich traditions, intergenerational connections, and all-American fun!

Drawn from The Gladstone Collection of Baseball Art, a private New York collection that has been gathered over the past forty years, The Art of Baseball features works by acclaimed American artists—including William Merritt Chase, Robert Rauschenberg, and William Zorach—as well as folk artists who were inspired by the sport. Whether the creator was an academic artist or a sign painter with a deadline, the works of art in The Gladstone Collection are about the game itself. A diverse selection of paintings, sculptures, textiles, and decorative arts reflects various dimensions of baseball such as the playing field, positions, equipment, uniforms, and fans, as well as larger issues of race and gender in the sport.

The exhibition considers baseball locally through both the major league tradition of the Boston Red Sox and through recreational leagues in communities like Concord, where semi-pro games at Emerson Field once drew thousands of spectators. A highlight of the exhibition is iconic Boston Red Sox artifacts courtesy of the National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum and Barbara and Ted Alfond, including the bat used by Jim Rice to hit his 301st home run, a mask worn by Carlton Fisk, a cap worn by Carl Yastrzemski, a glove used by Ted Williams, and three Red Sox World Series rings.

Mon – Sat 9am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm
Sun (in June, July & August) 9am – 5pm

Members Free - Join Today!
Adults $10
Seniors (62 & over) $8
Students (18 & over with valid id) $8
Children (5-18) $5
Children under 5 Free
Active Military (with valid id): Free

Concord Museum
53 Cambridge Turnpike
Concord, MA
Exhibit New England
June 16 -
September 06, 2015
A Kingdom of Images: French Prints in the Age of Louis XIV, 1660–1715
From grand royal portraits to satiric views of everyday life, and from small-scale fashion prints decorated with actual fabrics to monumental panoramas of Versailles and the Louvre, this exhibition explores the rich variety of prints that came to define French power and prestige in the era of Louis XIV (1638–1715). During the Sun King's long reign, printmakers and publishers effectively deployed prints to promote French culture, art, and style. Commemorating the 300th anniversary of Louis XIV's death, A Kingdom of Images: French Prints in the Age of Louis XIV, 1660–1715 features nearly 100 works from the Getty Research Institute and the Bibliothèque nationale de France.

Tue – Fri & Sun 10:00am – 5:30pm
Sat 10:00am – 9:00pm
Closed Mondays

Free admission

Research Institute Galleries I and II
The Getty Center
1200 N Sepulveda Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
June 16 -
October 15, 2015
The Ancestry of the Mother Road: Mapping Route 66
Route 66 looms large in American culture. In song and story, the mother road carries us to the promise of a better life. Traveling Route 66 is still the ultimate road trip even now as we pick our way along a road disrupted by the modern, looking for remnants of an earlier path. Route 66 was years in the making as Americans sought the best path from the East to the West, and is being remade even today, as it continues to hold a special place in the imagination of travelers and wanderers of all kinds. Railroad scouts and surveyors, early auto adventurers, dust bowl migrants, suburban road-tripping families, all following their own paths, but all on the same road.

Corridor Gallery
Pusey Library
Harvard University Libraries
Harvard University
Cambridge, MA
Exhibit New England
June 17 -
September 27, 2015
Lafayette: An American Icon
Born into one of France’s wealthiest and most prestigious families, Marie Joseph Paul Yves Roch Gilbert du Motier de La Fayette (1757-1834) dreamed of becoming a champion of freedom and a hero of chivalric proportions. An inborn faith in human rights joined with a natural personal dignity to serve his plans well: by the time he was twenty years old, Lafayette was one of the most famous Europeans of his day. Beginning in 1777, when he left France for America to offer assistance in the American Revolution, he enthralled his countrymen and earned the adoration of the rebellious Americans. Within a year, George Washington thought of the young Frenchman as an adopted son, Lafayette considered himself to be a “citizen of two worlds,” and American patriots commonly referred to him as “Our Marquis.” Lafayette’s fame was assured when he went back to France in 1779 to plead the American cause—and subsequently returned to America with the French government’s promise of troops, ships, and financial support. This alliance turned the tide of the American Revolution and eventually led to the British surrender at Yorktown, Virginia, a historic event in which Lafayette participated.

The Boston Athenæum celebrates Lafayette and his role in the founding of the new United States with an exhibition of portraits and other images of Lafayette—paintings, sculptures, and engravings—as well as a small selection of contemporary documents, manuscripts, and maps. The exhibition is inspired by the recent historic reconstruction of Hermione, the frigate that brought Lafayette back to America in 1780. That ship, with its game-changing news, made landfall in Boston in April of that year, and its modern descendant will visit the city in July 2015. The Athenæum’s exhibition features works borrowed from a number of major American institutions, namely the American Numismatic Society, New York City; the Herbert F. Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY; Cornell University Library, Division of Rare Books and Manuscripts; Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, Bentonville, AR; Lafayette College Art Collection, Easton, PA; David Bishop Skillman Library, Lafayette College; the Massachusetts Historical Society, Boston; the Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York; the Museum of Fine Arts Boston; the Smithsonian American Art Museum, Washington DC; Washington and Lee University, Lexington, VA; and the Washington County Museum of Fine Arts, Hagerstown, Maryland; as well as the collection of Robert and Elizabeth Owens, Boston. These objects will join some of the Athenæum’s own Lafayette-related treasures, notably Jean-Antoine Houdon’s great bust of Lafayette, acquired by the Athenæum in 1828 from Thomas Jefferson’s descendants. Lectures by scholars of the American Revolution and biographers of Lafayette; curatorial gallery talks; an audio gallery guide; and concerts of period French and American music are among the programs that will enhance the visitors’ experience and help to celebrate the achievements of this great patriot, “Our Marquis.”

Mon - Thu 9am - 8pm
Fri 9am - 5:30pm
Sat 9am - 4pm
Sun 12pm - 4pm

Members free
non-members $5.00

Boston Athenaeum
10½ Beacon Street
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
June 18 -
August 30, 2015
Mark Mothersbaugh: Myopia
n a body of work spanning over 30 years, Mark Mothersbaugh presents a unique combination of cultural criticism and personal expression through his drawings, films, paintings, sculpture, and music. A creative force behind Devo, the punk-era, art-house band, Mothersbaugh has been making art since before the band’s inception. All along, his work has both embraced handmade qualities and the slick elements of consumer culture.

At once an artist, musician, and tinkerer, he offers a key to understanding the current state of art, with its hybridity, subjectivity, and fluid boundaries. This retrospective intends to reveal the creative and artistic mind behind what is familiar to many people.

The exhibition will feature artworks from the beginning of Mothersbaugh’s career through his most recent work. This retrospective encompasses the most comprehensive presentation of the artist’s work to date, not only revealing his unique aesthetic sensibility between pop art and comic culture, but also his role as a key figure in establishing the alternative legacy of millennial art.

Free admission

Galleries 262-265, 280-281
Minneapolis Institute of Arts
2400 Third Avenue South
Minneapolis, MN
Exhibit Midwest
June 20 -
September 27, 2015
Whistler and Roussel: Linked Visions
After seeing Theodore Roussel’s watercolor The Thames Embankment, Chelsea at a London gallery in 1885, the already well-established James McNeill Whistler requested an introduction to the younger artist. Their meeting sparked more than a decade of professional collaboration that included side-by-side working sessions and camaraderie in both public and private settings. As a result of this communal creativity, Whistler, Roussel, and their artistic circle made remarkable technical and aesthetic developments in lithography and color etching. This exhibition—built around the Art Institute’s exceptional holdings of works on paper by Whistler and a recent major gift of works by Roussel—offers a new perspective on this artistic network and the resulting innovation through 175 objects, including etchings, lithographs, drawings, paintings, and artist-designed frames.

Displayed throughout the Jean and Steven Goldman Prints and Drawings Galleries in the Richard and Mary L. Gray Wing, the exhibition demonstrates the creative impact of the group’s shared network of models, studio assistants, poets, and critics. Related works by various members of this network—from the museum’s permanent collection as well as private collections and the Terra Foundation for American Art—are enhanced and given context by the inclusion of correspondence, historical ephemera, and surviving etching plates, presenting a full picture of the creative exchange and invention that characterized this 19th-century artistic community.

Accompanying the exhibition is an interactive digital component, available both in the galleries and also on the Art Institute’s website, which gives visitors the opportunity to explore the extent of interconnection among the members of Whistler and Roussel’s network. Each artist is represented by a portrait image, a brief biography, and a list of related works, while different layers of the interface illustrate how various members of the network were connected through professional, familial, or other social relationships. A digital publication—aimed at Whistler enthusiasts, students of 19th-century art, and those more broadly interested in the history of artistic collaboration—provides additional insight into the exhibition.

Daily 10:30 – 5pm
Thu until 8pm

Free Thursday Evenings
General admission to the Art Institute of Chicago is free to Illinois residents every Thursday from 5:00 to 8:00 p.m.

Galleries 124–127
The Art Institute of Chicago
111 South Michigan Avenue
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
June 20 -
August 23, 2015
A Certain Slant of Light: Spencer Finch at the Morgan
American artist Spencer Finch (b. 1962) has created a large-scale, site-specific installation at the Morgan inspired by its great collection of medieval Books of Hours—beautiful, hand-painted works that served as personal prayer books for different times of the day and different periods of the year. Taking advantage of the Morgan's four-story, glass-enclosed Gilbert Court, Finch applied films of color to the windows and hung additional glass panes in the center of the court to make a kind of calendar based on the movement of the sun.

Finch grouped the panes of glass by month with each having a palette that suggests the time of the year. For example, November is harvest time, and the month’s colors are those of ripe grains and produce. The installation also indicates what the artist calls "red-letter days." Red-colored glass aligns with the sun's arc across Gilbert Court at noon on secular holidays that the artist considers significant, such as Sir Isaac Newton's birthday on January 4. The precise measurements required to create the installation at the Morgan are a hallmark of Finch's work. At the same time, his installations emphasize movement and change, capturing fleeting moments of sublime beauty.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5pm
Fri 10:30am - 9pm
Sat 10am - 6pm
Sun 11am - 6pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue at 36th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 22 -
October 02, 2015
In the Library: Setting the Scene with Theater Architecture and Set Design
From amphitheaters of the ancient world to the digitally outfitted entertainment centers of today, the theater venue is constantly evolving. But in the 18th and 19th centuries, theaters presented unique problems for architects. While excellent acoustics were critical, so was design, as a theater was meant to represent the modern city in which it stood yet also serve as a lasting and noble reflection of that city's cultural patrimony. This focus installation recounts the comedy and drama that unfolded during this pivotal era in architecture and design as told through a collection of nearly two dozen rare books.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 11am – 6pm

East Building, Ground Floor, Study Center
National Gallery of Art
National Mall (between 3rd & 9th Streets NW)
6th Street & Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 22 -
September 11, 2015
Mapping the Young Metropolis: The Chicago School of Sociology, 1915-1940
In 1915, University of Chicago sociology professor Robert E. Park published The City: Suggestions for the Investigation of Human Behavior in the City Environment, an article that inspired a quarter-century of social research at the University of Chicago and transformed the discipline of sociology. This explosion of scholarship came to be known as the Chicago School of Sociology. Faculty and graduate students in the Department of Sociology adopted Chicago as their urban laboratory and began to study the city intensively, examining distinctive neighborhoods, institutions and social patterns. Archives in the Special Collections Research Center preserve key records of their research methodology: tools, such as questionnaires and life histories, along with analyses, such as statistical tables and city maps. Archival documents reveal the new sociological research process, from proposal through data collection to final report. The exhibition also displays a series of influential books written by Chicago sociologists, many based upon PhD dissertations, among them Louis Wirth's The Ghetto (1928) and Harvey Zorbaugh's The Gold Coast and the Slum (1929). The exhibition coincides with the annual meeting in Chicago of the American Sociological Association, August 22-August 25, 2015.

Mon - Fri 9am - 4:45pm
Sat 9am - 12:45pm while classes at the University of Chicago are in session.

The Special Collections Research Center will be CLOSED on Monday, September 7, 2015 for Labor Day

Special Collections Research Center Exhibition Gallery
The Joseph Regenstein Library, 1st floor
1100 East 57th Street
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
June 23 -
September 13, 2015
Andrea del Sarto: The Renaissance Workshop in Action
This major loan exhibition celebrates the transformation of the art of drawing by Andrea del Sarto (1486–1530), one of the greatest Florentine Renaissance artists. Moving beyond the graceful harmony and elegance of his elders and peers, such as Leonardo da Vinci, Raphael, and Fra Bartolommeo, Sarto brought unprecedented realism and immediacy to his art through the rough and rustic use of red chalk and the creation of powerful life and compositional studies. Comprising rare drawings and panel paintings from key international collections, the exhibition fully illuminates Andrea del Sarto's inventiveness, creative process, and workshop practice.

Tue – Fri & Sun 10:00am – 5:30pm
Sat 10:00am – 9:00pm
Closed Mondays

Free admission

West Pavilion, Plaza Level
The Getty Center
1200 N Sepulveda Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
June 24 -
October 11, 2015
Captain Linnaeus Tripe: Photographer of India and Burma, 1852-1860
This exhibition will feature some of the earliest and most striking views of the landscape and architecture of India and Burma, by a pioneering British photographer. Part of the V&A India Festival.

This captivating exhibition of the pioneering 19th-century British photographer Captain Linnaeus Tripe features over 60 of his most striking views of Indian and Burmese landscape and architecture, taken between 1852-1860. Through these early photographs, Tripe explored the possibilities of this new medium, showcasing and documenting archaeological sites, monuments and landscapes, rarely seen in the West. Tripe creates an impression of the world around him, combining the keen eye of a surveyor with the sensibilities of an artist, while giving testimony to his emerging skills as photographer.

0.00 - 17.45 daily
10.00 - 22.00 Friday (reduced gallery openings after 18.00)

Victoria and Albert Museum
Cromwell Road
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
June 26 -
October 11, 2015
Alice: 150 Years of Wonderland
This exhibition will bring to light the curious history of Wonderland, presenting an engaging account of the genesis, publication, and enduring appeal of Lewis Carroll's classic tale, Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.

For the first time in three decades, the original manuscript will travel from the British Library in London to New York, where it will be joined by original drawings and letters, rare editions, vintage photographs, and fascinating objects—many never before exhibited.

The enchanting tale of Wonderland was first told “one golden afternoon” to Alice Liddell and her two sisters. Delighted by the fantastic world of logic and nonsense inhabited by rabbits in waistcoats and playing card gardeners, Alice begged for a written copy of her namesake's adventures under ground. Charles Lutwidge Dodgson (better known by his pen name Lewis Carroll) painstakingly wrote out the story, illustrating the original manuscript with his own pen and ink drawings.

Revised and radically expanded, it appeared in 1865 as Alice's Adventures in Wonderland with the iconic illustrations of Sir John Tenniel. But Tenniel was dissatisfied with the printing quality, and the edition was suppressed almost immediately. Now, only twenty-two or twenty-three copies of the first edition are known to survive. It was quickly republished, and Tenniel's brilliant drawings (markedly different from Carroll's own) and their relationship to the text contributed to the initial and enduring success of the book.

From here, the ethos of Alice and the universe of Wonderland took hold of our imagination, and—150 years later—we are still following her down the rabbit hole.

Tue - Thu 10:30am - 5:00pm
Fri 10:30am - 9:00pm
Sat 10:00am - 6:00pm
Sun 11:00am - 6:00pm

The Morgan Library & Museum
225 Madison Avenue (at 36th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 26 -
September 13, 2015
Art as Activism: Graphic Art from the Merrill C. Berman Collection
Throughout much of the 20th century, political protests and calls for action reached the public on posters and broadsides. Long before digital technology made worldwide communication possible, graphic artists used the powerful tools of modernist art to inform communities, stir up audiences and call attention to injustice. American graphic artists, often drawing on European models developed in the 1920s to fight fascism or promote revolution, used brilliant colors and violent imagery to produce ephemeral artifacts aimed to inspire and energize the angry or disaffected. Posted on walls and bulletin boards, or slapped up on store windows and church doors, these bright, quickly produced images embodied the anger of the masses, ultimately serving as the wallpaper of public discontent.

Art as Activism: Graphic Art from the Merrill C. Berman Collection presents a selection of posters produced between the early 1930s and the 1970s, some by known artists like Emory Douglas and Hugo Gellert, others by unidentified designers. Many of the best known date from the activist period of the 1960s, but their style and power have deep roots in the past and would continue to shape the imagery of protest until replaced by other forms of social media, including street art and ultimately the internet.

The exhibition is drawn from the Merrill C. Berman Collection, one of the world's finest private collections of modern graphic art. Over the past forty years, Merrill Berman has put together a collection of graphic design comparable to the collections of the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam and the Museum of Modern Art in New York. Selections from his holdings have appeared in exhibitions throughout the world.

Tue - Thu & Sat 10am - 6pm
Fri 10am - 8pm
Sun 11am - 5pm
Mon CLOSED

New-York Historical Society
170 Central Park West at Richard Gilder Way (77th Street)
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
June 26 -
August 25, 2015
Evidence of Women: Women as Printers, Donors, and Owners of Law Texts
Women printed, donated, and owned law books – from manuals to treatises to codes – long before women entered legal practice. From queens to unknown women, from the fifteenth to the nineteenth centuries, this exhibit provides a glimpse of women’s involvement with law books both inside and outside of official structures.

This exhibit provides further evidence of women’s long involvement with the law even at times when they could not practice it. Since the exhibit represents only a small sampling from the vast corpus of law texts, it prompts reflection on the potential depth and breadth of women’s interactions with the law as producers, transmitters, and consumers, instead of as objects or eventually practitioners of law. It especially highlights women’s importance in the dissemination of law texts through their substantial and sustained role as printers and sellers of law books.

Rare Book Exhibition Gallery Level L2, Lillian Goldman Law Library
Yale Law School
127 Wall Street
New Haven, CT
Exhibit New England
June 27 -
October 18, 2015
Night Vision: Nocturnes in American Art, 1860-1960
This is the first major museum survey dedicated to scenes of the night in American art from 1860 to 1960—an era not yet illuminated by electricity to the beginning of the Space Age. Night Vision: Nocturnes in American Art will bring together 90 works in a range of media—including paintings, prints, drawings, and photographs—created by such leading American artists as Ansel Adams, Winslow Homer, Edward Hopper, Lee Krasner, Georgia O’Keeffe, Albert Ryder, John Sloan, Alfred Stieglitz, and Andrew Wyeth, among others. Featuring exceptional works from the Museum’s collection as well as loans from prestigious public and private collections across the United States, the exhibition will provide visitors with an opportunity to consider transformations in American art across generations and traditional stylistic confines. Organized by Bowdoin curator Joachim Homann, Night Vision will demonstrate the popularity of the theme with American artists of diverse aesthetic convictions and investigate how they responded to the unique challenges of picturing the night.

The works featured in Night Vision will reflect the broad range of subject matters that attracted artists to night scenes—including the reflections of moonlight on ocean waves, encounters in electrified urban streets, and firework celebrations. For some mid-nineteenth-century artists, such as Albert Bierstadt, paintings of the night offered the compelling artistic challenge of representing the natural elements of clouds, moon, and sky when shrouded in darkness, while at the same time providing rich opportunities for the symbolic use of light. Following the industrial revolution and emergence of electricity in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, American artists, such as Alfred Stieglitz, John Sloan, and Martin Lewis, began to consider new techniques in order to capture electrical sources of light and their effects on nighttime conditions. Across the range of works presented in Night Vision, visitors will see how reduced visual information and an altered perception in the dark tested artists’ ability to render shadow, light, and form. This lack of light ultimately resulted in less illustrative scenes and transformed the night into an arena for stylistic experimentation and the rise of abstraction in the early mid-twentieth century.

From June 28 through August 14, 2015, Bowdoin College students will give tours of the exhibition Tuesday through Sunday at 2:00pm.

Major programming related to the exhibition includes scholarly lectures by Barbara Haskell, Curator of painting and sculpture, Whitney Museum of American Art; Eleanor Harvey, Senior Curator, Smithsonian American Art Museum, and Alexander Nemerov. Students and volunteer docents will lead gallery tours. In addition, the BCMA is organizing film screenings, musical performances, and family day events.

KEYNOTE LECTURE:
June 27, 2015 | 5:00 p.m. | Kresge Auditorium, Visual Arts CenterKeynote Lecture: “Night Vision: Nocturnes in American Art, 1860-1960”

June 27, 2015 | 6:00 to 7:30 pm. | Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Opening reception celebrating the summer exhibition, Night Vision: Nocturnes in American Art, 1860-1960.

July 2, 2015 | 11:00 a.m. | Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Music at the Museum
Bowdoin International Music Festival faculty perform a selection of nocturnes in conjunction with the exhibition, Night Vision: Nocturnes in American Art, 1860–1960. RSVPs are requested.

July 16, 2015 | 12:00 noon | Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Gallery Conversation
Joachim Homann, curator, leads a discussion of Night Vision: Nocturnes in American Art, 1860-1960.

July 23, 2015 | 11:00 a.m. | Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Music at the Museum
Bowdoin International Music Festival faculty perform a selection of nocturnes in conjunction with the exhibition, Night Vision: Nocturnes in American Art, 1860–1960. RSVPs are requested.

July 30, 2015 | 12:00 noon | Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Gallery Conversation
Linda Docherty, catalogue essayist and associate professor of art history emerita, Bowdoin College, leads a discussion of Night Vision: Nocturnes in American Art, 1860-1960

August 13, 2015 | 12:00 noon | Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Gallery Conversation
Jane Brox, author of Brilliant: The Evolution of Artificial Light, leads a discussion of Night Vision: Nocturnes in American Art, 1860–1960.

August 20, 2015 | 12:00 noon | Bowdoin College Museum of Art
Gallery Conversation
Joachim Homann, curator, leads a discussion of Night Vision: Nocturnes in American Art, 1860-1960.

Tue - Sat 10am - 5pm
Thu 10am - 8:30pm
Sun 1pm - 5pm

Fully accessible, free & open to the public

Halford Gallery
Center Gallery
Becker Gallery
Focus Gallery
Bernard and Barbro Osher Gallery
Bowdoin College Museum of Art
9400 College Station
Brunswick, ME
Exhibit New England
June 30 -
October 29, 2015
A Renaissance Man : The Art of Fred Marcellino
The Carle is pleased to announce A Renaissance Man : The Art of Fred Marcellino, which opens June 30, 2015, and remains on view until October 29, 2015. The exhibition comprises over 90 works and shows the full range of Marcellino’s talent, from youthful Abstract-Expressionism through record cover and book jacket design to the crowning achievements of his career—illustrations for children’s books. As he noted about his picture-book art, "each picture is a link in a chain, and they all exist in counterpoint with the text. And although you want each picture to have impact, just like a jacket, the book illustration can also be much more subtle. It can be pondered and savored over a period of time. It's a very different discipline from what I was used to, but I must say it was love at first sight." Of special focus will be the art for Puss in Boots (1990), for which he won a Caldecott Honor award. The exhibition coincides with the 25th anniversary of the book’s publication. A 48-page soft-cover book by Nicholas Falletta, The Art of Fred Marcellino, will accompany the exhibition.

Tue. – Fri. 10am – 4pm
Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 12pm – 5pm

The Eric Carle Museum
of Picture Book Art
125 West Bay Road
Amherst, MA
Exhibit New England
July 01 -
November 08, 2015
Emmet Gowin: Photographs
Wed 10am — 5pm
Thu & Fri, 10am — 9pm
Sat & Sun 10am — 5pm

Closed Mon & Tue, New Year's Day, July 4, Thanksgiving, Christmas Eve & Christmas Day

Free admission
Parking $8 | Free for members

Gallery L11
Bloch Building
The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
4525 Oak Street
Kansas City, MO
Exhibit Midwest
July 01 -
August 02, 2015
Field Guide: James Prosek’s Un/Natural World

North Carolina Museum of Art
2110 Blue Ridge Road
Raleigh, NC
Exhibit South
July 01 -
October 31, 2015
Fantastic Worlds: Science and Fiction, 1780-1910
This exhibition explores the intersecting influences of science, innovation, industry, and the Victorian creative imagination through books from the Smithsonian Libraries and selected historical objects from Smithsonian museums.

The industrial revolution that began at the end of the 18th century paved the way for a period of dramatic change in America and Europe as advances in science, art, and industry forged a new world. This revolution was also a communications revolution: mechanized printing and book production, increased literacy, the first illustrated newspapers, and the penny post all changed the way information was consumed and shared. And the public was enthralled by the rapid invention and scientific discoveries that characterized the age. Science became spectacle, and such literary luminaries as Jules Verne, Mary Shelley, and Edgar Allan Poe responded, crafting fiction that explored the farthest reaches of the new scientific landscape and the startling possibilities this new knowledge uncovered.

10am – 5:30pm daily

Free admission

American History Museum
1st Floor, West Wing
Smithsonian Libraries Gallery
1400 Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 04 -
November 05, 2015
Warhol's Nature
Drawn primarily from the extensive collections of The Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh, this exhibition will explore the artist’s surprising lifelong engagement with nature as subject matter. Although well known for his responsiveness to popular culture and advertising, Warhol simultaneously explored the natural world through his work, depicting landscapes, flora, and fauna in innovative and surprising ways. Organized by theme, the exhibition includes works from every decade of the Pop icon’s long career, from his earliest drawings as a commercial illustrator through his later paintings of flowers and wildlife. Visitors will have the opportunity to experience well-known artworks like Warhol’s Self-Portrait in his infamous fright wig overlaid with camouflage, the iconic Flowers series of the 1960s, and an interactive installation of his inflatable Clouds. Photographs, documents, and personal objects once owned by Warhol will offer further insight into this understudied yet vitally important strain of the artist’s career.

Mon & Thu 10am - 6pm
Wed & Frd 10am - 9pm
Sat & Sun 10am - 6pm
Tue CLOSED

Summer bonus hour! From Memorial Day through Labor Day, Crystal Bridges’ galleries will open at 10 am every day (closed Tuesdays).

$8 adults
FREE Youth ages 18 & under
FREE for Members

See two exhibitions for one price July 25 through October 5! Your $8 ticket includes admission to BOTH Warhol’s Nature and JAMIE WYETH.

Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art
600 Museum Way
Bentonville, AR
Exhibit South
July 07 -
September 27, 2015
Touching the Past: The Hand and the Medieval Book
Precious historical artifacts, manuscripts preserve some of the finest examples of medieval art. Seen in libraries and museums behind glass, these books have been largely removed from the realm of touch, making it easy to forget that their lavishly illuminated pages were once turned, stroked, stitched, and sometimes even sliced by generations before us. Drawn primarily from the permanent collection, Touching the Past: The Hand and the Medieval Book explores manuscripts as tangible, tactile objects that invited touch and were handled—reverently, carelessly, obsessively, and critically—by medieval audiences.

Tue – Fri & Sun 10:00am – 5:30pm
Sat 10:00am – 9:00pm
Closed Mondays

Free admission

North Pavilion, Plaza Level
The Getty Center
1200 N Sepulveda Blvd.
Los Angeles, CA
Exhibit West
July 07 -
October 04, 2015
"Dr. Seuss's Boids and Beasties"
A selection of original drawings by beloved children's author Theodor Seuss Geisel, illustrating his whimsical and fantastical creatures.

Main floor, Geisel Library
The Library
UC San Diego
9500 Gilman Drive
La Jolla, CA
Exhibit West
July 08 -
September 19, 2015
Embraced: The International Community
This exhibition examines the influence the Center has had on the international book arts scene as well as the international artists who have come to the Center to study, exhibit, or teach. This is fourth and final exhibition of the Center’s 40th anniversary year-long celebration, each of which featured and documented a particular program.

Artists included are: Biruta Auna, Robert Bringhurst, Inge Bruggeman, Ken Campbell, Ulises Carrión, Ana Cordeiro, Béatrice Coron, Steven Daiber, Helen Douglas & Telfer Stokes, Gavin Dovey, Colette Fu, Michael Gibbs, Takuji Hamanaka, Barbara Henry, Amos Paul Kennedy Jr., Kumi Korf, Hedi Kyle, Catarina Leitão, Ligorano/Reese with Daniel Kelm, Margarita Lypiridou, Mikhail Magaril, Franco Marinai, Russell Maret, Barbara Mauriello, Clifton Meador, Bernard Middleton, Susan Mills, Jánis Nedéla, Asuka Ohsawa, Zahra Partovi, Werner Pfeiffer, Tom Phillips, Lise Poirier, John Randle, John Ross, Miriam Schaer, Gaylord Schanilec, Robbin Ami Silverberg, Alexandra Soteriou, Sylvia de Swaan, and Sam Winston.

Mon - Fri 11am - 6pm
Sat 10am - 5pm

Note: We will be closed Fri-Sun, July 3-5 for the 4th of July weekend.

Main Gallery
The Center for Book Arts
28 W. 27th Street
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 08 -
September 19, 2015
/MIT ÐƏ DETƏ/: SOURCE MATERIALS VISUALIZED
ARTIST MEMBERS EXHIBITION

/mit ðə detə/: Source Materials Visualized presents artists’ books, book-related artworks, and text-based new media that are visual interpretations, extrapolations, and recontextualizations of researched source materials such as data analysis, surveying, mapping, plotting, data mining, statistics, analytics, observations, and schemes. In alignment with the exhibition’s theme, the title “/mit ðə detə/” represents the phrase “Meet the data” rendered phonetically. The exhibition features artist members of the Center as well as invited artists to further the discourse of the exhibition’s theme.

Artists included are: Karen Baldner, Jen Bervin, Matthew Birchall, AJ Bocchino, Sara Bouchard, Sarah Bryant, Evelyn Faulkes, Neil Freeman, Barbara Henry, Candace Hicks, Peter Jellitsch, Jessica Lagunas, Woody Leslie, Emily McVarish, Toby Millman, Barbara Milman, John Risseeuw, Maria Veronica San Martin, Libby Scarlett, Tim Schawrtz, Ellen Sheffield, Ward Shelley, Joshua Singer, Edyth Skinner, Jeff Thompson, Carolyn Thompson, Angie Waller, Thomas Parker Williams, and Sam Winston.

Mon - Fri 11am - 6pm
Sat 10am - 5pm

Note: We will be closed Fri-Sun, July 3-5 for the 4th of July weekend.

Center for Book Arts
28 West 27th Street, 3rd Floor
New York, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 10 -
September 05, 2015
Adam Golfer: A House without a Roof
Booklyn is pleased to present the solo-exhibition of artist Adam Golfer's recent work in film, photography, text, and collected archival material.
Golfer's family history - its memories, objects, and mythologies - becomes material for taking stock in the divergent iterations of global narratives.

A House Without a Roof concerns the strands of history connecting the Jewish Diaspora out of Europe and forced mass migrations from Palestine following WWII with the creation of the State of Israel.

The book associated with the exhibition loosely traces the triangular relationship between Golfer's grandfather - a survivor of Dachau, his father - who lived on a kibbutz in the early 1970s, and the artist - caught between the membrane of histories that turned the oppressed into oppressors and residents into refugees. A House Without a Roof negotiates the splintered narratives of war and displacement between Europe, Israel/Palestine, and the United States.

The exhibition also includes the video piece, Router (2014), a work that epitomizes Golfer's hybrid approach to art and filmmaking. Router shifts between the actions of two subjects; a New York performance artist, and a German WWII reenactor, creating a distinctly separate dialogue by way of the space between them.

A House Without a Roof was begun in 2011. Its sense of "rooflessness", of disjointed familiarity, - architecturally, historically, and politically questioning one's sense of being planted - hovers throughout Golfer's book, use of imagery, and in the uncertainty of the space between the two characters in Router. As in the reading of the book's text, one memory is often redirected by the addition of another. One's ability to locate era, subject, or speaker (third and first person voices diverge and overlap) is complicated by a perpetual relocation of literary devices.

Adam Golfer lives and works in Brooklyn, NY. He holds a BFA in Photography from the Maryland Institute College of Art and is currently an MFA candidate in the Interdisciplinary Studio Arts program at Hunter College in New York. Adam's photographs and videos focus on themes of war, performance and memory. He has exhibited at the Camera Club of New York, the 92nd Street Y and the Goethe Institut in Washington, DC. His photographs have appeared in TIME, The Wall Street Journal, FADER, Die Zeit and W, among others. Golfer has given artist lectures at ICP, MICA, NYU and Parsons. In 2013 he was featured as one of PDN's 30 New and Emerging Photographers to Watch. In August 2015 Golfer will be a resident at the Kuldiga Artists' Residence program in Latvia.

A House Without a Roof is the first in a series of exhibitions considering artists who negotiate, reference, or embody socio-political concerns within their work.

Opening Reception Friday, July 10, 7 - 10pm.

Gallery Hours: 12 - 5pm Thursday - Tuesday and by appointment.

Booklyn
37 Greenpoint Ave
4th fl, Ste. E4G (Box #23)
Brooklyn, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 10, 2015 -
January 03, 2016
Disney and Dali: Architects of the Imagination
Guest-curated by filmmaker Ted Nicolaou, this extraordinary, immersive, and enriching experience tells the story of the unlikely alliance between two of the most renowned innovators of the twentieth century: brilliantly eccentric Spanish Surrealist Salvador Dalí and American entertainment innovator Walt Disney. Presented through an interactive multimedia experience of original paintings, story sketches, conceptual artwork, objects, correspondences, archival film, photographs, and audio—many of which highlight work from Disney studio artists Mary Blair, Eyvind Earle, John Hench, Kay Nielsen, and more—this comprehensive exhibition showcases two vastly different icons who were drawn to each other through their unique personalities, their mutual admiration, and their collaboration on the animated short Destino. Although the film was not completed during their lifetimes, the friendship between these two great men nevertheless endured.

“The Walt Disney Family Museum, founded by Walt’s daughter, Diane Disney Miller, presents the life story of Diane's father, which story inspires visitors to heed their imaginations and persevere in pursuing their goals,” said The Walt Disney Family Museum’s Executive Director Kirsten Komoroske. “In keeping with this mission, the exhibitions at the museum feature dreamers, innovators, and collaborators. The museum’s next major exhibition unveils another aspect of Walt's story: the friendship between Walt and the influential and revolutionary artist, Salvador Dalí. The exhibition, co-organized with the Dalí Museum, not only further fulfills the mission of the museum, but also further solidifies the museum’s place among the many phenomenal fine art institutions in the San Francisco Bay Area.”

Open daily 10am–6pm, except every Tues, Jan 1, Thanksgiving & Dec 25

Last ticket sale and entry is 4:45pm

Diane Disney Miller Exhibition Hall
Walt Disney Family Museum
104 Montgomery Street
The Presidio
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
July 11, 2015 -
February 21, 2016
Unfinished Stories: Snapshots from the Peter J. Cohen Collection
Spanning the 20th century, the more than 100 found photographs in “Unfinished Stories” depict a century of image-making by private photographers. “A quick shot fired by a hunter without deliberate aim,” reads the original definition of a snapshot from the early 19th century. The term “snapshot,” popularized shortly after the invention of Kodak’s box camera in the 1880s, came to describe photographs of everyday life using a handheld camera. Speedy new technology boosted the ability to create a visual diary, commemorating events and personal moments, road trips and holidays. Now, more than a century later, these once ubiquitous and now historic, silver gelatin photographs are rapidly being replaced by Instagram and other digital forms of photography, hence a new appreciate for such photographs.

“Unfinished Stories” celebrates a century of snapshots from the Peter J. Cohen Collection of amateur photographs. An avid collector, Cohen rescued more than 50,000 lost, discarded, or disowned personal photographs, culled from flea markets, antique shops, galleries, eBay, and private dealers. As he sifted and sorted through his finds, Cohen discovered mesmerizing, often humorous, shots removed from their original context: People at Play, Photographers’ Shadows, Double Exposure, Couples, Oddities, and Hula Madness. These pictures reveal the lives of strangers through intimate exposures, telling a story, or as Cohen puts it, “a teeny part of a story that remains unfinished.”

“Unfinished Stories” celebrates unexpected discoveries in these compelling visual objects, each representative of what makes photography such a rich form of expression and a deep cultural symbol for everyone who’s had to stand still and say, “Cheese!”

Mon & Tue 10am – 4:45pm
Wed – Fri 10am – 9:45pm
Sat & Sun 10am – 4:45pm

Members free
Adults $25
Seniors (65+) $23
Students (18+) $23
Youths 7–17* FREE*
Children 6 & under FREE

Mary Stamas Gallery (Gallery 153)
MUSEUM OF FINE ARTS, BOSTON
Avenue of the Arts
465 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
July 11, 2015 -
February 21, 2016
Yours Sincerely, John S. Sargeant. Through Nov. 15, 2015. Exhibit: Pastoral to Pop: 20th-Century Britain on Paper
Prints and drawings from a century of change by England’s great artists

This survey of more than 50 British prints and drawings from the 20th century features rarely seen works from the MFA’s collection as well as recent acquisitions and loans. Ranging from an 1890s drawing of Brittany by Post Impressionist Robert Bevan to a 1999 etching by Lucian Freud—perhaps the greatest figural artist of his generation—this selection presents a surprising mixture of subjects and styles. Highlights of the exhibition are streamlined color linocuts made by Grosvenor School artists Cyril Power, Sybil Andrews, and Lill Tschudi, while abstract works on view demonstrate the “Vorticist” style—a uniquely British variant of Futurism and Cubism. Other sections of the exhibition touch on landscape, architecture, and the music hall; differing depictions of the human figure (including works by Henry Moore and David Hockney); and the British Pop explosion of the 1960s.

Mon & Tues 10am – 4:45pm
Wed – Fri 10am – 9:45pm
Sat & Sun 10am – 4:45pm

Members FREE
Adults $25
Seniors (65+) $23
Students (18+) $23
Youths 7–17* FREE*
Children 6 & under FREE

Frances Vrachos Gallery (Gallery 144)
Museum of Fine Arts
Avenue of the Arts
465 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
July 11, 2015 -
June 26, 2016
The Gentle Lessons of Donkey-Donkey, Petunia, The Happy Lioness, and other Animal Pals from the Imagination of Roger Duvoisin
Roger Duvoisin’s remarkable children’s book illustrations have charmed and captivated generations of young readers, guiding them through some of life’s important lessons. The story of Donkey-donkey teaches children how to accept themselves – and the way they look. The silly goose Petunia thinks that carrying a book under her wing makes her wise; but after several mishaps, she realizes that she must learn to read in order to put wisdom into her mind and heart. A crocodile who befriends farmyard animals, and eventually the farmer and his wife, discovers that, “Life is so beautiful when we have so much in common with friends.”

Born in Geneva, Switzerland, in 1904, Roger Duvoisin came to the United States in the mid-1920s to work as a textile designer. In 1932, he created A Little Boy Was Drawing, his first children’s book, which he wrote and illustrated for his son. Duvoisin eventually became a celebrated illustrator of more than 140 children’s books, forty of which he also authored. Until his death in 1980, Duvoisin resided in New Jersey.

In addition to A Little Boy Was Drawing, the exhibition features original illustration drawings for some of Duvoisin’s beloved picture book classics for children, including Donkey-donkey: The Troubles of a Silly Little Donkey (1933); Caldecott Medal winner White Snow, Bright Snow (1947), authored by Alvin Tresselt; Petunia (1950); A for the Ark (1952); Nubber Bear (1966), authored by William Lipkind; The Old Bullfrog (1968) and The Web in the Grass (1972), both by Berniece Freschet; The Crocodile in the Tree (1972); Snowy and Woody (1979); and The Happy Lioness (1980), authored by Duvoisin’s wife Louise Fatio. The almost forty drawings in this display were selected from the more than 2,000 Duvoisin works in the Zimmerli’s extensive collection of American prints and drawings.

This family-friendly exhibition is open to the public on Fridays, Saturdays, and Sundays, as well as during first Tuesday evenings of the month.

Duvoisin Gallery
Zimmerli Art Museum
71 Hamilton Street
New Brunswick, NJ
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 14, 2015 -
March 01, 2016
Aubrey Beardsley: Artist and Aesthete
A focus on the illustrator and writer, Aubrey Beardsley (1872-1898). In a short life of intense and fevered activity, Beardsley produced many original and highly-finished black-and-white drawings for process block reproduction. His designs were frequently grotesque, morbid and erotic and include illustrations of Alexander Pope's Rape of the Lock (1895) and Oscar Wilde's Salome (1894). He was also art editor for The Yellow Book (1894–5) and, with Arthur Symons, produced The Savoy (1896). Beardsley was known for his elegance, charm and witty conversation and became a cult figure of the decadent aesthetic movement. He became embroiled in the scandal surrounding Oscar Wilde’s arrest for committing ‘indecent acts’ and in 1895 was sacked from the Yellow Book, after which he fled to France. Beardsley died of tuberculosis, which had plagued him since his youth, on 16 March 1898 aged only twenty-five.

Free & open to the public

Room 29: case display
National Portrait Gallery
St. Martin’s Place
London, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
July 15 -
September 25, 2015
Comfortable Words: Anglican Piety and the Book of Common Prayer
This exhibition of the four hundred year old Book of Common Prayer and its progeny showcases a book that is not only used for public worship and private prayer but, by its liturgical excellence, holds a special place in the evolution of English language and literature. Its words for worship, felicitous translations and paraphrases of the old Latin mass, helped guide the development of the English language a generation before Shakespeare and Milton and the King James Bible. The prayer book has also been the crowning masterpiece of the world’s greatest typographers and printers who lavished their art on the prayer book, customizing them with magnificent decoration evident in the fine printings and bindings you will see displayed.

Featuring the FIRST THREE EDITIONS from 1549, 1552 and 1559 and the FIVE REVISIONS of 1662, 1789, 1892, 1928 and 1979 which guided the worship of the Episcopal Church in America into the 21st Century.

Mon - Thu 9am – 5pm
Sat - Sun CLOSED
Fri 9am – 1pm

Bishop Ward Gallery
Methodist Library
Drew University
36 Madison Avenue
Madison, NJ
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 16 -
December 20, 2015
Darkness and Light: Exploring the Gothic
Housed in the neo-Gothic grandeur of The John Rylands Library, Darkness and Light reveals how Gothic architecture and anatomy inspired and influenced a literary genre, and how the lasting legacy of Gothic can be found in art, films and subculture today.

From the fantastical to the macabre, this intriguing exhibition unearths Gothic treasures from the Library’s Special Collections to investigate subjects as varied as the role of women in the Gothic movement, advances in medical science and classic literature.

Amongst the fascinating items on display is Horace Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto (1764), the first Gothic novel. With a Gothic medieval castle, doomed love and restless spectres of the past, it sets the scene for the genre and sits alongside a whole host of Gothic bestsellers including The Monk, Udolpho and Jekyll and Hyde.

The exhibition also showcases artwork by students from the University of Salford and a gallery of photographic portraits of 'Goths', celebrating diversity and inviting visitors to explore what Gothic means to them.

Alongside the exhibition, experience a ghostly Gothic tour of the Library or come along to screenings of classic Gothic films, including FW Murnau’s Nosferatu, in the striking Historic Reading Room.

Mon 12 noon - 5pm
Tue 10am - 5pm
Wed 10am - 5pm
Thu 10am - 5pm
Fri 10am - 5pm
Sat 10am - 5pm
Sun 12 noon - 5pm

Free and open to the public

The John Rylands Library
150 Deansgate
Manchester, UNITED KINGDOM
Exhibit International
July 17 -
October 04, 2015
Be Enveloped ! artistry, mystery & history
Be Enveloped! seeks to engage visitors to experience envelopes in myriad ways.

:: As a functional structure – a manufactured object that envelops or encloses its contents securely and confidentially, for mailing and other usages;

:: As a vehicle for art and/or commerce, from advertising covers, illustrated envelopes, and collages, to identity systems and branding;

:: As a historical record or personal artifact, where the envelope may add significantly to the story told by its contents;

:: As a decorative object, keepsake, or collectible;

:: As an internationally recognized icon for personal communication – on stationery, postage stamps, and other merchandise;

:: As a literary device, where envelopes are central and inspirational– from Griffin and Sabine to The Jolly Postman and Flat Stanley.

Opening reception July 17th, 6 - 8pm

Unfolding the Envelope
The Companion bookazine is an ode to the envelope, presenting reflections from enthusiasts with diverse & delightful perspectives. Debuting at the opening at a favorable price.

San Francisco Center for the Book
375 Rhode Island Street
San Francisco, CA
Exhibit West
July 19 -
September 27, 2015
Robert Seydel The Eye in Matter
The art of Robert Seydel (1960-2011) is a rare hybrid of the visual and literary that dissolves boundaries between the lyrical, the narrative, reading and looking, marked by an unrelenting sense of play. Seydel merges the historical past with the present by merging actual personages with fictional characters – for example, the viewer/reader meets Joseph Cornell and Marcel Duchamp. Much of his work is made under the auspices of various personas in place of the singular first person perspective.

Beginning in 2000, Seydel created this series of works using the alter ego Ruth Greisman, a resident of Queens, New York, who was inspired by his aunt of the same name. “Robert Seydel: The Eye in Matter” features a definitive selection from this fictional archive with a selection of Ruth’s “journal pages” and almost one hundred collages (many previously unpublished and unexhibited), and Seydel’s notebooks, open to pages that reveal glimpses of the process of making this visionary body of work.

An exceedingly solitary man who spent untold hours each day reading, studying, writing and making art, Seydel used the notebooks not simply as a diary or record but as a means of selecting, arranging and composing. Many of Ruth’s journal writings are first drafted there—merging daily life and dreams as Seydel traces the leaps of her acrobatic consciousness from the banal to the hallucinatory, the melancholic to the ecstatic.

In Ruth’s collages, Seydel applied his combinatorial magic to debris from the street, forgotten photographs and faded scraps of paper, transforming earthly detritus into illuminated arrangements whose meanings shape-shift as each collage is “read.” These works invite the viewer into a world made from the daily, devotional practice of making art, into a world in which the work of art is life itself. As Ruth writes: “I’ll invent who I am, against what is. My time and name: a Queens of the mind.

Robert Seydel was a prolific artist and writer who left behind a richly layered and highly original body of work after his sudden death at the age of fifty. Book of Ruth (Siglio, 2011) is the first publication of a selection of these materials and a rare view into a multi-layered approach to collage, drawing, photography, narrative and lyric writing. Seydel rarely exhibited his work in his lifetime other than in a solo exhibition at the CUE Foundation in New York City and in “Five Contemporary Visual Poets” at the Wright Exhibition Space in Seattle. A beloved professor at Hampshire College in Amherst, MA, for more than a decade, he also served as curator at the Photographic Resource Center at Boston University for a number of years.

“A Picture is Always a Book: Further writings from Book of Ruth” has just been published in 2014 by Siglio Press in conjunction with Smith College Libraries to accompany this exhibition.

Opening reception: Sun, July 19th 2 - 4pm

Queens Museum
New York City Building
Flushing Meadows Corona Park
Queens, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 20, 2015 -
March 04, 2016
Fashioning Philadelphia - The Style of the City, 1720-1940
Home to modest Quakers, prosperous free blacks, well-heeled international transplants, and working classes of all sorts, Philadelphia was once the country's most cosmopolitan city. Observers remarked that our tastes were as refined as those of Paris and London.

In addition to being known for stylish residents, Philadelphia gained a reputation as a manufacturing powerhouse by the 19th century. Called the “Workshop of the World,” the city supported countless manufacturers producing goods used in the fashion industry. Tanneries, ironworks, and mills made the leather, metal, and cloth that a thriving community of shoemakers, tailors, and milliners fashioned into parasols, hoop skirts, shawls, and hats.

Philadelphia did not just make clothing and accessories, but also shaped American ideas about fashion. The 19th century’s most important fashion magazines, such as Godey’s Lady's Book, were published here and distributed across the country. Chestnut Street became world-renowned as one of the most fashionable retail corridors, where men like retail pioneer John Wanamaker situated their stores. This exhibition tells the largely unheralded story of the city's contributions to the early fashion industry, from the early-18th through the mid-20th century.

Special Opening Preview and Reception
Thursday, July 16, 2015
5:30 – 7:00pm

Louise Lux-Sions and Harry Sions Gallery
The Library Company of Philadelphia
1314 Locust Street
Philadelphia, PA
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
July 22 -
September 25, 2015
ST BRIDE UNVEILED
St Bride Foundation was established in 1891 as the social and educational hub of printing and publishing on Fleet Street.

The unparalleled library of artefacts and books now plays an important role in illustrating the history of print and graphic design, as well as the history of our culture in general.

This collection has not been on public view in the same room before. St Bride Unveiled therefore offers an exclusive opportunity to see its highlights, ranging from the Book of the Dead to the typography of 20th Century signage.

Mon – Fri 10.00 – 21.00
Sat & Sun 11.00 – 16.00

Free admission, open to the public

In the Layton Gallery
St Bride Foundation
Bride Lane
Fleet Street
London, ENGLAND
Exhibit International
July 25 -
November 15, 2015
Yours Sincerely, John S. Sargent
John Singer Sargent comes to life through letters and lore

Behind the renowned paintings of John Singer Sargent lies another legacy—a treasure trove of letters, photographs, and sketches that document the artist’s world. Among the correspondence, more than a dozen letters from Sargent to Claude Monet illuminate his lifelong friendship and admiration for the French Impressionist master. Another note, carefully written in a neat round hand, describes a certain portrait as a “masterpiece”; it is signed Amélie Gautreau, an appreciative sitter best known today as Madame X.

In celebration of the recent gift to the MFA of The John Singer Sargent Archive, which establishes the Museum as the center for Sargent scholarship, this exhibition selected from the archive and the MFA’s collection, brings Sargent’s era to life, enhancing our understanding of the man and his work. The show features watercolors, prints,drawings, correspondence, and photographs arranged around several themes. Caricatures of Sargent by his friends and fellow artists Henry Tonks and Max Beerbohm add a dose of humor to our view of this hard-working artist, while sketches, props, and photographs of his studios illuminate his artistry and reveal the spaces of his labor.

Member Talk: "Yours Sincerely, John S. Sargent"
For Members Only - Ticket Required
August 13, 2015 6:30pm – 7:30pm
Harry and Mildred Remis Auditorium (Auditorium 161)

Mon & Tues 10am – 4:45pm
Wed – Fri 10am – 9:45pm
Sat & Sun 10am – 4:45pm

Members FREE
Adults $25
Seniors (65+) $23
Students (18+) $23
Youths 7–17* FREE*
Children 6 & under FREE

Edward and Nancy Roberts Family Gallery (Gallery LG26)
Museum of Fine Arts
Avenue of the Arts
465 Huntington Avenue
Boston, MA
Exhibit New England
August 01 -
30, 2015
Philip Taaffe: Works on Paper & Illustrated Books, 1982-2012

Opening reception: Saturday, August 1 6pm - 8pm

Glenn Horowitz Bookseller
87 Newtown Lane
East Hampton, NY
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
August 04 -
November 29, 2015
Frank Reaugh: Landscapes of Texas and the American West
Artist, educator, inventor, and naturalist, Charles Franklin Reaugh (1860–1945), pronounced "Ray," is one of the Southwest's earliest and most distinguished artists. Working in the vein of American Impressionism, Reaugh devoted his career to visually documenting the vast, unsettled regions of the Southwest before the turn of the twentieth century.

Drawing on more than 200 artworks in the Ransom Center's Frank Reaugh collection, as well as other archives, museums, and private collections across the state, the exhibition examines Reaugh's mastery of the pastel medium and his sophisticated yet direct approach to the challenges of landscape painting, particularly en plein air (painting outdoors). While Reaugh's contributions have often been linked to the region, his work holds broad historical precedents.

Highlights include side-by-side comparisons of his small field sketches with larger studio works illustrating the same geographic location and "Twenty-four Hours with the Herd," Reaugh's epic series of mural-size pastels that served as the centerpiece of his performance work of the same title.

The exhibition offers a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for visitors to experience a historical survey of the most significant works created by an artist often referred to as "the Dean of (early) Texas Artists."

Mon - Wed & Fri 10am – 5pm
Thu 10am – 7pm
Sat & Sun Noon – 5pm

Free admission

Ransom Center
University of Texas Austin
21st & Guadalupe Streets
Austin, TX
Exhibit Southwest
August 07 -
November 15, 2015
Raw Material: Uncovering Chicago's Historical Collections
Chicago Collections will hold its first public exhibition at Chicago Public Library's Harold Washington Library Center. Our three month exhibition will highlight notable archives, manuscripts, and objects from our members' collections. We are excited to celebrate our collaboration with the Chicago community as Chicago Collections continues to grow.

The stories Chicagoans tell about themselves and their history are as diverse and dynamic as the city itself. But where do they find the resources and evidence to bring those stories to life? Raw Material: Uncovering Chicago's Historical Collections answers this question using a rich display of personal, cultural, and historical artifacts including photographs, letters, diaries, and other diverse items that tell stories linking Chicago’s past to the intimate, personal experiences of life in our city.

This exhibit will be accompanied by multiple lectures, artist talks, and educational projects.

Free & open to the public

Special Collections Exhibit Hall, 9th Floor
Harold Washington Library Center
Chicago Public Library
400 S. State Street
Chicago, IL
Exhibit Midwest
August 08, 2015 -
February 07, 2016
From the Library: Photobooks After Frank
The publication of Robert Frank's The Americans marked a shift in the medium of photography. Traditionally, photographs were viewed as an objective representation of reality, but Frank demonstrated they could also serve as expressive channels to communicate a truth about the photographer's experience of the world. This focus installation explores the role of the photobook in the decades following Frank's seminal work and the ways in which it shaped the emergence of photography as a viable fine art.

Mon – Sat 10am – 5pm
Sun 11am – 6pm

West Ground Floor Gallery 21
National Gallery of Art
National Mall (between 3rd & 9th Streets NW)
6th Street & Constitution Avenue NW
Washington, DC
Exhibit Mid-Atlantic
August 19, 2015 -
June 26, 2016
Jazz: Print Series by Romare Bearden
Romare Bearden (American, 1911-1988) was one of the leading artists of the twentieth century. An artist, writer, and jazz lyricist, throughout his long career he depicted African-American life in his paintings, prints, and most notably in his collages.

Born in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, he matured as an artist in New York during the Harlem Renaissance of the 1920s and 1930s. In 1979, he created a remarkable lithograph print series on jazz based on his paintings and monotypes. In this suite of six prints he captured the essence of this genre of music and his love of jazz and the blues. Art historian Gail Gelburd notes in her book on Bearden’s prints, A Graphic Odyssey: Romare Bearden as Printmaker, “It is the sound of jazz that gives these images their sounds. Behind the paintings [and these prints], you can hear the music of his friends, jazz musicians such as Earl (Fatha) Hines, Cab Calloway, and Duke Ellington.”

The subject of these prints—jazz musicians and performance halls—was a favorite of Bearden’s as well as many of his contemporaries who were influenced by the vibrant music scene in Harlem. As a child Bearden lived just a few blocks from the Savoy Ballroom, and for sixteen years he worked in an art studio above the landmark Apollo Theatre in Harlem. However, the connection between Bearden’s work and jazz goes beyond subject matter to include style and composition, incorporating such aspects as improvisation and call and response.

Bearden’s work is included in many important public collections including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Philadelphia Museum of Art, among others. He was the recipient of many awards and honors, most notably the National Medal of Arts presented by President Ronald Reagan in 1987.

Sun - Fri 1pm - 5pm
Sat Closed

The museums are now now closed for summer break: May 15 to August 18, 2015

Booth Lobby
Joel & Lila Harnett Museum of Art
Modlin Center for the Arts
28 Westhampton Way
University of Richmond
Richmond, VA
Exhibit South